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Realistic or Modern Paint It Black

Sub Genres
  1. Action
  2. Adventure
  3. Dystopian
  4. Realistic
  5. Slice of Life

SpazTheButcher

"Yeah, I use Wagner, my boys love it"
"They come from the end of the line, most of 'em. Small towns you never heard of: Pulaski, Tennessee. Brandon, Mississippi. Pork Bend, Utah. Wampum, Pennsylvania. Two years' high school's about it. Maybe if they're lucky, a job waiting for 'em back in a factory. But most of 'em got nothin'. They're poor. They're the unwanted. Yet they're fighting for our society and our freedom. It's weird, isn't it? At the bottom of the barrel, and they know it. Maybe that's why they call themselves 'grunts', cause a grunt can take it, can take anything."

It is 1971. The US involvement in Vietnam is going down, but the draft relentlessly continues. People from all over the nation are having a rifle shoved in their hand and being sent overseas. Anti-war protesters are numbering in the millions, and discipline is barely heard of amongst troops. And yet, they serve with a purpose, and some even find pride in their valor. For whatever reason, you have been sent to 'Nam, whether you volunteered of were drafted, here you are.

Rules:
1. Please stay in the period(1971), if you need to look up whatever you need to clarify for dates.
2. I enjoy some historical controversy(e.g the draft), but avoid racism and sexism. Those have no place in Vietnam
3. Movie references are allowed
4. 1-2 paragraph minimum


FYI We are in the 7th Air Cavalry, we are a small squad made up of two fireteams, each fire team led by Rowboat Girlyman Rowboat Girlyman and Jackson123 Jackson123

Roles Needed(Other than rifleman):
-Radioman
-Squad Gunner
-Grenadier (LAW or Thumper)
-Translator(Optional)
-Medic


Name:
Rank: (Highest rank allowed is Cpl)
Age:
Faceclaim or Description:

Personality:
Background:

Equipment:
Weapon(s):
Helmet Graffiti(Cuz Why not):
Name: Johnny Person
Rank: Sergeant
Age: 21
Faceclaim: View Avatar

Personality: Quiet, he mostly keeps to himself, but in the heat of combat he leads with a sailor's mouth and with a soldier's pride
Background: Born in Nebraska, he was raised by a military family, both his brothers joining the Army. He enlisted in 1968, and served with the 3rd Infantry Division during his first tour in Vietnam. When he got back to the states he worked hard and helped soldiers acclimate to civilian life. He punched an officer in the Coast Guard due to a disrespectful comment and was given a choice: court martial or combat. He chose the latter and was transferred to the 7th Air Cav.

Equipment: x2 Canteens, x6 20 round magazines(loaded with only 16 round to prevent jamming), x3 white smoke, x2 red smoke, x2 green smoke, x2 frags, flashlight, knife.
Weapon(s): M16A1 fitted with a bayonet
Helmet Graffiti: A lot his written on his helmet, such as "Send John Wayne, not Bob Hope", "God is My Pointman", "I see a red door...", a list of his firebases, Micah 4:4, and "Don't be first, Don't be last, and Don't volunteer for anything." On his helmet band he also has items, on the left side being a rosary, and a small American Flag(folded into a triangle), and on the right side he has his 3rd ID patch and a black king(from chess). He also has a Nixon Lodge campaign button.
 
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Jackson123

The meaning of life is the fine game of nil
Here lemme submit a squad gunner real quick

Name: John Williams
Rank: Corporal (E-4)
Age:47
Faceclaim or Description:
DE783377-414A-47C7-9457-F1C02355098A.jpeg
Personality: Meticulous and thorough, some would say he’s an assertive leader figure.
Background:
Born in 1924 to a middle class family in San Francisco, California. Due to the stock market crash that results in what was called the Great Depression, young Williams experienced profound economic and social turmoil throughout his childhood.

As a teenager, Williams often got into trouble with the authorities, and he was arrested twice for criminal mischief by the age of 17. After being released from his second arrest with a warning, the news coverage of the Attack on Pearl Harbour arrived. Knowing America would definitely be joining the war, he decided to enlist for the US Army at the end of December 1941.

He was posted to the 35th Infantry, 25th Division and first saw action during the Guadalcanal Campaign in December 1942. Subsequently, he also took part in Battle of New Georgia, after which the the division was moved to New Zealand for rest and training.

During the Battle of Saipan, Williams was transferred to the US Army 105th Infantry Regiment, where Williams survived the largest Banzai charge in history, tens of hours of intense and unrelenting hand to hand combat that took a toll of 2,000 on the US forces before the entire Japanese forces that took part in the attack was practically destroyed.

For the remainder of war in the Pacific, Williams was stationed in Saipan and fought the guerrilla war against the remnants of Japanese forces led by Captain Oba Sakae, until they finally surrendered in December 1945, three months after Japan herself officially surrendered. After the war concluded, Williams would return home to finish university.

Peace in Asia did not last long however, in 1950, reenlisted as a Corporal, Williams was posted to the 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry, 7th Infantry Division to take part in the war broke out in Korea. Williams was in the amphibious forces that landed in Inchon during Operation Chromite, landed in 18 September after 1st Marine secured their right flank, it was a decisive victory despite technical difficulties such as dangerous tidal range (one of the largest in the world) in the area of operation, leads to the collapse of North Korean Army and the UN forces able to recapture Hanseong (today Seoul) and push northwards all the way to the Yalu river.

This prompted the Chinese to intervene in Korean War, incompetence in intelligence made Gen MacArthur failed to realise when over 300 thousands Chinese troops crossed the border into Korea, the full brunt of the Chinese offensive results in a military disaster for the UN.

During the furious action that followed, the 7th Infantry Division's spread out regiments were unable to resist the overwhelming PVA forces. In Chosin Reservoir, William’s battalion was attacked from all sides trapped with two other battalions, they were encircled by over 150,000 Chinese troops, a brutal 17-day battle in freezing weather soon followed in which the UN forces were eventually able to break out of the encirclement and to make a fighting withdrawal to the port of Hungnam, inflicting heavy casualties on the Chinese, but the three battalions which Williams was part of were destroyed by overwhelming PVA forces. Williams carried his wounded comrades through miles of mountainous terrain under enemy fire until they got to safety, and for this he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.

He took part in the Third and Fourth Battle of Seoul when the South Korean Capital switch hands multiple times between the UN and Chinese forces, he participated in the Battle of Triangle Hill before the Armistice was signed.

In 1965, the ever worsened situation of Vietcong insurgency finally urged the US to send ground troops into Vietnam, and Williams found himself yet again jumping into a warzone.

Equipment: Sleeping Roll Carrier, M-17 Gas Mask Bag, General Purpose Strap. Canteen x2. Extra pairs of socks.
Weapon(s): M60 (belt fed)
Helmet Graffiti(Cuz Why not): Still Ain’t Dead Yet
 
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SpazTheButcher

"Yeah, I use Wagner, my boys love it"
Here lemme submit a squad gunner real quick

Name: John Williams
Rank: Corporal (E-4)
Age:47
Faceclaim or Description:
View attachment 856964
Personality: Meticulous and thorough, some would say he’s an assertive leader figure.
Background:
Born in 1924 to a middle class family in San Francisco, California. Due to the stock market crash that results in what was called the Great Depression, young Williams experienced profound economic and social turmoil throughout his childhood.

As a teenager, Williams often got into trouble with the authorities, and he was arrested twice for criminal mischief by the age of 17. After being released from his second arrest with a warning, the news coverage of the Attack on Pearl Harbour arrived. Knowing America would definitely be joining the war, he decided to enlist for the US Army at the end of December 1941.

He was posted to the 35th Infantry, 25th Division and first saw action during the Guadalcanal Campaign in December 1942. Subsequently, he also took part in Battle of New Georgia, after which the the division was moved to New Zealand for rest and training.

During the Battle of Saipan, Williams was transferred to the US Army 105th Infantry Regiment, where Williams survived the largest Banzai charge in history, tens of hours of intense and unrelenting hand to hand combat that took a toll of 2,000 on the US forces before the entire Japanese forces that took part in the attack was practically destroyed.

For the remainder of war in the Pacific, Williams was stationed in Saipan and fought the guerrilla war against the remnants of Japanese forces led by Captain Oba Sakae, until they finally surrendered in December 1945, three months after Japan herself officially surrendered. After the war concluded, Williams would return home to finish university.

Peace in Asia did not last long however, in 1950, reenlisted as a Corporal, Williams was posted to the 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry, 7th Infantry Division to take part in the war broke out in Korea. Williams was in the amphibious forces that landed in Inchon during Operation Chromite, landed in 18 September after 1st Marine secured their right flank, it was a decisive victory despite technical difficulties such as dangerous tidal range (one of the largest in the world) in the area of operation, leads to the collapse of North Korean Army and the UN forces able to recapture Hanseong (today Seoul) and push northwards all the way to the Yalu river.

This prompted the Chinese to intervene in Korean War, incompetence in intelligence made Gen MacArthur failed to realise when over 300 thousands Chinese troops crossed the border into Korea, the full brunt of the Chinese offensive results in a military disaster for the UN.

During the furious action that followed, the 7th Infantry Division's spread out regiments were unable to resist the overwhelming PVA forces. In Chosin Reservoir, William’s battalion was attacked from all sides trapped with two other battalions, they were encircled by over 150,000 Chinese troops, a brutal 17-day battle in freezing weather soon followed in which the UN forces were eventually able to break out of the encirclement and to make a fighting withdrawal to the port of Hungnam, inflicting heavy casualties on the Chinese, but the three battalions which Williams was part of were destroyed by overwhelming PVA forces. Williams carried his wounded comrades through miles of mountainous terrain under enemy fire until they got to safety, and for this he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.

He took part in the Third and Fourth Battle of Seoul when the South Korean Capital switch hands multiple times between the UN and Chinese forces, he participated in the Battle of Triangle Hill before the Armistice was signed.

In 1965, the ever worsened situation of Vietcong insurgency finally urged the US to send ground troops into Vietnam, and Williams found himself yet again jumping into a warzone.

Equipment: Sleeping Roll Carrier, M-17 Gas Mask Bag, General Purpose Strap. Canteen x2. Extra pairs of socks.
Weapon(s): M60 (belt fed)
Helmet Graffiti(Cuz Why not): Still Ain’t Dead Yet
Sweet. Thanks for hoppin' in Jack
 

Rowboat Girlyman

New Member
Here lemme submit a squad gunner real quick

Name: John Williams
Rank: Corporal (E-4)
Age:47
Faceclaim or Description:
View attachment 856964
Personality: Meticulous and thorough, some would say he’s an assertive leader figure.
Background:
Born in 1924 to a middle class family in San Francisco, California. Due to the stock market crash that results in what was called the Great Depression, young Williams experienced profound economic and social turmoil throughout his childhood.

As a teenager, Williams often got into trouble with the authorities, and he was arrested twice for criminal mischief by the age of 17. After being released from his second arrest with a warning, the news coverage of the Attack on Pearl Harbour arrived. Knowing America would definitely be joining the war, he decided to enlist for the US Army at the end of December 1941.

He was posted to the 35th Infantry, 25th Division and first saw action during the Guadalcanal Campaign in December 1942. Subsequently, he also took part in Battle of New Georgia, after which the the division was moved to New Zealand for rest and training.

During the Battle of Saipan, Williams was transferred to the US Army 105th Infantry Regiment, where Williams survived the largest Banzai charge in history, tens of hours of intense and unrelenting hand to hand combat that took a toll of 2,000 on the US forces before the entire Japanese forces that took part in the attack was practically destroyed.

For the remainder of war in the Pacific, Williams was stationed in Saipan and fought the guerrilla war against the remnants of Japanese forces led by Captain Oba Sakae, until they finally surrendered in December 1945, three months after Japan herself officially surrendered. After the war concluded, Williams would return home to finish university.

Peace in Asia did not last long however, in 1950, reenlisted as a Corporal, Williams was posted to the 1st Battalion, 32nd Infantry, 7th Infantry Division to take part in the war broke out in Korea. Williams was in the amphibious forces that landed in Inchon during Operation Chromite, landed in 18 September after 1st Marine secured their right flank, it was a decisive victory despite technical difficulties such as dangerous tidal range (one of the largest in the world) in the area of operation, leads to the collapse of North Korean Army and the UN forces able to recapture Hanseong (today Seoul) and push northwards all the way to the Yalu river.

This prompted the Chinese to intervene in Korean War, incompetence in intelligence made Gen MacArthur failed to realise when over 300 thousands Chinese troops crossed the border into Korea, the full brunt of the Chinese offensive results in a military disaster for the UN.

During the furious action that followed, the 7th Infantry Division's spread out regiments were unable to resist the overwhelming PVA forces. In Chosin Reservoir, William’s battalion was attacked from all sides trapped with two other battalions, they were encircled by over 150,000 Chinese troops, a brutal 17-day battle in freezing weather soon followed in which the UN forces were eventually able to break out of the encirclement and to make a fighting withdrawal to the port of Hungnam, inflicting heavy casualties on the Chinese, but the three battalions which Williams was part of were destroyed by overwhelming PVA forces. Williams carried his wounded comrades through miles of mountainous terrain under enemy fire until they got to safety, and for this he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.

He took part in the Third and Fourth Battle of Seoul when the South Korean Capital switch hands multiple times between the UN and Chinese forces, he participated in the Battle of Triangle Hill before the Armistice was signed.

In 1965, the ever worsened situation of Vietcong insurgency finally urged the US to send ground troops into Vietnam, and Williams found himself yet again jumping into a warzone.

Equipment: Sleeping Roll Carrier, M-17 Gas Mask Bag, General Purpose Strap. Canteen x2. Extra pairs of socks.
Weapon(s): M60 (belt fed)
Helmet Graffiti(Cuz Why not): Still Ain’t Dead Yet

Okay sorry to be a stickler but theres no way a 47 year old would be running around the front lines of Vietnam as a Corporal. Dude should be like a Master Sgt or a First Sergeant by now, but he definitely wouldn't be on the line in combat.
 

Lorsh

serf slasher
Okay sorry to be a stickler but theres no way a 47 year old would be running around the front lines of Vietnam as a Corporal. Dude should be like a Master Sgt or a First Sergeant by now, but he definitely wouldn't be on the line in combat.
True, you can be a corporal for life in the CAF but the US has got an "up or out" policy.
 

Jackson123

The meaning of life is the fine game of nil
Okay sorry to be a stickler but theres no way a 47 year old would be running around the front lines of Vietnam as a Corporal. Dude should be like a Master Sgt or a First Sergeant by now, but he definitely wouldn't be on the line in combat.

Larry Alan Thorne was 46 when he died in Vietnam (well he was a captain at that point but he was very much on the frontline), and I think I’ve read there were guys who really fought in WW2, Korean War and Vietnam all three.

Correct me if I’m wrong but from what I’ve found the policy essentially tells them that they need to be deployable or else they will get discharged from the Army. Not sure if rank really was an issue.
 
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Jackson123

The meaning of life is the fine game of nil
Okay sorry to be a stickler but theres no way a 47 year old would be running around the front lines of Vietnam as a Corporal. Dude should be like a Master Sgt or a First Sergeant by now, but he definitely wouldn't be on the line in combat.
No wait, I found it, Retention Control Points. Emmmm lets see, seems like they decreased the RCP in 2011 and beforehands you could say in Private through PFC for 8 years and Corporal 10-12 years. And I said my guy returned home for a while to finish school or something so let’s just say he spent like 15 years as active (including the 3 years of 1942-1945 in WW2 and 3 years of 1950-1953 in Korea, and 6 years after 1965 in Nam) out of the 29 years (1942-1971) in the army so it’s still theoretically possible to be a CPL at that point, or the guys behind desks just forgot about him and he simply don’t care as long as he got wars to fight
 
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SpazTheButcher

"Yeah, I use Wagner, my boys love it"
No wait, I found it, Retention Control Points. Emmmm lets see, seems like they decreased the RCP in 2011 and beforehands you could say in Private through PFC for 8 years and Corporal 10-12 years. And I said my guy returned home for a while to finish school or something so let’s just say he spent like 15 years as active (including the 3 years of 1942-1945 in WW2 and 3 years of 1950-1953 in Korea, and 6 years after 1965 in Nam) out of the 29 years (1942-1971) in the army so it’s still theoretically possible to be a CPL at that point, or the guys behind desks just forgot about him and he simply don’t care as long as he got wars to fight
If he is the "Old Man", I would prefer if maybe he was not a squad gunner. A radiomen would be more his speed, if you catch my drift.
 

Jackson123

The meaning of life is the fine game of nil
If he is the "Old Man", I would prefer if maybe he was not a squad gunner. A radiomen would be more his speed, if you catch my drift.
....And face 5-second life expectancy? Nah, mowing down charlies with M60 would probably be more of his thing than calling in air strike
 

SpazTheButcher

"Yeah, I use Wagner, my boys love it"
....And face 5-second life expectancy? Nah, mowing down charlies with M60 would probably be more of his thing than calling in air strike
-_- fine. But just sayin, you cannot complain if someone says that you have passed your expiration date.
 

Rowboat Girlyman

New Member
....And face 5-second life expectancy? Nah, mowing down charlies with M60 would probably be more of his thing than calling in air strike
You seem to have that backwards because the radioman is going to be back away from the shooting if he can help it while the machinegunner is going to be the guy drawing the most attention because he's just pissing hot lead constantly.
 

Jackson123

The meaning of life is the fine game of nil
You seem to have that backwards because the radioman is going to be back away from the shooting if he can help it while the machinegunner is going to be the guy drawing the most attention because he's just pissing hot lead constantly.
From what I’ve read the radioman are targeted because if you get rid of him you don’t need to worry about napalm nuking everyone anytime soon, so they got the worst deal out of it. The machinegunner while also dangerous at least you can like, have fun with the pew pew pew
 

Rowboat Girlyman

New Member
From what I’ve read the radioman are targeted because if you get rid of him you don’t need to worry about napalm nuking everyone anytime soon, so they got the worst deal out of it. The machinegunner while also dangerous at least you can like, have fun with the pew pew pew
Dude you're missing the point of what I said.
The platoon leader would intentionally try to keep the radioman away from the absolute front line because why would you want to get your only lifeline back to the rear echelon support units cut off in the first volley of fire?
Not trying to flex but I was actually in the US army so I kind of know what I'm talking about.
 

Jackson123

The meaning of life is the fine game of nil
Dude you're missing the point of what I said.
The platoon leader would intentionally try to keep the radioman away from the absolute front line because why would you want to get your only lifeline back to the rear echelon support units cut off in the first volley of fire?
Not trying to flex but I was actually in the US army so I kind of know what I'm talking about.
I’ll admit I’m just guessing stuff here, but I would assume you were not in the army when the radioman have to carry like, a big ass boxy equipment at his back? Because when thinking about Vietnam the first thing come to mind would be ambush, ambush all around and the guy carrying a huge ass box is sort of a big target, and it’s not like the medic in Pacific where they can just get rid of the red cross to avoid sniper fire, so that’s my interpretation of that talk of 5-second life expectancy in nam for radioman
 

Rowboat Girlyman

New Member
Get into a firefight in real life and tell me if you have the clarity of thought to aim for the slightly bigger green outline in a sea of green outlines that are all returning fire at once.
I'm sorry I'm really not trying to ruin the thread right off the bat by being a buzzkill but if we're going for realism we should probably do some research on our subjects.
The US Army has a book of battle drills that you can literally look up on google. Battle drill 4 is how to react to an ambush. They literally train you for that sort of thing. The reality is that even the most minimally trained US soldier is probably going to outmatch a good 70% of Vietnamese fighters if they have decent leadership holding them together.
Small unit tactics haven't changed much since Vietnam either, you definitely don't put your radio man in the advance element where he's gonna get shredded first.
 
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