Battle of Britain (1999 video game)

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Battle of Britain
Battle of Britain 1999 video game box.png
Developer(s)TalonSoft
Publisher(s)TalonSoft
Designer(s)Gary Grigsby, Keith Brors
Platform(s)Windows
Release
Genre(s)Grand strategy wargame
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer

Battle of Britain is a 1999 computer wargame developed and published by TalonSoft. It was designed by Gary Grigsby and Keith Brors.[2]

Gameplay[edit]

Set in World War II, Battle of Britain is a computer wargame that simulates the conflict between Germany and the United Kingdom during the Battle of Britain. [2]

Development[edit]

Battle of Britain was developed by TalonSoft and was designed by Gary Grigsby and Keith Brors.[3] The pair had previously co-created the Steel Panthers series at Strategic Simulations Inc. (SSI), but had left the company in late 1997 to join TalonSoft, with the stated goal of making a wargame based on the Battle of Britain.[4] It was planned as the pair's first of three games for TalonSoft,[5] and was originally entitled Battle of Britain 1941 and set for a release date of August 1998.[6] According to Alan Dunkin of GameSpot, the game was envisioned as a semi-remake of Grigsby's earlier game U.S.A.A.F. - United States Army Air Force.[2] It was Grigsby's first attempt at an air-combat title since U.S.A.A.F.; the subject matter was relatively rare in computer wargames at the time.[7] Grigsby and Brors developed the game while simultaneously working on a fourth Steel Panthers game at SSI.[8]

The game was Grigsby's first game developed for Microsoft Windows.[9]

Reception[edit]

According to David Chong of Computer Games Strategy Plus, critical reactions toward the game were "lukewarm",[19] as it received above-average reviews according to the review aggregation website GameRankings.[10] Reviewing the game for PC Gamer US, William R. Trotter concluded, "There's a lot to admire in the depth and accuracy of this simulation, but you'd better be a serious student of the World War Two air war. For everyone else, it may just be too much work."[3]

Legacy[edit]

In late 1999, the game received a "follow-up" game from TalonSoft, entitled 12 O'Clock High: Bombing the Reich. It was again designed by Gary Grigsby and Keith Brors.[20] It reused the game engine from Battle of Britain.[19] In 2009, publisher Matrix Games reworked and re-released the game and 12 O'Clock High together as Gary Grigsby's Eagle Day to Bombing the Reich.[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gentry, Perry (March 12, 1999). "What's in Stores Next Week". Gamecenter. CNET. Archived from the original on August 17, 2000. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d Dunkin, Alan (May 4, 1999). "Battle of Britain Review [date mislabeled as "May 1, 2000"]". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on October 30, 2004. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  3. ^ a b c Trotter, William R. (July 1999). "Battle of Britain". PC Gamer. Vol. 6 no. 7. Imagine Media. p. 126. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  4. ^ PC Gamer staff (December 12, 1997). "Grigsby Joins TalonSoft". PC Gamer. Imagine Media. Archived from the original on February 18, 1998.
  5. ^ Dunkin, Alan (January 26, 1998). "War Games Update [date mislabeled as "April 28, 2000"]". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on June 3, 2000. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  6. ^ Coleman, Terry (March 1998). "TalonSoft Signs Hall-of-Famer Gary Grigsby" (PDF). Computer Gaming World. No. 164. Ziff Davis. p. 44. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  7. ^ Udell, Scott (September 14, 1998). "Battle of Britain (Preview)". Computer Games Strategy Plus. Strategy Plus, Inc. Archived from the original on February 5, 2005.
  8. ^ Coleman, Terry (August 1999). "Free Agency" (PDF). Computer Gaming World. No. 181. Ziff Davis. p. 166. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  9. ^ CGW staff (September 1998). "100+ Hot New Games (Battle of Britain)" (PDF). Computer Gaming World. No. 170. Ziff Davis. p. 153. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  10. ^ a b "Battle of Britain (1999) for PC". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on May 11, 2019. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  11. ^ Dultz, Marc (March 23, 1999). "Battle of Britain". Gamecenter. CNET. Archived from the original on October 16, 2000.
  12. ^ Chick, Tom (April 19, 1999). "Battle of Britain". Computer Games Strategy Plus. Strategy Plus, Inc. Archived from the original on March 4, 2003. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  13. ^ Case, Loyd (August 1999). "Spreadsheets and Spitfires (Battle of Britain Review)". Computer Gaming World. No. 181. Ziff Davis. p. 145.
  14. ^ Brenesal, Barry (1999). "Battle of Britain Review for PC on GamePro.com". GamePro. IDG Entertainment. Archived from the original on January 13, 2005. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  15. ^ "Battle of Britain". GameStar (in German). Webedia. August 1999.
  16. ^ "Battle of Britain". Génération 4 (in French). No. 124. July 1999. p. 180. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  17. ^ Kornifex (August 24, 1999). "Test: Battle Of Britain". Jeuxvideo.com (in French). Webedia. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  18. ^ "Battle of Britain". PC Games (in German). Computec. September 1999.
  19. ^ a b Chong, David (December 12, 1999). "12 O'Clock High: Bombing the Reich". Computer Games Strategy Plus. Strategy Plus, Inc. Archived from the original on April 6, 2005.
  20. ^ Fudge, James (November 1, 1999). "12 O'Clock High: Bombing the Reich Released". Computer Games Strategy Plus. Strategy Plus, Inc. Archived from the original on April 6, 2005.
  21. ^ Levandowski, Larry (November 24, 2009). "Eagle Day to Bombing the Reich". Armchair General. World History Group. Archived from the original on June 3, 2010.

External links[edit]