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Christopher Luxon, an MP only since last year, becomes National Party Leader with Nicola Willis the new Deputy Leader

Public Policy / news
Christopher Luxon, an MP only since last year, becomes National Party Leader with Nicola Willis the new Deputy Leader
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Christopher Luxon, the Botany MP who entered Parliament just last year, is the new National Party leader.

National says Nicola Willis, a Wellington-based list MP, is the new Deputy Leader.

Prior to entering Parliament Luxon was CEO of Air New Zealand between 2012 and 2019. He replaces Judith Collins who lost the job last week after a vote of no confidence from the party caucus. Willis replaces Shane Reti as deputy.

Luxon is National's fifth leader since John Key quit in 2016 following Bill English, Simon Bridges, Todd Muller and Collins. Bridges, who was in the running to be leader again, withdrew from contention earlier on Tuesday clearing the way for Luxon to take the leadership.

“It is a tremendous privilege to lead our great party, and I thank my colleagues for the confidence they have placed in me,” Luxon says.

“I’m delighted the Caucus has elected Nicola Willis as Deputy Leader. She will do an incredible job and we will be a formidable team. The unified National Party that Nicola and I lead will work every day to represent all New Zealanders, earn back their trust and confidence, and deliver for them."

“Now, more than ever, New Zealand needs the National Party to offer them hope, ambition and drive to meet the challenges of the coming decade. We believe New Zealanders need a government of action – not rhetoric," says Luxon.

“I came to politics because I know how to solve problems and get things done. I have built a career out of reversing the fortunes of under-performing companies and I’ll bring that real-world experience to this role."

National released the following speech from Luxon.

Tēnā koutou katoa and good afternoon everyone.

It’s an incredible privilege and honour to have been elected Leader of the New Zealand National Party today and I thank my colleagues for putting their trust and confidence in me.

And it is fantastic to have Nicola Willis elected as our Deputy Leader. I can tell you she will do an incredible job and we will be a formidable team.

I’d also like to thank Judith Collins for her service to the National Party during a very difficult period, and Dr Shane Reti for the dignified way he has supported our team through recent days.

Much has been made of my relative newness to Parliament but to be honest, I see it as an advantage.

I bring a fresh set of eyes, and what I see is that this place and this country needs a shake-up.

Nicola and I are fresh new faces for a revitalised National Party.

We are the reset.

Today we are drawing a line under the events of the last four years, and we are putting them behind us.

If you are one of the 413,000 voters who moved away from us, my message to you is: from today, National is back.

I have built a career out of reversing the fortunes of under-performing companies and I’ll bring that real-world experience to this role.

Under my leadership, National will use our breadth of talent and real-world experience every day to deliver for each and every New Zealander.

We will be a new National Party for New Zealand.

There will be other opportunities for me to talk more about who I am, and National’s policies and plans.

But today I want to be very clear with you about one thing: New Zealand is at a critical cross-roads as we grapple with, and emerge from, a global pandemic.

We have a choice: a choice between our current road to mediocrity, or a pathway to a more confident, aspirational and prosperous future.

New Zealand needs an alternative now more than ever to take us in the right direction – because frankly, the country is heading the wrong way.

Inflation is soaring. We are paying more than ever before at the checkout and the petrol pump, and everyday Kiwis are struggling to get ahead.

There’ll be a million Kiwis missing at Christmas dinner this year because they can’t get home to see their loved ones.

After over 100 days in lockdown, Aucklanders are still utterly confused and directionless.

Our provincial heartland feels taken for granted. Our farmers are not villains!

I know that there is a massive difference between announcements and achievement.

Talking about something gets you a headline. Actually getting things done is what improves the lives of everyday New Zealanders.

For four years, New Zealand has had a government great at delivering good PR but woeful at delivering much else.

Nice ideas and good intentions don’t pay the rent or the mortgage, educate our children, keep us healthy, keep us safe from crime and gangs, improve our mental health, lower our emissions or keep us united.

I’ve seen the incredible things that people can accomplish when they are freed up and given the tools and the choices to seize opportunities.

I believe in a New Zealand that rewards hard work; a New Zealand that empowers Kiwis to take a punt and create prosperity for themselves and their families.

Most of all I believe in a New Zealand that while small in size is large in ambition. Let’s rediscover that!

Growing our economy and raising productivity are the single biggest things we can do to improve the lives of all New Zealanders.

I pledge now to those New Zealanders that I will give everything I have to this role.

I’m proud to lead a government-in-waiting that will work every day to represent all New Zealanders – a “national National Party” that earns back their trust and confidence, and actually delivers for them.

And the National Government I will lead will be a government of action.

We will bring the tide back in and lift all boats.

We need to seize the tremendous opportunities we have, rather than squander them.

As I often say, we’re all going to get the country we deserve – and I firmly believe that together we – each and every one of us – can achieve the very best.

Finally, can I say no-one can do this role without the support of their family and to my wife Amanda, and our kids William and Olivia, who are in lockdown in Auckland probably watching on TV, thank you for being so supportive, understanding and encouraging – I love you.

I want to again thank my Caucus colleagues for my selection as Leader and I thank Nicola for joining me in the leadership team.

We welcome your comments below. If you are not already registered, please register to comment.

Remember we welcome robust, respectful and insightful debate. We don't welcome abusive or defamatory comments and will de-register those repeatedly making such comments. Our current comment policy is here.

194 Comments

Knock me over with a feather

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4

Reality Is:

- Luxon owns 7 HOUSES
Nicola Willis has said she does NOT want to see large falls in house prices

MOST people in New Zealand DO NOT own their own home, rather most live in a household occupied by a homeowner.

National might be able to pick up a few more votes in this demographic I suppose. Labour do have a better-track record of increasing house prices though. 

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6

There’s no way National should be given the chance at the wheel. They’ll pump and drive house prices to the moon. That’s all they know.

Stick with labour - there will be a house price correction.

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2

I like your sarcasm 

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I voted TOP last time. I'm incline to vote Act now.

Luxon didn't stuff up today and that's a good sign.

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2

His first attack point out of the gate on RNZ tonight was framing Labour's health reforms as a "distraction". Privatisation of the health sector will be top of the list in the hard-right neoliberal agenda he favours. 

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2

The public health system has clearly been great success right?

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For the money we invest, yes. We have better health outcomes than the big countries like the US, despite them spending significantly more.

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NZ's Public Health Service has been 'public' in name only since the Gibb reforms of the early 1990s, which needlessly imposed an ideologically-driven competitive model on what had been by and large a very well functioning department. The loss of professional skills in government departments and at the management level, as well as the decline of long-term planning, quality controls and adequate resourcing over the following decades were sheeted home when Covid hit. Another legacy of the neoliberal reforms of the 1980s and 90s.

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1

If he starts questioning everything that has happened after National lost power, then it is surely a desperate move.
Where is the 'Reset' in that ? 
Let him come out with bold plans. I like it that he talked about Education. How about starting a few more Medical Universities to bring up more Doctors in New Zealand ? 

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“I came to politics because I know how to solve problems and get things done. I have built a career out of reversing the fortunes of under-performing companies and I’ll bring that real-world experience to this role."

I have lost count of the number of successful businessmen who think they can move effortlessly in politics. Few succeed and I wouldn't put money on Luxon being one of them. my guess is that labour will be quietly delighted with National's choice.

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26

If it was a contest of which party provides the best bbq you might find that Labours bbq is all sizzle and no meat, with JA in charge of it but that is all she does. Nationals bbq has the leader being roasted and the caucus running the show. I will reserve judgement on mr luxon though

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Too early for Luxon but good luck Both Luxon and Willis are trained by John Key

Hopefully Luxon cant make a dent in the polls

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..trained by key. So the housing crisis (and all other ills) will be solved by a combination of denying it exists and mass immigration. Spare me.

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Wheras Labour has promised to build 100'000 affordable houses and has completely and utterly failed to deliver

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Well actually Labour wanted to buy them.... it’s Fletchers and the industries failure to deliver them.

but go on

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OK. Pumped this country full of cheap printed money. 30% year on inflation in the one area they where originally voted in to fix. 

Again the main policy promised. 

Housing affordability has gone from bad. To hands-down the worst in the developed world.

No one could do more to make it skyrocket. 

Labour are a complete disorganised train wreck. 

 

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5

Um...you are aware of a global pandemic going on at the moment? As unpalatable  as it is,there was no choice but to inject money into the economy.Lets see how it all pans out as higher interest rates ,new mortgage deductibilty and taxes on rental incomes kick in.

at least we are not burying our heads in the sand like Australia and saying they won't raise interest rates.

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0

Where as John Key promised not to raise GST & raise NZ incomes to Australian levels..

Mr Key's response to the question was: "National is not going to be raising GST. National wants to cut taxes not raise taxes.

 

Mr Key signalled in his speech to Parliament yesterday that the Government is likely to raise GST to 15 percent from 12.5 percent.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/3311679/Key-no-GST-rise-video-emerges

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3

Heard Luxon get interviewed by Susie Ferguson late last year/early this year. Post interview National spin doctors said he'd been 'susied' and its a right of passage. In reality he had a shocker and came off as a businessman more used to giving orders than withstanding serious scrutiny. Hopefully his coaches will be working overtime otherwise cindy will walk over him, even if it is all empty empathy

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Luxon was trained by Unilever, one of the very best marketing companies in the world (& one that used to take no prisoners when it comes to results at the time he was there, I can't speak for the last decade). I knew him for a couple of years when he was a fresh management grad recruitment in his first role, he was humble and worked hard to achieve.

While I wont be voting National I doubt he's going to be NZs own version of Ozs "Scotty from Marketing" 

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This is his best chance as most people I know have had enough of JA government people will not forget the split she has put into society 

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He never impressed as Air NZ's CEO. 

Rob Fyfe did all the heavy lifting and breathed life and enthusiasm into the staff and customers.  Luxon then came along and did the typical bean counter stuff by cutting and maximizing income.  During his tenure the company became less encouraging to deal with and I largely shifted to Jetstar.  At the optimum career time he pulled a "John Key" and left before the chickens came home to roost.  (Covid off course masked all that) 

The fact that John Key supports him so enthusiastically, probably tells you everything else that you need to know.

To sum him up - John Key light. Not the total paradigm shift that the country desperately needs.  He will promise everything that we all hope to hear before the election.  Should he win - just expect the same old failed National policies  That will be handed down to him by his masters who really run the show.

Immigration up the to our eyeballs.  Stoking the property ponzie.  No expenditure on health or infrastructure.  Further impoverishing of all but the super wealthy and what public assets can we transfer to our wealthy mates.  

The real pity is that Labor are pretty much the same.  - May be they have the same masters. 

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Oh well Chris , looks like you will have to put up with other clowns who run the country into the brink of divsion 

Must be a red supporter

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Do you want the clowns on the left? or the clowns on the right? 

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No, it's 'Jokers' to the right

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No,it's JK to the right...

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Winding your way down on Baker Street

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Agree Chris-M,as an employee,I can tell you the staff felt the same....he jumped ship as the headwinds were on the horizon...and as for the bonuses he pulled out of the company...

I would think that Rob Fyfe and Ralph Norris are owed an apology from Christopher for his comment;

"... I have built a career out of reversing the fortunes of under-performing companies .."

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Given Ralph Norris was at Air NZ for only 2 years and then went to the Commonwealth Bank where he was one of the key leaders who turned the banking system into such a mess it resulted in a Royal Commission (the effects of which they are still seeing today) and then left to become Chairman of Fletchers where he managed to turn that also into a mess - I dont think we need to congratulate him for anything.  The best thing would be for him to remain in retirement

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wiki:

Air New Zealand (CEO 2002–2005)[edit]

Following September 11 and the collapse of its Australian subsidiary, Ansett Australia, Air New Zealand reported the country’s largest ever financial loss. To prevent the national airline’s collapse, the New Zealand government was forced to inject over $885 million in capital, taking a majority share in the airline.[8] Sir Ralph, who had been retained on the Air New Zealand Board, was offered the CEO role, taking the reins in early 2002. Under his leadership, the airline became a global success story, establishing itself as Australasia’s most profitable airline and launching a number of product innovations and new aircraft types.[8] As CEO, Sir Ralph returned the airline to profitability within 24 months and launched complete overhauls of the domestic and international products.[8] He also introduced the A320, Boeing 777 and Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft which continue to be the backbone of the airline’s fleet, and he oversaw a ten-fold increase in internet bookings from 4% to 48% of total sales volumes in twelve months.[9] The 'look to book' ratio also rose dramatically, from 25:1 to 8:1.[9] In 2004, Sir Ralph was again recognised by Deloitte/Management Magazine as New Zealand’s Chief Executive of the Year.

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Well Chris-M, let's wait and see just what Luxon's performance in this role will be before writing him off.  Judging by the present government's record, he has quite a bit he can work with if the media give him enough air time. Unfortunately, your self professed knowledge of the man obviously doesn't extend to getting his name right!

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3

As a traditional right-wing voter; disillusioned by the broken campaign promises that John Key made, I voted for Ardern last time to be just as let down by her Government.

Luxon has it ahead of him to even get me to vote again, let alone re-voting National, but let's see what he thinks he can do.

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My left perspective bw.

As a traditional left-wing voter; disillusioned by the broken campaign promises that Jacinda Ardern made, I voted for Ardern last time to be just as let down by her Government.

Ardern has it ahead of herself to even get my to vote again, let alone re-voting Labour, but let's see what she thinks he can do.

I still doubt I could vote National again, but 2 years is a long way off, should be more interesting than what it was with Collins in there anyway.

 

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In my opinion, comfortably the best choice.

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best choice or least worse choice?

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14

They only have 33 to choose from,the pool is pretty shallow...

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Yes, 'least worst choice' is a better way of putting it!

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I think I'm going to enjoy watching you lose over a long period Chris. May the beliefs you hide to further your ambition prove your undoing.

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6

.

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Zacko you must really like the current bunch of communists running the country

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Leader Luxon seems to be handling questions surprisingly well:

https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2021/11/livestream-christopher-…

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Communists? All I see are neoliberal centrists in power with zero vision or imagination.

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Exactly. A billion miles from communists or socialists.

 

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That's a shame, Simon O'Connor seems to be the only one talking sense atm.

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1

Labour are bloody hopeless but National with Luxon in charge are no more attractive to me. John key wannabe, no thanks. Just seems like he has a huge ego and make no mistake, he will just be keys puppet. This country is really lacking in quality politicians, or parties for that matter.

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Yup, if there was an election tomorrow I don't think I could hold my nose and vote for anyone. 

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7

The connection with John Key got him this job. When I heard John key has been helping Luxon to get support from some MPs. I knew this would play out. National still hasn't learnt anything. 

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11

The 'old boys network' is alive and well....

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7

Well we can only hope Luxon will be half as good as the best M NZ has ever had, Sir John Key

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4

Did I miss that poll?

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If you could read the notes for his speech this afternoon, you would see the date at the top would read 17 October 2020,the day he got elected...he will also has his Prime Minister speech already written.

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JA will eat him alive during election time. Pale stale and male. Try again National when you have someone more relevant.

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What are the demographics of a relevant person?

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She might, provided that she actually contests the election. The more probably contest is Robertson v Luxon. And I don't think Robertson has Ardern's x-factor at all.

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Come election time he won’t have to say a word.. the economy will be in the toilet and anyone with half a plan will take the election from Labour. 

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I'm happy to give him a chance but am pretty leery of evangelical christians. I mean, if theres one thing this country needs its more religious fruitcakes.

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9

I don't like this religious beat up. It's actually discriminatory. If you said the same thing about a Muslim then you'd probably be in trouble. 

Personally, I'm an agnostic. I respect his rights to freedom of religion, and I don't think his beliefs will have a major bearing on policy, given a party's policies are the product of a whole party rather than one person.

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19

I agree. It's getting worrying and tiresome how quickly people denigrate Christians. I have seen it rolled out against Luxon a lot - to the extent it's almost bot-like - even though I've never been concerned that he's a religious zealot intent on restarting the Crusades (he's my local MP). By all means, commentators should attack his corporate track record, policy positions, and uninspiring demeanour but let's leave his religion and hair (or lack thereof) out of it.

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12

I disagree, no one is criticising his religon or his entitlement to worship a faith. What they are rightly questioning is the very different scenario which is him leading a diverse multi-cultural country while holding extremely conservative religous views. I personally believe that is completely inappropriate and he should choose one path or another. 

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Is he really an extreme conservative though? An extreme conservative would never be talking about gender or rainbow certification in their maiden speech.

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Yes, he's ball's deep in it. I imagine his PR people are telling him what to say in public for fear of alienating voters. 

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So he’s extremely religious with extremely strong views, but publicly says differently to appease his PR people? So he’s a heretic. Or maybe he’s not that religious and his views aren’t that strong? Or maybe he genuinely believes his private views are his own.

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He's not religious, he's a Pentecostal Christian. That's a different beast. They don't keep their views to themselves! As a recent divorcee from someone brought up in that environment, the words escaping from a cult spring to mind. Not noted for his tree-hugging tendencies, Matthew Hooten's piece in the Metro: 

In the place of mainstream New Zealanders, National has been infiltrated by radical Christian evangelicals, mainly from the top half of the North Island. The current leader, president and MPs must pander to that group, dubbed ‘the Taliban’ by the party’s remaining centrists. Without returning to the pre-2003 constitution that allowed for creative destruction by National’s ordinary rank and file, there’s no obvious way out of this vicious cycle that is turning National into a Trump-like cult.

https://www.metromag.co.nz/society/society-politics/the-national-party-death-spiral

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You clearly don't know what you are talking about.

He's not a Pentecostalist, and they are different from Evangelicals.

 

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Alright...magical thinking then. Logic and reason conspicuously absent!

Matthew Hooten is a former National Party insider. His observations are a valuable insight.

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Hooton was an insider 20 years ago and still sour after the Muller failure. His importance is self-inflated and his expertise has led to failures on both the right and left side of politics when his consultancy has been involed. A good guideline is to believe the opposite of what he says. For example, the article you link to is pure assertion and hyperbole ("the Taliban", really!?) and a quick check of the few National MPs in the top-half of the North Island makes it evident that most are not religious fanatics.

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Well he certainly isn't talking about voting against abortion rights or euthanasia...

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Maybe those positions have nothing to do with his religion? My wife and I share the same religion and have opposite views to each other on those two issues.

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Plenty of people have been having a go at him based on his religion.

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Yeah, what about me. I'm having a go at him based on his religion.

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And I don't agree with that, even while I don't believe in his beliefs.

Have a go at his beliefs, sure, but saying he's not potentially a good leader because of those beliefs is frankly unfair and borderline discriminatory.

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Borderline?

Try making the same observations because he was gay, female, minor religious follewer. See the wild indignation that follows.

Ie. Jacinda ardern will struggle being a pm because she's a mum and therefore just can't put in as much time into the role as required. 

Discrimination is discrimination. You are either compotent or your not. 

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Who says we can't ridicule him for his beliefs? What if he believes in a stupid policy? What if he believes in making an irrational decision? We can't ridicule stupid policy or irrational decisions because he believes in them? How pathetic.

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You can ridicule him. I'm just making the observation that it seems to be that Luxon (and Christians generally) seem to bearing a disproportionate amount of criticism for their beliefs as opposed to their actual behaviour. If the same was said about other groups it may well be considered hate speech. 

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actual behaviour? History is littered with the detritus of religious behaviour. But hey, lets give him a go - he may suppress his belief in a higher power and focus on humanity instead - not holding my breath.

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You’ve mentioned religion but what you’re really talking about is ideology. And I agree that history is filled with the collateral damage of ideologues. But we don’t discard Marxist ideas completely just because many Marxists murdered many people. Instead, let’s look at the actual behaviour of Christians in Parliament in New Zealand: Savage’s applied Christianity, which coalesced in the Social Security Bill, started from suggestions in the Church and forms the foundation for our welfare state (first in the world too, I believe). Similarly, if you study evangelicals in New Zealand closely, you’ll see a deep desire to serve others. Luxon may have good intentions and create good outcomes. The National Party certainly needs someone with a moral compass. He may not. But I think it’s totally unfair to write him off already because of his religious beliefs.

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Is it a desire to do good or a desire for power? i'm not criticising christianity or his right to follow it, my point is I do not believe it's compatible with being Prime Minister. 

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I don’t know. We will see in time. But, to be fair, all politicians are power hungry bastards. Nationals current woes and Labour’s post-Clark demonstrate that politicians will sell their grandmothers for a chance to be Prime Minister.

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Replying to Essen: the problem with evangelicals like Sco Mo for example, is their belief about being 'chosen by God', which Luxon won't be saying publicly but will be thinking. That's dangerous and plugs right back into pre-Enlightenment thinking of the 'divine right of kings'. Michael Joseph Savage was not an evangelical Christian and there is a bloody big difference. Luxon is not for the people as Savage was, but for the right of corporations to do as they please. NZ's increasingly feudal society + a potential PM with a God complex...not a country I'd want to live in. 

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Meanwhile in socialist heaven....

Our hospitals are still unable to deal with this pandemic, and we have the least affordabile housing market in the entire developed world.

But you know, as long as we are visually diverse. That's the main thing right? 

 

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Your words not mine buddy. I don't subscribe to simplistic ideologies. My sister who is about to retire trained under the old system - with matrons who could run a ward far better than the remote managers my daughter who is also a nurse, has to contend with today. We also had family benefit which cashed up into a lump sum put many kiwis into their first homes. Another very good scheme trashed by Ruth Richardson. 

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the problem with evangelicals like Sco Mo for example

ScoMo isn't an evangelical. He's Pentecostal. As mentioned to you above by someone else, there are important differences.

Luxon is not for the people as Savage was, but for the right of corporations to do as they please.

There is no evidence for this (yet) and to assume that evangelists think that way is wrong anyway, as evangelists can be both left and right in their political thinking. 

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Religion is an ideology and does not have a great track record on morals, let alone ethics. No-one is writing him off or denying him religion - just pointing out the alarm bells and wondering if/when they will start ringing.

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Theres any number of religious MPs who aren't being denigrated for their beliefs.

Why do you suppose Luxon is singled out? I suspect it's because he's an evangelical rather than one of the other, less hard line faiths.

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Bingo! I wouldn't have cared less if he was a casual christian church goer (as most seem to be). It's the "evangelical" bit that scares me, a half step away from fanaticism IMO.  Look at the US evangelicals as well...

Doesn't mean that he still can't be good though, the first question today he answered pretty well, talking about the separation of his church and politics (which is actually impossible, but nice to hear he thinks about it).

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Let's bring some rattlesnakes over for him...

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There's a big difference between say an Angelican or Catholic, and a fundamentalist Christian.

There's a big difference between say a Muslim, and an Islamic fundamentalist.

No one should be ever voting for either of the latter.

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Right but I wouldn't say this about a non hard line muslim just as I wouldn't say it about a non hardline christian, I don't share their beliefs but I have no problem with them. 

Fundamentalist christians are batshit crazy, just as much as fundamentalist muslims, if you believe the world is 3000 years old or any of the other stupid shit in the bible or koran you're a dumbass and aren't fit to lead a country.

I doubt I'm going to get in trouble for saying these things.

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Remember Christopher spent nearly 20 years forging a career in North America,so being a fundamental evangelical christian is career enhancing...they love a good right wing christian  up there.

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'forging' interesting choice of verbiage

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What are you talking about? Just as anyone has the freedom to believe in religion, anyone has the freedom to ridicule it. Muslims don't get a free pass either. Delusional nonsense - all of it.

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Indeed.

Would anyone take an adult seriously who believed in the tooth fairy, Santa or the easter bunny? Well, there's as much evidence supporting their existence as his choosen deity. It's like a big red-flag that someone who isn't capable of critical thought. 

That said, I don't care what people believe as long as they don't impose on the freedoms of others or harm people. Unfortunately, Luxon will potentially be in a position where he can impose his archaic social beliefs on the population. Now that truly scares me. 

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You won’t be getting anything in your stocking this year. 

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Of course you should be free to ridicule religion, it's a belief system which is different to race , or say sexuality ie. Things that are not beliefs but natural attributes.

The problem I have is people effectively dismissing him automatically because of his religion.

But you are free to do so if you choose, although remember if you turned someone down for a job based on their religion then that is  blatant discrimination.

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 atheists only. no religion required.

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What if he was a Satan worshiper?

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That's an extreme and somewhat absurd comparison.

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I think he is National's only hope really. He could easily crash and burn, or he could be the next Key. Not that I like Key, but lots did and he won 3 elections. 

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"Help us Christopher, you're our only hope" says the dwindling National caucus

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You mean like when Ardern got elected (with Winston's help)

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What you talkin about Willis?! Both parties needed Winston's help

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It's called MMP,its been around for a while now.

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Agree. All the nonsense being spouted here about Reti being a good candidate!

And Soimon has too much baggage.

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So I assume that Simon got told he wouldn't win and to bail out gracefully?

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The Bridge(s) too far has collapsed. John Key wins, again.

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Did AirNZ shares go up today ?

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Surprisingly that darling of the Sharesies set actually went down

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Another man of the cloth, great news for Labour. At least NZ has certainty of what the government will look like over the next 5 years with the possibility of the touch of green after the next election.

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No they only have to be the minor party to form a coalition with Act. So it will be Labour/Act/National/Greens/NZ First/Maori party...that's right Winnie will be back

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Everyone is entitled to their beliefs, including religon, but it should remain private as it doesn't mix well with power. I don't believe a deeply religous person should be allowed to hold office, too conflicted and if you believe in god what else are you capable of believing?

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Well,we know what he doesn't believe in:

https://thespinoff.co.nz/politics/29-11-2021/the-national-partys-new-co…

How did the National leadership contenders vote on bills relating to abortion, gay marriage and euthanasia?

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That's the thing with religon, I don't need to know anything about him to know precisely what he believes in. 

He can try to hide or dilute his conservative faith, but we know. 

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National are toast, the average person won't want a bar of it.

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I don't think 'the average person' will give a toss if he's a  competent leader.

Anyway, who is is 'average person'? It's certainly not woke liberals who might be offended by him.

Middle NZ is still quite conservative.

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It will be 6 years worth of young voters added to the mix by 2023...the middle is moving,talk to your average 12-18 yo and you would be surprised how liberal they are...what would shock their parents,they take in their stride...  

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 Not anti gay anti abortion type levels, that’s probably only 10% these days. 

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The Family, a miniseries on Netflix, well worth watching;

https://www.netflix.com/nz/title/80063867

 

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Good article. Nicola Willis for party leader!

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Nicola is impressive. I've seen her in action @ select committee level. My thoughts are that she'd run rings around Luxon given half a chance.

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Don't agree.

I think the economy will be a shambles within 18 months, and that will be a good platform for Luxon the ex- business leader to push for victory.

It's like 2008 all over again.

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Yawn. At this stage all I care about is:

  • Dismantling medical segregation
  • Opening up the borders
  • Getting on with business as usual

Unlikely to happen on either side but I'll vote for any single party that campaigns on that platform wherever they stand on the spectrum.

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It would be wasted as they won't get 5%

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Evidence he’s even got the commies worried 

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Again I tell you, it is easier for seven houses to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.

Matthew 19:21-24

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Its all about how you interpret it. In this case it is interpreted as "thou must own seven houses"

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See it is even written in the scriptures ,property 'investors' are doing Gods work...although if you were really working hard at spreading the Gospel,you would have more than 7 houses...

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What happened to the camel?

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I would need to check the register of pecuniary interests to see if he owns a Camel. Generally speaking, it is either house hoarding or Camel ownership... rarely both.

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Luxon has learned one thing correctly. Picking Jessica.

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All the knockers will now come to the surface. Give the new National party leadership team a chance to prove themselves.

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From Christophers speech.."

Luxon said Collins, Bridges and Todd Muller all had "very important" roles to play in the future of the party.

"They have a unique set of skills we need to tap into... we'll set the baggage aside."

Well thats not exactly a 'reset'...and he thanked Judith for her work...LOL

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Exactly. He did not have the guts to say that the earlier leaders failed to hold it together and dropped the ball repeatedly. 
Hopefully, JK will teach him how to scuttle those who went before him. 

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His previous role did have a connection to baggage handling. 

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Nice.

 

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Quote from Christopher...""I'm just really proud to be doing it with Nicola," Luxon said when asked why the more senior politician, Willis, was not the leader."

Thats a bit icky,telling the nation he is 'doing it'  with Nicola :-)

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Wow I guess he is the next Colin Craig

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...we have heard it all before..."lift productivity"

John Key 2009

29 MAY 2009

Budget puts New Zealand on strong footing

"The Budget's three main aims are to improve public services and help New Zealanders through the recession, lift productivity and raise the country's international competitiveness, and take steps to keep government debt under control.

 But I believe the policies in the Budget put New Zealand on a stronger footing for growth, which will lift New Zealanders' incomes and opportunities."

TOP

 

 

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Hollow words we have heard before:

Key wage gap claim rebuffed

Tracy Watkins05:00, Apr 12 2011

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A row over New Zealand's role as a cheap labour market has renewed debate over the wage gap with Australia – and whether it is shrinking or growing.

National was elected in 2008 on the back of a promise to close the wage gap with Australia, and Prime Minister John Key suggested yesterday that the gap had closed because after-tax average wages had gone up by about 16 per cent since 2008.

But Council of Trade Unions economist Bill Rosenberg said his calculations showed the average Australian wage had surged 41 per cent ahead of the New Zealand wage by June 2010, compared with a 35 per cent gap in June 2009.

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Quoting the CTU to attack National is like quoting the Taxpayer's Union to attack Labour. Pointless.

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Take out the CTU,I was only using it to highlight that we are always hearing from the pollies that they will "lift productivity" and in Keys case achieve pay parity with Australia...are you suggesting we have achieved that?

Do you see hordes of Australians heading over to NZ to earn the big bucks?  

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i still remember the JK ads about them amount of kiwis moving to aussie, did it reverse under his government, no it increased and he covered it up by high immigration to cover up the loses

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OOOhhh,so what JK meant when he said he would raise kiwis wages was that 'new' kiwis would be earning more than in their homeland when they became chefs or liquor store staff working for their compatriots...  

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Did it? I’d be interested to see data on this. From memory, part of the problem was that post-GFC National turned on the immigration tap but around 2014 we started to see NZers return in numbers never seen before. At that point, immigration should have been turned off but they didn’t do it regrettably.

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Looks like net NZ citizen migration only went positive in 2019 https://www.stats.govt.nz/news/new-zealand-citizens-drive-net-migration…

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Our productivity has been lagging for decades. Just the opposite to our house prices, which are on a 30-year bull run. If you’re going to criticise Key for either of those things then every Prime Minister, left or right, we’ve had going back to Lange was a total waste of time. 

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Nope. Why would they. 

People move countries for increased opportunity. 

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The worst possible choice for leader.  Counting the days until he announces some conspiracy belief.

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The only logical choice. Good luck to him. Will be interested to see National's approach going forward. Hopefully they move away from myopic points scoring and focus on delivering a plan backed by decent policy.

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Great opening speech Mr Luxon!

We trust you and the team will do a great job!

The sooner we get these loopy Labour loons out of Government, the better!

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Happy-clappy time

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what has he promised bridges, finance? i will be interested to see the new line up

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In a new press release to show he is a good bloke (albeit a very intelligent,attractive one according to him),

Christopher has said he is happy for his name to be shortened to Christ... 

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You win the award for best comment today 

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He doesn't think a woman should be able to choose to abort an unwanted embryo from their own body. What is this, 1971? 

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Reti, a doctor and a so called a moderate, also has the same view I think.

Abortion is a thorny issue. In my view it still amounts to murder, but there are (in my opinion) limited legitimate circumstances for it's use.

I really struggle with the so called legitimacy given to it by the phrase 'it's a women's body to do as she pleases'. That just trivialises and demeans human life.

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It's very easy to trivialise and demean women when you're a man. You (and I) don't need to worry about having a child you don't want growing inside your body. Try and imagine that.

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Don't get me started HouseMouse, just don't...

If you've never been in the situation (or have no chance of ever being so) I suggest you keep your incredibly small minded (incredibly sh*tty) opinions to yourself.

I assume you are completely vegan, anti-war / combat, anti guns for anyone, against the police shooting that guy yesterday that was brandishing a gun in glen Eden etc. Anything else would be totally hypocritical. Or is it only an absolute overriding right to life for human embryos? Adult humans, other sentient beings etc can jam it? Can your mind handle the complexity that they might be subject to complex factors, but still be entitled to equal opportunities, or do you characterise an embryo as "innocent" and that makes it easy to write everyone else in the situation off? 

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HouseMouse,I respect your right to have an opinion,but where I draw the line is when 'opinions',especially ones based on a 2000 yo novel become enshrined in law,homosexuality,abortion,gay marriage etc are choices personal to the people involved,not anyone elses.It is no coincidence that draconian laws and views around these issues are generally rooted in religion as seen in heartland USA.

So like it or not,Luxons connection to a evangelical church started in Tennessee in the 1930's does give insight to the person. 

That is the equivalent of atheists passing a law that it is illegal to go to church. 

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A very simplified mischaracterisation of what was actually a complicated issue. I know many women in medicine, agnostic I would think, who had concerns about those reforms. 

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Sorry mate, you've already stated in the thread above your a fundamentalist Christian, so your ability to represent wider groups in a convo like this, pretty bloody limited.

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OMG what a surprise?..I bet the first call for congraulations will be Scomo

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Bishop Brian Tamaki might be brought in as an advisor to cabinet.

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Favourite animal - guinea pigs!

How many houses - seven!

Favourite film - um oh hard one um no don't know , maybe Bond

 

Sorry Nats fans, he stands zero chance of getting beyond the base... 

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While CL was basking in the glow of selection, JA was being heckled in Hamilton by protestors yelling "stick your vaccine mandate up your you know what". Amazing contrast from earlier times

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It was a small crowd of protestors tilting at windmills. Leadership requires the ability to make tough decisions. Ardern might not get everything right but I’m not sure many would have done any better in the circumstances. 

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Yea,given we are 3rd from the bottom for global Covid 19 death rate per capita,I think they are doing a pretty good job.

I notice Seymour and co have gone a bit quiet about opening up NZ and getting rid of MIQ since Omicron turned up...

get your calculator out and extrapolate some figures if we had Britains per capita death rate per below.

 

https://www.statista.com/statistics/1104709/coronavirus-deaths-worldwid…

 

 

 

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It’s a good point and Luxon lost me when he started the typical bagging of labour about this in his speech.

why couldn’t they be gracious and say Labour has handled it well but we have these other issues that need fixing and we think we are the team to do it. Criticising the response is in it self criticising so many kiwis who have all helped in our way. 
 

I expect no change and actually hope he gets elected with Willis and they can both be at ground zero when interest rates go up and the ponzi goes bang...

 

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Right at the top on teen suicides and housing unaffordability. 

Anyone can raise a drawbridge. 

Aside from that labour have done diddly squat. 

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Heard Fed Farmers Andrew Hoggard and someone from the manufacturers Association this morning discussing the two candidates. They both sounded quite unenthusiastic about them both and National in general, like either one getting the job would see them sucking a lemon.

Such a small pool of seeming incompetents. So many agendas.

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And of course, Willis only got the job because of a diversity quota.

Because Luxons is bald, the second in charge obviously had to have long hair.

A balance of both of which is a sign of political capabilities.

A near-disaster was surely avoided. 

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When I first saw Willis speak I thought she seemed quite competent and impressive.

As I listened to her more on several topics, my opinion changed - she presents well but I think she's quite lightweight on policy and deeper thinking.

So a bit like Ardern.

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he should have a shirt with his sponsor Ryobi on it...he has mentioned his predeliction for their One series power tools in every interview today...he must have memorised his speech for today,rolled out the same words for every one of them.

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Former Air NZ CEO Christopher Luxon showed 'enormous' intellectual capability but rarely met with 'ordinary workers' | Stuff.co.nz

There was often disparaging commentary about his leadership style that she felt was not warranted.

Luxon inherited an airline with a strong balance sheet and “a dream team” of executives around him, and he made the most of it, she said.

He also had a period of consistent growth with no “nasty black swan events” to deal with.

“He had the best circumstances that I have ever seen.”

He was a big part of setting up high-performance engagement at the airline with the staff’s unions but rarely attended the monthly meetings.

“He very rarely attended the monthly leadership meetings between union and company and was not close to the problems the unions and company were trying to sort out.”

Luxon rarely met directly with the unions in general and didn’t connect in person very often with staff, he said.

“He was not a CEO who spent a lot of time with ordinary workers.”

Luxon’s approach to high performance was “all too often style over substance and was consistently under-resourced”.

“That lack of support was a big part of what led it to falter when it was needed most.”

Whether he would be successful as leader of the National Party would depend on how connected he was with the concerns of everyday New Zealanders, he said.

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Is meeting with unions regularly a big part of the CEO's job?

 

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it was when Rob Fyfe was in charge..he was respected,if there was a real issue,he would come to a meeting and listen to everyone and wasn't averse to going against a middle manager if he thought it was fair.

It's a good way to hear whats really going on rather than hearing a sanitised and filtered version that often happens when these things 'cascade' upwards to senior management.

Rob used to put a day aside every month to actually physically work alongside the workers,he has cleaned toilets,lubed aircraft etc.

It all stopped when Luxo came on board,he almost never came down to see his 'highly valued asset' as he would refer to the workers...he is all weasel words,a joke when he says he is an extrovert who loves people...

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My wife worked at Air NZ when Fyfe was in charge, she really rated him.

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He definitely sounds like the real deal!

bring it on!

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Not sure if sarcasm or not. If not you clearly haven't figured it out, they al sound great! But when you see their true colours none of them are what you think. This guy is no different.

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Impressed with how Chris Luxon spoke today which gave me hope National might be able to gain traction and reverse its fortunes and put Labours performance in a true perspective. Nicola Willis is highly capable and was destined for greater things so I wish them well.

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Glad to have you as new leader of National Christopher, best of luck to you

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part of nationals covid plan as usual it involves high immigration settings 

they are a one trick pony when it comes to growing the economy 

Appendix Two: Immigration - seizing our opportunities

The success of New Zealand’s long-term economic and health response to COVID-19 will hinge on our immigration settings. The steps that we take to attract and retain talent will be decisive to our recovery.

The world as we know it has changed, and right now New Zealand is being left in the dust. Our post-pandemic future demands smart planning and a willingness to embrace bold new policy ideas. Instead, the Government has walked off the job and abandoned its post. The Immigration Minister has been almost invisible, unable to reach key decisions which has led to a broken department.

National’s immigration blueprint would seize every opportunity we have available, providing fresh policy thinking and exhibiting a mature vision for a diverse, connected and forward-looking New Zealand.

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It is crazy to expect to be able to grow out of the pandemic with the massive shortages of skilled staff from the decrepit healthcare system that is keeping us in lockdown through to the tech industry petitioning the inert government to allow visa applications to flow again. And all the hundreds of jobs that NZ companies need to fill with a finite and limited pool of local resources. Then add Canada and Australia’s clear policies to poach talent and we are, again, 12 months behind the rest of the world living in some sort of socialist nirvana. 

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Wow, there are some really basic, narrow minded, dumb comments in this section

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Don't be so hard on yourself Yvil,but congratulations on taking some time for self reflection.

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Well it didn't take long for someone to exemplify my comment above

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Your welcome :-)

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I only just heard Luxon's speech as I flew back to Auckland today. Most impressive, he is definitely the leader National has been missing, National is no longer directionless, I think Luxon is going to be an amazing leader and also a great Prime Minister. 

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Sounded full of dog whistle cliches...he tried to tick every box,productivity,gangs,a new future...yawn,more platitudes,let's hear some policy...oh and what portfolio is he giving Judith in his 'reset' Nat party.

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Well i read that speech and Luxon either thinks honesty is not the best answer or he is looking at Planet Key.

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There won't be a dry neoliberalist gusset tonight in Nationals caucus after-party.

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The Nat caucus parties won't be as much fun once he brings in his zero alcohol policy as he did at Air NZ.

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On more personal questions, Luxon told the AM Show he was "pro-life" and didn't support abortion, euthanasia or the death penalty. When questioned if he thought abortion was murder, he said "he didn't want to go there".

Shall we say yes then?

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