Jim Jordan says he won't run for Senate in 2022 | TheHill

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Jim Jordan says he won't run for Senate in 2022

Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanThe tale of the last bipartisan unicorns Sunday shows preview: Biden foreign policy in focus as Dem tensions boil up back home House Judiciary releases McGahn testimony on Trump MORE (R-Ohio), who gained national attention as one of former President Trump's most ardent defenders during his first impeachment, said Thursday he will not run for retiring Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanKerry Washington backs For the People Act: 'Black and Brown voters are being specifically targeted' This week: Democrats face fractures in spending fight UK appeals to Congress in push for trade deal MORE’s (R-Ohio) seat in 2022.

Jordan “is solely focused on representing the great people of Ohio’s Fourth District, and will not be running to fill the seat of retiring Senator Rob Portman,” a spokesperson for the congressman’s office told Cleveland.com.

“Mr. Jordan believes at this time he is better suited to represent Ohioans in the House of Representatives, where as the top Republican on the Judiciary Committee, he can advance an America first agenda, promote conservative values, and hold big government accountable.”

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Jordan was one of several potential GOP candidates mentioned after Portman announced that he would not seek a third term next year. Four of Jordan’s GOP colleagues — Reps. Mike TurnerMichael Ray TurnerJ.D. Vance emerges as wild card in Ohio GOP Senate primary Senate Armed Services chair throws support behind changing roles of military commanders in sexual assault prosecutions Gillibrand: 'I definitely want to run for president again' MORE, Steve StiversSteven (Steve) Ernst StiversNew Mexico Democrat Stansbury sworn into Haaland's old seat Retired GOP representative: I won't miss the circus, but I might miss some of the clowns The Hill's Morning Report - Census winners and losers; House GOP huddles MORE, Brad WenstrupBrad Robert WenstrupWhite House pressed on evacuating Afghan allies as time runs out FBI reclassifies 2017 baseball field shooting as domestic terror Scalise demands FBI reopen probe into 2017 baseball shooting MORE and David JoyceDavid JoycePorter urges increased budget for children's National Parks program Against mounting odds, Biden seeks GOP support for infrastructure plan Boehner finally calls it as he sees it MORE — have all expressed interest in potentially seeking the seat.

On the Democratic side, Reps. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanJ.D. Vance emerges as wild card in Ohio GOP Senate primary 9 Senate seats most likely to flip in 2022 Biden faces dilemma on Trump steel tariffs MORE and Joyce BeattyJoyce Birdson BeattyAdvocates warn against complacency after Chauvin verdict Democrats demand Biden administration reopen probe into Tamir Rice's death DOJ to probe Minneapolis police MORE have both declined to rule out a run. Beatty would be the state’s first Black senator if elected.

While Portman was considered among the more moderate GOP senators, the state has trended rightward since then-President Obama won it twice. Gov. Mike DeWineMike DeWineOhio GOP governor comes out against controversial state anti-vaccine bill Overnight Health Care: Biden says US donation of 500 million vaccines will 'supercharge' global virus fight | Moderna asks FDA to clear COVID-19 vaccine for adolescents FDA extends shelf life of J&J vaccine amid concern over expiring doses MORE (R) was elected in 2018 and it was one of just a few states that Trump flipped from Obama in 2016 and won a second time in 2020. Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownDemocrats reintroduce bill to create 'millionaires surtax' Cryptocurrency industry lobbies Washington for 'regulatory clarity' Biden 'allies' painting him into a corner MORE (D) is currently Ohio’s only Democratic statewide officeholder.

Portman, who was first elected in 2010, cited what he said was intractable partisan gridlock in announcing his retirement, saying, “We live in an increasingly polarized country where members of both parties are being pushed further to the right and further to the left, and that means too few people who are actively looking to find common ground.”