Nuclear Envelope: Definition, Function & Structure - Video & Lesson Transcript | Study.com

Nuclear Envelope: Definition, Function & Structure

Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Katy Metzler

Katy teaches biology at the college level and did her Ph.D. work on infectious diseases and immunology.

The nuclear envelope is a membrane barrier found in eukaryotic cells that separates the cells' cytoplasm from their nucleus. Explore the definition, function, and structure of the nuclear envelope to understand why this separation is important. Recognize the nuclear envelope's role in gene regulation and protein transportation. Updated: 09/21/2021

What is the Nuclear Envelope?

A major hallmark of eukaryotic cells is that they store their genetic material in the nucleus, a compartment that is separate from the cytosol. The nuclear envelope is the double membrane structure that surrounds the nucleus in eukaryotic cells and provides this compartmentalization.

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  • 0:01 What Is the Nuclear Envelope?
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Structure and Functions of the Nuclear Envelope

Here is a diagram of the nuclear envelope:

A diagram of the nuclear envelope.

In most cells, the nucleus is sphere-shaped, and this diagram shows a cross-section.

We'll go through each structural component of the nuclear envelope and learn about their functions at the same time.

The nuclear envelope is made up of a double membrane structure that provides a barrier between the nuclear contents and the cytosol: the inner nuclear membrane and outer nuclear membrane. They're connected together, but their protein compositions are different. The inner nuclear membrane contains integral and peripheral membrane proteins that anchor the nuclear envelope to the lamina, which is a sturdy protein meshwork that gives the nucleus its structure and shape.

As you can see in the diagram, the outer nuclear membrane is contiguous with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which is the intracellular compartment where lipids, as well as proteins that are going to be secreted or inserted into membranes, are made. The ER and outer nuclear membrane are both studded with ribosomes, which are the enzymes that translate mRNAs into proteins. The ribosomes are there so that ER proteins can be transported through the ER membrane as they are translated.

The space between the inner and outer nuclear membranes is called the perinuclear space. As shown in the diagram, it is contiguous with the inside of the ER, so the same processes occur in the ER as in the perinuclear space.

Although the nucleus is a separate compartment from the cytosol, many molecules have to go in and out. These molecules include histones, DNA and RNA polymerases, transcription factors, and ribosomal proteins. They are transported into and out of the nucleus through the nuclear pores, which are large protein complexes that penetrate through both membranes of the nuclear envelope.

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