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09.26.2021 • SUNDAY • M 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A1

SUNDAY • 09.26.2021 • $4.00 • EARLY EDITION

OPENING ARGUMENT ST. LOUIS PROSECUTOR’S OFFICE CAN’T KEEP ATTORNEYS ON STAFF BY JANELLE O’DEA AND JOEL CURRIER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS ine months into Circuit Attorney Kimberly M. Gardner’s second term, a decimated team of prosecutors is desperately understaffed and, some say, drowning in dysfunction. Gardner now employs just over 30 attorneys with 150 years of combined tenure in the office. Five years ago, more than 60 prosecutors had worked for the circuit attorney for a cumulative 500 years. Gardner won the election by promising to revolutionize prosecution in St. Louis. Now she has half of the attorneys on staff with one-third of the collective tenure of her predecessor. She spends hundreds of thousands of dollars on outside contracts, often with law firms that defend her from political and legal embroilment. Her prosecutors have missed hearings, showed up unprepared and quit. Police are angry that Gardner isn’t taking more cases. Defense attorneys are frustrated with delays. And some victims feel forgotten. “Kim Gardner needs to realize that there are

N

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kimberly M. Gardner, right, leaves the Mel Carnahan Courthouse on Tuesday. Gardner is in her second term as the city’s top prosecutor.

Please see ATTORNEYS, Page A4

‘We’re in a challenging situation and we acknowledge we do need more attorneys, and there’s no question about it. I don’t know what the ideal number would be. I think we’re constantly working and we’re constantly hiring.’ ALLISON HAWK, SPOKESWOMAN FOR CIRCUIT ATTORNEY KIMBERLY M. GARDNER

Low wages, hard work drive out caregivers for disabled

PROSECUTOR STAFFING AT ST. LOUIS CIRCUIT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE Number of attorneys 65 60 55 50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021

SOURCE: St. Louis Circuit Attorney's oÜce

PUBLIC PAY DATABASE Find out how much police officers, teachers, elected officials and other government workers earn around the St. Louis area. The 2021 edition of our Public Pay database includes more than 200,000 employees across 100+ agencies. Search for employees by name, see the top earners at each agency, and more. stltoday.com/payrolls

Biden enrages Black leaders, activists BY SEAN SULLIVAN AND TYLER PAGER

The Washington Post

breaks my heart when someone leaves Maria. She is very emotionally attached to her staff.” Direct-support professionals care for thousands of Missourians with autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and other intellectual and developmental disabilities. Without them, disabled adults would be totally reliant on family after they age out of the school system at 21. But the mostly behind-the-scenes role has been chronically overlooked and underpaid. Direct-support workers often earn less than pizza-delivery drivers, shelf

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden’s relationship with Black leaders and activists has rapidly deteriorated, as many have condemned his treatment of Haitian migrants and grown angry with his failure to overhaul policing and enact sweeping laws protecting voting rights. Partly as a response, Biden, in his first detailed public comments on the treatment of Haitians at the border in Texas, sought Friday to take some responsibility. He said there would be consequences for Border Patrol agents who treated migrants roughly and denounced their behavior Biden as “dangerous” and “wrong.” “Of course I take responsibility, I’m president,” he said. “I promise you, those people will pay.” White House officials are scrambling to try to repair the damaged relationships with Black leaders, holding private meetings with them that they hope will smooth relations. Black voters were a cornerstone of the coalition that powered Biden to the Democratic nomination and the White House last year, and they are expected to play a crucial role in next year’s midterm elections. Outrage among Black leaders about Biden reached new

Please see CAREGIVERS, Page A8

Please see BIDEN, Page A9

LAURIE SKRIVAN PHOTOS, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Direct-support professional Shayla Glamann, right, on Monday assists Maria Fields out of her home in Florissant to go bowling. “Our job is support Maria,” Glamann said. “We want her to be as independent as possible.” BY COLLEEN SCHRAPPEN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FLORISSANT — Someone is with Maria Fields seven days a week, from 6 in the morning until 10 at night. They visit the park with her, take her to the doctor and make her favorite PBJs for lunch. Maria is 34, blind and has autism. It takes a team of special workers rotating through parents Beverly and Carl Fields’ home in Florissant to care for her. And it’s getting increasingly difficult to find team members. “We’ve seen some really good Direct-support professional Lisa Kaliski prepares morning medication people leave,” said Beverly Fields. for Maria Fields on Wednesday. Fields’ support team administers “And they wanted to stay. It medication 12 times throughout the day.

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Messenger: Is it time to talk police merger again in St. Louis? • A2

TOMORROW

90°/64° BREEZY

Sultan: What I learned about vaccines from my dog • B1 Nicklaus: Do Democrats really want a progressive tax code? •

C1

Pandemic puppy boom

From farm to your door

STL LIFE

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1 M Vol. 143, No. 269 ©2021


S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

SUNDAY • 09.26.2021 • $4.00 • FINAL EDITION

OPENING ARGUMENT ST. LOUIS PROSECUTOR’S OFFICE CAN’T KEEP ATTORNEYS ON STAFF BY JANELLE O’DEA AND JOEL CURRIER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS ine months into Circuit Attorney Kimberly M. Gardner’s second term, a decimated team of prosecutors is desperately understaffed and, some say, drowning in dysfunction. Gardner now employs just over 30 attorneys with 150 years of combined tenure in the office. Five years ago, more than 60 prosecutors had worked for the circuit attorney for a cumulative 500 years. Gardner won the election by promising to revolutionize prosecution in St. Louis. Now she has half of the attorneys on staff with one-third of the collective tenure of her predecessor. She spends hundreds of thousands of dollars on outside contracts, often with law firms that defend her from political and legal embroilment. Her prosecutors have missed hearings, showed up unprepared and quit. Police are angry that Gardner isn’t taking more cases. Defense attorneys are frustrated with delays. And some victims feel forgotten. “Kim Gardner needs to realize that there are

N

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kimberly M. Gardner, right, leaves the Mel Carnahan Courthouse on Tuesday. Gardner is in her second term as the city’s top prosecutor.

Please see ATTORNEYS, Page A4

‘We’re in a challenging situation and we acknowledge we do need more attorneys, and there’s no question about it. I don’t know what the ideal number would be. I think we’re constantly working and we’re constantly hiring.’ ALLISON HAWK, SPOKESWOMAN FOR CIRCUIT ATTORNEY KIMBERLY M. GARDNER

PROSECUTOR STAFFING AT ST. LOUIS CIRCUIT ATTORNEY'S OFFICE Number of attorneys 65 60 55 50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021

SOURCE: St. Louis Circuit Attorney's oÜce

PUBLIC PAY DATABASE Find out how much police officers, teachers, elected officials and other government workers earn around the St. Louis area. The 2021 edition of our Public Pay database includes more than 200,000 employees across 100+ agencies. Search for employees by name, see the top earners at each agency, and more. stltoday.com/payrolls

Low wages, hard work drive out caregivers for disabled Cards win again to break record SPORTS

Biden enrages Black leaders, activists BY SEAN SULLIVAN AND TYLER PAGER

The Washington Post

breaks my heart when someone leaves Maria. She is very emotionally attached to her staff.” Direct-support professionals care for thousands of Missourians with autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and other intellectual and developmental disabilities. Without them, disabled adults would be totally reliant on family after they age out of the school system at 21. But the mostly behind-the-scenes role has been chronically overlooked and underpaid. Direct-support workers often earn less than pizza-delivery drivers, shelf

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden’s relationship with Black leaders and activists has rapidly deteriorated, as many have condemned his treatment of Haitian migrants and grown angry with his failure to overhaul policing and enact sweep- Biden ing laws protecting voting rights. Partly as a response, Biden, in his first detailed public comments on the treatment of Haitians at the border in Texas, sought Friday to take some responsibility. He said there would be consequences for Border Patrol agents who treated migrants

Please see CAREGIVERS, Page A8

Please see BIDEN, Page A9

LAURIE SKRIVAN PHOTOS, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Direct-support professional Shayla Glamann, right, on Monday assists Maria Fields out of her home in Florissant to go bowling. “Our job is support Maria,” Glamann said. “We want her to be as independent as possible.” BY COLLEEN SCHRAPPEN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FLORISSANT — Someone is with Maria Fields seven days a week, from 6 in the morning until 10 at night. They visit the park with her, take her to the doctor and make her favorite PBJs for lunch. Maria is 34, blind and has autism. It takes a team of special workers rotating through parents Beverly and Carl Fields’ home in Florissant to care for her. And it’s getting increasingly difficult to find team members. “We’ve seen some really good Direct-support professional Lisa Kaliski prepares morning medication people leave,” said Beverly Fields. for Maria Fields on Wednesday. Fields’ support team administers “And they wanted to stay. It medication 12 times throughout the day.

THE LATEST

Puppy love

TODAY

85°/69° MOSTLY SUNNY

Messenger: Is it time to talk police merger again in St. Louis? • A2

TOMORROW

91°/68° NEAR-RECORD HEAT

Sultan: What I learned about vaccines from my dog • B1 Nicklaus: Do Democrats really want a progressive tax code? •

C1

Pandemic puppy boom

Shannon’s final week in the booth

STL LIFE

SPORTS

WEATHER D12 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

2 M Vol. 143, No. 269 ©2021


NEWS

A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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TONY’S TAKE

With two openings for chief, is it time to talk police merger again? TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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LOTTERY Multistate games MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 17-21-27-43-56 Mega ball: 15 Megaplier: 3 Estimated jackpot: $20 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $523 million CASH4LIFE Friday: 15-18-23-36-44 Cash ball: 2

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M 1 • SUNDAY • 09.26.2021

Tuesday morning at O’Fallon Park on the city’s north side, a rarity ensued during one of those events that takes place far too often. There was a news conference about a homicide. Multiple homicides, actually. That’s not all that rare in the city, nor in the county, lately. But this is: There were two police chiefs there, from both the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department and the St. Louis County Police Department. The two largest departments in the St. Louis region are working together to try to solve a series of homicides in the city and the county that detectives think might be related. It’s not like this never happens. Police officers in various departments share information all the time on individual cases. But to have a public showing of the city and county departments working together, at this particular time, has the potential to be meaningful. Here’s the pertinent background: • Both departments are in the process of looking for their next chiefs. • Both departments have been at an impasse in negotiations with their respective police unions. (The county broke through the impasse with at least two of its contracts this week). • Both departments have been losing officers at a rate higher than the national average, but, both individually and when combined, provide more than enough officers per capita to keep St. Louis well above national rankings for that statistic. Crime is rising in St. Louis County; and while it’s dropping in the city after a pandemic spike, there is still a lot of worry in the region about crimes downtown and in the central corridor, a recurring issue in St. Louis.

Just two years ago, former county police Chief Jon Belmar offered a proposal involving both departments that would, in theory, have helped direct more resources to the important central corridor area, where many of the region’s big employers are situated and where most tourists come to St. Louis to experience all the region has to offer. Belmar suggested the two departments merge, either through an initiative petition or through the county department contracting to take over policing of the city, after the city re-entered the county as a municipality. Belmar’s proposal came at the same time the nonprofit Better Together was pushing a statewide initiative to create a regionalized St. Louis government by combining the city and the county and dissolving most of the municipalities in the county (as well as their police departments). The Better Together proposal collapsed like a house of cards because of political upheaval, dishonesty and corruption. Belmar’s proposal never went anywhere, in part because he had his own problems of mismanagement in the county department he led. But neither proposal was wrong to suggest consolidation of police departments in the St. Louis region. There are people in all of the various political camps in the St. Louis region — progressive and conservative, Republican and Democrat, Black and white, police union and protester — who support elements of such a marriage, sometimes for different reasons. The problem with every discussion of regionalism in St. Louis is that the messenger matters. St. Charles County Executive Steve Ehlmann, for instance, often talks about making more regional decisions on economic development, crime and the airport, but some will dismiss him as just another suburban Republican. On the other side of the political spectrum, is St. Louis Mayor Tishaura O.

Jones, who opposed the Better Together effort, but said at the time she supported a city re-entry into the county. She and the Better Together folks (some of them, at least) were Democrats from different arms of the same party, and they didn’t see eye to eye. Now, Jones is mayor of St. Louis, and she has a good working relationship with St. Louis County Executive Sam Page. The two leaders each have police departments that, on their own, are less than they might be together. As each department searches for its next chief, shouldn’t regional leaders at least be wondering if one chief might be better than two, even if the 50-plus county municipalities with their own departments are, for now, left alone? There’s never a good time to touch the third rail of St. Louis politics, as any discussion of city-county merger is likely to create a lightning-strike of criticism. But one outgoing police chief standing next to an acting police chief in a city park that is a stone’s throw from the county is enough to get the regionalism juices flowing. In 2015, when nationally renowned Police Executive Research Forum looked at policing in St. Louis, it found massive dysfunction created by so many departments. “The fragmentation in the St. Louis region is extreme,” the report said. At the time, PERF executive director Chuck Wexler suggested that combining departments — while also reforming police — made sense. “There is an opportunity for people to change, to say that out of this (Ferguson) tragedy, we’re going to build something important. We’re going to create standards, reduce duplication, pay good officers better but have fewer officers, get quality control and better use-of-force policies,” Wexler said. Call me a cock-eyed optimist, but maybe he was just a few years before his time. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

Mom shares HIV status to reduce stigma BY DEANESE WILLIAMS-HARRIS

Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — When Chatrivia Kennedy was summoned to her doctor’s office for the results of a blood test at eight months pregnant with her second child, she prepared herself for the news. Less than two weeks earlier, the then 24-year-old’s partner was diagnosed with pneumocystis pneumonia, a condition that strikes those with a compromised immune system. Kennedy’s partner’s doctor contacted her at his request, she said, and told her she should get tested for HIV. She immediately did. “When I walked into the room and saw my midwife, doctor and a counselor, I already knew I had it,” she recalled. She was asked if she had any concerns after being told she was HIV positive. “So you’re telling me I can’t have any more children?” Kennedy remembered blurting out. “The doctor told me it was the first time someone asked that question after hearing they were HIV positive.” Kennedy has since had two more children and a grandson, all of whom are HIV negative thanks to adhering to prenatal preventative treatment during her last three pregnancies, she said. “All that mattered was I had to protect the baby I was carrying,” she said. “I didn’t have time to worry about myself.” Her viral load was very low when she gave birth to her last three children, so she was able to have vaginal births, she said. Transmission rates from mother to child are relatively low at 1%, if the mother takes medical precautions. The mother of four, who hid her HIV status for 14 years because of the stigma attached to it, is using her story to help raise awareness of HIV. She is an author and an advocate for those who struggle with HIV or abuse. The Chicago native said she spent more than a decade studying scriptures from her childhood to gain the courage to break her silence. Concerned with how her children might feel, she let them know her plans. “One of my daughters said if disclosing your status helps someone, we are for you telling people,” she recalled. The morning of World Aids Day 2018, Kennedy posted on Youtube she was HIV positive. Her family and her co-workers at Mount Sinai Hospital, where she worked as a certified nursing assistant, embraced her and remain her biggest support system,

BRIAN CASSELLA, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chatrivia Kennedy sits at home in Chicago’s Roseland neighborhood on July 14 with some of the books she has written, including a word search book that educates readers about HIV. Kennedy hid her HIV diagnosis for 14 years until coming out on YouTube on World Aids Day in 2018. she said. HIV stigma is still rooted in fear because of images that appeared in the early 1980s of people dying of AIDS-related illnesses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. New treatments help HIV patients reach a stage where it is undetectable and unable to infect others, and help patients live longer and healthier lives. But health officials say stigma and transmission of HIV are still issues, particularly in the Black community. HIV-infection rates in Chicago were highest among Black gay men in 2019, according to Cynthia Tucker, AIDS Foundation Chicago vice president of Prevention and Community Partnerships. Tucker said she’s seen an increase in infection rates among Black women and Black trans women in health care settings that provide HIV treatment. In response, the organization has recently geared up to address infection and transmission rates, Tucker said. The Elevate project targets Black women and trans women living with HIV/AIDS to line them up with employment and mental health services. A task force concentrates on educating providers and doctors on speaking to patients about medications such as PrEP to keep partners negative and ultimately slow down transmission rates in communities. “The goal is to identify cases, address mental needs, help them secure and keep employment and place them under health care management,” Tucker said. “Undetectable means ‘untransmittable,’” Tucker said.

Many women don’t know they, too, can take PrEP because they view it as a male product, therefore, the conversation is not had, Tucker explained. Though advertisements mention PrEP has not been studied in cisgendered persons assigned female at birth, Tucker said other studies in Africa have shown the product does work in women. A big part in lowering rates of transmission in Black women and trans women is making sure they find and stay in care. Out of 81.5% of newly diagnosed HIV cases, only 41% have stayed under a doctor’s care, Tucker said. Kennedy has been on HIV meds for about four years. Her HIV is undetectable as of July, she said, and recent lab work from the Howard Brown Health Center confirmed that. “If it wasn’t for God, I wouldn’t be here,” Kennedy said. “Sometimes our story is for someone else. If you tell your story, you can prevent someone from dying. My story is my gift, and God said your gift will make room for you.” After disclosing her status on social media, Kennedy started self-publishing books starting with “Hope in Silence,” a compilation of scriptures that helped her get through having HIV. She has written 11 books addressing the dangers of sharing your body freely with individuals who have not been honest or are unaware of their status. Her books are available on Amazon. She also posts weekly on her YouTube channel The Tea About HIV, used to educate others about the virus, and is planning to start a foundation committed to stopping HIV transmission in the Black community. Kennedy hopes her ordeal of finding out she was HIV positive in the last trimester of her pregnancy will shed light on the importance of HIV testing, she said. She said attending her first HIV/AIDS conference in September 2019, in Washington, cemented one of God’s promises stated in Proverbs 18:16: “A man’s gift maketh room for him, and bringeth him before great men.” “I was in the same room with powerful women who did not let HIV overcome them and were helping others,” said Kennedy, who recently turned 40. “It’s only the beginning for me. I will make a change in my community. My life is so good now. I sometimes forget I am HIV positive.”

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Country singer David Frizzell is 80. Actor Kent McCord (“Adam 12”) is 79. “The Weakest Link” host Anne Robinson is 77. Singer Bryan Ferry is 76. Actor Mary Beth Hurt is Milian 75. Singer-actor Olivia Newton-John is 73. Actor James Keane (“Bulworth,” TV’s “The Paper Chase”) is 69. Singer-guitarist Cesar Rosas of Los Lobos is 67. Country singer

Carlene Carter is 66. Actor Linda Hamilton is 65. Singer Cindy Herron of En Vogue is 60. Actor Melissa Sue Anderson (“Little House on the Prairie”) is 59. Singer Tracey Thorn of NewtonEverything but the Girl is John 59. TV personality Jillian Barberie is 55. Guitarist Jody Davis of Newsboys is 54. Actor Jim Caviezel (“The Passion of the Christ”)

is 53. Actor Tricia O’Kelley (“The New Adventures of Old Christine”) is 53. Actor Ben Shenkman (“Royal Pains,” “Angels in America”) is 53. Singer Shawn Stockman of Boyz II Men is 49. Music producer Dr. Luke is 48. Jazz trumpeter Nicholas Payton is 48. Singer and TV personality Christina Milian is 40. Actor Zoe Perry (“Young Sheldon”) is 38. Singer-songwriter Ant Clemons is 30. — Associated Press


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A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Stay up to date with local and national coronavirus coverage • Resource center: Find information on vaccinations and testing in your area. stltoday.com/resources • Email: Sign up to receive daily pandemic roundups. stltoday.com/newsletters • Updates: Read the latest news about COVID-19 in your community. stltoday.com/coronavirus

TONY’S TAKE

With two openings for chief, is it time to talk police merger again? TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CUSTOMER SERVICE 314-340-8888 Customer service hours 6:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Monday-Friday 7–11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday 7–10 a.m. on holidays service@stltoday.com SUBSCRIBE STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201 PLACE DEATH NOTICES STLtoday.com or 800-365-0820 ext. 8600 PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING STLtoday.com or 314-621-6666 FAX AD INFORMATION: 314-340-8664 BUY REPRINTS: STLtoday.mycapture.com

CONTACT US For news tips only, phone: 314-340-8222 Submit news tips: metro@post-dispatch.com Submit calendar events: events.stltoday.com Main number: 314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon 314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand 314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig 314-340-8142 Sports: Roger Hensley 314-340-8301

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M 2 • SUNDAY • 09.26.2021

Tuesday morning at O’Fallon Park on the city’s north side, a rarity ensued during one of those events that takes place far too often. There was a news conference about a homicide. Multiple homicides, actually. That’s not all that rare in the city, nor in the county, lately. But this is: There were two police chiefs there, from both the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department and the St. Louis County Police Department. The two largest departments in the St. Louis region are working together to try to solve a series of homicides in the city and the county that detectives think might be related. It’s not like this never happens. Police officers in various departments share information all the time on individual cases. But to have a public showing of the city and county departments working together, at this particular time, has the potential to be meaningful. Here’s the pertinent background: • Both departments are in the process of looking for their next chiefs. • Both departments have been at an impasse in negotiations with their respective police unions. (The county broke through the impasse with at least two of its contracts this week). • Both departments have been losing officers at a rate higher than the national average, but, both individually and when combined, provide more than enough officers per capita to keep St. Louis well above national rankings for that statistic. Crime is rising in St. Louis County; and while it’s dropping in the city after a pandemic spike, there is still a lot of worry in the region about crimes downtown and in the central corridor, a recurring issue in St. Louis.

Just two years ago, former county police Chief Jon Belmar offered a proposal involving both departments that would, in theory, have helped direct more resources to the important central corridor area, where many of the region’s big employers are situated and where most tourists come to St. Louis to experience all the region has to offer. Belmar suggested the two departments merge, either through an initiative petition or through the county department contracting to take over policing of the city, after the city re-entered the county as a municipality. Belmar’s proposal came at the same time the nonprofit Better Together was pushing a statewide initiative to create a regionalized St. Louis government by combining the city and the county and dissolving most of the municipalities in the county (as well as their police departments). The Better Together proposal collapsed like a house of cards because of political upheaval, dishonesty and corruption. Belmar’s proposal never went anywhere, in part because he had his own problems of mismanagement in the county department he led. But neither proposal was wrong to suggest consolidation of police departments in the St. Louis region. There are people in all of the various political camps in the St. Louis region — progressive and conservative, Republican and Democrat, Black and white, police union and protester — who support elements of such a marriage, sometimes for different reasons. The problem with every discussion of regionalism in St. Louis is that the messenger matters. St. Charles County Executive Steve Ehlmann, for instance, often talks about making more regional decisions on economic development, crime and the airport, but some will dismiss him as just another suburban Republican. On the other side of the political spectrum, is St. Louis Mayor Tishaura O.

Jones, who opposed the Better Together effort, but said at the time she supported a city re-entry into the county. She and the Better Together folks (some of them, at least) were Democrats from different arms of the same party, and they didn’t see eye to eye. Now, Jones is mayor of St. Louis, and she has a good working relationship with St. Louis County Executive Sam Page. The two leaders each have police departments that, on their own, are less than they might be together. As each department searches for its next chief, shouldn’t regional leaders at least be wondering if one chief might be better than two, even if the 50-plus county municipalities with their own departments are, for now, left alone? There’s never a good time to touch the third rail of St. Louis politics, as any discussion of city-county merger is likely to create a lightning-strike of criticism. But one outgoing police chief standing next to an acting police chief in a city park that is a stone’s throw from the county is enough to get the regionalism juices flowing. In 2015, when nationally renowned Police Executive Research Forum looked at policing in St. Louis, it found massive dysfunction created by so many departments. “The fragmentation in the St. Louis region is extreme,” the report said. At the time, PERF executive director Chuck Wexler suggested that combining departments — while also reforming police — made sense. “There is an opportunity for people to change, to say that out of this (Ferguson) tragedy, we’re going to build something important. We’re going to create standards, reduce duplication, pay good officers better but have fewer officers, get quality control and better use-of-force policies,” Wexler said. Call me a cock-eyed optimist, but maybe he was just a few years before his time. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

Outdoor futsal court opens in south St. Louis BY ROBERT PATRICK

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — A new sports court opened Saturday in south St. Louis dedicated to futsal, a worldwide sport not yet well known here. The court was pushed by area community leaders, backed by the new St. Louis Major League Soccer team, and is the first completed community project the team has promised to fund, build or help with. “This is the exact example of what we want to continue to do to be an exceptional club and neighbor,” Khalia Collier, St. Louis City SC’s vice president of community relations, said to the crowd at the opening ceremony on Saturday. Futsal, created in Uruguay about 90 years ago, is a fastpaced, small-court version of soccer. Many soccer players play it to improve dribbling, ball skills and reflexes. The new court here, in the Dutchtown neighborhood’s Marquette Park, is the first outdoor futsal court in south St. Louis, if not the whole city, organizers said on Saturday. The idea for a dedicated outdoor futsal court started more than two years ago, when Fred

HILLARY LEVIN, HLEVIN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Members of the Umoja Soccer Club put on a demonstration at the new futsal court, which was dedicated Saturday in Marquette Park in the Dutchtown neighborhood of St. Louis. St. Louis City SC teamed up with local organizations to bring the court to the park. Maboneza, founder of the Umoja soccer club, soccer enthusiast Daniel Flynn and the Allies of Marquette Park met to discuss the idea, said Nate Lindsey, president of Dutchtown Main Streets, a nonprofit community development organization that helped the project. The city parks department and other groups played roles. St. Louis City SC helped fund the court.

Maboneza said his team, which is mainly composed of immigrants from central and eastern Africa, had been playing soccer in the park since 2016. They had to go to a church in Ballwin in 2014 to play futsal on a converted basketball court. The team played a demonstration game Saturday before Maboneza sent them off to train for a soccer game Sunday. The court was designed by

artist and muralist Jayvn Solomon. Solomon consulted with local residents before coming up with the design, which incorporates the SC team slogan and colors with a local landmark, Cleveland High School. “I want this to represent Dutchtown fully,” he said. Boosters of both the neighborhood and the park hope it will be the first of more improvements. Collier said St. Louis City SC is “looking for phenomenal projects with great leadership that already exists.” The team wants to support and amplify the projects, then bring its community coaches, philosophy and curriculum. Collier said the team sees a soccer gap between St. Louis communities: “acres” of soccer fields in parts of St. Louis County and an almost complete lack elsewhere. “You go into the city and you wouldn’t even know the sport exists sometimes,” she said. With the Marquette Park court now complete, Collier said the team would remain involved. A new St. Louis City SC program will send community coaches all over the region to help with soccer skills training.

Post-Dispatch earns awards at Missouri Press contest FROM STAFF REPORTS

ST. LOUIS — The St. Louis PostDispatch has won first-place awards in 14 categories, including breaking news coverage, government coverage, news photography and editorial writing, in the annual Better Newspaper Contest, sponsored by the Missouri Press Foundation. The newspaper, which competed against the state’s other large dailies, swept two entire categories — best editorials and best news photos — winning first, second and third place, as well as honorable mention. The awards were presented Saturday at a ceremony during the annual Missouri Press Association convention, held this year in Excelsior Springs. First place was awarded in these categories: Breaking News: Annika Mer-

rilees, for coverage of the death of a St. Charles County poll worker; News: Erin Heffernan and Joel Currier, for “One mile in St. Louis,” a look at gun violence along a stretch of North Grand Boulevard; Government coverage: Jacob Barker, for a report on the Howard Bend Levee District; Education: Blythe Bernhard and Laurie Skrivan, for a report on children and parents coping with virtual learning; Health: Michele Munz, for coverage of persistent sewer and drainage trouble in Centreville; Religion: Erin Heffernan, for her report on how one priest celebrated Easter Sunday Mass during the pandemic; History: Jane Henderson, for her examination of controversies surrounding King Louis IX and other historical figures; Editorial: For the editorial “If disaster is what you’re looking for, Trump

and Parson have a plan”; and Columnist (Humorous): Kevin McDermott, for multiple entries. The Post-Dispatch also won first place in these visual categories: News photograph: David Carson, for “Protesters march St. Louis streets in solidarity with Minneapolis”; Feature photograph: Laurie Skrivan, for “St. Louis city police officer saved by ECMO treatment”; Photo package: Robert Cohen, Gary Hairlson and Brent Fisher, for “Deadly gun violence on one mile of a St. Louis street”; Photo illustration: Christian Gooden, for “Time for tempura”; and Video: Colter Peterson, for “Maplewood woman’s community food table a source of healing.” Additionally, the Post-Dispatch won 12 second-place awards, six third-place awards and 10 honorable mentions.

Carlene Carter is 66. Actor Linda Hamilton is 65. Singer Cindy Herron of En Vogue is 60. Actor Melissa Sue Anderson (“Little House on the Prairie”) is 59. Singer Tracey Thorn of NewtonEverything but the Girl is John 59. TV personality Jillian Barberie is 55. Guitarist Jody Davis of Newsboys is 54. Actor Jim Caviezel (“The Passion of the Christ”)

is 53. Actor Tricia O’Kelley (“The New Adventures of Old Christine”) is 53. Actor Ben Shenkman (“Royal Pains,” “Angels in America”) is 53. Singer Shawn Stockman of Boyz II Men is 49. Music producer Dr. Luke is 48. Jazz trumpeter Nicholas Payton is 48. Singer and TV personality Christina Milian is 40. Actor Zoe Perry (“Young Sheldon”) is 38. Singer-songwriter Ant Clemons is 30.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Country singer David Frizzell is 80. Actor Kent McCord (“Adam 12”) is 79. “The Weakest Link” host Anne Robinson is 77. Singer Bryan Ferry is 76. Actor Mary Beth Hurt is Milian 75. Singer-actor Olivia Newton-John is 73. Actor James Keane (“Bulworth,” TV’s “The Paper Chase”) is 69. Singer-guitarist Cesar Rosas of Los Lobos is 67. Country singer

— Associated Press


09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

Many faith leaders won’t OK vaccine exemptions BY PETER SMITH

Associated Press

As significant numbers of Americans seek religious exemptions from COVID-19 vaccine mandates, many faith leaders are saying: not with our endorsement. Leaders of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America said Thursday that while some people may have medical reasons for not receiving the vaccine, “there is no exemption in the Orthodox Church for Her faithful from any vaccination for religious reasons.” The Holy Eparchial Synod of the nationwide archdiocese, representing the largest share of Eastern Orthodox people in the United States, urged members to “pay heed to competent medical authorities, and to avoid the false narratives utterly unfounded in science.” “No clergy are to issue such religious exemption letters,” Greek Orthodox Archbishop Elpidophoros said, and any such letter “is not valid.” Similarly, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America issued a recent statement encouraging vaccine use and saying that “there is no evident basis for religious exemption” in its own or the wider Lutheran tradition. The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York laid out its own stance during the summer, saying that any priest issuing an exemption letter would be “acting in contradiction” to statements from Pope Francis that receiving the vaccine is morally acceptable and responsible. Both the Vatican and the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops have said Catholics can receive the vaccines in good conscience given the lack of alternatives and the goal of alleviating suffering — even while objecting to research with even a remote connection to abortion. A number of dioceses

have adopted policies similar to New York’s, and bishops in El Paso, Texas, and Lexington, Kentucky, have mandated vaccines for employees. But other Catholic jurisdictions are more accommodating of exemptions. The Colorado Catholic Conference, the policy arm of the state’s bishops, has posted online a template for a letter that priests can sign saying an individual parishioner may draw on Catholic values to object to the vaccines. South Dakota’s bishops have also taken that stance. At issue for many Catholics and other abortion opponents is that the most widely used COVID-19 vaccines were tested on fetal cell lines developed over decades in laboratories, though the vaccines themselves do not contain any such material. The issue is becoming more heated as public- and private-sector employers increasingly impose mandates. A clerical letter wouldn’t necessarily be needed for someone to be granted an exemption — federal law requires employers make reasonable accommodations for “sincerely held” religious beliefs — though a clergy endorsement could help bolster a person’s claim. The Rev. Robert Jeffress of First Baptist Dallas, a Southern Baptist megachurch, said he and his staff “are neither offering nor encouraging members to seek religious exemptions from the vaccine mandates.” “There is no credible religious argument against the vaccines,” he said via email. “Christians who are troubled by the use of a fetal cell line for the testing of the vaccines would also have to abstain from the use of Tylenol, Pepto Bismol, Ibuprofen, and other products that used the same cell line if they are sincere in their objection.”

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ST. CLAIR COUNTY — Police have man in custody: Illinois State Police on Saturday updated details on a crash and homicide that took place early Friday morning. Police said Saturday that the series of events began with a shooting that killed one person around 12:35 a.m. in the 5500 block of Avon Place in Washington Park. Washington Park police officers then tried to stop a vehicle matching a description of the car used by the shooter, and the car refused to stop, according to Illinois State Police. About 2 miles from the homicide scene, someone inside the fleeing car fired gunshots at the officer in pursuit near the intersection of 25th Street and Argonne Drive in East St. Louis. The officer returned fire. The officer was not injured. State police said investigators did not know if any of the occupants of the other car were struck. Police continued to follow the vehicle into St. Louis but eventually ended the chase. At about 2 a.m., St. Louis police responded to a crash at Fourth Street and Convention Plaza downtown involving the car that fled police and took a man into

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LAW AND ORDER MADISON COUNTY — Troy woman killed in Interstate 70 crash: A woman from Troy, Illinois, was killed in a crash Saturday on Interstate 70 that closed the westbound roadway for four hours, police said. The Illinois State Police said the two-vehicle crash occurred at 7:09 a.m. about 1 mile east of the I-55/270 interchange. The driver of a 2015 Mack truck with a dump trailer who was traveling east entered a “center turn around” and crossed the westbound lanes to attempt to dump his load in a construction zone, police said. A 2009 Volkswagen Jetta then struck the tractor-trailer. Riley Schreck, 20, was pronounced dead on the scene. The 56-year-old driver of the truck was taken to the hospital with non-lifethreatening injuries, police said.

LOCAL

custody. State police ask anyone with information about the incident to contact Zone 6 at 618-381-1467 or CrimeStoppers at 866-371-8477. Police did not release the name of the homicide victim or any further information Saturday.

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ST. LOUIS — Police seeking leads on linked murders: St. Louis police on Saturday again pleaded with the community for tips in three connected homicides within the past two weeks. Police asked the community to call detectives with any information they may have in the deaths, no matter how seemingly insignificant. The three deaths, a teen girl from Jennings, a woman from Spanish Lake and a man from St. Louis, were each three days apart, Sept. 13-18, police said. The department said that people should be on the lookout for unusual behavior in friends and family including unexpected intensive cleaning of a vehicle, possibly at an unusual time of day, unexplained injuries or a car unexpectedly disposed of or taken to a repair shop. St. Louis police on Saturday said they would be “using technology and forensic tools which may allow us to develop new investigative leads of interest.” Anyone with information on the cases can call the city’s homicide division at 314-444-5371. Those who wish to remain anonymous and are interested in a reward can contact CrimeStoppers at 866-371-8477. JEFFERSON COUNTY — Police capture emu: Police in De Soto on Saturday captured an emu that had been running loose in the city for at least several hours. About noon , the department said on Facebook that they were “currently trying to wrangle an Emu that’s loose in the city,” and asked for information about the emu’s owner. A little under two hours later, they reported that the emu had been successfully captured.

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A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 09.26.2021

Attorneys

GARDNER UNDERSPENDS ON SALARIES, OVERSPENDS ON CONTRACTS

From A1

These graphs show the difference between actual and budgeted spending each year by the circuit attorney, in millions of dollars.

Kimberly M. Gardner

Jennifer Joyce

Kimberly M. Gardner

Jennifer Joyce

grieving families behind her deci+ $0.4 GENERAL SALARIES CO N T R AC T WO R K sions,” said Shirley WashingtonCobb, whose son Dwight Wash+ $0.2 ington was beaten to death near the Enterprise Center in February 2020. Gardner’s office promised BUDGET not to take a plea deal, Washington-Cobb said. Then it did. − $0.2 2020 budget: $370,600 Prosecutors across the nation report that it is exceptionally dif2020 actual: $767,571 ficult to find good hires and keep − $0.4 Difference: +$396,971 them. It’s even harder, they say, for a circuit attorney who is trying − $0.6 to remake her office. But they do not describe the kinds of problems seen here. − $0.8 2020 budget: $7 million In 2016, the year before Gard2020 actual: $6 million ner took office, assistant circuit − $1.0 Difference: −$1 million attorneys averaged almost eight years employed there. Now: It’s less than four. At the same time — − $1.2 even as homicides remain a police ’10 ’11 ’12 ’13 ’14 ’15 ’16 ’17 ’18 ’19 ’20 ’10 ’11 ’12 ’13 ’14 ’15 ’16 ’17 ’18 ’19 ’20 priority, and gunfire has major Josh Renaud | Post-Dispatch companies rethinking their place SOURCE: City of St. Louis Budget Division | NOTE: Joyce served as St. Louis circuit attorney from 2000-2016; Gardner took office in 2017. in downtown St. Louis — the ofCRIMINAL CASES fice has struggled to clear cases DROPPED BY ST. LOUIS and secure guilty pleas. CIRCUIT ATTORNEY Gardner declined to be interviewed for this story. SpokesAnnual percentage woman Allison Hawk said the 40% office is handling its caseload and Jennifer Kimberly M. hustling to recruit experienced Joyce Gardner prosecutors. Still, she conceded difficulties. 30 “We’re in a challenging situation and we acknowledge we do need more attorneys, and there’s 20 no question about it,” said Hawk, a former corporate communications executive for the St. Louis Rams football team, on retainer 10 with Gardner’s office. “I don’t know what the ideal number would be. I think we’re constantly 0 2008 2011 2014 2017 working and we’re constantly hiring.” SOURCE: St. Louis Circuit Court; NOTES: Data for 2021 through August. Jennifer Joyce served as circuit Hawk said one of the chalattorney from 2000-2016; Kimberly M. Gardner took oÜce in 2017. lenges with rebuilding the staff is attracting applicants willing to work long hours for low pay. She department because they do not noted that the starting salary for understand what exactly her office stands for or what her office a first-time prosecutor is $50,000 is doing.” — an increase of $10,000 per year Jay Schroeder, president of the more than Gardner’s predecessor offered. St. Louis Police Officers Associa“This is not excuses,” Hawk tion said the Circuit Attorney office’s turnover and inexperience, said. “It is what it is.” among other issues, has hurt the But it’s about to get a lot harder. As pandemic restrictions ease, working relationship between cases hung up for the past year prosecutors and police. in the court system will start to “In the last five years, since that move through the docket. office has turned over, there is no “We know that the onslaught is relationship there between the coming,” Hawk said. “So we are policemen and the prosecutors,” working actively to identify adhe said. “It almost seems more ditional attorneys to handle those COURTESY PHOTO adversarial — the prosecutor to the policeman — than it really cases.” Dwight Washington poses with his daughter Eveylyn in a photo provided by Washington’s mother. ever has been.” Turnover the number of attorneys in her tice, a progressive agenda attracts Gardner is spending salary Gardner, the city’s first Black office ever dipping below 50. people who want to see change. money on public relations, coun- ‘Trials can’t go’ circuit attorney, took office in She wouldn’t comment pub- But he, too, struggles to keep tal- seling in diversion programs and Gardner’s office claims a felJanuary 2017 on a pledge to re- licly on Gardner, but said, for her, ent. Big law firms circle his office for a liaison with city police, to- ony conviction rate of more than build trust in the criminal justice being short-staffed meant being like vultures, he said. taling more than $20,000 per 90%, but has declined to explain system. She pledged to focus on down one or two attorneys. “I Another progressive prosecu- month. its calculation. Circuit court violent crime and reorganize what would lose sleep being down one tor, Rachael Rollins of Suffolk The Post-Dispatch obtained data, however, presents a difshe called a “top-heavy” office. attorney,” Joyce said. “It would be County, Massachusetts, said some of the consultant contracts ferent picture: In 2019, the year The exodus began almost im- a big deal.” The office maintained there is always turnover in district by settling a 2019 lawsuit the before the pandemic hamstrung mediately. More than 30 of 60 a list of people to call when there attorney offices after an election newspaper filed against Gard- courts, the court system cleared prosecutors left in 2017, the year were openings, she said. — particularly so when there is an ner’s office for alleged violations fewer than 2,000 cases, suspects Gardner took office, according Hawk said Gardner was elected upset. of the Sunshine Law after the Cir- pleaded guilty in 1,100 and Gardto the payroll records. About 20 to create a “smarter, fairer apAnd heavy turnover can have cuit Attorney’s Office refused to ner dropped 600 cases. to a major im- release them. In comparison, in 2016, Joyce’s more left the following year. An- proach pact on public other 20 or so quit in 2019, and public safety,” “In the last five years, The contracts show that paid final year, almost 3,000 cases end mass in- since that office has about 15 more left in 2020. safety. consultants include Hawk, Gard- were cleared, with 2,300 guilty Patrick Hamacher started as c a rc e ra t i o n , “You have ner’s part-time spokeswoman, pleas and just 400 cases dropped. an assistant circuit attorney in and make the turned over, there is an even big- who earns $7,500 a month, and St. Louis University law proger backlog of Maurice Foxworth, a Gardner fessor and defense lawyer Susan 2011, ran for the office in the 2016 criminal jus- no relationship there cases, fewer political campaign worker and McGraugh said Gardner’s manDemocratic primary, and stayed tice system in on after the election, he said, be- St. Louis more between the policemen people to try business consultant since 2017 agement of the office’s criminal them,” Bunn who makes $5,000 a month for docket has stopped cases from cause he agreed with Gardner’s equitable. She and the prosecutors. said. “With “organizational re-structuring, moving forward. progressive platform. But he left claims more It almost seems more high turnover, budget development” and other in January 2018. He said Gardner than a dozen “There is no way to work you’ve got services. Gardner is rarely seen around the fact that they’re not lacked leadership ability, man- accomplish- adversarial — the young attor- in public without Foxworth at doing the work on their end,” agement skills and had “no co- ments toward prosecutor to the neys and not her side. that goal, insaid McGraugh, who previously herent vision” for the office. a whole lot of “That was pretty obvious early cluding reduc- policeman — than it Also, for nearly two years, re- supported Gardner. “It makes experience. So tired Missouri Highway Patrol everything stop. We’ve seen that on and it was obvious because ing jail popu- really ever has been.” there was a lack of communica- lations, trimyou’ve got sort Capt. Ron Johnson has earned trials can’t go, pleas can’t go and tion coming from her and her ex- ming prison — Jay Schroeder, president of the of a brain drain $5,000 monthly as Gardner’s li- preliminary hearings can’t go besentences for St. Louis Police Officers Association when it comes aison with the St. Louis Metro- cause of the inability of the circuit ecutive staff,” he said. to knowledge politan Police Department. When attorney to properly manage their Some former assistant pros- n o n v i o l e n t ecutors told the Post-Dispatch offenders, expanding diversion and experience in the courtroom.” Gardner hired him, she said his caseload.” they believed in Gardner’s reform programs, offering regular victim Tom Hogan, a former district services were needed to combat McGraugh said the loss of exagenda, but the workload became counseling and limiting the arrest attorney in Pennsylvania and fed- “divisive rhetoric” in the commu- perienced prosecutors puts deunsustainable as lawyers quit and and detention of people accused eral prosecutor, is now studying nity and show “that we continue fendants, judges and the public few with experience filled the of less serious crimes. prosecutors in the 100 largest U.S. to work with law enforcement at a disadvantage. “When you lose all your senior void. One said there was a “huge At the same time, her office has cities as part of his work toward daily.” people, all you have is young atamount of distrust” between requested fewer attorney posi- a master’s degree in criminology Gardner and her staff. tions from the city each year. She at the University of Pennsylvania. ‘A learning curve’ torneys coming in,” McGraugh Many left for higher-paying also hasn’t filled the positions “Your average prosecutor’s ofJohnson said relations be- said. “They can’t train themjobs at civil law firms, to pursue she has: She is authorized to have fice,” he said, “even when fully tween the two public safety of- selves, right? They should not private criminal defense or to five attorney managers this year, staffed, is just barely keeping up fices are improving. Gardner be trying serious cases. And they join the public defender’s office. according to city budget docu- with the caseload.” and St. Louis police Chief John don’t know how to administer a Several went to St. Louis County ments, but has two. She could hire Hayden didn’t meet before. large prosecuting attorney’s ofProsecuting Attorney Wesley 12 more experienced lawyers, but Contract it out Now they do, up to two times a fice.” Bell’s office and other prosecu- as of this summer, had only filled Gardner is now spending vastly month, Johnson said. This summer, three murder tors’ offices in the region; a few one spot. less on lawyers: Total attorney U.S. law enforcement is in a cases were dismissed within became judges. Others retired. She has, however, found entry- payroll has dropped 39% to $2.6 schism between traditional and one week, in part because of abOnly one top staffer, Chief level attorneys: Her office is bud- million from $4.3 million in 2010. progressive prosecuting ap- sent or unprepared prosecutors. Warrant Officer Christopher geted for 14 “attorney I” positions But she spends far more than she proaches, Johnson said. Gardner’s office had assigned Hinckley, has lasted since the — the least experienced — but had is budgeted on contracts with “It’s been a learning curve one assistant prosecutor about for both sides,” Johnson said. 30 cases, including some of the start of Gardner’s first term. An- 25, as of July. outside firms. nette Llewellyn served as GardIn 2018, her office budget was “There’s been that divide, based city’s highest-profile felony ner’s chief trial assistant and left A national trend $20,000 for legal services. Gard- on change.” cases, after she started maternity Johnson believes relations be- leave. That assistant prosecutor to join the circuit bench in 2018. Nelson Bunn Jr., executive di- ner spent $137,000. In 2020, the Robert Steele, former first assis- rector of the National District budget was again $20,000; she tween the managers of the two then resigned. tant, left in 2019 to take the same Attorneys Association, said many spent $290,000. The Clayton law offices are better, but said there Washington-Cobb said she was position in Bell’s office, where lawyers fresh from law school firm Capes Sokol has collected is work to do to get a feeling of deeply disappointed Gardner’s he’s making $25,000 more. Tra- with hefty student loan debt are more than $275,000 over the past cooperation to trickle down to office made a plea agreement in vis Partney left for an executive routinely lured from prosecutors year in defense of her office, over the police officers. July with the man who killed her position in the Jefferson County offices to firms that pay better. public document, office spending The presidents of both St. Louis son. “I think my son was mean“This is not a ‘last 18 months’ and employment discrimination police officer organizations said ingless to her,” she said. prosecutor’s office. Rachel Smith left to start her own firm, and did problem,” Bunn said. “This has cases, among others. And it paid many rank-and-file officers are An assistant prosecutor promsome work as an assistant pros- been going on pre-pandemic the St. Louis law firm Brown & frustrated with Gardner’s office ised Washington-Cobb the office ecutor for Christian County near with already high caseloads for James about $150,000 to defend over what they say are unreason- wouldn’t cut such a deal, she said. Springfield, Missouri. both prosecutors and defense at- against a lawsuit that blocked able expectations for evidence reBut, before that case could be Gardner’s executive staff is torneys and a lack of resources at spending on legal bills over the quired to file charges. resolved, that assistant prosecuinvestigation into former Gov. down to Hinckley and First Assis- the state and local level.” “The circuit attorney in the tor quit for another job. past, when I was taking cases, Janelle O’Dea • 314-340-8349 tant Serena Wilson-Griffin, a forLarry Krasner, district at- Eric Greitens. mer labor lawyer with no previous torney in Philadelphia, called it So far this year, she has won would say, ‘You’re missing this, @jayohday on Twitter prosecutorial experience. There is the “Great Resignation.” He was approval to transfer at least next time make sure you get that,’ jodea@post-dispatch.com no longer a chief trial assistant or elected in 2018 on a progressive $500,000 from her salary bud- giving officers a roadmap,” said Joel Currier • 314-340-8123 chief of staff. platform, and said though law get to cover legal and professional Sgt. Donnell Walters, president @joelcurrier on Twitter Former St. Louis Circuit Attor- school graduates can make three services, according to records of the Ethical Society of Police. jcurrier@post-dispatch.com “A lot of officers have left the ney Jennifer Joyce doesn’t recall times the amount in private prac- from the Comptroller’s office.


CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

Biden tasks OSHA with vaccine mandate BY PAUL WISEMAN

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn’t make many headlines. Charged with keeping America’s workplaces safe, it usually busies itself with tasks such as setting and enforcing standards for goggles, hardhats and ladders. But President Joe Biden this month threw the tiny Labor Department agency into the raging national debate over federal COVID-19 vaccine mandates. The president directed OSHA to write a rule requiring employers with at least 100 workers to force employees to get vaccinated or produce weekly test results showing they are virus free. The assignment is sure to

test an understaffed agency that has struggled to defend its authority in court. And the legal challenges to Biden’s vaccine mandate will be unrelenting: Republican governors and others call it an egregious example of government overreach. South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster vowed to fight the mandate “to the gates of hell.” “There are going to be some long days and nights for the folks who are drafting this rule,” says labor lawyer Aaron Gelb, a partner in the Chicago office of Conn Maciel Carey. “It’s an interesting time to be an OSHA lawyer, for sure.” When Congress created OSHA 50 years ago to police workplace safety, 38 workers were dying on the job every day. Now that figure is

closer to 15 — even though the American workforce is has more than doubled in the interim. OSHA writes rules designed to protect workers from dangers such as toxic chemicals, rickety scaffolding and cave-ins at construction sites. “The hazard in this case is the infectious worker,” says epidemiologist David Michaels, OSHA director in the Obama administration. “This rule will tell employers: You have to take steps to make sure potentially infectious workers don’t come into the workplace.” OSHA will use its power under a 1970 law to issue an expedited rule —called an “emergency temporary standard” or ETS — and bypass its own cumbersome rulemaking process, which typically takes nearly

315

eight years from beginning to end, according to a 2012 study by the Government Accountability Office. To fast-track the rule, OSHA must show that it is acting to protect workers from a “grave danger.” The mandate the White House announced this month will cover 80 million employees — nearly twothirds of the private sector workforce. Employers that don’t comply could face penalties of up to $13,600 per violation. Businesses are anxious to see how OSHA handles questions like: Which vaccines and tests are acceptable and which aren’t? How should employers handle requests from employees who seek exemptions on medical or religious grounds? Who’s going to pay for the testing? Some employers won’t be happy if they have to foot the bill for employees who refuse free vaccinations. Once it’s out, the rule would take effect in 29 states where OSHA has jurisdiction, according to a primer by the law firm Fisher Phillips. Other states such as California and North Carolina that have their own federally approved workplace safety agencies would have up to 30 days to adopt equivalent measures. The OSHA rule would last six months, after which it must be replaced by a permanent measure. “There are going to be legal challenges brought to whatever rule,” attorney Gelb said. “OSHA is going to really devote time and effort to drafting a rule that will survive those legal challenges.” He predicts the rule won’t be published in the Federal Register until November. The agency is already often stretched thin. Even including what OSHA calls its “partners” at state workplace safety agencies, there are only 1,850 inspectors to oversee 130 million workers at 8 million workplaces. “It is not helpful to have a criti-

MATT ROURKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A syringe is prepared with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine recently at a clinic at the Reading Area Community College in Reading, Pa. President Joe Biden has directed OSHA to write a rule requiring employers with at least 100 workers to force employees to get vaccinated or produce weekly test results showing they are virus free. cal agency like this understaffed, particularly because of moments like this,” says Celine McNicholas, director of government affairs at the left-leaning Economic Policy Institute. Until June, when it issued a COVID-related ETS covering the health care industry, OSHA hadn’t implemented an emergency rule since 1983. Overall, it has issued 10. But courts have overturned four and partially blocked a fifth, according to the Congressional Research Service. Michaels, now a professor of public health at George Washington University, says the “grave danger” is obvious in a country battling a pandemic that has killed more than 650,000 Americans. “OSHA’s plan very clearly fits those requirements,” he says. “And I’m not worried about a court saying it doesn’t.” Many employers may welcome the mandate. They wanted to require vaccines but feared alienating their workers who resist being coerced into getting inoculated. “Most employers in my view should greet this with relief,” says McNicho-

las, former special counsel at the National Labor Relations Board. “This gives them a roadmap of exactly what they need to do.” Then again, at a time when companies are posting job openings faster than applicants can fill them, some big employers fear losing vaccine-resistant employees to smaller businesses that aren’t covered by the mandate. Former OSHA chief Michaels calls Biden’s mandate “a very good first step. But we need more.” He wants to see the rules expanded to smaller employers. More than 175 million Americans are fully vaccinated. But 80 million of those eligible for inoculation haven’t yet received their first shot, the White House says. The Biden administration is also requiring vaccinations for federal workers and contractors and for 17 million healthcare workers. Those initiatives, plus the vaccination or testing mandate for big employers, should add 12 million to the ranks of the vaccinated by March 2022, Goldman Sachs estimates.

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NATION

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

Supreme Court justices: We aren’t politicians BY MARK SHERMAN AND JESSICA GRESKO

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Three Supreme Court justices delivered the same plea in rapid succession in recent days: Don’t view justices as politicians. The justices have reason to be concerned. Recent polls show a sharp drop in approval of a court now dominated by conservatives. The call by justices Clarence Thomas, Stephen Breyer and Amy Coney Barrett for the public not to see court decisions as just an extension of partisan politics isn’t new. But the timing of the recent comments is significant, just after a summer in which conservative majorities on the court prevailed over liberal dissents

on abortion, immigration and evictions, and at the start of a blockbuster term. The future of abortion rights and expansions of gun and religious rights already are on the docket. Other contentious cases could be added. The outcome in each could fracture the court along ideological lines, with the court’s six conservative justices chosen by Republican presidents prevailing over its three liberals nominated by Democrats. To some observers, the Supreme Court is facing the most serious threat to its legitimacy since its decision in Bush v. Gore two decades ago that split liberals and conservatives and effectively settled the disputed 2000 presidential election in favor of Republican George W. Bush.

“I think we may have come to a turning point. If within a span of a few terms we see sweeping right-side decisions over left-side dissents on every one of the most politically divisive issues of our time — voting, guns, abortion, religion, affirmative action — perception of the court may be permanently altered,” said Irv Gornstein, executive director of Georgetown University’s Supreme Court Institute. Paul Smith, who has argued before the court in support of LGBTQ and voting rights among other issues, said people are increasingly upset that the ”court is way to the right of the American people on a lot of issues.” But views of the court have dipped before, then rebounded, from a public

315

TIMOTHY D. EASLEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett speaks to an audience at the 30th anniversary of the University of Louisville McConnell Center on Sept. 12 in Louisville, Ky. that doesn’t pay too much attention to the court’s work and has trouble identifying most of the justices. Tom Goldstein, the founder of the court-focused SCOTUSblog website who argues frequently before the justices, doubts this time will be different. He says the court “has built up an enormous font of public respect, no matter what it does.” Still, Thomas, Breyer and Barrett took aim at the perception of the court as political in recent speeches and interviews. Breyer, the court’s eldest member at 83 and leader of its diminished liberal wing, has spoken for years about the danger of viewing the court as “junior league politicians.” But he acknowledged it can be difficult to counter the perception that judges are acting politically, particularly after cases like the one from Texas in which the court by a 5-4 vote refused to block enforcement of the state’s ban on abortions early in pregnancy. The majority was made up of three justices appointed by President Donald Trump and two other conservatives, with the three liberals and Chief Justice John Roberts in dissent. “It’s pretty hard to be-

lieve when a case like those come along that we’re less divided than you might think,” Breyer said in an interview earlier this month with The Washington Post. Barrett echoed Breyer’s comments soon after. “My goal today is to convince you that this court is not comprised of a bunch of partisan hacks,” the Trump nominee said in a talk in Louisville, Kentucky, at a center named for Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, who was sitting on the stage near the justice. McConnell engineered Barrett’s swift confirmation just days before last year’s presidential election and little more than a month after the liberal icon, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, died. Barrett’s confirmation was arguably the most political of any member of the court. She was confirmed on a 5248 vote, the first in modern times with no support from the minority party. McConnell’s push to confirm Barrett in the final days before the election stood in contrast to his decision to hold open the seat held by Justice Antonin Scalia when Scalia died months before the election in 2016 and President Barack Obama, a Democrat, sought to name

a replacement. In an appearance a few days after Barrett’s, Thomas said the justices themselves were to blame for shifting perceptions of the court by taking on roles that properly belong to elected officials. “The court was thought to be the least dangerous branch and we may have become the most dangerous,” he said at the University of Notre Dame, where Barrett taught law for many years. Three new polls, all conducted after the court’s Texas abortion vote, have shown sharp drops in approval of the court. Just 40% of Americans approve of the court, according to the latest Gallup poll. That’s among the lowest it’s been since Gallup started asking that question more than 20 years ago. Approval was 49% in July. The change in the composition of the court and the controversies over Trump’s three nominees have prompted calls from liberal interest groups to expand the court and institute term limits for the justices, who have lifetime tenure under the Constitution. At the moment, those changes seem unlikely to succeed. But one group, Demand Justice, said this past week that it is planning to spend more than $100,000 on advertising in the coming weeks to promote the idea of court expansion. And a court reform commission established by President Joe Biden is supposed to issue a report by November. Some court-watchers think the efforts of the liberal groups, rather than the court’s actions, are responsible for changing views of the justices. “I do think there’s a sustained campaign to delegitimize the court that has gotten some traction on the left,” said Roman Martinez, a Washington lawyer who regularly argues before the court.

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CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

Biden faces limits of broad pandemic aid BY JOSH BOAK AND ZEKE MILLER

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden entered the White House promising to stop the twin health and economic crises caused by COVID-19, but $1.9 trillion and countless initiatives later he’s confronting the limits of what Washington can achieve when some state and local governments are unwilling or unable to step up. Six months after Congress passed the massive rescue plan, administration records show that more than $550 billion has yet to be disbursed. The sum could help provide a key economic backstop as the coronavirus’ delta variant continues to pose a threat. But in some cases, it’s also led to frustration as aid for renters, testing and vaccines goes unused despite mass outreach campaigns. Republican critics say the unspent money shows that Biden’s relief package was too big and inflationary; the administration says the unspent funds reflect

the extent of planning in case the recovery from the pandemic hits more snags with virus mutations and unexpected economic disruptions. By law, about $105 billion of the state and local aid and more than half of the expanded child tax credits cannot be paid out yet. “There are some things designed to address immediate hardship and others that are designed to allow for a multi-year policy response — they’re not really bugs, they’re features,” said Gene Sperling, who is overseeing the rescue plan for Biden. “The fact that a solid portion of these funds can be used over a few year period is a good-news story for ensuring a durable recovery.” But some of the backlog stems from bottlenecks — or outright blockages — at the state or local level, beyond the influence of Washington. The extent of the challenge was apparent when Biden recently announced new vaccine requirements for federal workers and employers with 100

or more workers and emphasized the need for testing and keeping schools open. “We’re facing a lot of pushback, especially from some of the Republican governors,” Biden said Thursday. “The governors of Florida and Texas — they’re doing everything they can to undermine the lifesaving requirements that I’ve proposed.” The Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have stood up “Operation Expanded Testing” to work with schools, homeless shelters and care facilities to provide screening testing at no cost to most organizations, and CDC has offered its technical expertise — but that doesn’t mean states will take them up on it. Iowa and Idaho, for instance, have rejected tens of millions of dollars in federal assistance to boost virus testing in schools. In Texas and a handful of other GOP-controlled states, officials have moved to block schools from

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on the economy through vaccinations, robust testing and economic relief money — but didn’t move quickly enough to use them. The Biden administration can point to clear successes with its relief package. Economic growth has jumped sharply this year, with monthly job gains averaging 636,000 and demand outpacing the supply of autos, furniture, appliances and other goods. The president and his aides point to forecasts suggesting that U.S. economic growth could be the strongest in four decades. Yet the delta variant has slowed economic activity as hiring slipped in August to just 235,000 added jobs. The slowdown overlapped with the lapse of expanded unemployment benefits, causing 8.9 million people to lose weekly benefit payments and another 2.1 million to lose a $300-a-week supplemental unemployment payment. The delta variant has spread as funds to combat COVID-19 go untapped.

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CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

ANOTHER MURAL GOING UP IN BELLEVILLE

DANIEL SHULAR, DSHULAR@POST-DISPATCH.COM

IN-PERSON PRIDE EVENT RETURNS TO TOWER GROVE Drag queen Bella Rose dances though the crowd Saturday at the Stupp Amphitheater during a show at the 2021 Tower Grove Pride celebration at Tower Grove Park in St. Louis. This year’s event was the first in-person Tower Grove Pride since 2019 as the 2020 event was called off due to the pandemic, replaced by a procession of vehicles called the Care-AVan.

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Simiya Sudduth, of St. Louis, works on her portion of a painting as part of the Belleville Mural Project on Saturday on the side of Tapestry of Community Offerings, 825 W. Main St. The Belleville Mural Project is a collaborative effort between the city’s residents, artists and downtown business owners to put more public art into the downtown district.

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(after potential federal tax credit)

Estimate Lease Payment

$379

4

/month for 36 month lease. $3,579 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license options, and dealer fees. No security deposit required. For highly qualified customers through Volkswagen Credit.

EPA Estimate Range for ID.4 Pro

Estimated Charging Time (at a public DC faster charger)

260 miles

62 miles in about 10 minutes

5

6

2

Starting MSRP of $39,995 for a 2021 Volkswagen ID.4 Pro with single-speed automatic transmission. Prices exclude transportation, taxes, title, other options and dealer charges. Dealer sets actual price. 3The potential tax credit shown is for informational purposes only. This information does not constitute tax or legal advice. Any available credits apply only on the original purchase of a qualifying vehicle and are not available in a lease transaction. All persons considering use of available tax credits should consult a tax advisor to determine eligibility based on their specific tax situation. Tax credits are subject to various limitations not within Volkswagen control and are subject to change without notice. 4 Closed end lease financing available for a new, unused 2021 ID.4 Pro, on approved credit to highly qualified customers by Volkswagen Credit through participating dealers. Monthly lease payment based on MSRP of $39,995 and destination charges less a $7,500 Lease Incentive and suggested dealer contribution resulting in a capitalized cost of $31,182.80. Excludes tax, title, license, options, and dealer fees. Amount due at signing includes first month’s payment, customer down payment of $2,501, and acquisition fee of $699. Monthly payments total $13,644. Your payment will vary based on final negotiated price. At lease end, lessee responsible for disposition fee of $395, $0.20/mile over 30,000 miles and excessive wear and use. Offer not valid in Puerto Rico. See your Volkswagen dealer for details or, for general product information, call 1-800-Drive-VW. Offer is subject to change or terminate without notice. 52021 ID.4 Pro EPA estimated total range is 260 miles. Actual mileage and range will vary and depend on several factors including driving and charging habits, accessory use, temperature and topography, battery age, load, and vehicle condition. Battery capacity decreases with time and use. See owner’s manual for details. 6ID.4 Pro equipped with fast charging capability maximum rate of 125kW. Based on charging at a 125kW or higher charger. Charging times and range will vary and depend on a variety of factors including ambient temperature, charger type, battery age, condition and initial state of charge, vehicle condition, driving and charging habits, accessory use, topography, load and others. Frequent and consecutive fast charging can permanently decrease battery capacity. The trim shown has a higher MSRP than the advertised price. See dealer for details.

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NATION

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Thunberg joins large German climate rally BY KARIN LAUB AND FRANK JORDANS

Associated Press

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BERLIN — Tens of thousands of environmental activists staged a rally outside Germany’s parliament Friday, two days before the country holds a national election, to demand that politicians take stronger action to curb climate change. The protest outside the Reichstag in Berlin was part of a string of rallies around the world, from Japan, India and Nigeria to Greece, Italy and Britain — amid dire warnings that the planet faces dangerous temperature rises unless greenhouse gas emissions are cut sharply in coming years. Across Germany alone, hundreds of thousands of marchers joined similar protests in several cities and towns. The idea for a global “climate strike” was inspired by teenage Swedish activist Greta Thunberg’s solo protest in Stockholm three years ago. It snowballed into a mass movement until the coronavirus pandemic put a stop to large gatherings. Activists only recently started staging smaller protests again. Thunberg, 18, addressed the Berlin rally from a stage, telling the crowd that voting is important but must be coupled with protests that put politicians under constant pressure. “We can still turn this around,” she said, to cheers. “We demand change, and we are the change.” Thunberg and prominent German climate activist Luisa Neubauer accused politicians of falling short, saying the programs of the main parties weren’t far-reaching enough to limit global warming to 2.7 Fahrenheit — the more ambitious limit in the 2015 Paris climate accord. Neubauer has referred to Sunday’s election as the “vote of the century,” arguing that the decisions taken by the next government will influence the country’s

efforts to tackle climate change for decades to come. The issue has been a major topic during the election campaign. Across the street from the protest, two young climate activists pressed on with a hunger strike meant to draw politicians into making public commitments on climate policy. Henning Jeschke, 21, started his fast on Aug. 30, initially as part of a group of seven, with the others having since dropped out, most this week. In their place, another hunger striker joined Jeschke. Both said they would escalate and begin refusing liquids. Organizers initially said Jeschke and Lea Bonasera would stop taking liquids Thursday evening, but Jeschke’s father, Eckart, said the more severe protest is to begin Saturday morning. The hunger strikers are demanding that Olaf Scholz of the Social Democrats, seen as a front-runner for becoming Germany’s next chancellor, acknowledges publicly that the country faces a climate emergency. A German government official said pressure from young climate activists already resulted in concrete policies in recent years, from higher carbon prices to billions of euros (dollars) being invested in greener technologies. “We also have a new mood across society, where politicians don’t have to explain why they’re doing something to protect the climate anymore. They have to explain why they’re not protecting the climate,” German Environment Ministry spokesman Nikolai Fichtner said. In Prague, the Czech Republic’s capital, hundreds of students and environment activists shouted “Now or never,” and displayed banners with slogans and statements such as “Climate justice,” and “We want a healthy planet for our children.”

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LOCAL

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Missouri Republicans move to cut funds for Planned Parenthood APPLY NOW! TRIO EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY CENTERS PROVIDE FREE RESOURCES √ Financial Aid Resources √ Tutoring √ Career Exploration √ College Access √ Student Debt Management √ Goal Setting

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JEFFERSON CITY — Missouri lawmakers who want to halt all public funds to Planned Parenthood are recommending that the Legislature give Republican Gov. Mike Parson’s administration authority to cancel abortion providers’ Medicaid contracts based on behavior in other states deemed illegal or unethical. The Senate Interim Committee on Medicaid Accountability and Taxpayer Protection approved a report with that recommendation on Thursday. Planned Parenthood in St. Louis is Missouri’s only abortion provider. Abortion providers are already prohibited from using Medicaid funds for abortion except when the mother’s life is in danger or in the cases of rape or incest. Some lawmakers want to pull all pub-

lic funds, including those for birth control, sexually transmitted disease treatments, cancer screenings and other health care for low-income women. Democrats warned that the move would trigger a confrontation with the federal government that could threaten the overall Medicaid program. Senate leaders created the interim committee to “deliver the knockout punch” to Planned Parenthood, The Kansas City Star reported. The committee’s report says the Legislature should change state law to allow the Department of Social Services to cut contracts with any provider when it or its affiliates have “committed fraud, abuse, or unethical behavior and has been removed or prohibited from being a Medicaid provider in another state’s Medicaid program” based on behavior that would be grounds for suspension or cancellation in Missouri. Texas has already blocked Planned Parenthood from receiving Medicaid funds for non-abortion services.

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

“Still Here” reads a banner hanging on the front of the Planned Parenthood building Monday on Forest Park Avenue in St. Louis.

Dispose of your unwanted household chemicals and paint with the St. Louis Household Hazardous Waste Program Two locations—by reservation only To schedule a reservation, visit www.hhwstl.com or call (314) 615-8989.


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

LAURIE SKRIVAN PHOTOS, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Direct-support professional Lisa Kaliski gets Maria Fields ready for the day on Tuesday at Fields’ home in Florissant. “I want Maria to live her best life. Over time the three of us have built trust and rapport. Beverly (Maria’s mom) and I like to joke around that I am like Maria’s second mom and, due to our age differences, Diana and Shayla are her sisters,” said Kaliski, who is part of team of direct-support professionals that provide care and companionship for the 34-year-old Fields. eryone is fighting for the same dollar.” But there have been signs of progress. The Division of Developmental Disabilities, part of the Missouri Department of Mental Health, is awaiting federal approval for a spending proposal that covers a $12.39-an-hour reimbursement rate. This year, the American Rescue Plan provided short-term funding for home- and communitybased services. The Better Care Better Jobs act, introduced in June, would bolster Medicaid and provide incentives for states to build their direct-care workforce. Missouri’s budget includes $56 million to increase rates paid to service providers.

Caregivers From A1

stockers and cashiers. And as other industries increase wages in response to widespread employee shortages, disabilityservice organizations — shackled by reimbursement rates set by the state — are losing even more ground in the competition for job-seekers. Low pay and high demands fuel a worker churn that leave nonprofits and families in a constant cycle of hiring, training and forming new relationships. Maria is minimally verbal and needs help with daily tasks most people take for granted: using the bathroom, getting dressed, eating a snack. A 2-inch binder is packed with her medical information, schedules and behavior interventions. Maria’s team keeps track of her crowded calendar of appointments with doctors and therapists. They coax her into carrying her laundry to the washing machine, clap for her when she plinks out some notes on a musical keyboard, and prompt her to wave to the neighbors when they’re out on a walk. “We all try to make her be as independent as she possibly can,” said Lisa Kaliski, who has been paired with Maria, through the nonprofit Easterseals Midwest, for six years. Easterseals, based in Maryland Heights, provides in-home and sharedliving support to more than 650 clients throughout eight counties in Missouri and Illinois. The organization is 300 people shy of a full staff of 1,700, even with a new $1,500 signing bonus and hourly pay that just increased to $15. For clients who need 24-hour support, placement in a house can take six months, more than twice as long as in years past. Julie Weidman’s 20-year-old daughter, Anna, has autism and cerebral palsy. Weidman, of west St. Louis County, opted years ago to find her own support workers for Anna. But it has become progressively harder for Weidman to find workers, much less keep them. Many times, she hasn’t even gotten past the interview. “They shut us down once we talk hourly rates,” she said. When Weidman’s husband died suddenly last year, she knew it was time for a shared-living arrangement for her daughter. She worried she wouldn’t be able to help Anna out of the house on her own if there was an emergency. Even getting her out of bed and ready for school was becoming a herculean task. “There have been some

Not disposable

Beverly Fields wishes her daughter Maria a great day before she leaves for work on Wednesday at her home in Florissant. “The support professionals allow me to be Maria’s mom,” Fields said. “I know how blessed we are to have them.”

“We’re stuck in this quicksand. Everyone is fighting for the same dollar.” — Erika Leonard, the executive director of the Missouri Association of Rehabilitation Facilities

Direct-support professional Diana Thuo rewards Maria Fields with a high-five during an online speech therapy session on Wednesday. mornings where it’s been so difficult just getting her up, I nearly break down in tears and think, ‘I don’t know how to deal with this anymore,’” said Weidman. In April, the state approved Anna’s eligibility. This month, Weidman finally found an Easterseals placement, at a house 5 minutes away. “This will allow me to be Anna’s mom and not Anna’s caregiver,” she said.

The right applicant Kaliski started as a direct-support professional three decades ago, when she was living in Chicago. Over the years, she has left and come back to the profession a few times. The work fulfills her, but it can be difficult to justify the paycheck. Her husband’s job allows her to get by. Many direct-support workers find themselves in tougher financial straits. Average pay in Missouri in 2019 was $11.67 an hour. More than half of them receive some form of government assistance. One in four falls below the poverty line. “It’s hard to make ends meet,” said Michele Roedder, a support manager at St. Louis Arc, a nonprofit

based in Creve Coeur. Arc is a mid-sized organization, managing 35 homes for 110 residents. Over 200 people work in residential settings, and the agency is looking to hire three dozen more. Roedder has been with Arc for 20 years, working her way up after starting as a direct-support worker. She manages a five-resident home in Hazelwood. Filling openings on her team is a challenge. A man she hired over the summer almost immediately quit after landing a job at a shoe store — for the same pay but with far fewer responsibilities, Roedder said. She needs more applicants, but also wants the right kind of applicants. “Here, we’re talking about personalities, not just pushing papers,” Roedder said. “You have to be gentle, kind and openminded. You really affect people’s lives.” Arc raised its starting pay to $14 an hour in July, a $2 bump. But it feels like a never-ending game of catch-up. Last month, average hourly pay in U.S. restaurants and supermarkets topped $15. Best Buy, Costco and several other

large companies start their them,” said Sherry Grodworkers out at that rate. ner, the human resources director at Arc. “They beA growing need come numb to the fact that Disability advocates and someone they don’t know agencies have been sound- is helping them use the ing the alarm for years. In bathroom.” 2017, the President’s ComIn Missouri, more than mittee for People with In- 23,000 people receive ditellectual Disabilities re- rect services, a jump of ported on three decades 40% since 2011. In that of obstacles in finding, same period, the number keeping and educating of direct-support prostaff, calling the problem fessionals has increased “untenable” and blaming modestly, to an estimated low wages, poor benefits, workforce of 30,000, aclimited training and lack of cording to the state Dicareer-advancement pos- vision of Developmental sibilities. Disabilities. The situation further “The need is never going deteriorated under the to go away,” said Grodner. strain of the pandemic. People with intellecSome workers, worried tual and developmental about being exposed to disabilities live decades the virus, quit and never longer than they did in returned. Before vaccines previous generations. An were available, agencies aging U.S. population, couldn’t safely float em- in general, means home ployees between houses health aides and nursing when they were short- home assistants — which draw from the same pool handed. Burnout flared. During the early days of as support workers — are COVID, Roedder was log- also in high demand. ging up to 70 hours a week, Agencies have little wigdoing both her supervisory gle room when it comes duties and pinch-hitting to what they pay. Reimwith on-the-ground assis- bursement rates are set tance. She tried her best to by the state; two-thirds keep her team happy, sur- of that is covered by a fedprising them with small eral match. treats, like packs of gum “Every year, we are and handwritten thank- working with elected ofyou notes. ficials on why this is critiAcross agencies, turn- cal,” said Erika Leonard, over soared beyond 50%. the executive director of Many new hires never the Missouri Association crossed the three-month of Rehabilitation Facilities, mark. For managers, that’s a lobbyist organization a costly, time-consuming based in Jefferson City. headache; for residents, Because of term limits, the repercussions are even Leonard has to regularly more distressing. reintroduce the issue to a “The folks we support new crop of legislators. always have to meet some“We’re stuck in this one new who can care for quicksand,” she said. “Ev-

Competitive wages are crucial, but only part of the solution. Direct-support workers, like the people they care for, have historically been relegated to the margins. Many people without a disabled family member have no idea what a direct-support professional does. The occupation does not have its own category within the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The career path is seldom promoted in high schools. “At some point, we have to value the people doing this work and not view them as disposable,” said Wendy Sullivan, the CEO of Easterseals Midwest. Stakeholders have been working on possible solutions. Many are embracing technology as a way to monitor residents remotely. The Department of Disabilities is piloting a small apprenticeship program this fall. At the tiny support nonprofit L’Arche St. Louis, recruitment efforts center on college graduates seeking a gap-year job before returning to school or beginning their careers. The agency has had good luck filling the 30 or so positions for its three homes, but the approach comes with a downside: May and August mean shifts in schedules and a disruption in the flow of the houses. Last month, two support workers quit at Joyful House, a home in Maplewood with a big front porch, a backyard full of garden plots and four residents who love to bake. The departure was marked with pizza and homemade chocolate chip cookies. Mary Ellen Wojciechowski, 52, has seen plenty of direct-service professionals come and go since she moved in about four years ago. “It’s kind of sad,” she said. “Because you have to say goodbye.” Colleen Schrappen • 314-340-8072 @cschrappen on Twitter cschrappen@post-dispatch.com


09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

NATION

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

DEMETRIUS FREEMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST

Civil rights attorney Ben Crump and members of George Floyd’s family speak to the press after meeting with President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris at the White House on May 25.

Biden From A1

highs this week, creating fissures with potentially far-reaching implications. Biden’s deportations of Black Haitians seeking asylum at the Southern border while images and videos of white Border Patrol agents grabbing and shouting at them went viral drew sharp rebukes from normally supportive Black allies. The official collapse of policing negotiations on Capitol Hill this week also all but extinguished dim hopes of ushering in new laws the year after George Floyd was murdered by a Minneapolis police officer. And lingering uncertainty over the fate of a long-shot push to expand voting rights has created growing anxiety about future elections. “He said on election night: Black America, you had my back, I’ll have yours,” civil rights activist Al Sharpton said in a Thursday phone interview. “Well, we’re being stabbed in the back, Mr. President. We need you to stop the stabbing — from Haiti to Harlem.” Sharpton — who visited the border area on Thursday and said he is in touch with administration officials — said Biden faces a “defining moment,” in which he could “rise to the occasion” or let down “those that helped you get there.” Like many Black leaders, he is calling on Biden to stop deporting Haitian migrants under a public health order and urge the Senate to work around the filibuster to pass a voting law. Biden has won plaudits from Black leaders for historic investments to combat poverty in African American communities through a sweeping pandemic relief bill, and he has been praised for staffing a diverse government and putting barrier-breaking officials in top positions. White House officials emphasized executive actions the Biden administration has taken, such as the Justice Department limiting the use of “chokeholds” by agents and stepping up scrutiny of GOP voting laws. “We have done a number of things specifically geared at the African American community,” said Cedric L. Richmond, director of the White House Office of Public Engagement. Richmond pinned blame on Congress for legislative inaction on policing reform, and said that he will continue to listen to concerns from activists. “They have their role — their role is to push and push us hard as they can. And our role is to govern,” he added. But the Biden administration has given no indication it is preparing to stop invoking the health order, known as Title 42, to expel many migrants arriving at the border during the pan-

demic. The Trump administration used the provision, prompting many Democrats to complain that Biden is following in his predecessor’s footsteps. And Biden has stopped short of publicly endorsing a change to Senate rules that would allow Democrats to pass voting rights legislation without meeting the 60-vote threshold for most legislation. A group of Democratic senators recently introduced a pared-down voting rights, campaign finance and government ethics bill, but it remains far from certain it will garner the support needed to win passage. Sensing the growing animosity, White House officials including Richmond hosted members of the Congressional Black Caucus for a meeting on Wednesday and spoke with more than a dozen civil rights leaders and immigrant activists on Thursday. Disagreements were aired in Thursday’s discussion, according to a White House official, and the conversation was frank. While it did not prompt a deportation policy change, the official said, it enabled the White House to detail its efforts on the border, which include setting up climatecontrolled medical tents for migrants and distributing food and water. NAACP President Derrick Johnson — who had excoriated the Biden administration over its handling of the situation on the border earlier in the week and demanded a meeting — called Thursday’s conversation “productive in general,” but he declined to elaborate. While the meetings won Biden some goodwill from Black leaders, the White House continues to face demands that it relax its immigration policy. The issue of race has surfaced in the current debate in a way that it had not during previous crises at the border, because the majority of Haitians are Black. Black leaders have condemned the behavior of border agents in photos and videos that went viral this week that showed some, on horseback, grabbing and yelling and Black migrants. Many said it reminded them of images from darker days in the country’s history. “The only time I’ve seen that, historically, is under Jim Crow and when Black slaves were running away and the slave master was chasing them,” said New York state Assemblywoman Michaelle Solages, the first person of Haitian descent to be elected into her state’s legislature. Solages, a Democrat, also called on Biden loosen his immigration policy. The White House has criticized the rough behavior of border agents and the Department of Homeland Security has opened an investigation into the matter. The administration has also

FELIX MARQUEZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Customs and Border Protection mounted officers attempt to contain migrants as they cross the Rio Grande from Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, into Del Rio, Texas, on Sept. 19. The Border Patrol’s treatment of Haitian migrants, they say, is just the latest in a long history of discriminatory U.S. policies and of indignities faced by Black people, sparking new anger among Haitian Americans, Black immigrant advocates and civil rights leaders. directed U.S. border officials to suspend horse patrols in the migrant camp in Del Rio, Texas. Until Friday, Biden had said little publicly about the matter, leaving it to administration officials to be the public face of the government’s response. White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Biden believes the images “are horrific.” But she and other officials have defended the continued use of Title 42 to deport many migrants, noting that the provision applies to people arriving at the border from other countries, not just Haiti. On Tuesday, the White House was preparing to nearly double the number of Haitians being deported to the Caribbean nation from Texas. “Our policy process has continued to be the same with Haiti as it is for anybody coming through an irregular — through irregular migration across our border,” Psaki said on Thursday. White House officials have also emphasized that they extended temporary protected status eligibility to Haitians lacking legal status who arrived in the United States before July 29. All of this has done little to quell the anger that many Black leaders feel. For starters, they say, Biden ought to speak out himself, which Biden did on Friday. “I think it’s incumbent upon him to step forward and say something and to be as vocal now as he was when he was running,” said Shelia Huggins, a Democratic National Committee member from North Carolina. Biden denounced the behavior of border agents. “To see people treated like they did — horses nearly running them over and people being strapped. It’s outrageous,” he said. “It’s dangerous, it’s wrong.” As a candidate, Biden promised sweeping action

to address racial inequities and vowed to chart a new course on immigration, turning the page on President Donald Trump’s restrictionist policies. While he has delivered on those promises in some respects, Black leaders see a lot that was left unmet. “There are too many issues where you can point to and say, ‘You’re just not delivering,’” said Huggins. She credited Biden for tackling the pandemic, but added: “My expectations are so much higher. The expectations from Black voters across the country — we have just expected a whole lot more.” Many Black leaders have been disappointed by the lack of movement to spur police officers to treat people of color better, in the wake of a national reckoning over police violence and racism. Talks between congressional Republicans and Democrats fell apart this week. Biden vowed to continue trying to find a way to make progress and blamed Republicans for their resistance. Beyond policy prescriptions, Biden, as a candidate, sought a clear rhetorical contrast with Trump on issues of race. He forcefully denounced Trump for having “fanned the flames of white supremacy.” He traveled to Houston ahead of Floyd’s funeral to meet with his family in his hometown. He selected a Black and Asian woman to serve as his running mate. Biden’s deep connections to Black leaders, combined with an ambitious plan to root out systemic inequities, helped him win both the Democratic primary and the general election with overwhelming support from Black voters, a fact he made clear on the night he won the presidency. “Especially those moments when this campaign was at its lowest ebb — the

African American community stood up again for me,” he said in Wilmington, Delaware. “You’ve always had my back, and I’ll have yours.” As Biden prepared to assume the presidency, he identified racial justice, along with the pandemic, the economy and climate change, as one of the “four historic crises” the country was facing. He promised once again to make the issue a priority of his administration. Rep. Mondaire Jones, DN.Y., said the Biden administration has “done miserably” in addressing racial justice. While Jones lauded the White House’s efforts on tackling the pandemic and its disproportionate impacts on communities of color, he said Biden has failed to take aggressive action to address key issues including voting rights, policing reform and immigration. “I don’t care how many Black people you have in the Cabinet or on your staff,” he said. “If you are not doing what is required to advance legislation and executive action that will put us on a path toward racial justice, you are not doing what you said you would do when you ran for president.” Jones, who was elected in 2020, said this week was the angriest he has seen his colleagues in the Congressional Black Caucus because of the treatment of Haitian migrants at the border who are fleeing political violence and a devastating earthquake. Cliff Albright, the cofounder and executive director of the Black Voters Matter Fund, echoed Jones’s concerns, saying many Black leaders and voters have been infuriated with Biden’s administration this week because the treatment of migrants at the border falls directly under his purview.

“This is one that falls squarely within the executive branch,” he said. “This is his Border Patrol. It’s not Trump’s Border Patrol. It’s not (Senate Minority Leader Mitch) McConnell’s Border Patrol.” Some Black leaders voiced support for Biden, saying he inherited dire situations from Trump that he is still trying to dig the country out of eight months into his presidency. “I’ve never seen the president disengage or the vice president disengage on issues of crisis dealing with the Black community,” said Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, DTexas, who participated in a meeting with White House officials on Wednesday about the situation in Del Rio. The frustrations that spilled out into the open this week have been building for months, according to Albright. The lack of action to address what Biden deemed a racial justice crisis, Albright said, will have an impact on Democrats’ political fortunes. In the midterms, Democrats are defending narrow congressional majorities that run through states like Georgia, North Carolina and Pennsylvania, where Black voter turnout will be key. First midterms have historically been bad for the party of the president, and Democrats can ill afford to have many Black voters — who tend to vote strongly Democratic — sit out the election. “This could be a dealbreaker for a lot of minorities — not just Haitians,” said Florida state Sen. Shevrin “Shev” Jones, a Democrat, speaking of Biden’s handling of the border situation. He recalled a conversation with a “strong Democrat” who suggested Black people “will start questioning where we stand.” Democrats are already contending with other head winds, such as Biden’s declining approval rating and his struggles with independent voters. Biden has also had to deal with surprise controversies, such as the resignation of the special envoy for Haiti, who quit Thursday in protest of the administration’s deportation policy. Many Democrats have pointed out the danger associated with returning Haitians to a country that has descended into turmoil. For Black leaders, such considerations should not be divorced from Biden’s vows to foster more equity in the United States. “This administration elevated the pursuit of racial equity as a commitment and a moral imperative,” said Nana Gyamfi, the executive director of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration, speaking at a Wednesday news conference. “However, that racial equity has not extended itself to the area of immigration.”


09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 2

NATION

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

DEMETRIUS FREEMAN, THE WASHINGTON POST

Civil rights attorney Ben Crump and members of George Floyd’s family speak to the press after meeting with President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris at the White House on May 25.

Biden From A1

roughly and denounced their behavior as “dangerous” and “wrong.” “Of course I take responsibility, I’m president,” he said. “I promise you, those people will pay.” White House officials are scrambling to try to repair the damaged relationships with Black leaders, holding private meetings with them that they hope will smooth relations. Black voters were a cornerstone of the coalition that powered Biden to the Democratic nomination and the White House last year, and they are expected to play a crucial role in next year’s midterm elections. Outrage among Black leaders about Biden reached new highs this week, creating fissures with potentially farreaching implications. Biden’s deportations of Black Haitians seeking asylum at the Southern border while images and videos of white Border Patrol agents grabbing and shouting at them went viral drew sharp rebukes from normally supportive Black allies. The official collapse of policing negotiations on Capitol Hill this week also all but extinguished dim hopes of ushering in new laws the year after George Floyd was murdered by a Minneapolis police officer. And lingering uncertainty over the fate of a longshot push to expand voting rights has created growing anxiety about future elections. “He said on election night: Black America, you had my back, I’ll have yours,” civil rights activist Al Sharpton said in a Thursday phone interview. “Well, we’re being stabbed in the back, Mr. President. We need you to stop the stabbing — from Haiti to Harlem.” Sharpton — who visited the border area on Thursday and said he is in touch with administration officials — said Biden faces a “defining moment,” in which he could “rise to the occasion” or let down “those that helped you get there.” Like many Black leaders, he is calling on Biden to stop deporting Haitian migrants under a public health order and urge the Senate to work around the filibuster to pass a voting law. Biden has won plaudits from Black leaders for historic investments to combat poverty in African American communities through a sweeping pandemic relief bill, and he has been praised for staffing a diverse government and putting barrierbreaking officials in top positions. White House officials emphasized executive actions the Biden administration has taken, such as the Justice Department limiting the use of “chokeholds” by agents and stepping up scrutiny of GOP voting laws. “We have done a number of things specifically geared at the African American community,” said Cedric L.

Richmond, director of the White House Office of Public Engagement. Richmond pinned blame on Congress for legislative inaction on policing reform, and said that he will continue to listen to concerns from activists. “They have their role — their role is to push and push us hard as they can. And our role is to govern,” he added. But the Biden administration has given no indication it is preparing to stop invoking the health order, known as Title 42, to expel many migrants arriving at the border during the pandemic. The Trump administration used the provision, prompting many Democrats to complain that Biden is following in his predecessor’s footsteps. And Biden has stopped short of publicly endorsing a change to Senate rules that would allow Democrats to pass voting rights legislation without meeting the 60-vote threshold for most legislation. A group of Democratic senators recently introduced a pared-down voting rights, campaign finance and government ethics bill, but it remains far from certain it will garner the support needed to win passage. Sensing the growing animosity, White House officials including Richmond hosted members of the Congressional Black Caucus for a meeting on Wednesday and spoke with more than a dozen civil rights leaders and immigrant activists on Thursday. Disagreements were aired in Thursday’s discussion, according to a White House official, and the conversation was frank. While it did not prompt a deportation policy change, the official said, it enabled the White House to detail its efforts on the border, which include setting up climate-controlled medical tents for migrants and distributing food and water. NAACP President Derrick Johnson — who had excoriated the Biden administration over its handling of the situation on the border earlier in the week and demanded a meeting — called Thursday’s conversation “productive in general,” but he declined to elaborate. While the meetings won Biden some goodwill from Black leaders, the White House continues to face demands that it relax its immigration policy. The issue of race has surfaced in the current debate in a way that it had not during previous crises at the border, because the majority of Haitians are Black. Black leaders have condemned the behavior of border agents in photos and videos that went viral this week that showed some, on horseback, grabbing and yelling and Black migrants. Many said it reminded them of images from darker days in the country’s history. “The only time I’ve seen that, historically, is under Jim Crow and when Black slaves were running away and the slave master was chasing

FELIX MARQUEZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Customs and Border Protection mounted officers attempt to contain migrants as they cross the Rio Grande from Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, into Del Rio, Texas, on Sept. 19. The Border Patrol’s treatment of Haitian migrants, they say, is just the latest in a long history of discriminatory U.S. policies and of indignities faced by Black people, sparking new anger among Haitian Americans, Black immigrant advocates and civil rights leaders. them,” said New York state Assemblywoman Michaelle Solages, the first person of Haitian descent to be elected into her state’s legislature. Solages, a Democrat, also called on Biden loosen his immigration policy. The White House has criticized the rough behavior of border agents and the Department of Homeland Security has opened an investigation into the matter. The administration has also directed U.S. border officials to suspend horse patrols in the migrant camp in Del Rio, Texas. Until Friday, Biden had said little publicly about the matter, leaving it to administration officials to be the public face of the government’s response. White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Biden believes the images “are horrific.” But she and other officials have defended the continued use of Title 42 to deport many migrants, noting that the provision applies to people arriving at the border from other countries, not just Haiti. On Tuesday, the White House was preparing to nearly double the number of Haitians being deported to the Caribbean nation from Texas. “Our policy process has continued to be the same with Haiti as it is for anybody coming through an irregular — through irregular migration across our border,” Psaki said on Thursday. White House officials have also emphasized that they extended temporary protected status eligibility to Haitians lacking legal status who arrived in the United States before July 29. All of this has done little to quell the anger that many Black leaders feel. For starters, they say, Biden ought to speak out himself, which Biden did on Friday. “I think it’s incumbent upon him to step forward and say something and to be as vocal now as he was when he was running,” said Shelia

Huggins, a Democratic National Committee member from North Carolina. Biden denounced the behavior of border agents. “To see people treated like they did — horses nearly running them over and people being strapped. It’s outrageous,” he said. “It’s dangerous, it’s wrong.” As a candidate, Biden promised sweeping action to address racial inequities and vowed to chart a new course on immigration, turning the page on President Donald Trump’s restrictionist policies. While he has delivered on those promises in some respects, Black leaders see a lot that was left unmet. “There are too many issues where you can point to and say, ‘You’re just not delivering,’” said Huggins. She credited Biden for tackling the pandemic, but added: “My expectations are so much higher. The expectations from Black voters across the country — we have just expected a whole lot more.” Many Black leaders have been disappointed by the lack of movement to spur police officers to treat people of color better, in the wake of a national reckoning over police violence and racism. Talks between congressional Republicans and Democrats fell apart this week. Biden vowed to continue trying to find a way to make progress and blamed Republicans for their resistance. Beyond policy prescriptions, Biden, as a candidate, sought a clear rhetorical contrast with Trump on issues of race. He forcefully denounced Trump for having “fanned the flames of white supremacy.” He traveled to Houston ahead of Floyd’s funeral to meet with his family in his hometown. He selected a Black and Asian woman to serve as his running mate. Biden’s deep connections to Black leaders, combined with an ambitious plan to root out systemic inequi-

ties, helped him win both the Democratic primary and the general election with overwhelming support from Black voters, a fact he made clear on the night he won the presidency. “Especially those moments when this campaign was at its lowest ebb — the African American community stood up again for me,” he said in Wilmington, Delaware. “You’ve always had my back, and I’ll have yours.” As Biden prepared to assume the presidency, he identified racial justice, along with the pandemic, the economy and climate change, as one of the “four historic crises” the country was facing. He promised once again to make the issue a priority of his administration. Rep. Mondaire Jones, DN.Y., said the Biden administration has “done miserably” in addressing racial justice. While Jones lauded the White House’s efforts on tackling the pandemic and its disproportionate impacts on communities of color, he said Biden has failed to take aggressive action to address key issues including voting rights, policing reform and immigration. “I don’t care how many Black people you have in the Cabinet or on your staff,” he said. “If you are not doing what is required to advance legislation and executive action that will put us on a path toward racial justice, you are not doing what you said you would do when you ran for president.” Jones, who was elected in 2020, said this week was the angriest he has seen his colleagues in the Congressional Black Caucus because of the treatment of Haitian migrants at the border who are fleeing political violence and a devastating earthquake. Cliff Albright, the cofounder and executive director of the Black Voters Matter Fund, echoed Jones’s concerns, saying many Black leaders and voters have been

infuriated with Biden’s administration this week because the treatment of migrants at the border falls directly under his purview. “This is one that falls squarely within the executive branch,” he said. “This is his Border Patrol. It’s not Trump’s Border Patrol. It’s not (Senate Minority Leader Mitch) McConnell’s Border Patrol.” Some Black leaders voiced support for Biden, saying he inherited dire situations from Trump that he is still trying to dig the country out of eight months into his presidency. “I’ve never seen the president disengage or the vice president disengage on issues of crisis dealing with the Black community,” said Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, DTexas, who participated in a meeting with White House officials on Wednesday about the situation in Del Rio. The frustrations that spilled out into the open this week have been building for months, according to Albright. The lack of action to address what Biden deemed a racial justice crisis, Albright said, will have an impact on Democrats’ political fortunes. In the midterms, Democrats are defending narrow congressional majorities that run through states like Georgia, North Carolina and Pennsylvania, where Black voter turnout will be key. First midterms have historically been bad for the party of the president, and Democrats can ill afford to have many Black voters — who tend to vote strongly Democratic — sit out the election. “This could be a dealbreaker for a lot of minorities — not just Haitians,” said Florida state Sen. Shevrin “Shev” Jones, a Democrat, speaking of Biden’s handling of the border situation. He recalled a conversation with a “strong Democrat” who suggested Black people “will start questioning where we stand.” Democrats are already contending with other head winds, such as Biden’s declining approval rating and his struggles with independent voters. Biden has also had to deal with surprise controversies, such as the resignation of the special envoy for Haiti, who quit Thursday in protest of the administration’s deportation policy. Many Democrats have pointed out the danger associated with returning Haitians to a country that has descended into turmoil. For Black leaders, such considerations should not be divorced from Biden’s vows to foster more equity in the United States. “This administration elevated the pursuit of racial equity as a commitment and a moral imperative,” said Nana Gyamfi, the executive director of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration, speaking at a Wednesday news conference. “However, that racial equity has not extended itself to the area of immigration.”


A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEWS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

Some fear US weighing climate vs. human rights on China BY ELLEN KNICKMEYER

Associated Press

U.S. envoy John Kerry’s diplomatic quest to stave off the worst scenarios of global warming is meeting resistance from China, the world’s biggest climate polluter, which is adamant that the United States ease confrontation over other matters if it wants Beijing to speed up its climate efforts. Rights advocates say they see signs, including softer language and talk of heated internal debate among Biden administration officials, that China’s pressure is leading the United States to back off on criticism of China’s mass detentions, forced sterilization and other abuses of its predominantly Muslim Uyghur minority in the Xinjiang region. But the White House took a step this past week that could further deepen the U.S.-China divide, forming a security alliance with Britain and Australia that will mean a greater sharing of defense capabilities, including helping equip Australia with nuclear-powered submarines. President Joe Biden came out strong from the start of his presidency with sanctions over China’s abuse of the Uyghurs, and his administration this spring called it genocide. But the U.S. desire for fast climate progress versus China’s desire that the U.S. back off on issues such as human rights and religious freedom is creating conflict between two top Biden goals: steering the world away from the climate abyss and tempering China’s rising influence. It would be “disastrous in the long term for the United States government to backtrack, tone down, let the Chinese manipulate the issue,” said Nury Turkel, a Uyghur advocate and the vice chairman of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, an advisory panel that makes policy recommendations to the White House and Congress.

Chinese leaders repeatedly linked the issue of climate change and their complaints over perceived U.S. confrontation on human rights and other issues during Kerry’s most recent China trip this month, Kerry told reporters in a call. The Chinese complained specifically about sanctions the administration has put on China’s globally dominant solar panel industry, which the U.S. and rights groups say runs partly on the forced labor of imprisoned Uyghurs. “My response to them was, ‘Hey, look, climate is not ideological, it’s not partisan, it’s not a geostrategic weapon or tool, and it’s certainly not, you know, day-to-day politics,’” said Kerry. He told reporters in a call after the talks that he could only relay China’s complaints about the sanctions to Biden and Secretary of State Antony Blinken. China in 2019 pumped out 27% of climate-eroding fossil fuel fumes, more than the rest of the developed world combined. The United States is the secondworst offender, at 11%. That makes China central to the world’s fastevaporating hopes of cutting fumes from use of petroleum and coal before catastrophic climate change becomes inevitable and irreversible. Kerry, the former secretary of state and Biden’s global climate envoy, has led repeated calls, online meetings and visits to Chinese officials before November’s U.N. climate summit in Scotland. He has urged the Chinese to move faster on steps such as cutting their building, financing and use of dirty-burning coal-fired power plants. He and others see that summit as a last chance to make significant emissions cuts in time. Climate efforts will also be a theme of leaders at the U.N. General Assembly this week. China under President Xi Jinping has said it will hit peak climate pollution by

the end of this decade and then make China climate pollution neutral by 2060, a decade later than the U.S. and other countries have pledged. As China asserts its economic influence and territorial claims, and tension and competition rise with the United States, Xi and his officials have shown no desire to be seen as following the U.S. line on climate or anything else. Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi told the U.S. diplomat in a video meeting on Kerry’s latest China trip that “China-U.S. cooperation on climate change cannot be divorced from the overall situation of ChinaU.S. relations.” The U.S. should “take positive actions to bring China-U.S. relations back on track,” Wang added, according to a Foreign Ministry statement. “The Chinese believe that the U.S. needs cooperation from China more than China needs the United States,” and like others see the United States as weaker now than in the past, said Bonnie Glaser, an expert on Asia and Asia security matters at the German Marshall Fund of the United States. U.S. global climate objectives in that context are another “point of leverage, and they are trying to use that to get the United States to back off some policies they find particularly objectionable,” including U.S. pressure on human rights, Glaser said. Kerry has said no country is as committed to human rights as the United States and that his climate discussions with China’s leaders have been constructive. But there’s talk China’s pressure on the human rights-climate front is having effect. An account circulating in China policy and human rights circles in Washington claimed Kerry had a forceful debate with other administration officials on the matter before his most recent China trip. Some claim administration influence in

a bipartisan bill on Uyghur forced labor that stalled in the House after easily passing the Senate. The State Department declined comment on the two matters. Uyghur and human rights advocates say they believe administration officials are softening their tone on social media and in other public comments on China and human rights.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said the United States continues trying to make progress on areas of both shared interest and mutual disputes with China. U.S. Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry listens to a speech Sept. 13 in New Delhi, India. MANISH SWARUP, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NATION

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

Sanders aims to nationalize run for governor BY ANDREW DEMILLO

Associated Press

CABOT, Ark. — She’s toured the state in an RV emblazoned with her name, launched a TV ad that’s airing during Arkansas Razorbacks football games and spoken to packed rooms at restaurants. Former White House press secretary Sarah Sanders’ introduction as a candidate for governor hasn’t strayed from most campaigns here. Except for the crowds, which are far beyond what people have seen in this mostly rural place. And the campaign talk, which often isn’t about the state. “As I travel around the state, I keep hearing this criticism, ‘Oh, there’s that Sarah Sanders, nationalizing the race,’” Sanders told hundreds of people packed at a Colton’s Steak House in Cabot, a half-hour drive from the state capital of Little Rock. “And my answer to those people is, ‘You bet I am.’ Because if you’re not paying attention to what is happening in this country, you’re missing what is going on.” Sanders’ celebrity as former President Donald Trump’s spokesperson granted her immediate front-runner status in one of the nation’s most Trump-friendly states. It’s also transforming politics in a place where voters in state races are used to hearing overwhelmingly about Arkansas taxes, Arkansas roads and Arkansas schools. This is hardly the only state where local politics isn’t local anymore. Republican candidates for governor elsewhere also are focused more on President Joe Biden than their own opponents and on federal, rather than state, issues. And many Democrats would rather talk about Trump than about their rivals. “Her approach suggests she understands the contemporary electorate in Arkansas and everywhere,” said Janine Parry, a political science professor at the University of Arkansas. Politics,

Parry said, “is in a period of profound nationalization.” It’s a sharp contrast with past races for governor in Arkansas, where Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson campaigned on requiring computer science education in schools. His predecessor, Democratic Gov. Mike Beebe, ran on phasing out the sales tax on groceries. Sanders, 39, announced her bid in January with a promise to fight the “radical left,” something that’s awfully hard to find in solidly red Arkansas. On Twitter and elsewhere, she rails against Biden on his coronavirus pandemic response, immigration and the withdrawal from Afghanistan. “Sarah Sanders is not running for governor of Arkansas. She is running on a national stage,” said Michael John Gray, a former chair of the state Democratic Party, who’s now heading an independent committee focused primarily on defeating Sanders’ bid. Sanders’ approach reflects just how polarized the country has become in recent years. Invoking unpopular national Democratic figures is seen as the best votermotivating tactic, even in local races. In Iowa, Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds, who is expected to run for reelection, is criticizing Biden on numerous issues including federal spending. In Oklahoma, Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt, who faces reelection next year, has had little to say about his state’s battle with COVID-19 — which hit the grim milestone of 10,000 deaths this week — but issued a slick video on Biden’s Afghanistan performance. Some Democrats are also leaning national. California Gov. Gavin Newsom defeated a recall attempt earlier this month with a campaign that railed against “Trumpism.” New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy is campaigning on abortion rights and gun control, and at a recent rally, he criticized states like Florida and Texas for their right-

wing policies. When Sanders does talk about Arkansas, she does so only in broad strokes. She says she’s tired of the state being at the bottom of many rankings. She said she wants to eliminate the state’s income tax, though she offers no hints on how. She also mentions doing something on education and workforce training, which she said hasn’t changed substantially since her father, Mike Huckabee, was governor from 1996 to 2007. “We have to stop just trying to push kids through the system and actually focus on how are we preparing them to go into the workforce,” she told The Associated Press. Though best known for her White House briefings, during which she sparred with reporters and faced questions about her truthfulness, Sanders is no stranger to the state’s politics. She appeared in TV ads for her dad’s campaigns in the 1990s and early 2000s and chaired Arkansas Sen. John Boozman’s campaign. She’s mostly steered clear of referring to the current governor, Hutchinson, whom Trump has branded as a RINO, or Republican in Name Only, after he vetoed an anti-transgender bill. Hutchinson is barred by the state’s term limits from running for governor again. Her first TV ad features footage of her dad and former President Bill Clinton as they marked the 40th anniversary of Little Rock Central High School’s desegregation. It quickly pivots to a favorite target, claiming that the “radical left wants to teach our kids America is a racist and evil country.” Sanders embarked on a statewide tour this month that included a rally with country singer John Rich that drew 1,000 people and a parade on Lake Ouachita that her campaign said included more than 1,500 boats. Sanders’ only rival in the Republican primary, Attorney General Leslie Rutledge, has lagged far behind in fundraising. Sanders in

July reported raising $9 million since she announced her candidacy, with the majority of the money coming from out of state. Former White House press secretary Sarah Sanders greets supporters at an event for her campaign for governor at a Colton’s Steak House on Sept. 10 in Cabot, Ark. ANDREW DEMILLO, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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St. Louis HELP loans the donated home medical items to anyone in need, at no cost or fee. We will only accept donations of manual wheelchairs, shower chairs, tub transfer benches, canes/crutches/walkers, Rollators (seated walkers), grab bars, elevated toilet seats, portable commodes, lift chairs, seating cushions/back supports, folding ramps, diapers/ bed pads and Invacare brand only electric hospital beds, – these items only, please.

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT DONATION DRIVE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9TH 9 AM through 2 PM

Clean the attic, garage or basement and make a tax-deductible donation of your medical equipment at one of the designated drop off locations on October 9, 2021 Assumption Catholic Church 4725 Mattis Road, 63128 (S. of Lemay Ferry - enter on Basler)

New Covenant Church 1401 Timberlake Manor Pkwy, 63017 email (40 Outer Road & Timberlake Manor)

Webster Groves City Hall 4 E. Lockwood, 63119 (Lockwood & Elm)

St. Charles Recycling Center 60 Triad Avenue, 63304 (Triad Ave. & Central School Road)

North County Community Church 7410 Howdershell Road, 63042 (Howdershell & Avion)

St. Louis HELP Warehouse 6546 Manchester Road, 63139 (East of McCausland & Manchester)

St. Louis HELP Warehouse 9709 Dielman Rock Island Drive, 63132 (Between Olive and Page)

For more information please call

St. Louis HELP (314) 240-0796 - www.stlhelp.org We Also Need Volunteers To Staff Sites & Unload The Site Trucks! St. Louis HELP is a non-profit organization. All donations are tax-deductible.

Trust National Leaders With Your Breast Health Because where you get your mammogram makes a difference. Trust starts with a dedicated team of Washington University radiologists affiliated with the internationally recognized Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. At Siteman Cancer Center, every mammogram is read by a breast imaging specialist, with the skill, expertise and experience only a national leader can deliver. Make your breast health a priority. Schedule your mammogram today. Call 800-600-3606 or visit SitemanMammogram.wustl.edu


09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

WEEK IN REVIEW

VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO VIEW MORE WEEK IN REVIEW CONTENT

IN THE NEWS World leaders’ mood dire at UN

IN THE NEWS Pfizer: Vaccine OK for ages 5-11

Racism, climate change and worsening divisions among nations and cultures topped the agenda Wednesday as world leaders at the United Nations General Assembly in New York outlined reasons the world isn’t working as it should — and what must be done to fix it. The atmosphere was somber, angry and dire as speakers at the annual event decried the inequalities and deep divisions that have prevented united global action to end the COVID-19 pandemic, which has killed nearly 4.6 million people, and the failure to tackle the climate crisis threatening the planet. Later Wednesday, President Joe Biden announced that the United States will double its purchase of Pfizer’s COVID-19 shots to share with the world to 1 billion doses.

Pfizer said Monday its COVID-19 vaccine works for children ages 5 to 11 and that it will seek U.S. authorization for this age group soon — a key step toward beginning vaccinations for youngsters. The vaccine made by Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech already is available for anyone 12 and older. But with kids now back in school and the delta variant causing a huge jump in pediatric infections, many parents are anxiously awaiting vaccinations for their younger children. The kid dosage proved safe, with similar or fewer temporary side effects that teens experience, said Dr. Bill Gruber, a Pfizer senior vice president. “I think we really hit the sweet spot,” said Gruber, who’s also a pediatrician.

SPENDING PLAN: The House voted Tuesday night to keep the government funded, suspend the federal debt limit and provide disaster and refugee aid, setting up a high-stakes showdown with Republicans. The federal government faces a shutdown if funding stops on Sept. 30, the end of the fiscal year. ABORTION: The Supreme Court said Monday it will hear arguments Dec. 1 in Mississippi’s bid to have the landmark Roe v. Wade decision guaranteeing a woman’s right to an abortion overturned. Mississippi is asking the high court to uphold its ban on most abortions after the 15th week of pregnancy. RANSOMWARE: The Biden administration on Tuesday announced sanctions against a Russia-based virtual currency brokerage that officials say helped at least eight ransomware gangs launder virtual currency.

FELIX MARQUEZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS

WHITE HOUSE CRITICIZED FOR HANDLING OF HAITIAN MIGRANTS The White House faced sharp condemnation this past week for its handling of an influx of Haitian migrants, who waded across the Rio Grande from Mexico to Del Rio, Texas, to escape harsh conditions in their homeland. Striking video of U.S. Border Patrol agents maneuvering their horses to forcibly block and move migrants attempting to cross the border sparked resounding criticism from both Democrats and Republicans. On Monday, U.S. officials defended the response that included immediately returning 6,000 migrants to their impoverished Caribbean country. On Thursday, Daniel Foote, the U.S. special envoy to Haiti, resigned in protest of the “inhumane” expulsions. Above, U.S. Customs and Border Protection mounted officers try to contain migrants last Sunday as they cross the Rio Grande.

BIG NUMBER

THE WATER COOLER

1,947

Av e ra g e number of COVID deaths per day in the U.S., according to data from Johns Hopkins University. That’s an increase of 40% over the past two weeks.

HE SAID ... This is probably going to be the last time I see my home. Or, in the best-case scenario, the house will remain isolated by the lava and inaccessible for who knows how long.” — Javier Lopez, a resident of Spain’s Canary Islands who was forced to evacuate after a volcano erupted last Sunday.

EMMYS: Netflix’s “The Crown” and “The Queen’s Gambit” combined with Apple TV+’s “Ted Lasso” to sweep top series honors at last Sunday’s Emmy Awards, a first for streaming services. “The Crown” and “The Queen’s Gambit” tied as leaders with 11 awards each, with “Ted Lasso” topping the comedy side with seven trophies. Netflix won a leading total of 44 awards, equaling the broadcast network record set back in 1974 by CBS. CHRIS ROCK: Comedian Chris Rock said last Sunday he has been diagnosed with COVID-19. Rock, 56, wrote on Twitter: “Hey guys I just found out I have COVID, trust me you don’t want this. Get vaccinated.”

WILLIE GARSON (1964-2021): Willie Garson, who played Stanford Blatch on TV’s “Sex and the City” and its movie sequels, has died, his son announced Tuesday. He was 57. “I love you so much papa. Rest In Peace and I’m so glad you got to share all your adventures with me and were able to accomplish so much,” Nathen Garson wrote on Instagram. No details of his death were released. NETFLIX DEAL: Video streaming giant Netflix said Wednesday it has acquired the works of Roald Dahl, the late British author of celebrated children’s books such as “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.” The new deal paves the way for Netflix to bring all of the author’s catalog to screens.

BOOSTER SHOTS: The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday signed off on the targeted use of booster doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine for Americans who are 65 and older, younger adults with underlying health conditions and those in jobs that put them at high risk for COVID-19. FEDERAL RESERVE: Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell signaled Wednesday that the Fed plans to announce as early as November that it will start withdrawing the economic support it unleashed after the coronavirus paralyzed the economy 18 months ago. WILDFIRES: More than 9,000 firefighters remain assigned to 10 large, active wildfires in California, the state Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said Thursday. California fires have burned 3,671 square miles this year, including two large fires in the heart of California’s giant sequoia country on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada. — Associated Press

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M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

PRESENTED BY

GET TO KNOW THESE PA R S L E Y FAMILY POWERHOUSES S P O N S O R E D CO N T E N T BY K R I ST I E L E I N

CELERY

DILL

PARSNIP ARSNIP

PARSLEY ARSLEY

First, some mythbusting: Celery is not a negative-calorie food; no food is. Eating celery does not expend more calories than it contains (about 10 calories per large stalk). But there are still plenty of reasons to work it into your diet. Celery is high in water, which keeps you fuller for longer, and it’s a good source of fiber, folate and potassium. The leaves also hold loads of nutrients — use them just as you would parsley.

While most of us associate dill with pickles or dips, the herb contains a remarkable amount of good-for-you nutrients, such as vitamins A and C, iron and calcium. It’s great for heart health, and there’s some evidence that dill can help mitigate diabetes — or even prevent it from developing. Fresh or dried dill (dried is more potent) pairs particularly well with traditional autumn side dishes, such as roasted carrots and sweet potatoes.

An earthier, nuttier and even sweeter (when cooked) alternative to carrots, parsnips are terrific additions to meals in fall and winter — that’s when parsnips are in season and at their best. Toss them into stews, puree them into a creamy side dish, slice them lengthwise and bake like fries—all of these preparations bring vital nutrients including manganese, folate and vitamin C.

Chimichurri sauce, parsley pesto and tabbouleh might have their origins in distant corners of the world, but parsley is their common denominator. The verdant herb is a lowcalorie way to brighten a range of food while imparting vitamins C and K, iron and magnesium, and it’s thought to be particularly good for the kidneys.

“Vitamin K helps to make some of the proteins that are essential for blood clotting and for building healthy bones,” says Dr. Adetunji Toriola, a Washington University researcher at Siteman Cancer Center. Vegetables in the parsley family contain significant amounts of water and fiber, which boosts hydration and leads to feeling fuller longer. It isn’t even necessary to wait around for plants in the parsley family to grow: The seeds

SALMON 4 salmon fillets (4 oz each) ½ tsp salt ½ tsp garlic powder ¼ tsp red pepper flakes

DILL SAUCE ½ cup mayonnaise ¼ cup plain Greek yogurt 1 Tbsp lemon juice 1 tsp garlic, minced 2 tsp fresh dill (or 1 tsp dill weed)

PARSLEY DIJON CARROTS 3 cups carrots, shredded 2 green onions, thinly sliced 2 Tbsp fresh chopped parsley 3 Tbsp olive oil 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard 1 Tbsp white wine vinegar 1 tsp honey Salt and pepper to taste

 DOCTOR'S ORDERS “Parsley” is more than an herb; it also refers to an entire family of plants and vegetables (Apiaceae) that includes parsnips, celery, carrots, cumin, dill and cilantro. And even though these foods might not take center stage for meals, they are brimming with crucially important vitamins, antioxidants and fiber. Along with vitamins A (excellent for eye health) and C (hello, healthy skin!), members of the parsley family are excellent sources of vitamin K.

» LET’S COOK! Salmon with Dill Sauce and Parsley Dijon Carrots

themselves are beneficial. “Cumin has been shown to aid digestion and may even help with symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome,” Dr. Toriola says, “and coriander, the seeds of the cilantro plant, can help lower blood sugar and fight inflammation.” Members of the parsley family are also loaded with antioxidants, compounds that sweep away harmful cellular buildup. “The body generates what’s called free radicals, which are unstable molecules that are produced in the body as a response to many environmental and chemical reactions,” explains Dr. Toriola. These reactions can potentially lead to a number of cancers and diseases, but antioxidants in foods like parsley help mitigate the damage that free radicals can cause to cells throughout the body. Beyond their slate of health benefits, the aromatic spices that make up the parsley family — such as cumin, dill, anise and

PREPARATION

DR. ADETUNJI TORIOLA Washington University researcher at Siteman Cancer Center PHOTO PROVIDED BY SITEMAN CANCER CENTER

fennel — simply taste good. Dr. Toriola points out that reaching for spices rather than salt or sugar is a far superior way to impart flavor and save calories. Better still, herbs like parsley and dill are widely available in both fresh and dried forms. If given the choice, though, Dr. Toriola says that “fresh is always best because all of the nutrients are still preserved. But even if you cannot have them fresh, dried will still do you a lot of good. They still have a substantial amount of vitamins and nutrients that the body can make use of.”

Preheat oven to 350°F. Place salmon fillets skin side down in ungreased baking pan. Season with salt, garlic powder and red pepper flakes. In small bowl, mix ingredients for dill sauce (mayonnaise, yogurt, lemon juice, garlic and dill) and set aside. In medium bowl, combine carrots and green onions. Whisk together dressing of olive oil, Dijon mustard, vinegar and honey. Add salt and pepper to taste. Pour dressing over carrot mixture and stir to coat. Set aside. Bake salmon for 15–20 minutes, until fish begins to flake easily with fork. Top each fillet with dill sauce and serve with carrots.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY SITEMAN CANCER CENTER

Know Your Risk. Change Your Future. siteman.wustl.edu/YDR


09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A13

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A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

NATION&WORLD DIGEST

COVID-19

House votes to protect abortion

Booster effort underway

WASHINGTON — The House passed legislation Friday that would guarantee a woman’s right to an abortion, an effort by Democrats to circumvent a new Texas law that has placed that access under threat. The bill’s 218-211 approval is mostly symbolic, as Republican opposition will doom it in the Senate. Still, Democrats say they are doing all they can to codify the Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade decision after the Supreme Court recently allowed the Texas law banning most abortions in the state to take effect. Despite the long odds in his chamber, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said in a statement after the vote that “Congress must assert its role to protect the constitutional right to abortion.” Codifying the Roe ruling would mean creating a right to abortion in federal law, a monumental change that would make it harder for courts and states to impose restrictions.

CDC director warns unvaccinated people still biggest concern BY LAURAN NEERGAARD AND MIKE STOBBE

Associated Press

The U.S. launched a campaign to offer boosters of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine to millions of Americans on Friday even as federal health officials stressed the real problem remains getting first shots to the unvaccinated. “We will not boost our way out of this pandemic,” warned Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — even though she took the rare step of overruling the advice of her own expert panel to

make more people eligible for the booster. The vast majority of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations are among the unvaccinated, Walensky noted. All three COVID-19 vaccines in the U.S. offer strong protection against severe illness, hospitalization and death despite the extra-contagious delta variant that caused cases to soar. But immunity against milder infection appears to wane months after initial vaccination. People anxious for another Pfizer dose lost no time rolling up their sleeves after Walensky ruled late Thursday on who’s eligible: Americans 65 and older and others vulnerable because of underlying health problems or where they work and live — once they’re six months past their last dose.

Health officials must clear up confusion over who should get a booster, and why. For now, the booster campaign is what Walensky called “a first step.” It only applies to people originally vaccinated with shots made by Pfizer and its partner BioNTech. Decisions on boosters for Americans who received Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccines are still to come. President Joe Biden said if you’re vaccinated, “You’re in good shape and we’re doing everything we can to keep it that way, which is where the booster comes in.” He urged those now eligible for an extra shot to “go get the booster,” saying he’d get his own soon — and that everyone should be patient and wait their turn. Exactly who should get a booster

was a contentious decision as CDC advisers spent two days poring over the evidence. Walensky endorsed most of their choices: People 65 and older, nursing home residents and those ages 50 to 64 who have chronic health problems such as diabetes should be offered one once they’re six months past their last Pfizer dose. Those 18 and older with health problems can decide for themselves if they want a booster. But in an unusual move, Walensky overruled her advisers’ objections and decided an additional broad swath of the population also qualifies: People at increased risk of infection — not serious illness — because of their jobs or their living conditions. That includes health care workers, teachers and people in jails or homeless shelters.

TEXAS | MIGRATION

UN panel urges help for women DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Aid to Afghanistan should be made conditional to ensure the protection of women’s rights and access to education under the rule of the Taliban government, a panel of high-level speakers said at the United Nations on Friday. Since taking control of the country last month when the U.S.-backed government collapsed, the Taliban have allowed younger girls and boys back to school. But in grades six to 12, they have allowed only boys. The United Nations says 4.2 million children are not enrolled in school in Afghanistan, and 60% of them girls. The virtual panel discussion took place on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly, where the Taliban have requested to speak as representatives of Afghanistan. BRIEFLY RENTERS: Almost a month after a federal eviction moratorium ended, the Treasury Department said Friday that states and cities distributed money for nearly 1.4 million payments in August and the pace picked up from the month before. More than 16.5% of the tens of billions of dollars in federal rental assistance reached tenants last month, compared with 11% in July. SHOOTING: A gunman who killed one person and wounded 14 others in a Collierville, Tennessee, grocery store worked in a sushi business at the store and was the son of refugees from Myanmar who had settled in Nashville, a family friend said Friday. The shooter was identified by police as UK Thang. N. KOREA: Kim Yo Jong, the influential sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, said Friday her country is willing to resume talks with South Korea if conditions are met, indicating it wants Seoul to persuade Washington to relax crippling economic sanctions. JAIL: New York City faced mounting pressure Friday to solve its spiraling jail crisis, with members of Congress calling for a federal civil rights investigation and a court-appointed monitor blasting the city for a failure of leadership amid staggering violence, selfharm and the deaths this year of at least 12 inmates. FOREIGN RELATIONS: Meeting with the leaders of India, Australia and Japan, President Joe Biden declared Friday that the U.S. and other members of the Indo-Pacific alliance known as “the Quad,” are showing they “know how to get things done” in an increasingly complicated corner of the globe. ABORTION: A federal appeals court seemed to indicate Friday that it would wait until the U.S. Supreme Court rules on a case that seeks to overturn its landmark decision guaranteeing a woman’s right to an abortion before ruling on the appeal of a lower court’s ruling blocking a restrictive Georgia abortion law. — Associated Press

JULIO CORTEZ, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent, left, drops off a migrant couple Friday as a member of a humanitarian group, right, receives them after their release from custody in Del Rio, Texas.

Officials say camp is now empty Many face expulsion due to rules about seeking asylum in US BY MARÍA VERZA AND JUAN LOZANO

Associated Press

DEL RIO, Texas — No migrants remained Friday at the Texas border encampment where almost 15,000 people — most of them Haitians — converged just days earlier seeking asylum, local and federal officials said. It’s a dramatic change from last Saturday, when the number peaked as migrants driven by confusion over the Biden administration’s policies and misinformation on social media converged at the border crossing connecting

Del Rio, Texas, and Ciudad Acuña, Mexico. At a news conference, Del Rio Mayor Buno Lozano called it “phenomenal news.” Many face expulsion because they are not covered by protections recently extended by the Biden administration to the more than 100,000 Haitian migrants already in the U.S., citing security concerns and social unrest in the Western Hemisphere’s poorest country. The devastating 2010 earthquake forced many of them from their homeland. The United States and Mexico appeared eager to end the increasingly politicized humanitarian situation that prompted the resignation of the U.S. special envoy to Haiti and widespread outrage after

images emerged of border agents maneuvering their horses to forcibly block and move migrants. On Friday, President Joe Biden said the way the agents used their horses was “horrible” and that “people will pay” as a result. The agents have been assigned to administrative duties while the administration investigates. “There will be consequences,” Biden told reporters. “It’s an embarrassment, but it’s beyond an embarrassment — it’s dangerous, it’s wrong, it sends the wrong message around the world and sends the wrong message at home. It’s simply not who we are.” Meanwhile, Homeland Security officials said about 2,000 Haitians have been rapidly expelled on 17 flights since Sunday and more

could be expelled in coming days under pandemic powers that deny people the chance to seek asylum. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas said Friday that the U.S. allowed about 12,400 to enter the country, at least temporarily, while they make claims before an immigration judge to stay in the country under the asylum laws or for some other legal reason. They could ultimately be denied and would be subject to removal. Mayorkas said about 8,000 migrants “have decided to return to Mexico voluntarily,” and about 5,000 are in DHS custody and being processed to determine whether they will be expelled or allowed to press their claim for legal residency.

Arizona GOP vote President says budget review: Biden won talks at a ‘stalemate’ Former president’s allies unable to prove unsubstantiated claims BY BOB CHRISTIE AND CHRISTINA A. CASSIDY

Associated Press

PHOENIX — A Republican-backed review of the 2020 presidential election in Arizona’s largest county ended Friday without producing proof to support former President Donald Trump’s false claims of a stolen election. After six months of searching for evidence of fraud, the firm hired by Republican lawmakers issued a report that experts described as riddled with errors, bias and flawed methodology. Still, even that partisan review came up with a vote tally that would not have altered the outcome, finding that Biden

won by 360 more votes than the official results certified last year. The finding was an embarrassing end to a widely criticized quest to prove allegations that election officials and courts rejected. It has no bearing on the certified results. Previous reviews by nonpartisan professionals that followed state law found no significant problem with the vote count in Maricopa County, home to Phoenix. Still, for many critics, the conclusions reached by the firm Cyber Ninjas and presented at a hearing Friday underscored the dangerous futility of the exercise, which helped fuel skepticism about the validity of the 2020 election and spawned copycat audits nationwide. “We haven’t learned anything new,” said Matt Masterson, a top U.S. election security official in the Trump administration.

Some congressional Dems resist Biden’s $3.5T investment plan BY LISA MASCARO AND JONATHAN LEMIRE

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden said Friday that talks over his $3.5 trillion rebuilding plan have hit a “stalemate” in Congress as he made the case for his expansive effort to recast the nation’s tax and spending programs and make what he sees as sweeping, overdue investments. Biden spoke at the White House as Democrats in the House and Senate labored to finish drafts and overcome differences between the party’s centrist and moderate factions. Despite efforts by the president and congressional leaders to show progress, Biden cast the

road ahead as long and potentially cumbersome, even with upcoming deadlines. “We’re getting down to the hard spot here,” Biden told reporters at the White House. “We’re at this stalemate at the moment.” The president’s acknowledgment of Democrats’ disagreements contrasted with congressional leaders’ more upbeat tone in recent days. On Friday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., predicted passage of both pillars of Biden’s domestic agenda. One is a still-evolving $3.5 trillion package of social safety net and climate programs, the other a separate $1 trillion measure financing highway, internet and other infrastructure projects that’s already passed the Senate with bipartisan support. “We’re going to pass both bills,” she told reporters.


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

NATION&WORLD DIGEST

TEXAS | MIGRATION

Hurricane Sam becomes Category 4

Border set to reopen

MIAMI — Far from land, Hurricane Sam strengthened into a Category 4 hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean on Saturday. No coastal watches or warnings were in effect for Sam, which was about 1,025 miles east-southeast of the northern Leeward Islands in the Caribbean Sea on Saturday evening. It was moving west-northwest at 10 mph. Forecasters said Sam could get even stronger Sunday morning with winds of 150 mph. Swells from the storm could cause dangerous rip current conditions off the coast of the Lesser Antilles early next week, officials said. Meanwhile Teresa, which had been a subtropical storm, faded to a remnant low Saturday, about 150 miles north of Bermuda.

Teacher vaccine mandate delayed New York City schools have been temporarily blocked from enforcing a vaccine mandate for its teachers and other workers by a federal appeals judge just days before it was to take effect. Workers in the nation’s largest school system were to be required to show vaccination proof starting Monday. But late Friday, a judge for the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals granted a temporary injunction sought by a group of teachers pending review by a three-judge panel, which will take up the motion Wednesday. Department of Education spokesperson Danielle Filson said officials were seeking a speedy resolution in court. The New York Post reported that the department sent an email to principals Saturday morning saying they “should continue to prepare for the possibility that the vaccine mandate will go into effect later in the week.” As of Friday, 82% of department employees have been vaccinated, including 88% of teachers.

Officials: Passenger traffic OK’d Saturday, cargo on Monday BY MARÍA VERZA AND JUAN LOZANO

Associated Press

DEL RIO, Texas — The Texas border crossing where thousands of Haitian migrants converged in recent weeks was set to be partially reopened late Saturday, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said. Federal and local officials said no migrants remained at the makeshift encampment as of Friday, after some of the nearly 15,000 people were expelled from the country and many others were allowed to remain in the U.S., at least temporarily, as they try to seek asylum. In a statement, officials said trade and travel operations would resume at the Del Rio Port of En-

try for passenger traffic at 4 p.m. Saturday. It will be reopened for cargo traffic on Monday morning. CBP temporarily closed the border crossing between Del Rio and Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, on Sept. 17 after the migrants suddenly crossed into Del Rio and made camp around the U.S. side of the border bridge. CBP agents on Saturday searched the brush along the Rio Grande to ensure that no one was hiding near the site. Bruno Lozano, the mayor of Del Rio, said officials also wanted to be sure no other large groups of migrants were making their way to the Del Rio area to try to set up a similar camp. The Department of Homeland Security planned to continue flights to Haiti throughout the weekend, ignoring criticism from Democratic lawmakers and human rights groups who say Haitian migrants are being

sent back to a troubled country that some left more than a decade ago. The number of people at the Del Rio encampment peaked last Saturday as migrants driven by confusion over the Biden administration’s policies and misinformation on social media converged at the border crossing. The U.S. and Mexico worked swiftly, appearing eager to end the humanitarian situation that prompted the resignation of the U.S. special envoy to Haiti and widespread outrage after images emerged of border agents maneuvering their horses to forcibly block and move migrants. The U.S. government expelled 2,324 Haitians on 21 flights to Haiti from Sunday through Friday, according to the Department of Homeland Security. On Friday, the government operated four flights from Del Rio with 375 Haitian migrants; two flights

to Port-au-Prince and two to Cap-Haitien. The department said the flights will continue “on a regular basis” as people are expelled under pandemic powers that deny migrants the chance to seek asylum. The Trump administration enacted the policy, called Title 42, in March 2020 to justify restrictive immigration policies in an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. The Biden administration has used it to justify the deportation of Haitian migrants. A federal judge late last week ruled that the rule was improper and gave the government two weeks to halt it, but the Biden administration appealed. Officials said the U.S. State Department is in talks with Brazil and Chile to allow some Haitians who previously resided in those countries to return, but it’s complicated because some of them no longer have legal status there.

CHINA-US-CANADA | PRISONER SWAP

BRIEFLY WILDFIRE: Damage assessment teams went out Saturday to determine how many buildings have burned in a forest fire that has displaced thousands of residents in Northern California. The Fawn Fire is north of the city of Redding. PLOT: Four teenagers have been charged with a plot to attack a Pennsylvania high school in 2024, on the 25th anniversary of the massacre at Colorado’s Columbine High School, authorities said. The mother of one of the teens had discovered text messages on her child’s cellphone. VOLCANO: The airport on the Spanish island of La Palma shut down Saturday because of an ash cloud spewing out of a volcano and scientists said another volcanic vent opened up. The intensity of the eruption that began Sept. 19 has increased in recent days. TRUMP: The rewards of an early Donald Trump endorsement were set to be on display Saturday in Georgia when a three-man ticket of candidates he’s backing in 2022 Republican primaries will be featured at one of his signature rallies. But GOP opponents of Trump-backed candidates aren’t folding in Georgia and some say the former president’s nod could hurt Republicans in a general election in the closely divided state. SOMALIA: A vehicle laden with explosives rammed into cars and trucks at a checkpoint leading to the entrance of the Presidential Palace in Somalia, killing at least eight people and wounding nine others, police said Saturday. The checkpoint is the one used by Somalia’s president and prime minister on their way to and from the airport in Somalia’s capital, Mogadishu. N. KOREA: Kim Yo Jong, the powerful sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, said Saturday that her country will take steps to repair ties with South Korea, and may even discuss another summit between their leaders, if the South drops what she described as hostility and double standards. — Associated Press

FRANK GUNN, THE CANADIAN PRESS

Michael Kovrig embraces his wife, Vina Nadjibulla, after arriving at Pearson International Airport on Saturday in Toronto.

Deal brings joyous homecomings Huawei Technologies executive exchanged for Canadian citizens BY ROB GILLIES

Associated Press

TORONTO — China, the U.S. and Canada completed a highstakes prisoner swap with joyous homecomings for two Canadians held by China and for an executive of Chinese global communications giant Huawei Technologies charged with fraud, potentially bringing closure to a 3-year feud that embroiled the three countries. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau hugged diplomat Michael Kovrig and entrepreneur Michael Spavor on the tarmac after they landed in Calgary, Alberta, early Saturday. The men were detained in China in December 2018, shortly after Canada arrested Meng Wanzhou, Huawei Technologies’ chief

financial officer and the daughter of the company’s founder, on a U.S. extradition request. Many countries labeled China’s action “hostage politics,” while China accused Ottawa of arbitrary detention. The two Canadians were jailed for more than 1,000 days. “It’s fantastic to be back home in Canada and I am immensely grateful to everybody who worked hard to bring both of us back home,” a noticeably thinner Kovrig said after a Canadian government plane landed in Toronto and he was greeted by his wife and sister. Meng’s return to China later Saturday was carried live on state TV, underscoring the degree to which Beijing has linked her case with Chinese nationalism and its rise as a global economic and political power. “I have finally returned to the warm embrace of the motherland,” Meng said. “As an ordinary Chinese citizen going through

this difficult time, I always felt the warmth and concern of the party, the nation and the people.” The chain of events involving the global powers brought an abrupt end to legal and geopolitical wrangling that has roiled relations between Washington, Beijing and Ottawa. The three-way deal enabled China and Canada to each bring home their own detained citizens while the U.S. wrapped up a criminal case against Meng that for months had been mired in an extradition fight. The first activity came Friday afternoon when Meng, 49, reached an agreement with federal prosecutors that called for fraud charges against her to be dismissed next year and allowed for her to return to China immediately. As part of the deal, she accepted responsibility for misrepresenting the company’s business dealings in Iran. The deal was reached as President Joe Biden and Chinese coun-

terpart Xi Jinping have sought to tamp down signs of public tension — even as the world’s two dominant economies are at odds on issues as diverse as cybersecurity, climate change, human rights and trade and tariffs. “The U.S. Government stands with the international community in welcoming the decision by People’s Republic of China authorities to release Canadian citizens Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig after more than two-and-a-half years of arbitrary detention. We are pleased that they are returning home to Canada,” U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken said in a statement. As part of the deal with Meng, the Justice Department agreed to dismiss the fraud charges against her in December 2022 — exactly four years after her arrest — provided that she complies with certain conditions, including not contesting any of the government’s factual allegations.

Taliban hang body in public, signaling past tactics ASSOCIATED PRESS

KABUL, Afghanistan — The Taliban hanged a dead body from a crane parked in a city square in Afghanistan on Saturday in a gruesome display that signaled the hard-line movement’s return to some of its brutal tactics of the past. Taliban officials initially brought four bodies to the central square in the western city of Herat, then moved three of them to other parts of the city for public display, said Wazir Ahmad Seddiqi, who runs a pharmacy on the edge of the square.

Taliban officials announced that the four were caught taking part in a kidnapping earlier Saturday and were killed by police, Seddiqi said. Ziaulhaq Jalali, a Taliban-appointed district police chief in Herat, said later that Taliban members rescued a father and son who had been abducted by four kidnappers after an exchange of gunfire. He said a Taliban fighter and a civilian were wounded by the kidnappers, and that the kidnappers were killed in the crossfire. An Associated Press video showed crowds gathering around

the crane and peering up at the body as some men chanted. “The aim of this action is to alert all criminals that they are not safe,” a Taliban commander who did not identify himself told the AP in an on-camera interview conducted in the square. Since the Taliban overran Kabul on Aug. 15 and seized control of the country, Afghans and the world have been watching to see whether they will re-create their harsh rule of the late 1990s, which included public stonings and limb amputations of alleged criminals, some of which took place in front

of large crowds at a stadium. After one of the Taliban’s founders said in an interview with The Associated Press this past week that the hard-line movement would once again carry out executions and amputations of hands, the U.S. State Department said such acts “would constitute clear gross abuses of human rights.” Spokesman Ned Price told reporters Friday at his briefing that the United States would “stand firm with the international community to hold perpetrators of these — of any such abuses — accountable.”


NATION

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A15

Tarana Burke tells her story BY JOCELYN NOVECK

Associated Press

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“Maybe it won’t catch on.” That’s what Tarana Burke was thinking — indeed, hoping — when she first found out the phrase “MeToo” was suddenly circulating online in October 2017, in the wake of shocking revelations about Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein. It was a phrase she had come up with over years of working with survivors of sexual violence. And she worried that it would be coopted or misused, turned into a mere hashtag for a brief moment of social media frenzy and ruining the hard work she had done. As it turned out, it did catch on. Actor Alyssa Milano had asked victims of sexual assault or harassment to share their stories or simply say #MeToo, and hundreds of thousands had done so on the very first day. But Burke’s fears did not materialize, and her movement has taken off in a way she’d never dreamed. “I wasn’t even dreaming this big,” she told The Associated Press in an interview. “I thought I had big, lofty goals and I didn’t dream nearly big enough.” Now, as the #MeToo movement — the social reckoning that began in 2017 — approaches its fourth anniversary, Burke, 48, has come out with a highly personal, often raw memoir of her childhood in the Bronx in New York City, her journey into activism, and the beginnings of #MeToo. She also provides a vivid account of how she herself was raped when she was only seven years old — an event that shaped her future in profound ways. The interview has been edited for clarity and length. AP: Why was it time for this memoir? Burke: People will think this is a book about, you know, going to the Golden Globes and meeting a bunch of celebrities, and a bunch of powerful men whose lives were impacted by #MeToo. I want to tell a different story. My story is ordinary and also extraordinary: It’s so many other little black girls’ stories, so many young women’s stories. We don’t pay attention to the nuances of what survival looks like or what sexual violence feels like and how it impacts our lives. So it just felt important. This is a story that’s been growing inside me for more than 40 years. It was time to give it a home outside of my body. AP: What message do you hope to send other women and girls who, like you, experienced rape or sexual assault? Burke: That their experiences aren’t singular, and they aren’t alone. It feels really isolating, particularly if you’re dealing with sexual violence. I really want to convey the message that you are not alone. YOU are normal and the things that happened to you are NOT normal. It doesn’t make something wrong with you. AP: You write about how you felt both guilt, deep shame about what happened to you.

Burke: Shame is insidious. It’s all-consuming. It can get into all the nooks and crannies and cracks and crevices of your life. There’s not enough messages that say, ‘This is not your shame to Burke carry. This is not your burden to bear.’ AP: A key issue moving forward is the intersection of #MeToo and race. Have we moved forward as a society in that regard? Burke: We haven’t moved nearly enough. It became even more evident during the racial reckoning the country found itself in the last year or so. People cannot connect the two. Really, this is about advancing humanity. All of it is about liberation. And so Black lives have to matter. Women, people, have to have bodily autonomy. We need to live in a world that thinks about the environment and the actual space that we live in. All of those things are related to how we coexist as human beings. And we have to recognize that these systems of oppression we all live under affect us differently. I am Black and I am a woman and I am a survivor. And all those things exist at the same time. AP: A very raw part of this book explores how when you were young, you felt ugly. You had to navigate those feelings. Did this experience help you to parent your own child? Burke: I was very worried about Kaia’s selfesteem. But then Kaia turned out to be this beautiful child, a physically beautiful child. And still in middle school she came to me and said, ‘I want Hannah Montana’s nose,’ and things like, kids were bothering them because they thought they were ugly. And I was just like, wow, it doesn’t matter what you physically look like. People will find ways to to tear you down. If they see the vulnerability and and parts of you that shine, they’ll take the lowest hanging fruit and try to take that from you. AP: You describe how when #MeToo exploded in 2017, you were so afraid your movement, the work you’d done, would be co-opted. How did you get over that concern? Burke: Over time it became clear to me that whatever I’m supposed to do, whatever this assignment is that I’ve been given, it’s clearly an assignment for ME. And so if you take away how the world or the media describes #MeToo, what I built hasn’t really changed. I say this in the book: Little Black girls in Selma and white women in Hollywood really need the same things. And I realized, nobody can take that away from me. I just became really comfortable. It may not ever look like it looked in October 2017. But that’s OK, because what happened in October 2017 was a phenomenal moment that we shouldn’t be trying to duplicate. We should be trying to build on that and do other things. So I don’t have that fear anymore. And it’s been an incredible journey of learning.

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NATION

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A15

Committee OKs $3.5T spending plan BY ALAN FRAM

Associated Press

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WASHINGTON — Democrats pushed a $3.5 trillion, 10-year bill strengthening social safety net and climate programs through the House Budget Committee on Saturday, but one Democrat voted “no,” illustrating the challenges party leaders face in winning the near unanimity they’ll need to push the sprawling package through Congress. The Democratic-dominated panel, meeting virtually, approved the measure on a near partyline vote, 20-17. Passage marked a necessary but minor checking of a procedural box for Democrats by edging it a step closer to debate by the full House. Under budget rules, the committee wasn’t allowed to significantly amend the 2,465-page measure, the product of 13 other House committees. More important work has been happening in an opaque procession of mostly unannounced phone calls, meetings and other bargaining sessions among party leaders and rank-and-file lawmakers. President Joe Biden, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., have led a behind-the-scenes hunt for compromises to resolve internal divisions and, they hope, allow approval of the mammoth bill soon. Pelosi told fellow Democrats Saturday that they “must” pass the social and environment package this week, along with a separate infrastructure bill and a third measure preventing a government shutdown on Friday. Her letter to colleagues underscored the pile of crucial work Congress’ Democratic majority faces in coming days and seemed an effort to build urgency to resolve longstanding disputes quickly. “The next few days will be a time of intensity,” she wrote. Moderate Rep. Scott Peters, D-Calif., joined all 16

Republicans on the Budget committee in opposing the legislation. His objections included one that troubles many Democrats: a reluctance to back a bill with provisions that would later be dropped by the Senate. Many Democrats don’t want to become politically vulnerable by backing language that might be controversial back home, only to see it not become law. That preference for voting only on a social and environment bill that’s already a House-Senate compromise could complicate Pelosi’s effort for a House vote this week. Peters was among three Democrats who earlier this month voted against a plan favored by most in his party to lower pharmaceutical costs by letting Medicare negotiate for the prescription drugs it buys. Party leaders have tried for weeks to resolve differences among Democrats over the package’s final price tag, which seems sure to shrink. There are also disputes over which initiatives should be reshaped, among them expanded Medicare, tax breaks for children and health care, a push toward cleaner energy and higher levies on the rich and corporations. Democrats’ wafer-thin majorities in the House and Senate mean compromise is mandatory. Before the measure the Budget panel approved Saturday even reaches the House floor, it is expected to be changed to reflect whatever HouseSenate accords have been reached, and additional revisions are likely. The overall bill embodies the crux of Biden’s top domestic goals. Budget panel chairman John Yarmuth, D-Ky., cited “decades of disinvestment” on needs like health care, education, child care and the environment as the rationale for the legislation. “The futures of millions of Americans and their families are at stake. We can no longer afford the costs of neglect and in-

action. The time to act is now,” Yarmuth said. Republicans say the proposal is unneeded, unaffordable amid accumulated federal debt exceeding $28 trillion and reflects Democrats’ drive to insert government into people’s lives. Its tax boosts will cost jobs and include credits for buying electric vehicles, purchases often made by people with comfortable incomes, they said. “This bill is a disaster for working-class families,” said Rep. Jason Smith of Missouri, the committee’s top Republican. “It’s a big giveaway to the wealthy, it’s a laundry list of agenda items pulled right out of the Bernie Sanders socialist playbook.” The unusual weekend session occurred as top Democrats amp up efforts to end increasingly bitter disputes between the party’s centrist and progressive wings that threaten to undermine Biden’s agenda. Biden conceded Friday that talks among Democrats were at a “stalemate,” though Pelosi and Schumer have been more positive in an apparent effort to build momentum and soothe differences. A collapse of the measure at his own party’s hands would be a wounding preview to the coming election year, in which House and Senate control are at stake. To nail down moderates’ support for an earlier budget blueprint, Pelosi promised to begin House consideration by Monday of another pillar of Biden’s domestic plans: a $1 trillion collection of roadway and other infrastructure projects. Pelosi reaffirmed this week that the infrastructure debate would begin Monday. But many moderates who consider the infrastructure bill their top goal also want to cut the $3.5 trillion social and environment package and trim or reshape some programs. They include Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W. Va., and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz.

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S P A P E R • F O U N D E D B Y J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 ,M1 81 7•8 SUnDAy • 09.26.2021 A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SUNDAy • 09.26.2021 • A16 IAN CASO PRESIDEnT & PUBLISHER

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Gross prosecutorial incompetence Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner must start doing her job or get out of the way.

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t. Louis Circuit Attorney Kimberly Gardner either needs to step up her game dramatically or get out of the way. It pains us to state it so bluntly, but the profound mismanagement on her watch can no longer be ignored. Voters put their faith in Gardner last year despite a lackluster first term, believing ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM she could turn things Cori Bush gets a hug from activist supporter Ohun Ashe, right, around and deliver as Bush joins election-victory celebrations on Aug. 5, 2020, on long-promised with Circuit Attorney Kimberly Gardner, left, and then-Treasurer reforms. As an exTishaura Jones. haustive report by the Post-Dispatch’s cases. Under Gardner, the rate has skyJanelle O’Dea and Joel Currier makes rocketed above 35%. In 2019, before the clear, Gardner has come up far too short pandemic skewed statistics, fewer than on pretty much every objective perfor2,000 cases were cleared, with susmance measure. pects pleading guilty in 1,100 cases and Her most experienced prosecutors Gardner dropping 600. (Cases may be have abandoned the office, with some dropped for a variety of reasons beyond citing her mismanagement and lack of prosecutorial laxity.) The year before prosecutorial vigor as their reasons for she took over, 3,000 cases were cleared, leaving. The result is that Gardner now with 2,300 guilty pleas and only 400 must rely on a bevy of junior attorneys who lack the minimal experience neces- cases dropped. Yet, bizarrely, Gardner claims a 90% felony conviction rate — a sary to ensure criminals are brought to fictitious figure at best. justice. When Gardner became circuit Gardner is clashing with city Compattorney in 2017, there were more than troller Darlene Green over her mul60 prosecutors with a cumulative 500 tiple, expensive contracts with outside years of experience. Today, her staff of law firms. Gardner overspends her fewer than 40 attorneys has a combined budget and relies on contract work that 150 years of experience in the office. should be performed in-house. Among Few would argue with Gardner’s stated intentions of reforming the office her vacancies are the jobs of chief trial assistant and chief of staff — jobs cruto steer the focus away from prosecucial for managing a big office with so tions for non-violent or petty offenses many moving parts. Gardner has never and toward putting truly dangerous criminals behind bars. There has, in fact, been known for her people skills, and been a dramatic decrease in non-violent as the internal office pressures on her mount, her worst personality characand petty-offense prosecutions. But teristics are coming to the fore, former the same is true of the dangerous felony staffers indicate. Loyalty and trust are cases as well. Police are frustrated. dwindling. Judges are outraged at the incompeAfter the 2020 election, Gardner’s tence. Victims’ families are angry, feelchampions included Cori Bush and ing re-victimized by watching killers Tishaura Jones, who respectively won and assailants get off with hand-slap, their races for U.S. representative and plea-bargain sentences or walk free mayor. Today, their silence about their altogether. underperforming colleague speaks volBefore 2017, prosecutors annually umes. You can’t defend the indefensible. dropped only around 15% of criminal

Fiscal-responsibility fiction GOP’s debt-ceiling game is yet another justification for nuking the filibuster.

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enate Republicans’ threat to shut down the federal government and trash America’s credit rating rather than raise the debt ceiling to cover spending they themselves approved is a breathtaking study in hypocrisy and hostage-taking, even for them. Anyone who claims this dangerous game has anything to do with fiscal responsibility doesn’t understand the issue — or is betting along with those GOP senators that most Americans don’t. Either way, it’s a new low. Democrats, as the only grownups in the room, likely will have to make concessions on unrelated issues in order to prevent what could in theory escalate into a global economic crisis. This unacceptable situation, like others caused lately by Republican mischief, wouldn’t be happening if Democrats would do what they should already have done and eliminate the filibuster. The debt ceiling is the level of debt that the federal government can take on at any given time, as set by law. Since the government perpetually spends more than it brings in, that level has to be raised periodically, a process that traditionally has been bipartisan. The urgent point is, raising the debt ceiling isn’t approval of new spending but rather approval to pay the bills Congress has already incurred. In other words, refusing to raise the debt ceiling isn’t like deciding not to buy that Rolls-Royce; it’s like buying that Rolls-Royce on a credit card and then refusing to pay the credit card bill. This is what today’s Republican Party is trying

to pass off as fiscal responsibility. Especially galling is that the current debt was incurred largely by the very Senate Republicans who are now sanctimoniously refusing to pay it. Their budget-busting 2017 tax cuts, which they passed over Democratic opposition when the GOP controlled Congress, are a big part of the reason the debt ceiling has to be raised. If Congress fails to raise the ceiling along with a measure to fund the government, the result would be not only a federal government shutdown but a first-ever default on America’s debts. That would send the nation’s credit rating tumbling and likely send global markets into a tailspin. All so Republicans can preen in their campaign ads with the fiction of fiscal responsibility. Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell — always one to make up new rules as he goes along — has declared that majority Democrats are obliged to lift the ceiling all by themselves. Never mind that it’s always been a bipartisan process in the past. When McConnell was in charge, Democrats agreed to multiple debtceiling raises. Hypocrisy, thy name is Mitch. Still, Democrats should take McConnell’s advice and act like the majority they are — which cannot happen as long as the Senate labors under an arcane and arguably unconstitutional rule that allows the minority party to effectively hold the majority hostage. Nuke the filibuster, already.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

Outlawing abortion is costly mistake for conservatives Regarding “Supreme Court sets arguments in big abortion case” (Sept. 20): As we inch ever closer to Roe v. Wade being overturned, I wonder how many conservatives who are determined to outlaw abortion think we can do that and still live in a society where women are not second-class citizens and where government does not have much greater control over our private lives and pocket books. Simply put, it’s not possible to have all three. First, we need to somehow conclusively identify every father of every unwanted fetus so his life could be just as disrupted as the mother’s life. We all know how conservatives feel about public sex education and freely available birth control. Abstinence-only education for everyone, then? Second, for all the parents who cannot afford another mouth to feed, more social services will be needed if we indeed keep caring about the fetuses after they become children. And third, we’ll need public money to run the orphanages housing the growing number of abandoned and unadopted children. Think of the taxes. Considering how up-in-arms so many conservatives have gotten over mask and vaccine mandates, I suggest they stop and imagine more of their precious individual freedoms having to be compromised in order to make an equal society function without abortion rights. Joel Minor • University City

Page’s reprimand of Kahn is not nearly severe enough Regarding “St. Louis County Council wants embattled health director to answer questions about new mask mandate, July meeting” (Sept. 22): In my opinion, the St. Louis County health director, Faisal Kahn, has lied to — and about — the people he is paid to serve. He has defamed the county nationally with allegations he could not substantiate. County Executive Sam Page only verbally reprimanded Khan for an obscene gesture. What kind of an employer gets it so wrong? Peggy Barnhart • Ladue

Dumb to have anti-science GOP in charge of mandates Regarding Kevin McDermott’s excellent column “Is Missouri’s attorney general willing to sicken children for his Senate bid?” (Sept. 5): Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt worships at the horrible altar of former President Donald Trump. Schmitt is against mask mandates in public schools that would slow the transmission of the coronavirus. Children under 12, who cannot be vaccinated, absolutely need mask mandates. Instead of having health care professionals control health issues, we would have the anti-science Republican lawmakers in charge of mask mandates, which is fine if you are dumb enough to believe down is up, hot is cold, bad is good, lies are truth and Donald Trump is Jesus Christ. For truth, justice and the health of our children, I believe Missourians should say no to Schmitt’s efforts. Andrew Reeves • Kirkwood

Along with our freedom and liberty comes responsibility I find it extremely frustrating that the media is dominated by the rantings of the anti-science and antidemocracy minority crazies. Why has no one argued against those who have

appropriated the concept of individual liberty for their own self-serving interests? What has been lost in the public conversation has been the idea of the “common good.” The Constitution’s preamble specifically includes the phrase, “promote the general welfare” as one of the six reasons for establishing the Constitution. If protecting the health of the people is not included under the general welfare, then this phrase has no meaning. We’ve celebrated the concept of individual liberty and freedom to the almost total exclusion of the citizen responsibilities that accompany that freedom. For that failure, I blame our leaders and our media. It is much easier to tell people of their rights and liberties than to remind them that they have duties and responsibilities. Why haven’t we heard an angry response to the rantings of the personal freedom crowd? The recent numerous public acts of insurrection require the strongest pushback. Few of our leaders have had the courage to display the type of righteous anger that our country currently needs. It’s time that our leaders stand up and give a strong voice to the danger to our democracy that is now being created under the false flag of individual liberty. James W. Froehlich • O’Fallon, Mo.

Climate change could cripple Missouri’s corn production Regarding “Biden tours Ida damage, warns climate change ‘here’” (Sept. 7): In the Midwest, climate change has been reduced to a coastal issue — if it’s an issue at all. We would like to believe that we are insulated from the impacts of human-caused changes to our planet’s climate. Unfortunately, this is not the case. The very heart of the midwestern way of life, agriculture, stands to be another victim of the unprecedented shifts in the Earth’s atmosphere. The Corn Belt, which Missouri is a part of, is responsible for 90% of our nation’s corn grain and 30% of the global corn crop. Unaddressed, climate change could reduce corn yields by 40% within the next 30 years. The north Missouri economy, which relies heavily on its grain production, could not stand such a hit to a crop that buttresses the state’s economy. So, what do we do about it? We put a gradual price on carbon. This would allow industries like agriculture to incrementally adjust their operations without the risk of becoming financially insolvent. As large-scale agriculture adapts to more sustainable modes of production, it will do its part in saving the planet (and itself) from the worst-case-scenarios of climate change Trevor Callaway • St. Joseph, Mo.

Gen. Milley’s likeness suited alongside Benedict Arnold Regarding R.J. Matson’s syndicated editorial cartoon on Sept. 21: At first I thought Matson was trying to imply that Gen. Mark Milley might be a candidate for joining the great American presidents sculpted on Mount Rushmore. Then I noticed the subtle way the ribbons on the general’s chest spelled out “Trump is nuts.” In any case, Milley will never belong with the true patriots on that iconic sculpture. If he is put up there, I think we might as well put Benedict Arnold right along side him. John Jackson • Glendale Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

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OTHER VIEWS

09.26.2021 • SUNDAY • M 1 FROM THE EDITORIAL PAGE SEPT. 26, 1992

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A17

PROMISING CHILD-IMMUNIZATION PROGRAM • By the time the 153,000 babies in Missouri reach age 2, fewer than half of them will have received the series of vaccines needed to help ward off illnesses like measles and polio. Though about 85 percent of all Missouri babies get the first phase of immunizations, only, 44 percent get the full range of required booster shots. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Border chaos forces Americans to decide who we really are DHS Secretary told reporters: “Many of the individuals who repatriating is already underway. we encounter claim asylum At the height of the crisis, and have a right to have those More than 1,100 refugees have which occurred around midRUBEN asylum claims heard as our laws been deported back to Haiti — September, an estimated 15,000 NAVARRETTE JR. provide.” without immigration lawyers, refugees — most of them HaiWashington Post Sure enough. Three U.S. offiasylum hearings or due process of tians, including men, women, cials, speaking on condition of children and infants — braved the any kind. This must have been quite con- anonymity, have now disclosed brisk currents of the Rio Grande venient for the Biden administra- to reporters that more than and waded ashore near Del Rio, Some readers think that, as tion. It was also quite un-Ameri- 1,000 Haitians were discreetly Texas. These desperate souls a Mexican American, I have a camped under bridges until they can. The system is already rigged allowed to enter the United soft spot for Latino immigrants. States as part of the legal asyfigured out their next move. That to the point where only about These readers also assume that move depended entirely on what 25% of asylum claims are victori- lum process and given notices my views would harden if we to appear in immigration court ous. Given that the chances are confronted a wave of immigrants U.S. authorities decided to do slim to none, it’s cruel and unfair within 60 days. with these uninvited guests. who were non-Latino. The one thing that, it seems, to take away “slim.” Until a few days ago, the plan Well, here we are. Thousands no one can explain is how these Meanwhile, just the rumor of U.S. authorities was simple: of migrants and refugees are life-altering decisions are made. of impending deportations was deport scores of people back crossing the U.S.-Mexico borDoes the border patrol flip a enough to send thousands of to Haiti, as quickly and quietly der into Texas. And they’re not Haitians retreating back to Mex- coin? Some migrants go back to as possible. Authorities told coming from Mexico or Central Port-au-Prince, while others reporters that they were going to ico. But, in all likelihood, they’ll America. They’re from Haiti. get to go on to Portland? be back in Texas soon enough to remove as many as 1,000 people And I’m facing a bit of a Many of those headed back try their luck again. per day on what will eventually conundrum. Why not? The Biden adminis- to the Caribbean haven’t lived be seven daily flights. I don’t suppose the White in Haiti for more than a decade. tration changes its immigration There was even a rough timeHouse can help me sort this out. policy on a whim, sending mixed They left after the devastatThe Oval Office is overwhelmed. line. According to Homeland ing 2010 earthquake. They’ve signals to the desperate. Security Secretary Alejandro It’s hard to say which is more been living in South America, First, Mayorkas announces Mayorkas, the entire initiative chaotic: the madness at the in countries such as Chile or that Haitians should not come U.S.-Mexico border, or the Biden could be carried out over nine or Colombia. It makes no sense to Texas, or they will be appreadministration’s incoherent strat- 10 days, which would take us to hended and sent home to Haiti. to send these poor people to a egy for dealing with the madness the beginning of October. place they no longer recognize, Then, a few days later, the Now we learn that the at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Biden administration sends inconsistent messages to desperate immigrants.

where — after a series of catastrophic earthquakes, floods and mudslides — nothing awaits them but destruction and despair. Now back to my conundrum. It turns out I don’t have one after all. Just because the Biden administration is inconsistent and flip-flops between contradictory policies doesn’t mean I have to do the same. If they can make it to one of our borders or ports of entry, any desperate person in the world has the absolute right to plead their case and roll the dice in a U.S. asylum hearing. Of course, these people don’t have the right to stay permanently in the United States. They must earn that. But they have the right to try. In America, that’s how we roll. And it explains why this land of second chances is often the first choice for many of those searching for new lives. About that, we ought to be damn proud. Ruben Navarrette ruben@rubennavarrette.com Copyright The Washington Post

Leaderless GOP rushes headlong toward default Nobody is left to stop the ‘crazies’ from sabotaging American prosperity.

DANA MILBANK Washington Post

DANIEL SHULAR, DSHULAR@POST-DISPATCH.COM

A detective shines a flashlight on a stuffed animal while investigating a quadruple shooting near the intersection of 20th Street and St. Charles Street in the Downtown West neighborhood of St. Louis on Monday.

In the crossfire On crime, Mayor Tishaura Jones deserves credit for looking past her base, to her city. KEVIN MCDERMOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

There was an unfortunate but telling juxtaposition of headlines on the PostDispatch’s website early last week. “Man killed, three hurt in ‘egregious’ shootings at vigil in Downtown West neighborhood,” read one. Another announced: “Social justice groups criticize Jones’ plan to boost downtown St. Louis police presence.” That’s Mayor Tishaura Jones, who finds herself in the crossfire, so to speak, between the “defund the police” philosophy that got her elected — and that her base still demands of her — and the reality of leading one of the most violent cities in America. Jones was swept into office this year with the strong backing of progressive activists like her, who believe the way to address violent crime is by alleviating its root societal causes: poverty, racism, lack of education, lack of opportunity. There’s no doubt that those factors are, in fact, at the root of violent crime. Anyone who believes criminals are born rather than made must also believe it’s mere coincidence that today, as throughout history, the most impoverished areas just happen to be the most crime-ridden, with no cause-and-effect there. If you believe that, I have a big steel arch to sell you. Another pillar of belief among Jones and her base supporters is that traditional police culture is so rife with racism, so prone to abuse its power when interacting with people of color, that communities are better off with fewer cops. While most Americans — including most of us who consider ourselves liberals — don’t fully embrace that belief, it isn’t baseless. The whole

country watched last year as George Floyd’s life ebbed away under the knee of a Minneapolis cop, the crescendo of a pattern of horrific police killings of Black men in recent years that winds through Baltimore, Cleveland, New York, Chicago and, of course, Ferguson. Anyone who says there’s no racism problem in America’s police culture should also get in line for that arch sale. But the fact that Black citizens are disproportionately victimized by police violence (and they are) shouldn’t obscure the fact that they are also the primary victims of violent crime in general. Arch City Defenders, one of the social-justice groups criticizing Jones for sending more cops downtown, has documented 179 deaths, the majority of them Black, in police custody or in jails in the St. Louis region between 2009 and 2019. That’s an average of about 18 police-involved deaths per year, which is appalling. But St. Louis city has logged more than 140 homicides so far this year alone. And 130 of those victims were Black. Most violent crime doesn’t happen in a vacuum. When general chaos is allowed to reign, as it has downtown all summer, it provides an environment for tragedies like last week’s quadruple shooting at a Downtown West vigil for still another homicide victim. In that light, Jones’ plan to rotate in 30 additional officers to patrol downtown on weekends in response to the mayhem there isn’t a threat to Black residents, but a lifeline. Though you wouldn’t know that from the statement put out last week by a coalition of social-justice groups. The statement said that “doubling down on increased policing endangers vulnerable St. Louisans instead of keeping our communities safe.” It noted that the organizations have been supportive of Jones’ initial moves to shift money away

from police staffing and toward things like affordable housing and victim support services, but bemoaned that the addition of cops downtown “is not in line with a transformative approach to public safety.” This feels a little like chiding firemen for turning their hoses on a burning building, insisting they should instead be pondering the root causes of the fire. Philosophical purity untethered to messy reality is a luxury that activists can afford, but sitting mayors generally can’t. Not long ago, Jones herself might have been expected to be an author of that kind of activist statement, instead of its target. But she has by no means turned her back on their core beliefs. She’s not hiring new cops, for example (even though the strong case can be made that new hires are needed), but is just increasing police visibility in a crime hot spot in order to cool it down. That’s not some betrayal of progressivism; it’s common sense. To those on the left who are upset about it: What would you have her do? Seriously. When a city’s people — poor people, Black people, children — are being effectively terrorized by criminals, mayors don’t get to shrug it off as a symptom of long-term societal illness that will be cured over time with “a transformative approach to public safety.” People are scared, now, and they expect their political leaders to do something about it. Jones deserves credit for having the guts to look past her base, to her city. If posting more cops downtown turns out to be merely a stopgap measure to stanch the blood until society can address the underlying issues that drive the violence — good. Great. But in the meantime, just ignoring the bleeding in the here-and-now isn’t an option. Kevin McDermott is a Post-Dispatch columnist and Editorial Board member. On Twitter: @kevinmcdermott Email: kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com

“Unfortunately, Congress consistently brings the government to the edge of default before facing its responsibility. This brinkmanship threatens the holders of government bonds and those who rely on Social Security and veterans benefits. Interest rates would skyrocket, instability would occur in financial markets, and the federal deficit would soar. The United States has a special responsibility to itself and the world to meet its obligations.” — President Ronald Reagan, Sept. 26, 1987 This is not Ronald Reagan’s Republican Party. Neither is it the party of the Republican Revolution of ’94, the tea-party-infused GOP of 2010, nor even the Republican Party that surrendered to Donald Trump in 2016. No, this new version of the GOP is at once so radical and so lacking in responsible leadership that it is plunging headlong and unified toward forcing default on the full faith and credit of the United States. Congressional Republicans are inviting economic calamity. Reagan presided over 18 increases in the debt ceiling during his presidency. George W. Bush’s treasury secretary, Paul O’Neill, compared those who opposed raising the limit to “terrorists.” Former Republican House speaker John Boehner called it “insanity” to hold the debt limit hostage — and those who did it “crazies.” There have been squabbles over the debt limit for decades, including some near misses, but the United States has never defaulted on the debt its two parties have jointly accumulated. Though crazies threatened default, grownups in the GOP — Bob Dole, Boehner, an earlier incarnation of Mitch McConnell — pulled them back from the abyss. Until now. The crazies are in charge. McConnell, the Senate GOP leader, says flatly that he won’t vote to increase the debt ceiling, and he isn’t even negotiating. “That’s their problem,” he says of the Democrats. And Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Tex., has threatened to filibuster any debt-ceiling increase, which means Democrats can’t avoid default unless 10 Republican senators agree. If Republicans don’t budge, they would leave the U.S. economy hanging by a thread, potentially forcing Democrats to raise the ceiling by rewriting and passing a massive (and filibusterimmune) budget reconciliation package in a matter of days. It’s the legislative equivalent of passing a camel through the eye of a needle. As The Washington Post’s venerable congressional correspondent Paul Kane notes, Republicans have entirely invented this new standard that Democrats alone

are responsible for increasing the limit: “Almost every time the debt ceiling has been lifted, it has been done in bipartisan fashion under the regular Senate order that requires at least 60 votes to end debate on the legislation.” The hypocrisy is stunning. McConnell has voted to increase or suspend the debt limit 32 times, including thrice under Trump, who added $7.8 trillion to the debt, The Washington Post’s Jeff Stein reported. About 97% of the current debt existed before Joe Biden’s presidency; McConnell and his GOP colleagues are refusing to finance the debt they already incurred because they object to other spending that has merely been proposed. How did Republicans get to this sorry state? It began with Newt Gingrich, who as House speaker in 1995 led his party to suspend the “Gephardt Rule,” which automatically increased the debt limit with each year’s budget. Gingrich threatened default if President Bill Clinton didn’t agree to spending cuts. “I don’t care if we have no executive offices and no bonds for 60 days,” he said. But ultimately, he settled for relatively minor concessions. When Republicans regained power in the House in 2011, they repealed the Gephardt Rule for good, guaranteeing perpetual debt-limit brinkmanship. Boehner pleaded with Republicans to be “adults” and told them to “get your ass in line,” but his crazies refused to budge, and finally, on the cusp of default and after a downgrading of the U.S. debt rating, President Barack Obama agreed to Republicans’ spending cuts. McConnell concluded he enjoyed playing chicken with the nation’s credit. “It’s a hostage that’s worth ransoming,” he said then. So Republicans held the debt limit hostage again in 2013. Then, newbie senator Cruz forced a government shutdown in a doomed attempt to get Obama to agree to a repeal of Obamacare. It was a political disaster for Republicans, and as the shuttered federal government approached a default deadline, Boehner ordered Republicans to surrender. The following year, only some last-minute arm twisting by McConnell thwarted another Cruz attempt to block yet another debt-limit increase. “Nobody was proud of the fact that we had to keep voting to raise the ceiling,” Boehner later wrote in his memoir. “But not voting to raise the ceiling meant that government would stop running. The country wouldn’t be able to pay its bills and would risk going into default on the money we owed.” Now, Boehner is long gone, and McConnell rivals Cruz in his reckless handling of default. With the government now teetering on the edge of default and shutdown, there is simply nobody left to stop Republican crazies from sabotaging Americans’ prosperity. Dana Milbank @Milbank Copyright The Washington Post


A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

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A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • SEPTEMBER.26.2021

OBITUARIES

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Alfred, Neal B. - St. Louis

Gianino, Carmelo - St. Louis

Powers, Linda - Chesterfield

Amsler, Cynthia "Cindy" - Queen Creek, AZ

Haddad, Robert P. "Bob" - Webster Groves, MO

Rambo, Anna Kathleen "Kathy" - St. Louis

Arendt, Edward F. - St. Louis

Hoester, Elaine Douglass - St. Louis

Robinson, Virginia Hill - Winston-Salem, NC

Asher, Dorilla E. "Dee" - St. Louis

Huskey, Ellis Grant - St. Louis

Schrieber, Winona Jean - St. Louis

Beachum, Nancy C. - St. Louis

Jansen, Marian - St. Louis

Schulte, Jeffrey A. - St. Louis

Bearden, Teri Lynn (Valentine) - Sappington, MO

Jones, William R. - St. Louis

Shinkle - See Charles

Beckert - See Jansen

Karcher, Raymond Eugene - St. Louis

Smith, Gene - Santa Cruz, CA formerly of St. Louis

Borgmeyer - See Tichenor

Kolaski, Richard T. - Chesterfield, MO

Spielberg, Martin Norman - St. Louis

Bosecker - See Tichenor

Lampert, Rev. Robert E. - St. Louis

Swanson, William Donald - Wilkes-Barre, PA

Brais, Ann E. - Maryland Heights, MO

Lesher, James Calvin - St. Louis

Teasdale, John Warren - Fairfield Bay, AR

Bremehr, Sue A. - Crestwood

Littleton, Janice S. "Jan" - Arnold, MO

Thieret, William - Ballwin, MO

Charles, Alexandra Keeler - St. Louis

Marquardt-Wilde, Bernita B. "Bernie" - Arnold

Tichenor, Joan - St. Louis

Coughlin, Margot A. - St. Louis

Minderman, Dean C. - St. Louis

Veach, Janie G. - Florissant, MO

Danforth, William H., MD - St. Louis

Minderman, Richard D. - St. Louis

Vogel, Theodore "Ted" - Florissant

Darlow, Richard - St. Louis

Neitzert, Edward Henry - St. Louis

Ward, Lisa K. - St. Louis

DeVivo, Mary R. - Jennings, MO

Ojile, Joseph Elias - St. Louis

Watts D.O., Russell W. - Ferguson

Erdelen, Kevin P. - St. Louis

Patterson, Maria E. - St. Louis

White, Lawrence C. - St. Louis

Frank, Joseph A. - St. Louis

Patty, Billy Don - Wentzville, MO

White, Melba Summers - St. Louis

Gennaro, Carmela - St. Louis

Peterson, Arlene E. - St. Louis

Williams, Vivian - St. Peters, MO

Charles, Alexandra Keeler

Alfred, Neal B.

on September 18, 2021. Beloved husband of the late Marilyn J. "Jeannie" Alfred (nee Utley); loving father of Amanda (Bryan) Bartsch, Lindsay (the late Jason) Boyet and Joseph (Carrie) Alfred; cherished PaPa of Tyler, Caitlyn, Sam and the late Noah Bartsch, Jillian and Sydney Boyet and Julia Jean Alfred; our dear son, son-in-law, brother, brother-inlaw, uncle, nephew, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at Kutis South County Chapel on Thursday 9/30 from 4-8PM with a service at 7PM. Burial will be in Marmaduke, AR.

Amsler, Cynthia "Cindy"

(nee Ritzie) of Queen Creek, Arizona passed away peacefully on August 2, 2021. She is survived by her husband Kevin, daughters Jennifer (Michael) Lawhead, Kristen (Brett) Palmer, Kimberly (Rodney) Banks, 7 grandchildren, her mother, Mary Ellen Ritzie and siblings Robert (Cheryl) Ritzie, Linda (Carl) Brown, Mary (Steve) Brotherton and Janet (Steve) Kieffer. Services: A Memorial Mass will be held at St. Francis of Assisi Church on October 2 at 11:00 a.m. and will be live streamed at sfastl.org/live. In lieu of flowers, consider donations in her name to St. Vincent DePaul Society, St. Francis of Assisi Church, 4556 Telegraph Rd., St. Louis, MO 63129.

Arendt, Edward F.

St. Louis. Mo, 99, passed on Sep 12th, 2021; loving husband of Dorothy L. Arendt (nee Dunahugh) Loving father of a son Michael E. Arendt a river boat Cap't. Mr. Arendt was born on Feb 17th, 1922. Was in the Navy. A WWII Veteran. Mr. Arendt internment at Jefferson Barracks VA national cemetery with loving wife Dorothy.

Asher, Dorilla E. "Dee"

Monday, September 20, 2021. Private services will be held at the Coldwater Methodist Cemetery. Kutis Affton Service.

Beachum, Nancy C.

nee Anderson, passed away September 19, 2021. For more information please visit www.Ziegenheinfuneralhome.com

Bearden, Teri Lynn (Valentine)

of Sunset Hills, MO passed away on September 15, 2021. She was preceded in death by her husband Patrick Bearden as well as her parents Nanette and Robert Wright, and Clarance Valentine along with many other beloved friends and family. Teri is survived by her two daughters; Emily Stelzer (Tom) of Washington, MO and Taylor Bearden of St. Louis, MO; grandchildren Eleanor and Henry Stelzer; siblings, Dan Valentine (Cindy), Jill Riecker (Rob) and Joseph Wright as well as several adored nieces and nephews. As owner and operator of Merb's Candies since the 1980s, she was very proud to be a local, woman-owned business which has been satisfying St. Louis' sweet tooth since the 1920s. She always said that everything made at Merb's, was "made with love", and it truly was. She put her heart and soul into making Merb's Candies the St. Louis staple that we all know and love. A true philanthropist, Teri supported many local charities and volunteered her time and talents offering to do just about anything that was asked of her. She was a very generous and loving woman who never wanted to say "no" when someone would ask for her help. She was told on numerous occasions that she was "donating more product than she was making." Among the things Teri was most passionate about were traveling, crafting, spoiling her dogs, bringing home special collectibles and antiques she found, and spending time with loved ones. Teri was a breast cancer survivor and most recently, a recipient of an organ transplant. If you are not already a registered organ donor, we encourage you to become one. If desired, memorial contributions may be made to one of these in her honor: The Sick and Elderly Program of the Hill sickandelderly.com or Mid-America Transplant Foundation. midamericatransplant.org Services: A celebration of life will be held for Teri Bearden on October 3, 2021 with a private gathering. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Brais, Ann E.

Wed., 9/15/21. Visitation Tues., 9/28, 9:30-10:30 at Colliers Funeral Home (St. Ann). Funeral Mass Tues., 11, Holy Spirit Church (Maryland Heights). Colliersfuneralhomes.com

Bremehr, Sue A.

(nee Smith), Sue A. Bremehr, fortified with the Sacrament of Holy Mother Church, Tuesday, September 21, 2021 at the age of 64. Beloved wife of Thomas Bremehr for 22 years; loving mother of Eddie Nappier and Amanda (Jim) Hurst; proud grandma of Lucas and Kim; cherished daughter of June Smith and the late George Smith; special daughter-in-law to Fran and the late Ken Bremehr; sister-in-law to Dan (Cheryl) Bremehr, Laurie (Bob) Czerniewski and David (Kathleen) Bremehr; loving aunt, cousin and cherished friend to many. Dog lover to Lucy. Sue was the backbone of Christmas in Crestwood and to the Crestwood community. She was so selfless and always put everyone else first. She was 100% family oriented and a friend to everyone she met. There will be a Memorial Mass on Wednesday, September 29, 2021 at 11 a.m. at St. Elizabeth - St. Raymond Maronite Catholic Church, 1420 S. Sappington Rd., Crestwood, MO 63126. Family welcoming guests at 10 a.m. before Sue's Celebration of Life Mass at 11 a.m. Sue will be dearly missed by all who knew her because to know her was to love her. In lieu of flowers, Masses preferred. “To live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die.” THOMAS CAMPBELL

of St. Louis, died on Monday, Sept. 20, 2021, at the age of 42. Alexandra was the daughter of Sumner Sewall Charles and Victoria Shinkle Charles. She is also survived by her dearly loved older brother, Sumner S. Charles, Jr., his wife Jennifer and their sons, Sumner and Walker. Alexandra graduated from MICDS, earned a B.A. from Duke University and a Master of Social Work from Washington University. In addition to her quick mind, Alexandra possessed exceptional musical skills. She played the piano and had a lovely voice of operatic quality. She had an infectious laugh and cared deeply for those around her. She was creative, making and selling jewelry and painting and rejuvenating old furniture. She excelled at tennis and was a terrific swimmer. Alexandra will be deeply and eternally mourned by all those who loved her. In addition to her parents and brother she will be sorely missed by her aunt Lucile Field Shinkle; aunt Sudie Black Shinkle; uncle Bradford Shinkle, III, his wife Adaline and their children, Whitney Shinkle Rider and Brian Bradford Shinkle of Minneapolis; and her dog and best friend, Lily. Alexandra was predeceased by her greatly adored uncle, Brian Johnson Shinkle. Many of Alexandra's happiest days were spent in Maine at both her family's summer home and as a student at The Maine Coast Semester, a challenging program offered by Camp Chewonki. Alexandra will be interred in the Sewall Private Grounds at Oak Grove Cemetery in Bath, Maine. Services: The family will receive friends at THE LUPTON CHAPEL 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City, on Tuesday, Sept. 28th, from 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made in memory of Alexandra to The Maine Coast Semester at Chewonki, 485 Chewonki Neck Rd., Wiscasset, ME 04578 or to a charity of one's choice. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Coughlin, Margot A.

September 21, 2021, age 87. Vis. Tues., Sept. 28, 4-6 pm Baue Cave Springs. Funeral Wed., Sept. 29, 10 am, St. Monica Catholic Church 12140 Olive Blvd. Visit baue.com

Danforth, William H., MD

A memorial service celebrating the life of Washington University Chancellor Emeritus William H. Danforth, MD, will be held at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 2, in Graham Chapel on the university's Danforth Campus. Danforth, who served as chancellor for 24 of his more than 65 years of service to Washington University, died Sept. 16, 2020, at his home in Ladue, Mo. He was 94. A livestreamed broadcast of the service can be viewed in Brookings Quadrangle and Edison Theatre; all three locations are wheelchair accessible. The recorded livestream will be available at https://tinyurl.com/wdmemorial beginning at 11:30 a.m. CT Oct. 2. For information about COVID-19 safety protocols in place, please visit https://covid19.wustl.edu /health-safety/ before coming to campus. Parking is available in Millbrook Garage, Danforth University Center Garage and East End Garage. For questions, call 833-284-4698 or email specialevents@wustl.edu.

Haddad, Robert P. "Bob"

of Webster Groves, MO, passed away peacefully with family at his side in Houston, Texas at the age of 89 on September 17, 2021. He was born March 21, 1932 in Boston, Massachusetts to Helen (Kanaan) and George Haddad. Following graduation from Norwood High School in 1949, Bob joined the Air Force and served as an intelligence officer. He was stationed in Japan at the Tachikawa Air Base during the Korean War. After his service Bob worked at the Pentagon for the Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in Washington DC. There he met his lifelong love, Jan. They married and moved to St. Louis where they made their home. Bob worked as a cartographer for the Defense Mapping Agency and retired in 1991. Bob was the beloved husband of the late Jan Davis Haddad. They were married for 62 years at the time of Jan's passing in 2019. He was the loving father of Paula (husband Paschall) and Michael (wife Anna); cherished grandfather of Hannah, Will, Gabriel, and James; dear brother to Ralph. He was predeceased by his brother George and twin Ron. Bob enjoyed hunting, fishing, gardening, and most of all, golfing. Bob was a member of the Knights of Columbus, Boy Scouts (served as Scout Master Troop 302) and of Annunciation Catholic Church. He is remembered for his wit, charm, and steadfast faith. Services: Visitation will be September 30th from 10:00 - 11:00am at Annunciation Catholic Church, 12 W. Glendale Rd, Webster Groves, MO 63119. Following visitation, a Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 11:00am. Interment with Full Military Honors at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery will be at 12:30pm. In lieu of flowers, contributions in Bob's memory to Annunciation Catholic Church are greatly appreciated by his family. Family served by Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary.

Hoester, Elaine Douglass

94, passed into peace on September 17, 2021. Hers was a life of simple joys, kindness to others and devotion to her husband the late Honorable Robert G.J. Hoester and children. No strangers to adversity she and Bob believed in self sacrifice, responsibility, honor and service to others. Elaine had a quiet strength and a loving heart that was constant. She was patient, thoughtful and wise. She was never happier than when her nose was in a good mystery book or in her weekly bouquet of flowers. She is survived by her brother Byron Douglass, her children Greg Hoester and Tina Hoester (Alan Carney) nieces, nephews and grandchildren. The late Douglass (Robin) Hoester, their youngest son preceded her death in 2017. There will be a small celebration of her life at a later date. https://www.stlfuneral.com/obituaries/?filter=hoester

Huskey, Ellis Grant

Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, on the 19th day of September 2021, at the age of 84. Beloved husband of Dianne; cherished father of Richard (Jocelyn), Lynn (Scott) Antle, and Jeff (Andrea); devoted grandfather of Susan Huskey, Ashleigh Huskey, Alexandra Antle, Noah Antle, Sabrina Antle, Jacob Huskey and Jenna Huskey; dear brother-in-law, uncle, and friend to many. Services: Visitation, Wed., Sept. 29th from 4-8 p.m. at John L. Ziegenhein & Sons Funeral Home, 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63129). Funeral, Thurs., Sept. 30th, 10 a.m. at Lutheran Church of the Resurrection, 9907 Sappington Rd. (63128). Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

Jansen, Marian

(nee Mersinger) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Wednesday, September 22, 2021. Beloved wife of the late Clement H. Jansen; dear mother of Janice (Carolyn Turnbough) Darlow, Richard Entered into rest Tuesday, September 21, 2021 at age 75. Beloved Beckert; dear grandmother of Claire (David) Smith, Eric Beckert, brother of Jeanette Boehm; dear uncle of Robert (Nora), Philip Anne Beckert and Nicole (Andrew McKim) Beckert; dear (Sherry) and Rebecca Boehm; dear great-uncle, cousin, friend and great-grandmother of Daniel and Ian Smith; dear sister of Dorothy Bartnett and Arlene (Francis) Vien. Our dear aunt, cousin and retiree of MODOT. friend. Services: Visitation Monday, September 27, at New Services: Funeral from Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Apostolic Church (9701 Mackenzie) 4 p.m. until service at 7 Tuesday, September 28, 8:45 a.m. to Cure of Ars Catholic Church p.m. A SERVICE OF KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL. for 9:15 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B. National cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Heifer International DeVivo, Mary R. (heifer.org). Marian was an avid Bridge player and loved Age 62. Passed away Sept. 19, 2021. Was a longtime dancing. Visitation Monday 4-8 p.m. resident of Jennings, MO. Will be missed. Private services were held at Buchholz Mortuary. Jones, William R. Thurs., Sept. 16, 2021. Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON, Erdelen, Kevin P. 10151 Gravois, Sat., Oct. 2, 9 a.m. until funeral passed away September 22, 2021. Visit Tues. Sept 28, 4-8pm service at 11 a.m. Inurnment Resurrection Hutchens, Florissant. Service Wed. Sept 29, 10am, Hutchens. Cemetery. Burial Sacred Heart Cem., Florissant. Hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Frank, Joseph A.

October 30, 1930 - Tues., September 21, 2021. Husband of the late Cicely Fay; father of Denise (Larry), Mark (Darla) and Brad; son of the late Joseph and Emma; brother of the late Kurt H. (Joann). Served in US Army 1953 - 1955 and teacher with Mehlville School District 1956 - 1988. Services: Private burial at Sunset Memorial Park. Services by Kutis Affton Chapel.

Gennaro, Carmela V.

September 19, 2021. Visitation at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, September 28, 4-7 p.m. and Wednesday, 10 a.m. until funeral service at 11 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery.

Karcher, Raymond Eugene

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, on September 20, 2021. Husband of the late Dolores P. Karcher; father of Dan (Anne), Tim (Sandy), Ken (Rose), Doug (Crystal), and Greg (Chris); grandfather of Molly (Kyle Flynn), Libby (Brian Backer), Kimberly (Scott Allan), Katie, Grace, Emily, Collin, Allison, and Rachel; great-grandfather to Sylvia and Ethan; brother of Wilbert (Claudette) and the late Joseph (the late Norma); dear uncle and

friend to many. Services: Visit. Sunday, 9/26 from 4-8pm at John L. Gianino, Carmelo Ziegenhein & Sons Funeral Home (4830 Lemay Monday, September 13, 2021. Beloved husband of the late Ferry Rd.) Funeral Service Monday, 9/27 at 11am at St. Delores M. Gianino (nee Duewell); cherished father of Margaret Mary Alacoque Church (4900 Ringer Rd.) Gary (Sue) and Steve (Becky) Gianino; loving grandfather Interment Jefferson Barracks. of Vicki (Ryan) Jennings, Nick (Amanda ) Gianino, Valerie (Tony) Colombo, Sarah (Richard) Weimar, Ruth, David (Amanda) and Kolaski, Richard T. Daniel Gianino; great grandfather to 10; brother of the late Joe Gianino; dear brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend age 83 passed away Sunday, September 19, 2021. Visitation at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Tuesday, 4:00 - 8:00 to many. Services: Memorial visitation at St. Martin of Tours Church, pm. For more info see Schrader.com. Monday, September 27, 9 a.m. until Mass at 10 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the Lampert, Rev. Robert E. Greater St. Louis Honor Flight, 8050 Watson Rd., Suite 240, Fortified with the Sacraments of (63119) appreciated. A Kutis South County service. Holy Mother Church, Friday, September 17, 2021. Beloved son of the late William and Helen (nee McDonald) Lampert; dear brother of the late Pat Wolf; dear uncle and friend. Services: Vigil at St. Anselm Catholic Church (530 South Mason Rd. 63141) Monday, September 27; 7:00-9:00 p.m. Funeral Mass at St. SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE Vincent de Paul Chapel at Cardinal Rigali Center (20 Archbishop Dr. 63119) Tuesday, September 28 at 9:30 a.m. Interment Calvary Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to Oblate School of Theology, 285 Oblate Dr., San Antonio, TX 78216 or Benet Hill Monastery, 3190 Benet Ln., Colorado Springs, CO 80921 appreciated. A service of KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL

THEM GREAT

STLtoday.com/obits

“A great soul serves everyone all the time. A great soul never dies. It brings us together again and again.” MAYA ANGELOU


A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

OBITUARIES

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Acsay, Paul - St. Louis

Haddad, Robert P. "Bob" - Webster Groves, MO

Powers, Linda - Chesterfield

Alfred, Neal B. - St. Louis

Hoester, Elaine Douglass - St. Louis

Provow, Linda Marie - Town & Country, MO

Amsler, Cynthia "Cindy" - Queen Creek, AZ

Huskey, Ellis Grant - St. Louis

Rambo, Anna Kathleen "Kathy" - St. Louis

Arendt, Edward F. - St. Louis

Jansen, Marian - St. Louis

Robinson, Virginia Hill - Winston-Salem, NC

Asher, Dorilla E. "Dee" - St. Louis

Jones, William R. - St. Louis

Schneider, Jean Madeline - St. Louis

Beachum, Nancy C. - St. Louis

Karcher, Raymond Eugene - St. Louis

Schrieber, Winona Jean - St. Louis

Bearden, Teri Lynn (Valentine) - Sappington, MO

Koehler, John D. - St. Louis

Schulte, Jeffrey A. - St. Louis

Beckert - See Jansen

Kolaski, Richard T. - Chesterfield, MO

Shinkle - See Charles

Blumenkemper, John H. - St. Louis

Kulengowski, Jean - St. Peters

Smith, Gene - Santa Cruz, CA formerly of St. Louis

Borgmeyer - See Tichenor

Kunz, Myrna L. - St. Louis

Spielberg, Martin Norman - St. Louis

Bosecker - See Tichenor

Lampert, Rev. Robert E. - St. Louis

Swanson, William Donald - Wilkes-Barre, PA

Brais, Ann E. - Maryland Heights, MO

Lesher, James Calvin - St. Louis

Talbert, Richard E. - Wright City, MO

Bremehr, Sue A. - Crestwood

Littleton, Janice S. "Jan" - Arnold, MO

Teasdale, John Warren - Fairfield Bay, AR

Charles, Alexandra Keeler - St. Louis

Mallett, Mary Lee - St. Louis

Thieret, William - Ballwin, MO

Coughlin, Margot A. - St. Louis

Marquardt-Wilde, Bernita B. "Bernie" - Arnold

Tichenor, Joan - St. Louis

Danforth, William H., MD - St. Louis

Minderman, Dean C. - St. Louis

Veach, Janie G. - Florissant, MO

Darlow, Richard - St. Louis

Minderman, Richard D. - St. Louis

Vogel, Theodore "Ted" - Florissant

DeVivo, Mary R. - Jennings, MO

Neitzert, Edward Henry - St. Louis

Ward, Lisa K. - St. Louis

Erdelen, Kevin P. - St. Louis

Ojile, Joseph Elias - St. Louis

Watts D.O., Russell W. - Ferguson

Frank, Joseph A. - St. Louis

Patterson, Maria E. - St. Louis

White, Lawrence C. - St. Louis

Gennaro, Carmela - St. Louis

Patty, Billy Don - Wentzville, MO

White, Melba Summers - St. Louis

Gianino, Carmelo - St. Louis

Peterson, Arlene E. - St. Louis

Williams, Vivian - St. Peters, MO

Blumenkemper, John H.

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Wednesday, September 22, 2021. Beloved son of Henry Blumenkemper, and the late Patricia K. (Petri) Blumenkemper, dear brother of Robert (Cindy), Mary (Ron) Porterfield, Tom (Lisa), Henry Jr. (Heather); dear uncle of Bradley, Steven, Emily, Maggie, Andrew, Natalie, Dominic, Hazel, Henry III, and Austin; loving cousin, friend, and neighbor. Services: Visitation at St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Catholic Church (4900 Ringer Rd., 63129), Friday, October 1, 9:30 a.m. until Funeral Mass 11 a.m. Interment at Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Catholic Church appreciated.

Acsay, Paul

Age 69, passed away Tuesday, September 21, 2021. Paul was born in St Louis on June 2, 1952. Son of the late Dennis and Anna Acsay; brother of Denise, Peter and George (Kimberly) Acsay. He was a graduate of Nativity School, McBride High School, Florissant Valley Community College, and SIU-E. A proud Boy Scout and Explorer and loved Shaw's Garden and the Sheldon. Uncle, Godparent, raconteur, historian and great friend to many as well as a trivia champ. A gathering to share memories will be held at Pat Connolly Tavern on October 2, from 2 to 6 pm. Share condolences at https: /stlouiscremation.com

Alfred, Neal B.

on September 18, 2021. Beloved husband of the late Marilyn J. "Jeannie" Alfred (nee Utley); loving father of Amanda (Bryan) Bartsch, Lindsay (the late Jason) Boyet and Joseph (Carrie) Alfred; cherished PaPa of Tyler, Caitlyn, Sam and the late Noah Bartsch, Jillian and Sydney Boyet and Julia Jean Alfred; our dear son, son-in-law, brother, brother-inlaw, uncle, nephew, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at Kutis South County Chapel on Thursday 9/30 from 4-8PM with a service at 7PM. Burial will be in Marmaduke, AR.

Amsler, Cynthia "Cindy"

(nee Ritzie) of Queen Creek, Arizona passed away peacefully on August 2, 2021. She is survived by her husband Kevin, daughters Jennifer (Michael) Lawhead, Kristen (Brett) Palmer, Kimberly (Rodney) Banks, 7 grandchildren, her mother, Mary Ellen Ritzie and siblings Robert (Cheryl) Ritzie, Linda (Carl) Brown, Mary (Steve) Brotherton and Janet (Steve) Kieffer. Services: A Memorial Mass will be held at St. Francis of Assisi Church on October 2 at 11:00 a.m. and will be live streamed at sfastl.org/live. In lieu of flowers, consider donations in her name to St. Vincent DePaul Society, St. Francis of Assisi Church, 4556 Telegraph Rd., St. Louis, MO 63129.

Arendt, Edward F.

St. Louis. Mo, 99, passed on Sep 12th, 2021; loving husband of Dorothy L. Arendt (nee Dunahugh) Loving father of a son Michael E. Arendt a river boat Cap't. Mr. Arendt was born on Feb 17th, 1922. Was in the Navy. A WWII Veteran. Mr. Arendt internment at Jefferson Barracks VA national cemetery with loving wife Dorothy.

Asher, Dorilla E. "Dee"

Monday, September 20, 2021. Private services will be held at the Coldwater Methodist Cemetery. Kutis Affton Service.

Beachum, Nancy C.

nee Anderson, passed away September 19, 2021. For more information please visit www.Ziegenheinfuneralhome.com

Bearden, Teri Lynn (Valentine)

of Sunset Hills, MO passed away on September 15, 2021. She was preceded in death by her husband Patrick Bearden as well as her parents Nanette and Robert Wright, and Clarance Valentine along with many other beloved friends and family. Teri is survived by her two daughters; Emily Stelzer (Tom) of Washington, MO and Taylor Bearden of St. Louis, MO; grandchildren Eleanor and Henry Stelzer; siblings, Dan Valentine (Cindy), Jill Riecker (Rob) and Joseph Wright as well as several adored nieces and nephews. As owner and operator of Merb's Candies since the 1980s, she was very proud to be a local, woman-owned business which has been satisfying St. Louis' sweet tooth since the 1920s. She always said that everything made at Merb's, was "made with love", and it truly was. She put her heart and soul into making Merb's Candies the St. Louis staple that we all know and love. A true philanthropist, Teri supported many local charities and volunteered her time and talents offering to do just about anything that was asked of her. She was a very generous and loving woman who never wanted to say "no" when someone would ask for her help. She was told on numerous occasions that she was "donating more product than she was making." Among the things Teri was most passionate about were traveling, crafting, spoiling her dogs, bringing home special collectibles and antiques she found, and spending time with loved ones. Teri was a breast cancer survivor and most recently, a recipient of an organ transplant. If you are not already a registered organ donor, we encourage you to become one. If desired, memorial contributions may be made to one of these in her honor: The Sick and Elderly Program of the Hill sickandelderly.com or Mid-America Transplant Foundation. midamericatransplant.org Services: A celebration of life will be held for Teri Bearden on October 3, 2021 with a private gathering. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

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Frank, Joseph A.

October 30, 1930 - Tues., September 21, 2021. Husband of the late Cicely Fay; father of Denise (Larry), Mark (Darla) and Brad; son of the late Joseph and Emma; brother of the late Kurt H. (Joann). Served in US Army 1953 - 1955 and teacher with Mehlville School District 1956 - 1988. Services: Private burial at Sunset Memorial Park. Services by Kutis Affton Chapel.

Gennaro, Carmela V.

September 19, 2021. Visitation at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, September 28, 4-7 p.m. and Wednesday, 10 a.m. until funeral service at 11 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery.

Gianino, Carmelo

Monday, September 13, 2021. Beloved husband of the late Delores M. Gianino (nee Duewell); cherished father of Gary (Sue) and Steve (Becky) Gianino; loving grandfather of Vicki (Ryan) Jennings, Nick (Amanda ) Gianino, Valerie (Tony) Colombo, Sarah (Richard) Weimar, Ruth, David (Amanda) and Brais, Ann E. Daniel Gianino; great grandfather to 10; brother of the late Joe Wed., 9/15/21. Visitation Tues., 9/28, 9:30-10:30 at Colliers Gianino; dear brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend Funeral Home (St. Ann). Funeral Mass Tues., 11, Holy Spirit to many. Church (Maryland Heights). Colliersfuneralhomes.com Services: Memorial visitation at St. Martin of Tours Church, Monday, September 27, 9 a.m. until Mass at 10 a.m. Interment J.B. Bremehr, Sue A. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the (nee Smith), Sue A. Bremehr, fortified with the Sacrament of Holy Greater St. Louis Honor Flight, 8050 Watson Rd., Suite 240, Mother Church, Tuesday, September 21, 2021 at the age of 64. (63119) appreciated. A Kutis South County service. Beloved wife of Thomas Bremehr for 22 years; loving mother of Eddie Nappier and Amanda (Jim) Hurst; proud grandma of Lucas Haddad, Robert P. "Bob" and Kim; cherished daughter of June Smith and the late George of Webster Groves, MO, passed Smith; special daughter-in-law to Fran and the late Ken Bremehr; away peacefully with family at his sister-in-law to Dan (Cheryl) Bremehr, Laurie (Bob) Czerniewski side in Houston, Texas at the age of and David (Kathleen) Bremehr; loving aunt, cousin and cherished 89 on September 17, 2021. He was friend to many. Dog lover to Lucy. born March 21, 1932 in Boston, Sue was the backbone of Christmas in Crestwood and to the Massachusetts to Helen (Kanaan) Crestwood community. She was so selfless and always put and George Haddad. Following everyone else first. She was 100% family oriented and a friend to graduation from Norwood High everyone she met. School in 1949, Bob joined the Air There will be a Memorial Mass on Wednesday, September 29, Force and served as an intelligence 2021 at 11 a.m. at St. Elizabeth - St. Raymond Maronite Catholic officer. He was stationed in Japan Church, 1420 S. Sappington Rd., Crestwood, MO 63126. Family at the Tachikawa Air Base during welcoming guests at 10 a.m. before Sue's Celebration of Life Mass the Korean War. After his service at 11 a.m. Sue will be dearly missed by all who knew her because Bob worked at the Pentagon for to know her was to love her. In lieu of flowers, Masses preferred. the Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in Washington DC. There he met his lifelong love, Jan. They married and Charles, Alexandra Keeler moved to St. Louis where they made their home. Bob of St. Louis, died on Monday, Sept. worked as a cartographer for the Defense Mapping Agency and 20, 2021, at the age of 42. retired in 1991. Alexandra was the daughter of Bob was the beloved husband of the late Jan Davis Haddad. They Sumner Sewall Charles and were married for 62 years at the time of Jan's passing in 2019. He Victoria Shinkle Charles. She is also was the loving father of Paula (husband Paschall) and Michael survived by her dearly loved older (wife Anna); cherished grandfather of Hannah, Will, Gabriel, and brother, Sumner S. Charles, Jr., his James; dear brother to Ralph. He was predeceased by his brother wife Jennifer and their sons, George and twin Ron. Sumner and Walker. Bob enjoyed hunting, fishing, gardening, and most of all, golfing. Alexandra graduated from Bob was a member of the Knights of Columbus, Boy Scouts (served MICDS, earned a B.A. from Duke as Scout Master Troop 302) and of Annunciation Catholic Church. University and a Master of Social He is remembered for his wit, charm, and steadfast faith. Work from Washington University. Services: Visitation will be September 30th from 10:00 - 11:00am In addition to her quick mind, at Annunciation Catholic Church, 12 W. Glendale Rd, Webster Alexandra possessed exceptional musical skills. She played the Groves, MO 63119. Following visitation, a Mass of Christian Burial piano and had a lovely voice of operatic quality. She had an will be celebrated at 11:00am. Interment with Full Military Honors infectious laugh and cared deeply for those around her. She was at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery will be at 12:30pm. In lieu creative, making and selling jewelry and painting and rejuvenating of flowers, contributions in Bob's memory to Annunciation old furniture. She excelled at tennis and was a terrific swimmer. Catholic Church are greatly appreciated by his family. Alexandra will be deeply and eternally mourned by all those who Family served by Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary. loved her. In addition to her parents and brother she will be sorely missed by her aunt Lucile Field Shinkle; aunt Sudie Black Shinkle; Hoester, Elaine Douglass uncle Bradford Shinkle, III, his wife Adaline and their children, Whitney Shinkle Rider and Brian Bradford Shinkle of Minneapolis; 94, passed into peace on September 17, 2021. Hers was a life of simple joys, kindness to others and devotion to her husband the and her dog and best friend, Lily. Alexandra was predeceased by late Honorable Robert G.J. Hoester and children. No strangers to her greatly adored uncle, Brian Johnson Shinkle. adversity she and Bob believed in self sacrifice, responsibility, Many of Alexandra's happiest days were spent in Maine at both honor and service to others. Elaine had a quiet strength and a her family's summer home and as a student at The Maine Coast loving heart that was constant. She was patient, thoughtful and Semester, a challenging program offered by Camp Chewonki. wise. Alexandra will be interred in the Sewall Private Grounds at Oak She was never happier than when her nose was in a good Grove Cemetery in Bath, Maine. mystery book or in her weekly bouquet of flowers. She is survived Services: The family will receive friends at THE LUPTON CHAPEL 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City, on Tuesday, Sept. 28th, from 4 by her brother Byron Douglass, her children Greg Hoester and Tina Hoester (Alan Carney) nieces, nephews and grandchildren. p.m. - 6 p.m. The late Douglass (Robin) Hoester, their youngest son preceded In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made in memory of her death in 2017. There will be a small celebration of her life at a Alexandra to The Maine Coast Semester at Chewonki, 485 later date. https://www.stlfuneral.com/obituaries/?filter=hoester Chewonki Neck Rd., Wiscasset, ME 04578 or to a charity of one's choice. Huskey, Ellis Grant A SERVICE OF Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, on the THE LUPTON CHAPEL 19th day of September 2021, at the age of 84. Beloved husband of Dianne; cherished father of Richard (Jocelyn), Lynn (Scott) Antle, and Jeff (Andrea); devoted grandfather of Coughlin, Margot A. Susan Huskey, Ashleigh Huskey, Alexandra Antle, Noah Antle, September 21, 2021, age 87. Vis. Tues., Sept. 28, 4-6 pm Sabrina Antle, Jacob Huskey and Jenna Huskey; dear Baue Cave Springs. Funeral Wed., Sept. 29, 10 am, St. brother-in-law, uncle, and friend to many. Monica Catholic Church 12140 Olive Blvd. Visit baue.com Services: Visitation, Wed., Sept. 29th from 4-8 p.m. at John L. Ziegenhein & Sons Funeral Home, 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. Danforth, William H., MD A memorial service celebrating the (63129). Funeral, Thurs., Sept. 30th, 10 a.m. at Lutheran Church of the Resurrection, 9907 Sappington Rd. (63128). life of Washington University Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Chancellor Emeritus William H. Danforth, MD, will be held at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 2, in Graham Chapel on the university's Danforth Campus. Danforth, who served as chancellor for 24 of his more than 65 years of service to Washington University, died Sept. 16, 2020, at his home in Ladue, Mo. He was 94. A livestreamed broadcast of the service can be viewed in Brookings Quadrangle and Edison Theatre; all three locations are wheelchair accessible. The recorded livestream will be available at https://tinyurl.com/wdmemorial beginning at 11:30 a.m. CT Oct. 2. For information about COVID-19 safety protocols in place, please visit https://covid19.wustl.edu /health-safety/ before coming to campus. Parking is available in Millbrook Garage, Danforth University Center Garage and East End Garage. For questions, call 833-284-4698 or email specialevents@wustl.edu. At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our Darlow, Richard experienced staff of floral designers Entered into rest Tuesday, September 21, 2021 at age 75. Beloved is dedicated to the highest level brother of Jeanette Boehm; dear uncle of Robert (Nora), Philip of personal service. (Sherry) and Rebecca Boehm; dear great-uncle, cousin, friend and retiree of MODOT. Services: Visitation Monday, September 27, at New Order 24 Hours Apostolic Church (9701 Mackenzie) 4 p.m. until service at 7 p.m. A SERVICE OF KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL. schnucksfloral.com

Beautiful Memorials

DeVivo, Mary R.

Age 62. Passed away Sept. 19, 2021. Was a longtime resident of Jennings, MO. Will be missed. Private services were held at Buchholz Mortuary.

Erdelen, Kevin P.

passed away September 22, 2021. Visit Tues. Sept 28, 4-8pm Hutchens, Florissant. Service Wed. Sept 29, 10am, Hutchens. Burial Sacred Heart Cem., Florissant. Hutchensfuneralhomes.com

(314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557


ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A21

SEPTEMBER.26.2021 • SUNDAY • M 1

OBITUARIES Lesher, James Calvin

at home and surrounded by family, passed away peacefully on Thursday, September 23rd at the age of 93 after a long battle with Parkinson's disease. Beloved husband of 73 years to Dorothy L. Daniel: admired father to Mark (Susan) Lesher, Jeffery Lesher and Christine (Floyd) Reed; respected grandfather and greatgrandfather; mentor to many and friend to all. Born March 1, 1928 in O'Fallon, IL to Miles Solomon "Dutch" Lesher, the coal miner and Susie Melissa (McQueen) Lesher, the housewife and wonderful cook and baker. Jim worked in the flower industry his entire life and met the love of his life, Dorothy, while working at Netties Flower Garden in St. Louis. They married in 1948 and enjoyed life's adventures together, including Jim's Naval Service as a journalist in the Korean War and the opening of their own business, Lesher's Flowers Inc., in 1973. Lesher's Flowers is a thriving third-generation owned and operated business in St. Louis city. Jim also helped found and served as president for 30 years of LaSalle Wholesale Florist. Jim's faith was paramount to everything he did. He was a 70 year member of Tower Grove Baptist Church serving as Deacon and Sunday school teacher. Jim was an extraordinary man of faith and family. To have met him was to know his smile, his attitude of gratitude, his giving nature and his love of the Lord. His life's essence was that of Ephesians 4:32 - "And be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving one another, just as God also forgave you in Christ." In memory of Jim Lesher, please send flowers to someone you love. Donations in his honor may be made to Parkinson's Foundation or Heartland Hospice Memorial Fund. Services: Visitation will be 4-9 p.m., Tues., Sept. 28 at John L. Ziegenhein and Sons Funeral Home, 7027 Gravois Ave. Funeral services will be at 2 p.m., Wed., Sept. 29 at the funeral home. Interment will be in O'Fallon City Cemetery, O'Fallon, IL. www.ziegenheinfuneralhome.com

Littleton, Janice S. "Jan"

(nee Wilson) Tuesday, September 21, 2021. Beloved wife of David R. Littleton; dear mother of Carol (Robert) Kayser and Richard (Robyn) Littleton; dear grandmother of 8 and great-grandmother of 8; dear sister of Patricia (John) Martin, Karen (George) Cox, Laura Logan and Terry Wilson. Preceded in death by her parents, Frederick and LaVerne (nee Alsbury) Wilson and one granddaughter, Kylie Littleton. Our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Wednesday, September 29, 11:30 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the Juvenile Diabetes Association appreciated. Visitation Tuesday, 4-8 p.m.

Marquardt-Wilde, Bernita B. "Bernie"

Asleep in Jesus Monday, 9/20/21, age 82. Beloved wife of Roy Wilde and the late Rev. Mervin Marquardt; dear mother of Thene (Roger) Sheehy, Melanie (Randel) Lohmeyer and Lanette Marquardt; dear grandmother of Matthew, Justin (Brooklyn) Lohmeyer and Jesse Theis; dear sister of Robert (Christel) and Richard (Debra) Miske; family from her 2nd marriage, Steve (Glenda) Wilde, Matthew (Judy), Sarah, and Nathan Wilde; and several great-grandchildren; our dear aunt, cousin, sister-in-law and friend. Visitation at St. John's Lutheran Church (3517 Jeffco Blvd., Arnold, MO) on Monday, 9/27 from 9 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. Interment Shepherd Hills. Kutis So. Co. service.

Minderman, Dean C.

passed away, Saturday, September 4, 2021. Beloved son of Richard "Dick" (Ver) Minderman and the late Judith Minderman. Step-brother of Natalie (Don) Hake, Gail Kloeppel, Bill (Beth) Newhouse and Greg (Cathy) Newhouse. Our dear uncle, cousin and friend to many. Dean graduated from Webster Groves High School and then attended University of Missouri Columbia where he received a B.S. in journalism. He was a member of the Sigma Nu fraternity. Dean was an accomplished pianist and played with many well known bands in the St. Louis area. He will be greatly missed by everyone who knew him. Services: Due to the COVID virus the family will not be having visitation or services. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Minderman, Richard D.

passed peacefully on September 18, 2021. Born in St. Louis on May 5, 1932 to C.W. and Clara Minderman. He was a long time resident of Webster Groves and Des Peres, Missouri. Survived by his wife, Verneal Minderman (nee Meyer); stepchildren: Gail Kloeppel, Natalie (Don) Hake, Bill (Beth) Newhouse, and Greg (Cathy) Newhouse; brother-in-law, Kenneth Knapp; 8 grandchildren; 6 greatgrandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by his first wife, Judith Bohrer; son, Dean C. Minderman; and sister, Donna Knapp. Dick graduated from Southwest High School and then St. Louis University. After serving in the U.S. Army Finance Corp in Germany, he returned to St. Louis and built a long-term career in the grocery business. Dick was an avid supporter of Mizzou football and the St. Louis Cardinals. Richard also enjoyed playing racquetball with his friends and participated in the Racquetball Senior Olympics. He was an avid traveler and loved to tell stories of his travels. Richard donated his body to the SLU School of Medicine. In lieu of flowers, donations to The BackStoppers appreciated. Services: A Celebration of Life will be held Oct. 17, 2021, 1:00-4:00, at Westborough Country Club, 631 S Berry Rd., St. Louis MO 63122. Arrangements by Bopp Chapel.

Neitzert, Edward Henry

Neitzert, Edward, on Saturday, September 11, 2021. Beloved husband of Sylvia Neitzert (deceased); dear father of Kim (Dave) Paulson and Susan (Dan) Schettler; adored Dedo of Brian (Maranda) Schettler and John (Audrey) Schettler; loving great Dedo of Claire and Norah Schettler. Preceded in death by siblings Albert Neitzert, Helen Baer and Dorothy Dandridge; dear uncle, cousin and friend. Burial private. Contributions preferred to St. Johns Evangelical United Church of Christ or Shriner's Hospital.

Ojile, Joseph Elias

Sept. 22, 2021. Husband of Mary Ojile. Funeral was held at St. Raymond Maronite Cathedral. Please visit www.k-brothers.com for more details. Kriegshauser BROTHERS

Patterson, Maria E.

(nee Silva) Fortified with the Sacraments of the Holy Mother Church Sunday, September 19, 2021. Beloved wife of the late John M. Patterson; loving mother of John (Leigh), Joseph (Patricia), Robert (Nancy), Norman (Ruth), Dave (Tracy) and Michael (Janice) Patterson; adoring grandmother of 15 and great-grandmother of 7. Our dearest sister, sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Interment at Sunset Cemetery will be held in private. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Catholic Charities appreciated. KUTIS AFFTON SERVICE

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Celebrations of Life

Patty, Billy Don

of Wentzville, MO, passed away Friday, September 17, 2021, at the age of 93. Beloved husband of Ruth Marie Patty; cherished son of the late William Caney and Willa Lucille Patty. Devoted father of Mary Ellen (Joseph H. Felchlin III) Felchlin, John Michael (Beth Ann Roosa) Patty, Dolores "Dee" M. (Donald) Twillman, and Ruth Ann (Wayne) Baldwin; loving grandfather of Joseph (Cam) Felchlin, Michele Hunt, David Patty, Chris Patty, Michael (Andrea) Twillman, Jennifer Herndon, Sam Schnurbusch, and Addie (Chris Poole) Schnurbusch; treasured great-grandfather of Ashley (Mike) Lines, Brianna Martin, Elizabeth Felchlin, Willie Felchlin, Gavin Twillman, Caiden Twillman, and Sadie Baldwin; great-great-grandchildren, Cadi and Gabe Lines; dear brother of the late Bacil Patty, the late Wilbur Patty, the late Marion Patty, and the late Evelyn Patty. Billy Patty's three life-organizing principles centered on his deep spirituality, his commitment to humanitarian service, and his love of Ruthie and family. With Ruthie's loving support, his heart-filled warmth, and readiness to laugh and kid around, he maintained an animated generosity and commitment to service for others. He was an old soul and a Charismatic Catholic who led by: example and expressed his Christian principles through the creation, fund raising, and operation of a thriving inner city Food Pantry later affiliated with Our Lady of Perpetual Help, establishing God's Gang, a spiritually based youth program, leading Acts Retreats, conducting Life in the Spirit Seminars and Missions in Motion in various parishes. Other more secular expressions of his spirit were evident in his career as an author, architect, builder, boxer, blacksmith, copy editor, U.S. Navy code breaker, engineer, entrepreneur, motel owner, movie projectionist, published poet, Journeyman printer, real estate broker, storyteller, theology baccalaureate, utility company developer-owner-operator, and wagon wheel repairman. Services: In accordance with Billy's wishes, his body will be donated to science at St. Louis University Medical School. A memorial Mass will be live streamed on Tuesday, September 28 at 10 a.m. via www.StPatrickWentzville.org. Those attending in person will be required to mask and socially distance. In lieu of flowers, Billy would convincingly ask that any donations be directed to Our Lady of Perpetual Help Food Pantry at 4335 Warne Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri 63107 or via the website helpstlouis.org. Visit Baue.com

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Smith, Gene

January 13, 1936 - September 16, 2021. Rollin Eugene Smith passed away peacefully in his Santa Cruz, California home with his loving partner of 42 years by his side. He was born in St. Louis, graduated from Washington University where he studied art, and lived in the Central West End neighborhood in his 20s and 30s. He was a founding partner and Head Chef of the renowned Duff’s Restaurant on Euclid Ave, where his art spirit was

in everything he made. Gene owned property in the country near the rural town of Black Missouri with several friends and lived with them communally in the 1970s. He was the private chef for the Pulitzer family, who appreciated his food so much that they gave him their very own Pulitzer Prize in cooking. He launched "Dinner at Eight", a catering business serving Central West End clientele until he moved to Santa Cruz in 1977 to be the office manager of KFAT, a humorous, alternative radio station. He cooked at several Santa Cruz restaurants and was the assistant to two University of California Santa Cruz Vice Chancellors before returning to the catering business, delighting Santa Cruzans with his formal but easy-going dinners. His artistic talent was visible in his cooking, in his paintings, in his floral arrangements and in his approach to life. Gene was known not only for his impeccable taste but also for his sweet, kind and gentle manner. He was predeceased by his parents, Nina Wood Smith and John Alfred Smith, his brother Ted Smith and his son Timothy Carlson Smith. He leaves his life partner Alan Savat, his sister Mary Duba of St. Louis, eight nieces and nephews, and many great and great-great nieces and nephews. Services: A celebration of his life will be held at a future date to be announced. Donations can be made to Hospice of Santa Cruz County or a charity of your choice.

Spielberg, Martin Norman

September 23, 2021. Passed away peacefully at the age of 86, having spent his last few months in California with his children and grandchildren. A native of St. Louis and graduate of Washington University, Martin stayed close with his childhood friends throughout his life. He successfully owned and operated Spielberg Furniture on "The Hill", a family business started by his father Louis Spielberg over 80 years earlier. After retirement Martin spent winters in Florida, making many close friends and becoming an avid cyclist. Martin was a workout enthusiast, well Peterson, Arlene E. known by all at the "J". He loved to laugh and be surrounded by went to be with her Lord & Savoir on Sunday, September 19, 2021, friends and family. He will be missed by all. at the age of 97. Arlene was preceded in death by her husband Martin was the beloved husband of the late Patricia Spielberg; Charles E. Peterson Jr., children Charles L. Peterson, Terry J. loving partner of Barbara Morris; devoted father and father-in-law Peterson and grandson Tyler J. Peterson. of Laurie Rudman (Bruce), Julie Spielberg-Senet (Brad), Tammy Devoted mother of Pete Peterson and Larry (Theresa) Peterson; Spielberg and Steven Spielberg (Orly); cherished grandfather of grandmother of Kim (Ron) Johnston, Terah (Benjamin) Gennaria, Jacob Markus and Joshua Spielberg; and dear brother of the late and Spencer (Bela Simpson) Peterson; great-grandmother of Molly Albert Spielberg and the late Leonard Spielberg (late Charlotte). Johnston, Josephine Johnston. Dear uncle, cousin, and friend to many. Services: Visitation will be held on Tuesday, September 28, 2021, Services: Graveside service Sunday September 26 at 11:30 AM at from 4:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. @ JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery, 650 White Road. Service also SOUTH COUNTY, 4830 Lemay Ferry Road, St. Louis, MO 63129. available via Live Stream. Please visit www.bergermemorialchape Services will be held on Wednesday, September 29, 2021 @ l.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE 10:00 a.m. @ John L. Ziegenhein & Sons South County. Interment following services at Jefferson Barracks National Swanson, William Donald Cemetery. Memorial donations can be made to the World Bird William (Bill) Donald Swanson, of Sanctuary. Kirkwood, MO, passed away on September 18, 2021. He was Powers, Linda preceded in death by his wife of 66 73, September 21, 2021. Funeral Mass at Ascension Catholic years, Shirley M. Swanson, and is Church, Chesterfield, Friday (10/1) at 10:00 a.m. survived by his three children: For more info see Schrader.com. Kristin L. Swanson (Mac Prichard), William C. Swanson (Kathy Swanson), and Matthew L. Rambo, Anna Kathleen "Kathy" Swanson (Ashley Taylor Swanson); (nee Murray), 73, of St. Louis died unexpectedly on September 18, four grandchildren; and four 2021. She is survived by her loving husband of 36 years, Earnest O. great-grandchildren. Rambo, Jr., daughter Caitlin Shortal (Ryan), and siblings Barkley Murray, Cliff Murray, and Peggy Matson. Bill was born on February 20, 1930 A gifted musician and accomplished pianist, she earned a music degree from Arkansas Polytechnic College and did graduate in Columbia, MO and received a BA in civil engineering from the studies in music at the University of Iowa. She retired from University of Missouri at Columbia. After graduation he served in the Korean Conflict as a company commander and first lieutenant. Southwestern Bell/AT&T after almost 40 years of service. Services: A memorial visitation will be held at Bopp Chapel in He went on to work in the steel industry and ended his career at Granite City Steel, where he was vice president and general Kirkwood on October 8th from 6-8pm. www.boppchapel.com manager from 1984-1990.

Robinson, Virginia Hill

94, died peacefully at home in Winston-Salem, N.C. on September 16, 2021. She was surrounded by her children Michael Shepley and Lela Shepley-Gamble of St. Louis, Mo., and Virginia Riccio of Winston-Salem. The oldest of four children born to Maury and Lela Hill of St. Louis, Virginia survived her sisters Lela and Jane, and her brother Maury Jr. She attended the John Burroughs School in St. Louis and Briarcliff Junior College in Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. She married Ethan A. H. Shepley, Jr. in 1947 and they raised a family in St. Louis before their divorce in 1968. After a marriage and later divorce from Wade Robinson, Virginia moved to Sag Harbor, N.Y., Santa Fe, N.M. and Huntsville, Ontario, before settling in Winston-Salem to be close to her sister Jane Clarkson, niece Laurie Clarkson Rhyne, and the Rhyne family. Her daughter Virginia later moved to Winston-Salem and married Tom Riccio. A restless and iconoclastic spirit, Virginia was an artist, poet, playwright and writer. A resident of Homestead Hills, she was visited constantly by loyal friends who took great delight in her offerings of paintings and candy. She was able to discern love and kindness in people and was generous with them. Those who came to know her loved her very much.

No services are planned. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to Circle of Concern Food Pantry, Valley Park or Community Christian Church, Manchester, MO.

Teasdale, John Warren

John Warren Teasdale, 81, passed away Aug 8, 2021 in Fairfield Bay, Arkansas. He was preceded in death by his parents, David and Ruth Teasdale and brother, David Teasdale, Jr. He is survived by his brother, Thomas Teasdale Sr. (June;) nieces Laura and Marjorie Sara Teasdale; nephew, Thomas Teasdale, Jr. (Karen;) great nephew, Michael Teasdale and sister-in-law, Judy Teasdale. John grew up in Olivette, MO - a relatively rural part of St. Louis County with farms, scattered homes and plenty of open fields - a great environment for a young boy. He received a business degree from Washington University in St. Louis. John started a successful business with a good friend, but a wanderlust caused him to pull up his roots and leave St. Louis for Florida. Every few years he would get the urge to venture out again and off he would go to another part of the country - making new friends along the way. John finally settled in Fairfield Bay, where he stayed for a number of years before quietly passing away. Goodbye John ? we all love Schrieber, Winona Jean A lifetime resident and servant to you! St. Louis, Winona "Jean" Schrieber began her formative years as an orphan residing at the St. Louis Girls Home. The loving care and Thieret, William giving spirit of the Protestant 66, September 22, 2021. Funeral Mass at Holy Infant, women who ran the St. Louis Girl's Ballwin, Sat. (10/2) 10am. Visit. at Schrader Funeral Home, Home were the example of service Ballwin, Fri, (10/1) 4-8pm. For more info see schrader.com. to community that inspired Jean to give back. Tichenor, Joan Jean entered the St. Louis Police 87, Thurs., Sept 23, 2021. Visitation Sept 26, 4-8 p.m. at Hutchens Academy in 1951, a time when the Stygars Funeral and Cremation Center, St. Charles. Service Sept department had no female officers. 27, 11 a.m. Online guestbook www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com After 4 1/2 years with the City police Jean changed departments and became the first female Veach, Janie G. officer in the St. Louis County Police Department in 1957. During 74, on Thurs., 9/15. Visitation only her tenure as police officer, she was able to balance between from 1-4 pm on Thurs., 9/30 at career and family, raising three children on her own. Hutchens-Stygar, St. Charles. Both the County of St. Louis and the State of Missouri have Masks required. No flowers, honored Winona "Jean" Schrieber with Proclamations for her donations to Autism Society of community service and her trailblazing role in the St. Louis Police America. Community. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com Jean retired from the county police after 22 years of service, but her service to her community didn't stop after retirement. She continued to dedicate her life to serving the St. Louis Metropolitan area and the state of Missouri through volunteering. Here are just a few of the volunteer "jobs" Jean held after retirement: - For 20 years Schrieber volunteered at the Veteran’s Administration. - She delivered Meals on Wheels for 20 years before she had to Vogel, Theodore "Ted" give up driving. (even while using her walker!) - She volunteered at the riverfront in the St. Louis Visitor Center 93, Passed Monday, 9/20/21 following a brief illness. He was preceded in death by his wife of 67 years, Fay Vogel. He leaves 2 greeting visitors and promoting the city's offerings. - She was a volunteer driver many years for CORP (Saint Louis children and 5 grandchildren. Memorial: Sat. 10/2/21 1 p.m., (11:30 County Older Resident Programs) taking seniors to shop, to the a.m. Visitation begins) at Chapel of the Cross Lutheran, 11645 Benham Rd., St Louis 63136. In lieu of flowers, you may donate to doctor etc. Chapel of the Cross Lutheran at https://www.chapelofthecross.org - She was a volunteer usher at several of the local theaters. /give-via-paypal. For more details regarding Ted's life, please visit - She volunteered at the St. Louis Zoo. - She made weekly visits to local nursing homes to bring joy and https://stlouiscremation.com/obituaries/theodore-vogel/ give back rubs to residents who had no family or visitors. (even while using her walker!) Ward, Lisa K. - As her final act of service, Jean has donated her body to (nee Leahart), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Washington University for purposes of medical research. Church, Thursday, September 23, 2021. Beloved wife of Keith Winona "Jean" Schrieber is survived by her daughter Ward; loving mother of Kristine Ward, Amberly (Brendan) Nanci Schrieber-Smith of California and her son Jim Pohlman, Zachary and Wilson Ward, Berkley (Robert) Hall; adoring Schrieber of Florida. grandmother of Holden (Mariah) and Luke Kiefer, Dustin Modglin, Grayce, Charlotte and Andi Pohlman and Holly Hall; cherished daughter of Yvonne and the late Henry Leahart; dear sister of Schulte, Jeffrey A. 53, passed Friday, September 17, 2021 following a brief illness. He Nancy (Timothy) Frederking, Raymond (Deborah) Leahart, Noel leaves behind a wife of 24 years Terry Schulte (Lingle), 3 (Vanessa Atkins) Leahart and the late Kirby (surviving Debra) daughters Amber, Ashley and Alyssa. He is the son of Jerome and Leahart. Our dearest daughter-in-law, sister-in-law, aunt, Carolyn Schulte and a brother to Jay, Jim, and John and uncle to 3 great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. nephews. He was a member of First Baptist Church of O'Fallon and Services: Funeral at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, a friend to all. Services: First Baptist Church of O'Fallon, O'Fallon, Tuesday, September 28, at 12 noon. Interment at Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation Monday, 4-9 p.m. MO, September 30, 2021 at 4:30pm. “What we have once enjoyed, we can never lose. All that we love deeply becomes part of us.” HELEN KELLER

“There is no remedy for love but to love more.” HENRY DAVID THOREAU


09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A21

OBITUARIES Jansen, Marian

(nee Mersinger) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Wednesday, September 22, 2021. Beloved wife of the late Clement H. Jansen; dear mother of Janice (Carolyn Turnbough) Beckert; dear grandmother of Claire (David) Smith, Eric Beckert, Anne Beckert and Nicole (Andrew McKim) Beckert; dear great-grandmother of Daniel and Ian Smith; dear sister of Dorothy Bartnett and Arlene (Francis) Vien. Our dear aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, September 28, 8:45 a.m. to Cure of Ars Catholic Church for 9:15 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B. National cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Heifer International (heifer.org). Marian was an avid Bridge player and loved dancing. Visitation Monday 4-8 p.m.

Jones, William R.

Thurs., Sept. 16, 2021. Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON, 10151 Gravois, Sat., Oct. 2, 9 a.m. until funeral service at 11 a.m. Inurnment Resurrection Cemetery.

Karcher, Raymond Eugene

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, on September 20, 2021. Husband of the late Dolores P. Karcher; father of Dan (Anne), Tim (Sandy), Ken (Rose), Doug (Crystal), and Greg (Chris); grandfather of Molly (Kyle Flynn), Libby (Brian Backer), Kimberly (Scott Allan), Katie, Grace, Emily, Collin, Allison, and Rachel; great-grandfather to Sylvia and Ethan; brother of Wilbert (Claudette) and the late Joseph (the late Norma); dear uncle and

friend to many. Services: Visit. Sunday, 9/26 from 4-8pm at John L. Ziegenhein & Sons Funeral Home (4830 Lemay Ferry Rd.) Funeral Service Monday, 9/27 at 11am at St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Church (4900 Ringer Rd.) Interment Jefferson Barracks.

Koehler, John D.

1940-2021. Husband of Sharon Koehler (nee Hoffer); father of Karista Koehler (Hans Fredrickson) and Thomas M. (Amanda) Koehler; dear grandfather. Services: Mass 11:30 a.m. Thursday, September 30, 2021 at St. Margaret of Scotland Church, 3854 Flad Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110. Visitation 10 a.m. until Mass. See Ortmann Stipanovich website, www.osfuneralhomes.com for full obituary.

Kolaski, Richard T.

age 83 passed away Sunday, September 19, 2021. Visitation at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Tuesday, 4:00 - 8:00 pm. For more info see Schrader.com.

Kulengowski, Jean

September 4, 2021, 88. Virtual Service, October 3rd at 1:00 p.m. through www.congoroch.org. Contact 636-946-7811 or visit baue.com

Kunz, Myrna L.

(nee: Couch) Entered into Peace on Thursday, September 23, 2021. Beloved wife of the late Walter A. Kunz, Jr.; Loving mother of Cheryl Suschank, Cindy (Ron) Steinbruegge and the late Debbie Germain; dear grandma of Christopher (Rachel) Germain, Kim (Kirk) Forslund, Sarah Suschank and Scott (Laura), Jason and Justin Steinbruegge; dear great-grandma of Rileigh, Karson, Antonio, Ashtin, Jack and the late Mason; beloved great-great grandma of Liam and Aiden; our dear sister-in-law and friend to many. Services: Visitation will be held at Hoffmeister South County Chapel, 1515 Lemay Ferry Road, on Tuesday, September 28, 2021 from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m.. At 1:30 p.m. procession will proceed to the Mount Hope Mausoleum Chapel for services and entombment. If desired, please make expressions of sympathy in Myrna'’s memory via check or PayPal@masinyourface or physical address for memorials in care of Sarah Suschank, 226 W. Ripa, Saint Louis, MO 63125. Please share memories and condolences at hoffmeistersouthcounty.com

Lampert, Rev. Robert E.

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Friday, September 17, 2021. Beloved son of the late William and Helen (nee McDonald) Lampert; dear brother of the late Pat Wolf; dear uncle and friend. Services: Vigil at St. Anselm Catholic Church (530 South Mason Rd. 63141) Monday, September 27; 7:00-9:00 p.m. Funeral Mass at St. Vincent de Paul Chapel at Cardinal Rigali Center (20 Archbishop Dr. 63119) Tuesday, September 28 at 9:30 a.m. Interment Calvary Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to Oblate School of Theology, 285 Oblate Dr., San Antonio, TX 78216 or Benet Hill Monastery, 3190 Benet Ln., Colorado Springs, CO 80921 appreciated. A service of KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL

Lesher, James Calvin

at home and surrounded by family, passed away peacefully on Thursday, September 23rd at the age of 93 after a long battle with Parkinson's disease. Beloved husband of 73 years to Dorothy L. Daniel: admired father to Mark (Susan) Lesher, Jeffery Lesher and Christine (Floyd) Reed; respected grandfather and greatgrandfather; mentor to many and friend to all. Born March 1, 1928 in O'Fallon, IL to Miles Solomon "Dutch" Lesher, the coal miner and Susie Melissa (McQueen) Lesher, the housewife and wonderful cook and baker. Jim worked in the flower industry his entire life and met the love of his life, Dorothy, while working at Netties Flower Garden in St. Louis. They married in 1948 and enjoyed life's adventures together, including Jim's Naval Service as a journalist in the Korean War and the opening of their own business, Lesher's Flowers Inc., in 1973. Lesher's Flowers is a thriving third-generation owned and operated business in St. Louis city. Jim also helped found and served as president for 30 years of LaSalle Wholesale Florist. Jim's faith was paramount to everything he did. He was a 70 year member of Tower Grove Baptist Church serving as Deacon and Sunday school teacher. Jim was an extraordinary man of faith and family. To have met him was to know his smile, his attitude of gratitude, his giving nature and his love of the Lord. His life's essence was that of Ephesians 4:32 - "And be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving one another, just as God also forgave you in Christ." In memory of Jim Lesher, please send flowers to someone you love. Donations in his honor may be made to Parkinson's Foundation or Heartland Hospice Memorial Fund. Services: Visitation will be 4-9 p.m., Tues., Sept. 28 at John L. Ziegenhein and Sons Funeral Home, 7027 Gravois Ave. Funeral services will be at 2 p.m., Wed., Sept. 29 at the funeral home. Interment will be in O'Fallon City Cemetery, O'Fallon, IL. www.ziegenheinfuneralhome.com

Celebrations of Life

Mallett, Mary Lee

(nee Henry), the daughter of the late James Roy and Anna Lee (nee Brannon) Henry. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Friday, September 24, 2021. Beloved wife of the late Theodore A. Rechtin, Sr. and William O. Mallett; cherished mother of Pat Kraetsch (Bob), RoseAnn Bremser (Joe), Ted Rechtin, Jr. and the late Jim Rechtin (Kathy surviving) and step-mother of Cindy Ruegge (John) and Tammy Jones; cherished grandmother of Anna, Ted, Rick, Jim, Eric, Matt, Kate, Tim, Andrew, Mike and Mark and stepgrandmother of Neil, Robert and Camden; dear great-grand-mother, aunt and friend. Her absence will be felt by all but the memories will last forever! Services: Visitation at St. Stephen Protomartyr Catholic Church on Tuesday, Sept. 28, 9 a.m. until time of Mass at 10 a.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in Mary Lee's name can be made to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Pl., Memphis, TN 38105. A Kutis South County Service.

Marquardt-Wilde, Bernita B. "Bernie"

Asleep in Jesus Monday, 9/20/21, age 82. Beloved wife of Roy Wilde and the late Rev. Mervin Marquardt; dear mother of Thene (Roger) Sheehy, Melanie (Randel) Lohmeyer and Lanette Marquardt; dear grandmother of Matthew, Justin (Brooklyn) Lohmeyer and Jesse Theis; dear sister of Robert (Christel) and Richard (Debra) Miske; family from her 2nd marriage, Steve (Glenda) Wilde, Matthew (Judy), Sarah, and Nathan Wilde; and several great-grandchildren; our dear aunt, cousin, sister-in-law and friend. Visitation at St. John's Lutheran Church (3517 Jeffco Blvd., Arnold, MO) on Monday, 9/27 from 9 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. Interment Shepherd Hills. Kutis So. Co. service.

Minderman, Dean C.

passed away, Saturday, September 4, 2021. Beloved son of Richard "Dick" (Ver) Minderman and the late Judith Minderman. Step-brother of Natalie (Don) Hake, Gail Kloeppel, Bill (Beth) Newhouse and Greg (Cathy) Newhouse. Our dear uncle, cousin and friend to many. Dean graduated from Webster Groves High School and then attended University of Missouri Columbia where he received a B.S. in journalism. He was a member of the Sigma Nu fraternity. Dean was an accomplished pianist and played with many well known bands in the St. Louis area. He will be greatly missed by everyone who knew him. Services: Due to the COVID virus the family will not be having visitation or services. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Minderman, Richard D.

passed peacefully on September 18, 2021. Born in St. Louis on May 5, 1932 to C.W. and Clara Minderman. He was a long time resident of Webster Groves and Des Peres, Missouri. Survived by his wife, Verneal Minderman (nee Meyer); stepchildren: Gail Kloeppel, Natalie (Don) Hake, Bill (Beth) Newhouse, and Greg (Cathy) Newhouse; brother-in-law, Kenneth Knapp; 8 grandchildren; 6 greatgrandchildren; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by his first wife, Judith Bohrer; son, Dean C. Minderman; and sister, Donna Knapp. Dick graduated from Southwest High School and then St. Louis University. After serving in the U.S. Army Finance Corp in Germany, he returned to St. Louis and built a long-term career in the grocery business. Dick was an avid supporter of Mizzou football and the St. Louis Cardinals. Richard also enjoyed playing racquetball with his friends and participated in the Racquetball Senior Olympics. He was an avid traveler and loved to tell stories of his travels. Richard donated his body to the SLU School of Medicine. In lieu of flowers, donations to The BackStoppers appreciated. Services: A Celebration of Life will be held Oct. 17, 2021, 1:00-4:00, at Westborough Country Club, 631 S Berry Rd., St. Louis MO 63122. Arrangements by Bopp Chapel.

Peterson, Arlene E.

went to be with her Lord & Savoir on Sunday, September 19, 2021, at the age of 97. Arlene was preceded in death by her husband Charles E. Peterson Jr., children Charles L. Peterson, Terry J. Peterson and grandson Tyler J. Peterson. Devoted mother of Pete Peterson and Larry (Theresa) Peterson; grandmother of Kim (Ron) Johnston, Terah (Benjamin) Gennaria, and Spencer (Bela Simpson) Peterson; great-grandmother of Molly Johnston, Josephine Johnston. Services: Visitation will be held on Tuesday, September 28, 2021, from 4:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. @ JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS SOUTH COUNTY, 4830 Lemay Ferry Road, St. Louis, MO 63129. Services will be held on Wednesday, September 29, 2021 @ 10:00 a.m. @ John L. Ziegenhein & Sons South County. Interment following services at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorial donations can be made to the World Bird Sanctuary.

Powers, Linda

73, September 21, 2021. Funeral Mass at Ascension Catholic Church, Chesterfield, Friday (10/1) at 10:00 a.m. For more info see Schrader.com.

Provow, Linda Marie

(nee Starnes), died on September 21, 2021. Linda was born September 12, 1948 in St. Louis, Missouri to Vernon and Louise Starnes. She is survived by her husband, Roger, daughters, Kristen Kaiser, Lauren Provow (Todd Goldenhersh}, grandsons, Spencer Kaiser, Brady Kaiser, and Joshua Provow-Wall, sister, Cathy (Tom) Holmes, and brother, Mark (Linda) Starnes. In 1950, the Starnes family moved to East St. Louis, Illinois where sister Cathy and brother Mark added to the fun. The Starnes family grew up camping and boating with many other families, also taking cross-country vacations. Childhood was fun and taught Linda the importance of family. After graduating from East St. Louis Senior High, Linda got her first job, in the steno pool at Southwestern Bell Telephone. Her mother introduced her to Jackie who came to be known as Linda's "twin sister" since they shared the same birthday. In 1969 Linda and Roger moved to St. Louis where she was employed as assistant to the Barnes Hospital Controller. The early 70's brought a move as the assistant to a Vice President at Standard Container, a Robert R. Hermann company. 1978 brought the last stop in Linda's career, KPMG, one of the world's largest accounting firms. She was there for 30 years in several positions culminating as executive assistant to the managing partner in St. Louis, with whom she worked for 28 years. During these years she made hundreds of friends. Linda’s retirement brought new adventures. She started golf lessons and enjoyed playing in a weekly women's league and playing with Roger on family vacations. She also joined a local "Curves" gym working out, then going to the Daily Bread with the "Curves girls". Also was "Movie Monday" with her 50-year friends enjoying lunch and a movie. With these friends she and Roger traveled to the Eastern Caribbean, the Mediterranean, and trips around the U. S. Family was a very big part of Linda’s life. During their 53-year marriage Linda and Roger visited her sister's and brother's families at least yearly. They were Linda's best friends. Linda's immediate family was of utmost importance. Her daughter, Kristen, was able to take many vacations with Linda for 40 years, and her daughter, Lauren, for 25 years. The biggest thing that Linda taught was, again, importance of family. In Linda's last several months of illness, her daughters spent days with her during hospice keeping her comfortable and entertained. Before chemo started the girls organized a wonderful party and dinner and enlisted Linda's friends to make posters to help her fight her disease. Linda had never been more proud of their efforts nor more thankful for her friends. Services: A visitation for Linda will be held at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood, Missouri on Monday, October 4, 2021, from 10 a.m. to 12 Noon, followed by a short service. In lieu of flowers please contribute to the American Cancer Society or to your favorite charity. www.boppchapel.com

Rambo, Anna Kathleen "Kathy"

(nee Murray), 73, of St. Louis died unexpectedly on September 18, 2021. She is survived by her loving husband of 36 years, Earnest O. Rambo, Jr., daughter Caitlin Shortal (Ryan), and siblings Barkley Murray, Cliff Murray, and Peggy Matson. A gifted musician and accomplished pianist, she earned a music degree from Arkansas Polytechnic College and did graduate Neitzert, Edward Henry studies in music at the University of Iowa. She retired from Neitzert, Edward, on Saturday, Southwestern Bell/AT&T after almost 40 years of service. September 11, 2021. Beloved Services: A memorial visitation will be held at Bopp Chapel in husband of Sylvia Neitzert Kirkwood on October 8th from 6-8pm. www.boppchapel.com (deceased); dear father of Kim (Dave) Paulson and Susan (Dan) Schettler; adored Dedo of Brian Robinson, Virginia Hill (Maranda) Schettler and John 94, died peacefully at home in (Audrey) Schettler; loving great Winston-Salem, N.C. on September Dedo of Claire and Norah Schettler. 16, 2021. She was surrounded by Preceded in death by siblings her children Michael Shepley and Albert Neitzert, Helen Baer and Lela Shepley-Gamble of St. Louis, Dorothy Dandridge; dear uncle, Mo., and Virginia Riccio of cousin and friend. Burial private. Winston-Salem. Contributions preferred to St. The oldest of four children born Johns Evangelical United Church of Christ or Shriner's Hospital. to Maury and Lela Hill of St. Louis, Virginia survived her sisters Lela and Jane, and her brother Maury Ojile, Joseph Elias Jr. She attended the John Sept. 22, 2021. Husband of Mary Ojile. Funeral was held at St. Burroughs School in St. Louis and Raymond Maronite Cathedral. Please visit www.k-brothers.com Briarcliff Junior College in Briarcliff for more details. Kriegshauser BROTHERS Manor, N. Y. She married Ethan A. H. Shepley, Jr. in 1947 and they raised a family in St. Louis before their divorce in 1968. Patterson, Maria E. After a marriage and later divorce from Wade Robinson, (nee Silva) Fortified with the Sacraments of the Holy Mother Virginia moved to Sag Harbor, N.Y., Santa Fe, N.M. and Huntsville, Church Sunday, September 19, 2021. Beloved wife of the late John Ontario, before settling in Winston-Salem to be close to her sister M. Patterson; loving mother of John (Leigh), Joseph (Patricia), Jane Clarkson, niece Laurie Clarkson Rhyne, and the Rhyne family. Robert (Nancy), Norman (Ruth), Dave (Tracy) and Michael (Janice) Her daughter Virginia later moved to Winston-Salem and married Patterson; adoring grandmother of 15 and great-grandmother of Tom Riccio. 7. Our dearest sister, sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and A restless and iconoclastic spirit, Virginia was an artist, poet, friend to many. playwright and writer. A resident of Homestead Hills, she was Services: Interment at Sunset Cemetery will be held in visited constantly by loyal friends who took great delight in her private. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Catholic offerings of paintings and candy. She was able to discern love and Charities appreciated. KUTIS AFFTON SERVICE kindness in people and was generous with them. Those who came to know her loved her very much.

Patty, Billy Don

of Wentzville, MO, passed away Friday, September 17, 2021, at the age of 93. Beloved husband of Ruth Marie Patty; cherished son of the late William Caney and Willa Lucille Patty. Devoted father of Mary Ellen (Joseph H. Felchlin III) Felchlin, John Michael (Beth Ann Roosa) Patty, Dolores "Dee" M. (Donald) Twillman, and Ruth Ann (Wayne) Baldwin; loving grandfather of Joseph (Cam) Felchlin, Michele Hunt, David Patty, Chris Patty, Michael (Andrea) Twillman, Jennifer Herndon, Sam Schnurbusch, and Addie (Chris Poole) Schnurbusch; treasured great-grandfather of Ashley (Mike) Lines, Brianna Martin, Elizabeth Felchlin, Willie Felchlin, Gavin Twillman, Caiden Twillman, and Sadie Baldwin; great-great-grandchildren, Cadi and Gabe Lines; dear brother of the late Bacil Patty, the late Wilbur Patty, the late Marion Patty, and the late Evelyn Patty. Billy Patty's three life-organizing principles centered on his deep spirituality, his commitment to humanitarian service, and his love Littleton, Janice S. "Jan" of Ruthie and family. With Ruthie's loving support, his heart-filled (nee Wilson) Tuesday, September warmth, and readiness to laugh and kid around, he maintained an 21, 2021. Beloved wife of David R. animated generosity and commitment to service for others. He Littleton; dear mother of Carol was an old soul and a Charismatic Catholic who led by: example (Robert) Kayser and Richard and expressed his Christian principles through the creation, fund (Robyn) Littleton; dear grandmoth- raising, and operation of a thriving inner city Food Pantry later er of 8 and great-grandmother of affiliated with Our Lady of Perpetual Help, establishing God's 8; dear sister of Patricia (John) Gang, a spiritually based youth program, leading Acts Retreats, Martin, Karen (George) Cox, Laura conducting Life in the Spirit Seminars and Missions in Motion in Logan and Terry Wilson. Preceded various parishes. Other more secular expressions of his spirit were in death by her parents, Frederick evident in his career as an author, architect, builder, boxer, and LaVerne (nee Alsbury) Wilson blacksmith, copy editor, U.S. Navy code breaker, engineer, and one granddaughter, Kylie entrepreneur, motel owner, movie projectionist, published poet, Littleton. Our dear sister-in-law, Journeyman printer, real estate broker, storyteller, theology aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. baccalaureate, utility company developer-owner-operator, and Services: Funeral from Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 wagon wheel repairman. Lemay Ferry Rd., Wednesday, September 29, 11:30 a.m. Services: In accordance with Billy's wishes, his body will be Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donated to science at St. Louis University Medical School. contributions to the Juvenile Diabetes Association appreciated. A memorial Mass will be live streamed on Tuesday, September 28 Visitation Tuesday, 4-8 p.m. at 10 a.m. via www.StPatrickWentzville.org. Those attending in person will be required to mask and socially distance. In lieu of flowers, Billy would convincingly ask that any donations be directed to Our Lady of Perpetual Help Food SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND Pantry at 4335 Warne Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri 63107 or via the website helpstlouis.org. Visit Baue.com SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

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“What we have once enjoyed, we can never lose. All that we love deeply becomes part of us.” HELEN KELLER

Schneider, Jean Madeline

(nee: Mechler), 83, of St. Louis, MO, passed away on September 19, 2021. Beloved wife of the late Wayne E Schneider; loving mother of Michael (Edy) Garrison, Marilee (Jamie) Ferrari and Peggy (Brian) Burmeister; loving step-mother to Greg (Annette) Schneider, Gary (Cindy) Schneider and Kurt (Jenny) Schneider; dear grandmother of 8; dear sister of Marilyn Mechler; dear friend to many. Services: Private burial at Sunset Memorial Park.

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NATION

A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

Push for Native American curriculum makes gains BY SUSAN HAIGH

Associated Press

For years, many Native American tribes have felt their history has not been given its due by schools in Connecticut, a state that takes its name from an Algonquian word meaning “land on the long tidal river.” Soon, however, schools will be required to teach Native American studies, with an emphasis on local tribes, under a law passed this year at the urging of tribes including the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation, best known today for its Foxwoods Resort Casino. “When you’re in Connecticut, to not learn about the Eastern woodland tribes, the tribes that Connecticut was founded on, (that) was the issue that we were pressing,” said Rodney Butler, chairman of the Mashantucket Pequots. It has been a long-running goal of many Native Americans to have more about their history and culture taught in grade schools. New requirements have been adopted in Connecticut, North Dakota and Oregon, and advocates say their efforts have gained some momentum with the nation’s reckoning over racial injustice since the killing of George Floyd. The legislation affecting schools has advanced alongside new bans on Native American mascots for sports teams and states celebrating Indigenous Peoples Day in place of Christopher Columbus Day. The push for curriculum requirements has not been without challenges, with some legislatures deeming new laws unnecessary because Native American history already is reflected in school curriculum. There also have been some steps in the opposite direc-

JESSICA HILL, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A dancer participates Aug. 28 in an intertribal dance at Schemitzun on the Mashantucket Pequot Reservation in Mashantucket, Conn. Connecticut and a handful of other states have recently decided to mandate students be taught about Native American culture and history. tion amid battles over how topics related to race and racism are taught in classrooms. In South Dakota, a group of teachers and citizens charged with crafting new state social studies standards said last month that Gov. Kristi Noem’s administration deleted from their draft recommendations many elements intended to bolster students’ understanding of Native American history and culture. They said changes made to the draft gave it a political edge they had tried to avoid, aligning it instead with the Republican gov-

ernor’s rhetoric on what she calls patriotic education. The Department of Education said in a statement that it relied heavily on the recommendations from the workgroup and made “certain adjustments before the release of the draft to provide greater clarity and focus for educators and the public.” Meanwhile, in Montana, tribes and the parents of 18 students filed a federal lawsuit in July, alleging state education leaders are violating a state constitutional requirement to teach all children about

the unique culture and heritage of Native Americans. A 2019 report from the National Congress of American Indians, which surveyed 35 states with federally recognized tribes, found nearly 90% of states said they had efforts underway to improve the quality and access to Native American curriculum. While a majority said it’s included in their schools, less than half said it was required and specific to tribal nations in their state. “We are seeing a focus on different races and issues,” said Aaron

Payment, first vice president of the National Congress of American Indians and chairperson of the 44,000-member Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians in Michigan. Payment, who holds a doctorate in educational leadership, said Native American Studies should be incorporated across curriculum, and not taught “just at Thanksgiving, where it’s a condensed sort of module.” He doesn’t support states mandating the curriculum per se but believes states should provide incentives and funding to develop curriculum, with input from tribes. The Connecticut legislation makes it mandatory for schools to teach Native American studies starting with the 2023-2024 school year. It passed despite concerns raised by teachers unions and state Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona. Cardona, who is now the U.S. education secretary, had said it is important to teach about Native Americans but he was wary of unfunded mandates for school districts that are still working to implement other courses lawmakers and the governor have required them to teach. In North Dakota, a bill became law this year that requires all elementary and secondary schools, public and private, to include Native American tribal history in their curriculum, with an emphasis on tribes within the state. In Oregon, a similar law took effect in 2019 to provide “historically accurate, culturally embedded, place-based, contemporary, and developmentally appropriate” American Indian and Alaska Native curriculum in five subject areas.

Climate change, logging collide — and a forest shrinks BY MATTHEW BROWN

Associated Press

CUSTER CITY, S.D. — Looking down a hillside dotted with large stumps and nearly devoid of trees, a pair of retired U.S. Forest Service employees lamented logging policies they helped craft to deal with two harbingers of climate change — pine beetles and wildfires. Timber production dramatically ramped up two decades ago in the Black Hills National Forest along the South Dakota-Wyoming border, as beetles ravaged huge expanses of forest and worries grew over wildfires. The beetles left, but the loggers haven’t — and they’re now felling trees at twice the rate government scientists say is sustainable. That means the Black Hills forests are shrinking, with fewer and smaller trees. Timber sales from federal forests nationwide more than doubled over the past 20 years, according to government data. In Washington, D.C., Republicans and Democrats alike have pushed more aggressive thinning of stands to reduce vegetation that fuels wildfires. But critics of federal forest management say that in their fervor

to do something about climate change, officials are allowing the removal of too many older trees that can actually better withstand fire. In the Black Hills, stands of century-old ponderosa pines were thinned over the past two decades, then thinned again. In some areas, most of the remaining older and larger trees are being cut, leaving hillsides almost bare. “Eventually you’re not going to have any big trees on the whole forest,” said Dave Mertz, who worked as a government natural resources officer overseeing Black Hills logging until retiring in 2017. “The timber industry is pulling the strings now. The Forest Service has lost its way.” Across the western U.S., more trees have been dying as climate change dramatically alters the landscape and leaves forests more susceptible. Wildfires, insects and disease are the top killers, researchers say. A sweeping government review of forest health surveys since 1993 found that the rate of trees dying increased this century and outpaced new growth in all eight states examined — Arizona, Col-

orado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. Timber harvested from Forest Service lands over the past two decades also increased. In the Black Hills, those two trends have collided. With more trees being logged and even more killed by beetles and fires in recent years, government scientists say the forest can’t grow fast enough to keep up. The timber industry and allies in Congress are pushing back against that conclusion. Timber company representatives predict dire economic consequences if forest managers sharply reduce harvest levels. And they say wildfires and beetle outbreaks would get worse. One of the region’s seven mills closed in March, eliminating 120 jobs in Hill City, South Dakota. Owner Neiman Enterprises said a recent slowdown in timber sales meant it wouldn’t have enough logs. “These companies aren’t tech startups. They are multi-generational family companies that want to be there for the long term,” said Ben Wudtke, director of the Black Hills Forest Resource Association of saw mills and logging compa-

OBITUARIES Watts D.O., Russell W. September 22, 2021. Our dear father, husband, stepfather, grandfather and friend. Russ was a dedicated church elder, talented artist, expert model railroad builder and RC flyer. Celebration of life at a later date. Donate in memory to food vouchers at First Presbyterian Church of Ferguson, 401 Darst Rd, Ferguson, MO 63135

nies. To counter growing havoc from western wildfires, Biden’s administration wants to double the forest acreage thinned or treated with prescribed burns to 6 million acres annually — bigger than New Hampshire. One method to reduce fire risk is to remove dense stands of small trees and thick underbrush that accumulated for decades as wildfires — a natural part of the landscape — were suppressed. It’s expensive, labor-intensive work, and there’s little market value in small trees. When sworn in this summer, Forest Service Chief Randy Moore said combating climate change will require making it worthwhile to harvest smaller trees, such as using the vegetation as biomass to generate electricity. “It doesn’t pay for itself, and we don’t have markets that seem to be increasing quickly enough,” he said. The service’s former deputy chief, Jim Furnish, criticized the agency as too focused on timber production and too slow to react to climate change, to the detriment of the forest. There are signs of change under

Celebrations of Life

President Joe Biden, including the administration’s move last month to end large-scale commercial logging of old-growth trees in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest. But other projects that include old-growth removal are pending, including in Montana’s Kootenai National Forest along the Canada border, the Kaibab National Forest just north of the Grand Canyon in Arizona and Idaho’s Nez PerceClearwater National Forest. “The Forest Service’s approach to date has been to attack this as a management problem: ‘We need to cut more trees,’” Furnish told The Associated Press. “You can’t cut your way out of this problem.” Moore, the agency’s chief, acknowledged the warming planet was forcing changes, but said he hoped to find a “sweet spot” between the environment and industry — while removing enough vegetation to reduce wildfire risk. In the Black Hills, officials said they would consider the latest science alongside economic impacts as they seek to make logging sustainable. “We need the industry to help us,” Moore said, referring to climate change. “It’s not really about timber sales or cutting large trees.”

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White, Lawrence C. Sept. 20, 2021, 78. Vis. Tuesday, Sept. 28, 9:30-10:30am, Baue St. Charles, 620 Jefferson St. Funeral Mass to follow at 11:00 am, St. Charles Borromeo Church. Visit Baue.com

White, Melba Summers Melba was welcomed into the arms of Christ on September 8, 2021. Beloved daughter of late Harvey and Adele Summers, sister of late James Summers and Grace Kondis, brave mother of Susan Evans, Erin Meek, Lorena "Lori" (Gene) Werkmeister and late Michael White and Kathryn "Kate" (Steve) Holloway, charming grandmother, great grandmother, aunt, great aunt, cousin and friend of many. Melba was a long time dedicated nurse. Services: Private burial at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be given to Alzheimer's Association.

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Williams, Vivian Sep. 19, 2021, 86. Memorial service on Sat. Oct. 9th from 3-4pm, at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (2245 S Old Hwy 94, St Charles, MO 63303). Visit Baue.com

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WORLD

A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

Regional conflicts laid bare at UN BY SALLY HO

Associated Press

The speeches may be scripted, but the U.N. General Assembly can sometimes be the only direct window into the regional challenges that command global concern. On Saturday, world leaders were speaking on behalf of some of the most unstable and unsettling current conflicts. That includes India’s fight over the Kashmir region with bitter rival Pakistan, Haiti’s domestic crises spilling into a migrant crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border and questions about the Ethiopian government’s role in reported starvation deaths in the Tigray region. Haiti Prime Minister Ariel Henry didn’t shy away from addressing his country’s turmoil following a major earthquake and the assassination of its president, Jovenel Moise, in recent months — alluding to but not directly ad-

dressing reports that may implicate Henry himself in the murder. “I want to reaffirm here, at this platform, my determination to do everything to find the collaborators, accomplices and sponsors of this odious crime. Nothing, absolutely nothing, no political maneuver, no media campaign, no distraction, could deter me from this objective: rendering justice for President Moise,” Henry said in a prerecorded speech. “It is a debt to his memory, his family and the Haitian people,” Henry said. “The judicial inquest is going difficultly. It’s a transnational crime. And for that, we formally solicit mutual legal assistance. It is a priority of my government for the entire nation. Because this crime cannot rest unpunished et those culpable, all those culpable must be punished.” The statement comes days after Henry fired his chief prosecutor,

who had asked a judge to charge Henry in the slaying of Moise that has shocked the world and to bar the prime minister from leaving the country. Haiti’s troubles have moved beyond its borders, with thousands of migrants fleeing to the United States. This week, the Biden administration’s special envoy to Haiti, Daniel Foote, resigned in protest of “inhumane” largescale U.S. expulsions of Haitian migrants. Foote was appointed to the position only in July, following the assassination. Henry pointedly said that inequalities and conflict drive migration. But he stopped short of directly criticizing Washington, whose treatment of Haitian asylum-seekers has prompted an outcry. “Human beings, fathers and mothers who have children, are always going to flee poverty and

OBITUARIES Schrieber, Winona Jean

A lifetime resident and servant to St. Louis, Winona "Jean" Schrieber began her formative years as an orphan residing at the St. Louis Girls Home. The loving care and giving spirit of the Protestant women who ran the St. Louis Girl's Home were the example of service to community that inspired Jean to give back. Jean entered the St. Louis Police Academy in 1951, a time when the department had no female officers. After 4 1/2 years with the City police Jean changed departments and became the first female officer in the St. Louis County Police Department in 1957. During her tenure as police officer, she was able to balance between career and family, raising three children on her own. Both the County of St. Louis and the State of Missouri have honored Winona "Jean" Schrieber with Proclamations for her community service and her trailblazing role in the St. Louis Police Community. Jean retired from the county police after 22 years of service, but her service to her community didn't stop after retirement. She continued to dedicate her life to serving the St. Louis Metropolitan area and the state of Missouri through volunteering. Here are just a few of the volunteer "jobs" Jean held after retirement: - For 20 years Schrieber volunteered at the Veteran’s Administration. - She delivered Meals on Wheels for 20 years before she had to give up driving. (even while using her walker!) - She volunteered at the riverfront in the St. Louis Visitor Center greeting visitors and promoting the city's offerings. - She was a volunteer driver many years for CORP (Saint Louis County Older Resident Programs) taking seniors to shop, to the doctor etc. - She was a volunteer usher at several of the local theaters. - She volunteered at the St. Louis Zoo. - She made weekly visits to local nursing homes to bring joy and give back rubs to residents who had no family or visitors. (even while using her walker!) - As her final act of service, Jean has donated her body to Washington University for purposes of medical research. Winona "Jean" Schrieber is survived by her daughter Nanci Schrieber-Smith of California and her son Jim Schrieber of Florida.

conflict,” Henry said. “Migration will continue as long as the planet has both wealthy areas, whilst most of the world’s population lives in poverty, even extreme poverty, without any prospects of a better life.” It was a flat-out denial for Ethiopia Deputy Prime Minister Demeke Mekonnen, who rejected humanitarian concerns over Tigray as part of a “twisted propaganda campaign” in the embattled corner of northern Ethiopia. “The criminal enterprise and its enablers created and advertised horrific imagery of faked incidents. As if the real misery of our people is not enough, storylines are created to match not the facts but preconceived stereotypical attitudes,” Mekonnen said. Ethiopia has faced the pressure of global concern since the U.N. warned of famine in the conflict, calling it the world’s worst hun-

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Celebrations of Life

Spielberg, Martin Norman

September 23, 2021. Passed away peacefully at the age of 86, having spent his last few months in California with his children and grandchildren. A native of St. Louis and graduate of Washington University, Martin stayed close with his childhood friends throughout his life. He successfully owned and operated Spielberg Furniture on "The Hill", a family business started by his father Louis Spielberg over 80 years earlier. After retirement Martin spent winters in Florida, making many close friends and becoming an avid cyclist. Martin was a workout enthusiast, well known by all at the "J". He loved to laugh and be surrounded by friends and family. He will be missed by all. Martin was the beloved husband of the late Patricia Spielberg; loving partner of Barbara Morris; devoted father and father-in-law of Laurie Rudman (Bruce), Julie Spielberg-Senet (Brad), Tammy Spielberg and Steven Spielberg (Orly); cherished grandfather of Jacob Markus and Joshua Spielberg; and dear brother of the late Albert Spielberg and the late Leonard Spielberg (late Charlotte). Dear uncle, cousin, and friend to many. Services: Graveside service Sunday September 26 at 11:30 AM at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery, 650 White Road. Service also available via Live Stream. Please visit www.bergermemorialchape l.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Swanson, William Donald

William (Bill) Donald Swanson, of Kirkwood, MO, passed away on September 18, 2021. He was preceded in death by his wife of 66 years, Shirley M. Swanson, and is survived by his three children: Kristin L. Swanson (Mac Prichard), William C. Swanson (Kathy Swanson), and Matthew L. Swanson (Ashley Taylor Swanson); four grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

Bill was born on February 20, 1930 in Columbia, MO and received a BA in civil engineering from the University of Missouri at Columbia. After graduation he served in the Korean Conflict as a company commander and first lieutenant. He went on to work in the steel industry and ended his career at Granite City Steel, where he was vice president and general manager from 1984-1990. No services are planned. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to Circle of Concern Food Pantry, Valley Park or Community Christian Church, Manchester, MO.

Schulte, Jeffrey A.

ger crisis in a decade. Starvation deaths have been reported since the government in June imposed what the U.N. calls “a de facto humanitarian aid blockade.” In his speech Saturday, Mekonnen urged the international community to steer clear of sanctions, avoid meddling and take a “constructive approach” to its war forces from the region. “Prescriptions and punitive measures never helped improve situations or relations,” he said, less than 10 days after the U.S. threatened to impose sanctions against Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed and other leaders. Meanwhile, India Prime Minister Narendra Modi largely sidestepped his nation’s regional conflict, making only what appeared to be a passing reference to Kashmir, channeling his comments through the lens of the Afghanistan crisis.

Vogel, Theodore "Ted"

93, Passed Monday, 9/20/21 following a brief illness. He was preceded in death by his wife of 67 years, Fay Vogel. He leaves 2 children and 5 grandchildren. Memorial: Sat. 10/2/21 1 p.m., (11:30 a.m. Visitation begins) at Chapel of the Cross Lutheran, 11645 Benham Rd., St Louis 63136. In lieu of flowers, you may donate to Chapel of the Cross Lutheran at https://www.chapelofthecross.org /give-via-paypal. For more details regarding Ted's life, please visit https://stlouiscremation.com/obituaries/theodore-vogel/

Ward, Lisa K.

(nee Leahart), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Thursday, September 23, 2021. Beloved wife of Keith Ward; loving mother of Kristine Ward, Amberly (Brendan) Pohlman, Zachary and Wilson Ward, Berkley (Robert) Hall; adoring grandmother of Holden (Mariah) and Luke Kiefer, Dustin Modglin, Grayce, Charlotte and Andi Pohlman and Holly Hall; cherished daughter of Yvonne and the late Henry Leahart; dear sister of Nancy (Timothy) Frederking, Raymond (Deborah) Leahart, Noel (Vanessa Atkins) Leahart and the late Kirby (surviving Debra) Leahart. Our dearest daughter-in-law, sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, September 28, at 12 noon. Interment at Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation Monday, 4-9 p.m.

Watts D.O., Russell W.

September 22, 2021. Our dear father, husband, stepfather, grandfather and friend. Russ was a dedicated church elder, talented artist, expert model railroad builder and RC flyer. Celebration of life at a later date. Donate in memory to food vouchers at First Presbyterian Church of Ferguson, 401 Darst Rd, Ferguson, MO 63135

White, Lawrence C.

Sept. 20, 2021, 78. Vis. Tuesday, Sept. 28, 9:30-10:30am, Baue St. Charles, 620 Jefferson St. Funeral Mass to follow at 11:00 am, St. Charles Borromeo Church. Visit Baue.com

White, Melba Summers

Melba was welcomed into the arms of Christ on September 8, 2021. Beloved daughter of late Harvey and Adele Summers, sister of late James Summers and Grace Kondis, brave mother of Susan Evans, Erin Meek, Lorena "Lori" (Gene) Werkmeister and late Michael White and Kathryn "Kate" (Steve) Holloway, charming grandmother, great grandmother, aunt, great aunt, cousin and friend of many. Melba was a long time dedicated nurse. Services: Private burial at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be given to Alzheimer's Association.

53, passed Friday, September 17, 2021 following a brief illness. He leaves behind a wife of 24 years Terry Schulte (Lingle), 3 daughters Amber, Ashley and Alyssa. He is the son of Jerome and Talbert, Richard E. Williams, Vivian Carolyn Schulte and a brother to Jay, Jim, and John and uncle to 3 September 24, 2021. Visitation Sunday, October 3, 2021, 1 p.m. nephews. He was a member of First Baptist Church of O'Fallon and until funeral service at 3 p.m. at St. John's Lutheran Church, Sep. 19, 2021, 86. Memorial service on Sat. Oct. 9th from 3-4pm, at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints a friend to all. Services: First Baptist Church of O'Fallon, O'Fallon, Warrenton, MO. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com (2245 S Old Hwy 94, St Charles, MO 63303). Visit Baue.com MO, September 30, 2021 at 4:30pm.

Teasdale, John Warren

Smith, Gene

January 13, 1936 - September 16, 2021. Rollin Eugene Smith passed away peacefully in his Santa Cruz, California home with his loving partner of 42 years by his side. He was born in St. Louis, graduated from Washington University where he studied art, and lived in the Central West End neighborhood in his 20s and 30s. He was a founding partner and Head Chef of the renowned Duff’s Restaurant on Euclid Ave, where his art spirit was

in everything he made. Gene owned property in the country near the rural town of Black Missouri with several friends and lived with them communally in the 1970s. He was the private chef for the Pulitzer family, who appreciated his food so much that they gave him their very own Pulitzer Prize in cooking. He launched "Dinner at Eight", a catering business serving Central West End clientele until he moved to Santa Cruz in 1977 to be the office manager of KFAT, a humorous, alternative radio station. He cooked at several Santa Cruz restaurants and was the assistant to two University of California Santa Cruz Vice Chancellors before returning to the catering business, delighting Santa Cruzans with his formal but easy-going dinners. His artistic talent was visible in his cooking, in his paintings, in his floral arrangements and in his approach to life. Gene was known not only for his impeccable taste but also for his sweet, kind and gentle manner. He was predeceased by his parents, Nina Wood Smith and John Alfred Smith, his brother Ted Smith and his son Timothy Carlson Smith. He leaves his life partner Alan Savat, his sister Mary Duba of St. Louis, eight nieces and nephews, and many great and great-great nieces and nephews. Services: A celebration of his life will be held at a future date to be announced. Donations can be made to Hospice of Santa Cruz County or a charity of your choice.

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THEM GREAT STLtoday.com/obits

John Warren Teasdale, 81, passed away Aug 8, 2021 in Fairfield Bay, Arkansas. He was preceded in death by his parents, David and Ruth Teasdale and brother, David Teasdale, Jr. He is survived by his brother, Thomas Teasdale Sr. (June;) nieces Laura and Marjorie Sara Teasdale; nephew, Thomas Teasdale, Jr. (Karen;) great nephew, Michael Teasdale and sister-in-law, Judy Teasdale. John grew up in Olivette, MO - a relatively rural part of St. Louis County with farms, scattered homes and plenty of open fields - a great environment for a young boy. He received a business degree from Washington University in St. Louis. John started a successful business with a good friend, but a wanderlust caused him to pull up his roots and leave St. Louis for Florida. Every few years he would get the urge to venture out again and off he would go to another part of the country - making new friends along the way. John finally settled in Fairfield Bay, where he stayed for a number of years before quietly passing away. Goodbye John ? we all love you!

Thieret, William

In Memoriam JOSEPH R. BUFFA, SR. February 18, 1933 September 26, 2016 Always in our Hearts

Florist Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

66, September 22, 2021. Funeral Mass at Holy Infant, Ballwin, Sat. (10/2) 10am. Visit. at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Fri, (10/1) 4-8pm. For more info see schrader.com.

Tichenor, Joan

87, Thurs., Sept 23, 2021. Visitation Sept 26, 4-8 p.m. at Hutchens Stygars Funeral and Cremation Center, St. Charles. Service Sept 27, 11 a.m. Online guestbook www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Veach, Janie G.

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74, on Thurs., 9/15. Visitation only from 1-4 pm on Thurs., 9/30 at Hutchens-Stygar, St. Charles. Masks required. No flowers, donations to Autism Society of America. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

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NEWS

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A23

Illegal marijuana farms take West’s water BY ANDREW SELSKY

Associated Press

LA PINE, Ore. — Jack Dwyer pursued a dream of getting back to the land by moving in 1972 to an idyllic, tree-studded parcel in Oregon with a creek running through it. “We were going to grow our own food. We were going to live righteously. We were going to grow organic,” Dwyer said. Over the decades that followed, he and his family did just that. But now, Deer Creek has run dry after several illegal marijuana grows cropped up in the neighborhood last spring, stealing water from both the stream and nearby aquifers and throwing Dwyer’s future in doubt. From dusty towns to forests in the U.S. West, illegal marijuana growers are taking water in uncontrolled amounts when there often isn’t enough to go around for even licensed users. Conflicts about water have long existed, but illegal marijuana farms — which proliferate despite legalization in many Western states — are adding strain during a severe drought. In California, which legalized recreational marijuana in 2016, there are still more illegal cannabis farms than licensed ones, according to the Cannabis Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley. “Because peak water demand for cannabis occurs in the dry season, when streamflow is at its lowest levels, even small diversions can dry streams and harm aquatic plants and animals,” a study from the center said. Some jurisdictions are fighting back. California’s Siskiyou County Board of Supervisors in May banned trucks carrying 100 gallons or more of water from using roads leading to arid tracts where some 2,000 illegal marijuana grows were purportedly using millions of gallons of water daily. The illegal grows are “depleting precious groundwater and surface water resources” and jeopardizing agricultural, recreational and residential water use, the county ordinance says. In Oregon, the number of illegal grows appears to have increased recently as the Pacific Northwest endured its driest spring since 1924. Many are operating under the guise of being hemp farms, legalized nationally under the 2018 Farm Bill, said Mark Pettinger,

DESCHUTES COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

An aerial photo taken Sept. 2, the day officers raided the site in Alfalfa, Ore., shows the 30-acre property in the high desert where they found 49 greenhouses containing almost 10,000 marijuana plants and a complex watering system with several 15,000- to 20,000-gallon cisterns.

CAROL VALENTINE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jack Dwyer stands on the dry creek bed of Deer Creek in Selma, Ore., on Sept. 2, 2021. In 1972, Dwyer pursued a dream of getting back to the land by moving to an idyllic, tree-studded parcel in Oregon with Deer Creek running through it. But now, Deer Creek has become a dry creek bed after several illegal marijuana grows cropped up in the neighborhood last spring. spokesman for the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission. Under the law, hemp’s maximum THC content — the compound that gives cannabis its high — must be no greater than 0.3%. Fibers of the hemp plant are used in making rope, clothing, paper and other products. Josephine County Sheriff Dave

Daniel believes there are hundreds of illegal grows in his southern Oregon county alone, many financed by overseas money. He believes the financiers expect to lose a few grows, but the sheer number of them means many will last until the marijuana is harvested and sold on the black market outside Oregon.

None of the new sites has been licensed to grow recreational marijuana, Pettinger said. Regulators, confronted in 2019 by a backlog of license applications and a glut of regulated marijuana, stopped processing new applications until January 2022. The illegal grows have had “catastrophic” consequences for natural water resources, Daniel said. Several creeks have dried up far earlier than normal and the water table — the underground boundary between water-saturated soil and unsaturated soil — is dropping. “It’s just blatant theft of water,” Daniel said. Last month, Daniel and his deputies, reinforced by other law enforcement officers, destroyed 72,000 marijuana plants growing in 400 cheaply built greenhouses, known as hoop houses. The water for those plants came through a makeshift, illicit system of pumps and hoses from the nearby Illinois River, which belongs to the Wild and Scenic Rivers System, created by Congress to preserve certain rivers with outstanding natural, cultural and recreational values. Daniel said another illegal grow that had 200,000 plants was drawing water from Deer Creek using pumps and pipes. He called it “one of the most blatant and

ugly things I’ve seen.” “They had actually dug holes into the ground so deep that Deer Creek had dried up ... and they were down into the water table,” the sheriff said. Dwyer has a water right to Deer Creek, near the community of Selma, that allows him to grow crops. The creek can run dry late in the year sometimes, but Dwyer has never seen it this dry, much less this early in the year. The streambed is now an avenue of rocks bordered by brush and trees. Over the decades, Dwyer created an infrastructure of buried water pipe, a dozen spigots and an irrigation system connected to the creek to grow vegetables and to protect his home against wildfires. He uses an old well for household water, but it’s unclear how long that will last. “I just don’t know what I will do if I don’t have water,” the 75-yearold retired middle school teacher said. In the high desert of central Oregon, illegal marijuana growers are also tapping the water supply that’s already so stressed that many farmers, including those who produce 60% of the world’s carrot-seed supply, face a water shortage this year. On Sept. 2, Deschutes County authorities raided a 30-acre property in Alfalfa, just east of Bend. It had 49 greenhouses with almost 10,000 marijuana plants and a complex watering system. Neighbors told detectives the illegal grow has forced them to drill a new well, Sheriff Shane Nelson said. The Bend area has experienced a population boom, putting more demands on the water supply. The illegal grows are making things worse. In La Pine, south of Bend, Rodger Jincks watched a crew drill a new well on his property. Driller Shane Harris estimated the water table is dropping 6 inches per year. Sheriff’s deputies last November raided an illegal grow a block away that had 500 marijuana plants. Jincks’ neighbor, Jim Hooper, worries that his well might fail next. He resents the illegal grows and their uncontrolled used of water. “They’re just stealing the water from the rest of us, which is causing us to spend thousands of dollars to drill new wells deeper,” Hooper said.

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rate training is needed for most dogs, whether for behavioral or transportation purposes. Additionally, crating dogs with separation anxiety can help prevent destructive behaviors. Any dog can develop separation anxiety, regardless of breed, age, history or environment. Triggers can include: Genetic predisposition. A recent move. A major change in routine. Stressful or high-energy environments. A change in people at home. Whatever the cause, the best way to handle separation anxiety in dogs is to be consistent, positive and patient. If possible, socialize your dog with other animals and humans, too. Although crate training can be a challenge, it might be just what your canine companion needs when you’re not around. Keep in mind that crate training a dog who has separation anxiety requires a bit more time, patience and consistency. Here are four steps for crate training your dog.

the crate 1 Introduce Put the crate in a quiet area

departure cues 3 Give For a dog with extreme

short trips 4 Take Once you’ve conquered

of the home with the door open. Place something with a familiar scent inside the crate, such as a worn shirt or the dog’s blanket, since dogs rely on their sense of smell. Add a small bowl of dog food and a favorite toy, as well. Give your dog a few days to start building positive associations with the crate. Let them get comfortable going in and out on their own by leaving the door open for the first week.

separation anxiety, even putting on your shoes or grabbing your keys can cause stress. To work on this, put the dog in their crate and go about your day as usual until they settle down. Next, act as if you’re leaving by gathering the things you’d normally need for a trip outside. Start with one cue at a time, like picking up your keys or opening and closing the front door. Go to another room for 15 to 30 minutes while your dog is crated. Reward them for good behavior when they’re out. As this improves, consider moving the crate to a busier area of the home. Once your dog is no longer stressed about the idea of you leaving, incorporate more pre-departure cues into the crate-training routine.

your dog’s pre-departure anxiety, leave them at home in the crate while you take short trips. This could be a walk around the block or a trip to the mailbox. The goal is getting the dog used to being in the crate while you’re away. Start with 10- or 15-minute excursions, and work your way up to half an hour over several days. When you return, take your time to settle in before going to your dog. If the dog seems upset or overly excited to see you, wait until they calm down before letting them out of the crate. Once you do, reward them with a treat or praise for good behavior. Dogs can associate different activities with certain times of the day, so try varying the time you leave each day. Go out in the morning one day, then in the afternoon or evening the next. This will help the dog get used to you being gone at any point of the day, not just one specific period. If there are other people in the household, involve them in the crate training and short trips to get your dog accustomed to everyone coming and going.

crate time 2 Increase Once your dog is familiar with the crate, encourage them to go inside, then close the door for five- to 10-minute intervals. Don’t pay attention to them while they’re in there. After the time is up, let them out and reward them with treats, praise or playtime. Over the course of a few weeks, gradually increase the amount of time the dog spends in the crate — aim for 30-minute intervals. While the dog is in the crate, go about your day as usual. It’s OK to leave the room, but don’t leave the house until the dog is crated without showing signs of anxiety.

TIP A camera that feeds to your phone can be helpful to see how your dog acts while you’re away. Treat it as a guide for how long you can leave them alone.

O AMA Z

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Angela Watson is a writer for BestReviews. BestReviews is a product review company with a singular mission: to help simplify your purchasing decisions and save you time and money.


WORLD

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A23

Germans face big decision on Sunday BY GEIR MOULSON

Associated Press

BERLIN — Germany’s closely fought election on Sunday will set the direction of the European Union’s most populous country after 16 years under Angela Merkel, whose party is scrambling to avoid defeat by its center-left rivals after a rollercoaster campaign. The environmentalist Greens also are eyeing at least a share of power. About 60.4 million people in the nation of 83 million are eligible to elect the new parliament, which decides who will be the next head of government. Recent polls point to a neck-and-neck race between Merkel’s center-right Union bloc and the Social Democrats, with the latter marginally ahead. The polls show the Greens, making their first bid for the chancellorship, in third place after a campaign in which all three have held the lead. The Social Democrats’ candidate, current finance minister and Vice Chancellor Olaf Scholz, has seen his personal ratings climb amid errorstrewn campaigns by his rivals, the Union’s Armin Laschet and the Greens’ Annalena Baerbock. Merkel, who remains personally popular after steering Germany through a string of crises, announced in 2018 that she wouldn’t go for a fifth term. That set up the first election since West Germany’s initial vote in 1949 in which there is no incumbent chancellor seeking re-election. Voters appear underwhelmed by the choices. Whoever finishes first is expected to get a historically low share of the vote, with polls showing no party expected to get 30% support. The lowest score so far for a winning party is the Union’s 31% in 1949, which also is the bloc’s worst showing to date. Such an outcome would likely trigger lengthy haggling on a new governing coalition, with whichever party finishes first bestplaced — but not guaranteed — to have its candidate succeed Merkel. A first-place finish for the Social Democrats, who provided three of Germany’s eight post-World War II chancellors but have been Merkel’s junior governing partners for 12 of the past 16 years, would be remarkable after a long poll slump for the party. When the Union and the Greens chose their candidates this spring, the election was widely expected to be a race between the two. The Union was prepared for a Laschet-Baerbock battle and “Laschet wanted practically to act as the incumbent, with all his leadership expertise” from his current job as governor of Germany’s most populous state, North Rhine-Westphalia, political science professor Andrea Roemmele of the Hertie School in Berlin said this week. “But now the duel isn’t Laschet against Baerbock, it’s Laschet against Scholz, and in this combination Mr. Laschet has been forced into the role of challenger,” she said. “Scholz is deploying all the power of his vice chancellorship, of the finance minister, and is enjoying campaigning this way; he has simply managed to build up trust.” Scholz also has had the smoothest campaign, although opponents sought to capitalize on a recent police search at his ministry. Baerbock suffered from early gaffes, notably having to correct details in a resume and facing allegations of plagiarism in a new book. Laschet, the governor of North Rhine-Westphalia, was nominated after a divisive internal battle with a rival, then suffered from perceptions that he poorly handled deadly floods that hit his state in July. A scene in which he was seen laughing in the background as Germany’s president delivered solemn remarks about the disaster did not help his campaign image. Those woes have often distracted from policy issues. The leading parties have significant differences in their proposals for tackling climate change. Laschet’s Union is pinning its hopes on technological solutions and a market-driven approach, while the Greens want to ramp up carbon prices and end the use of coal earlier than planned. Scholz has emphasized the need to protect jobs as Europe’s biggest economy transitions to greener energy. Laschet insists there should be no tax increases as Germany pulls out of the coronavirus pandemic, which the country weathered well economically thanks to large rescue packages that have incurred new debt. Scholz and Baerbock favor tax hikes for the richest Germans, and also back an increase in the country’s minimum wage.

FERNANDO LLANO, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Migrants, many from Haiti, wade across the Rio Grande from Del Rio, Texas, with their belongings Sept. 22 to return to Ciudad Acuna, Mexico to avoid possible deportation from the U.S.

Haitians see history of racist policies in migrant treatment BY AARON MORRISON, ASTRID GALVAN AND JASEN LO

Associated Press

The recent images of men on horseback with long reins, corralling Haitian asylum seekers trying to cross into the U.S. from Mexico, provoked an outcry. But to many Haitians and Black Americans, they’re merely confirmation of a deeply held belief: U.S. immigration policies, they say, are and have long been antiBlack. The Border Patrol’s treatment of Haitian migrants, they say, is just the latest in a long history of discriminatory U.S. policies and of indignities faced by Black people, sparking new anger among Haitian Americans, Black immigrant advocates and civil rights leaders. They point to immigration data that indicate Haitians and other Black migrants routinely face structural barriers to legally entering or living in the U.S. — and often endure disproportionate contact with the American criminal legal system that can jeopardize their residency or hasten their deportation. Haitians, in particular, are granted asylum at the lowest rate of any nationality with consistently high numbers of asylum seekers, according to an analysis of data by The Associated Press. “Black immigrants live at the intersection of race and immigration and, for too long, have fallen through the cracks of red tape and legal loopholes,” said Yoliswa Cele, director of narrative and media at the UndocuBlack Network, a national advocacy organization for currently and formerly undocu-

mented Black people. “Now through the videos capturing the abuses on Haitians at the border, the world has now seen for itself that all migrants seeking a better tomorrow aren’t treated equal when skin color is involved.” Between 2018 and 2021, only 4.62% of Haitian asylum seekers were granted asylum by the U.S. — the lowest rate among 84 groups for whom data is available. Asylum seekers from the Dominican Republic, which shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti, have a similarly low rate of 5.11%. By comparison, four of the five top U.S. asylum applicants are from Latin American countries — El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico and Honduras. Their acceptance rates range from 6.21% to 14.12%. Nicole Phillips, legal director for the Haitian Bridge Alliance, said racism has long driven the American government’s treatment of Haitian immigrants. Phillips, whose organization is on the ground helping Haitians in Texas, says this dates back to the early 1800s, when Haitian slaves revolted and gained independence from France, and has continued through decades of U.S. intervention and occupation in the small island nation. She said the U.S., threatened by the possibility of its own slaves revolting, both assisted the French and didn’t recognize Haitian independence for nearly six decades. The U.S. also loaned money to Haiti so that it could, in essence, buy its independence, collecting interest payments while plunging the country into poverty for decades.

“This mentality and stigma against Haitians stems all the way back to that period,” Phillips said. The U.S. violently occupied Haiti from 1915 to 1934 and backed former Haiti dictator Francois Duvalier, whose oppressive regime resulted in 30,000 deaths and drove thousands to flee. While the U.S. long treated Cubans with compassion — largely because of opposition to the Communist regime — the administrations of George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton took a hard line on Haitians. And the Trump administration ended Temporary Protected Status for several nationalities, including Haitians and Central Americans. Over and over, the U.S. has passed immigration legislation that excluded Black immigrants and Haitians, and promoted policies that unfairly jeopardized their legal status in the country, advocates said. When they manage to enter the U.S., Black immigrants say they contend with systemic racism in the American criminal legal system and brutality of U.S. policing that has been endemic for people from across the African diaspora. The Black Alliance for Just Immigration, a national racial justice and immigrant rights group, largely defines Black immigrants as people from nations in Africa and the Caribbean. By that definition, AP’s analysis of 2019 Department of Homeland Security data found 66% of Black immigrants deported from the U.S were removed based on criminal grounds, as opposed to 43% of all immigrants.

Nana Gyamfi, BAJI’s executive director, said crimes of moral turpitude, including petty theft or turnstile jumping, have been used as partial justification for denying Black immigrants legal status. “We have people getting deported because of train fare,” she said. Leaders within the Movement for Black Lives, a national coalition of Black-led racial justice and civil rights organizations, have pointed to the treatment of Haitians at the border as justification for their broader demands for defunding law enforcement agencies in the U.S. Last year, following the police killing of George Floyd, the coalition proposed sweeping federal legislation known as the BREATHE Act, which includes calls to end immigration detention, stop deportations due to contact with the criminal legal system, and ensure due process within the immigration court system. “A lot of times in the immigration debate, Black people are erased and Black immigrants are erased from the conversation,” said Amara Enyia, a policy researcher for the Movement for Black Lives. Civil rights leaders have called for an investigation into the treatment of Black migrants at the border and for an immediate end to the deportation of Black asylum seekers. The migrant camp in Del Rio, Texas, is “a catastrophic and human disgrace,” the Rev. Al Sharpton said after touring the area with several Black American leaders in Del Rio. “We will keep coming back, as long as is necessary.”

Jailbreak shines light on mass incarceration of Palestinians BY JOSEPH KRAUSS AND JACK JEFFERY

Associated Press

RAMALLAH, West Bank — The cinematic escape of six prisoners who recently tunneled out of an Israeli penitentiary has shone a light on Israel’s mass incarceration of Palestinians, one of the many bitter fruits of the conflict. Hundreds of thousands of Palestinians have passed through a military justice system designed for what Israel still portrays as a temporary occupation, but that is now well into its sixth decade and critics say is firmly cemented. Nearly every Palestinian has a loved one who has been locked up in that system at some point, and imprisonment is widely seen as one of the most painful aspects of life under Israeli rule. The saga of the six, who were eventually recaptured, also underscored the irreconcilable views Israelis and Palestinians hold about the prisoners and, more broadly, what constitutes legitimate resistance to occupation. Israel classifies nearly every act of opposition to its military rule as a criminal offense, while many Palestinians see those acts as resistance and those engaged in them as heroes, even if they kill or wound Israelis. Israel has granted limited autonomy to the Palestinian Authority, which administers cities and towns in the occupied West Bank and is responsible for regular law enforcement. But Israel has overarching authority and the military regularly carries out arrest raids even in PA-run areas. Israel seized the West Bank along

NASSER NASSER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Qadoura Fares, center, attends a protest supporting prisoners, while a fellow protester carries a poster with pictures of the six Palestinian prisoners who escaped from an Israeli jail that says “heroes of the freedom tunnel,” Sept. 14 in the West Bank city of Ramallah. Fares, head of the Prisoners Club, which represents current and former Palestinian prisoners, said they are all “freedom fighters.” with east Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip in the 1967 war. The Palestinians seek an independent state in all three. The Palestinian prisoners held by Israel include everyone from hardened militants convicted of suicide bombings and shootings that killed Israeli civilians to activists detained for demonstrating against settlements and teenagers arrested for throwing stones at Israeli soldiers. Israel says it provides due process and largely imprisons those who threaten its security, though a small number are held for petty crimes. Palestinians and human rights groups say the system is designed to quash opposition and maintain permanent control over

millions of Palestinians while denying them basic rights. “Mass incarceration of Palestinians is a means to control the population, to stifle political activity, to keep a lid on turmoil and activism,” said Dani Shenhar, the legal director of HaMoked, an Israeli group that advocates for the rights of detainees. Four of the escapees were known militants convicted of deadly attacks against Israelis. Of the more than 4,600 Palestinians currently held by Israel in connection with the conflict — known as “security prisoners” — more than 500 are serving life sentences. A similar number are being held without charge in socalled administrative detention,

perhaps the most controversial aspect of Israel’s military justice system. Qadoura Fares, head of the Prisoners Club, which represents current and former Palestinian prisoners, said they are all “freedom fighters.” “We see them as symbols of the Palestinian people’s struggle,” he said. Alaa al-Rimawi, a Palestinian journalist with the Al-Jazeera television network, said he has spent a total of 11 years in prison in several stints over the last three decades over allegations related to political activism, but was never convicted of anything. The Israeli military declined to comment. In 2018 he was arrested while working as the West Bank director of Al-Quds TV, which is affiliated with the Hamas militant group that runs the Palestinian territory of Gaza. Al-Rimawi says he is not a member of Hamas or any other group. He said he was accused of “inciting violence against the occupation” by publishing stories about home demolitions and Palestinians killed by Israeli forces. He was released after 30 days but barred from working as a journalist for two months. On separate occasions earlier this year, he was briefly detained by both Israel and the Palestinian Authority, which also suppresses dissent. “Existence in a prison is like being in the grave,” al-Rimawi said. “And then you come out of it, and you feel like you came back to life after death.”


A24 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

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ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A25

SEPTEMBER.26.2021 • SUNDAY • M 1

TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 314-621-6666

Fall is in the Air! PHOTOS PROVIDED BY MCKELVEY HOMES

See what’s new this Fall at McKelvey’s Villages at Sandfort Farm Sponsored content by McKelvey Homes

Here’s something to think about while carving pumpkins and putting up those Fall decorations. Act quickly and, next year, you could be greeting trickor-treaters in a brand-new home at The Villages at Sandfort Farm. Fall Sales are in full swing this season, with the third and final phase selling fast! Situated just north of I-70, between Zumbehl and Truman Roads, historic Sandfort Farm is one of St. Charles’ most anticipated new-home developments in recent years. At this enviable location, McKelvey Homes, joined forces with two other builders to create an extraordinary master-planned community consisting of 253 homesites clustered around numerous cul-de-sacs radiating from a single main boulevard. Since the inaugural celebration, tremendous progress has been made at the site, and early visitors who may have been “just curious” at the time will definitely want to see this neighborhood again. Much of Sandfort Farm’s planned amenities, which include more than 33 acres of common ground, walking trails, a playground, swimming pool, and a 3,900 square foot pool house have started to take shape. The attractive stone monument that marks the entrance is now complete! And confirming the neighborhood’s residential appeal, brand-new homes are going up everywhere!

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A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • SEPTEMBER.26.2021

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CLASSIFIED All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise ‘any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.’ This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Land for Sale

ONLINE ONLY AUCTION CRP Income/Hunting/Home Sites

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Real Estate Auctions

Lewis County, MO Fri., Oct. 22 • 1 PM 104 Acres± • 2 Tracts Productive Tillable Cropland! Excellent Hunting/ Rec. Opportunities! sullivanauctioneers.com

3 PRIME, CLASS A FARM REAL ESTATE 3 EXCELLENT DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES 3 ZONED COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL The Ambrosia Land Investments, LLC property contains 93.83 surveyed acres. Tracts 1 - 4 are located at the northeast edge of Mascoutah, IL, along IL Route 4, approximately 3 miles south of I-64 and a short distance from Scott Air Force Base. Tracts 1 & 2 are further described as being located in the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 29, and Tracts 3 & 4 are further described as being located in the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 30, all in T1N-R6W, Mascoutah Township, St. Clair County, IL. Tract 5 is located at the east edge of Belleville, IL, along S. Green Mount Rd, between routes 161 and 158 and approximately 4 miles south of I-64. The property is further described as being located in the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 25, T1N-R8W, St. Clair County, IL.

844-847-2161

AMBROSIA LAND INVESTMENTS, LLC

Land Auction

Closing Title Company: Mark Cowgill, Community Title Shiloh LLC 1207 Thouvenot Ln, Ste 800 | Shiloh, IL 62269 | (618) 509-6704 AUCTION MANAGERS: John Borrowman (217) 430-0645 & John Sullivan (309) 221-6700

Adair County, MO Tues., Oct. 26 • 5 PM 400 Acres± • 5 Tracts Productive farmland currently in improved pasture & hay production! Country home & outbuildings! Open House: Oct. 16 • 11A-1P sullivanauctioneers.com

Knox & Macon County, MO Fri., Oct. 22 • 10 AM 290 Acres± • 7 Tracts Productive Tillable Cropland! Excellent Hunting/ Rec. Acreage! Beautiful Country Home! Open House: Oct. 9 • 10-12 Noon sullivanauctioneers.com

Marion County, MO Fri., Oct. 29 • 1 PM 115 Acres± • 1 Tract Highly productive tillable cropland with state highway frontage! sullivanauctioneers.com

844-847-2161

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SULLIVAN AUCTIONEERS, LLC (844)847-2161 www.SullivanAuctioneers.com IL Lic. #444000107

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HOMES

09.26.2021 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A27

LIVING | ADVICE

FALL LAWN

CARE

7 steps for preparing your yard for colder weather ANGELA WATSON | BestReviews

Y

ard maintenance doesn’t stop when summer’s over. Preparing your lawn for winter is important if you want a healthy, verdant yard next spring. Here are seven fall lawn care steps to take before the first frost.

the soil 2 Aerate Aeration is the act of breaking apart

the grass 5 Mow The ideal lawn height

compacted soil that blocks nutrients and stunts root growth. Lawns should be aerated once a year. In cooler regions, aerate in early fall or early spring. In warmer regions, aerate in early spring or before summer. Without regular aeration, grass will thin out and die; aeration is especially important for newly planted sod, heavily trafficked lawns and new constructions. For maximum impact, aerate your lawn before fertilizing it. That way, the fertilizer can get through to the grass roots. For hard soil or lawns with water runoff, use a plug aerator. Spike aerators work better on looser soil. After aerating your lawn, let any excess soil dry and break down, then overseed or fertilize the lawn as needed. TOP: Agri-Fab 48-Inch Tow Plug Aerator, $279.99 at Amazon RIGHT: Yard Butler 37-Inch Multi-Spike Lawn Aerator, $33.99 at Amazon

before winter hits is 2 inches. That’s short enough to prevent snow mold but long enough to protect the grass roots from cold temperatures. But keep in mind that mowing the grass all at once to a short height can cause stress on your yard. Instead, as temperatures fall, mow the grass in increments. This will also help slice up any fallen leaves and create a mulch that acts as a natural fertilizer for the yard.

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the yard 3 Dethatch A half-inch-thick layer of thatch, which is decomposing organic matter between the soil and upper grass, can be beneficial to your lawn. But if the thatch builds up, it can keep water and fertilizer from reaching root systems. It can also create problems in insulation, which makes it harder for your grass to withstand temperature changes. Use a thatching rake or dethatching machine to remove buildup. For warm-season grass, you may need to wait to aerate and dethatch the yard until spring, when grass starts growing. TOP: True Temper 54-Inch Adjustable Thatching Rake, $57 at Amazon RIGHT: Greenworks Corded 14-Inch Dethatcher, $129 at Amazon

to 2 inches of water a week for a healthy root system. Keep an eye on the daily temperature and make sure you water the grass before the first frost. This will strengthen the grass and protect it from cold damage. As the temperature drops, remember to disconnect hoses or irrigation systems to prevent freezing.

the yard 4 Overseed If your lawn is starting to look a little bare, overseed

your lawn 1 Fertilize Fall is the perfect time to fertilize your lawn, especially in the cold-weather-prone Midwest and Northeast. Fertilizing is an essential part of winterizing your lawn. Fertilizer strengthens grass roots before the cold sets in, making for greener and healthier spring grass. Generally, the best time to use fertilizer is in mid-October or a few weeks before the first frost in your area. Apply fertilizer in the early morning (dew can help it absorb into the soil) or early evening. Never use it just before or after a heavy downpour; the rain or leftover moisture will wash away the fertilizer. If you have warm-season grass like zoysia or Bermuda, fertilize up to about a month before the first frost. That way, the grass can go dormant for the winter. Along with regular fertilizer, give your lawn a boost with a fertilizer created specifically for the winter, which helps grass roots store nutrients over winter. Apply this four or five weeks after your regular fertilizer.

regularly 6 Water In general, grass needs 1

it before winter. This promotes thick grass growth and helps prevent weed growth. In cooler regions, overseed about 45 days before the first frost (warmer regions, wait until late spring). Evening is the best time of day to seed, once the temperature drops below 65 degrees. Before seeding the yard, test your lawn’s pH levels for ideal seeding conditions (6.2 to 7 pH is recommended). Then, sprinkle mulch over the areas you want to seed. For best results, use a seed spreader. TOP: Scotts Turf Builder Mini Broadcast Spreader, $40.99 at Amazon; RIGHT: SONKIR Soil pH Meter, $12.99 at Amazon

leaves 7 Rake In yards with

lots of trees, make sure to regularly rake up the leaves and remove leaf piles. A few leaves here and there are OK; they can be broken up into fertilizing mulch with a lawn mower. But piles of leaves can retain moisture and lead to soggy grass and decay.

Angela Watson is a writer for BestReviews. BestReviews is a product review company with a singular mission: to help simplify your purchasing decisions and save you time and money.

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Public Notices

Public Notices Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Federal Reserve Board's procedures, or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Holly Rieser, Manager, at (314) 444-4713. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a public meeting or formal hearing on the application if they are received in writing by the Reserve Bank on or before the last day of the comment period.

LEGAL NOTICE Simmons Bank, Pine Bluff, Arkansas intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to establish a branch at 1408 North Kingshighway Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63113. The Federal Reserve considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application including the record of performance of applicant banks in helping to meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments in writing on this notice to the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, P.O. Box 442, St. Louis, MO 63166-0442. Comments may also be submitted electronically to comments.applications @stls.frb.org. The comment period will not end before October 12, 2021. The Board's procedures for processing applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262.

LEGAL NOTICE Simmons Bank, Pine Bluff, Arkansas intends to apply to the Federal Reserve Board for permission to establish a branch at 7800 Forsyth Boulevard, Clayton, Mo 63105. The Federal Reserve considers a number of factors in deciding whether to approve the application including the record of performance of applicant banks in helping to meet local credit needs. You are invited to submit comments in writing on this notice to the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, P.O. Box 442, St. Louis, MO 63166-0442. Comments may also be submitted electronically to comments.applications@stls.frb. org. The comment period will not end before October 12, 2021. The Board's procedures for processing

Public Notices applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. Part 262. Procedures for processing protested applications may be found at 12 C.F.R. 262.25. To obtain a copy of the Federal Reserve Board's procedures, or if you need more information about how to submit your comments on the application, contact Holly Rieser, Manager, at (314) 444-4713. The Federal Reserve will consider your comments and any request for a public meeting or formal hearing on the application if they are received in writing by the Reserve Bank on or before the last day of the comment period.

Bids and Proposals Bids for Missouri State Highway Patrol General Headquarters facility improvements, Project Nos. R2109-01 and R2110-01, will be received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 10/21/2021 via MissouriBUYS. Bidders must be registered to bid. For specific project information, go to: http://oa.mo.gov/facilities

Campus and Research Farm Master Plans Lincoln University of Missouri is currently accepting qualification statements for professional services to develop Master Plans for Jefferson City campus and Research farms. Please submit all d o c u m e n t s t o lufacilitiesplanning@lincoln.edu by October 13, 2021. For additional information, please contact the Office of Facilities and Planning, 309 Young Hall, Lincoln University, Jefferson City, Missouri (573)681-5084.

KJLU Relocation - On Campus Lincoln University of Missouri is currently accepting qualification statements for professional design services to renovate an existing campus facility for the new home of KJLU Radio on the Jefferson City, MO Campus. Please submit all d o c u m e n t s t o lufacilitiesplanning@lincoln.edu by October 13, 2021. For additional information, please contact the Office of Facilities and Planning, 309 Young Hall, Lincoln University, Jefferson City, Missouri (573)681-5084.

YOUR VIEWS. PUBLISHED. Become a contributor to an ongoing conversation about the best ways to address problems, right wrongs and make our society better. Your input can generate useful ideas that catalyze positive action. Let your view be known and voice be heard in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Write a letter to the editor at STLtoday.com/letters

Bids and Proposals Multi-Purpose Campus

Ag

Facility

-

Bids and Proposals on

Lincoln University of Missouri is currently accepting qualification statements for professional services to include the design of a new multi-purpose agricultural facility on the Jefferson City, MO Campus. Please submit all documents to lufacilitiesplanning@lincoln.edu by October 13, 2021. For additional information, please contact the Office of Facilities and Planning, 309 Young Hall, Lincoln University, Jefferson City, Missouri (573)681-5084.

Nursing Facility and Elliff Remodel - On Campus

Hall

Lincoln University of Missouri is currently accepting qualification statements for professional design services to renovate an existing facility for the new home of our School of Nursing on the Jefferson City, MO Campus. Please submit all documents to lufacilitiesplanning@lincoln.edu by October 13, 2021. For additional information, please contact the Office of Facilities and Planning, 309 Young Hall, Lincoln University, Jefferson City, Missouri (573)681-5084.

Pawley Theater Renovation - On Campus Lincoln University of Missouri is currently accepting qualification statements for professional design services to renovate and modernize Pawley Theater on the Jefferson City, MO Campus. Please submit all documents to lufacilitiesplanning@lincoln.edu by October 13, 2021. For additional information, please contact the Office of Facilities and Planning, 309 Young Hall, Lincoln University, Jefferson City, Missouri (573)681-5084.

Request for Proposal: SSD 120-21: Bridges Program Relocation at South County Technical High School Project Manual and drawings will be available through County Blue beginning on Sept 14, 2021. A $200.00 refundable deposit made out to Special School District will be required for paper copies of plans, a $50.00 non-refundable fee will be required for electronic digital downloads. A non-mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held at 2:00 PM on September 20, 2021 at The new Bridges

renovation site at South Technical High School, 12721 West Watson Road, St. Louis, MO 63127. Bids are due at 2:00 pm on October 12, 2021 at Special School District Purchasing Department, 12110 Clayton Road, St. Louis, MO 63131.

St. Louis Treatment Court 22nd Judicial Circuit, City of St. Louis

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) Treatment Court seeks proposals to provide participants in Adult Treatment Court with • Alcohol/Location RFP-FY22-04

Monitoring,

A copy of the RFP may be obtained by writing to: Kate Mansfield, Room 526, 1114 Market Street, St. Louis, MO, 63101, or call 314-589-6702. Providers may obtain proposal specifications at www.stlcitycircuit court.com. Click on Treatment Court. Proposals must be submitted by 4pm, Sept 27, 2021 in Rm. 526, 1114 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63101.

Lost and Found My Mother passed away in 2019, am missing her diamond ring lost several months ago, at Dover & Leona. It was in a plastic grocery bag. Call Marie at 314-351-5494. $500 reward.

LITERARY NEWS, THE WEEK’S BESTSELLERS AND OUR REVIEWS.


TECHNOLOGY

A28 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

TECHNOLOGY | REVIEWS

HOME RUN 3 of the best treadmills to add to your personal gym in 2021

CNET

T

AM ON AZ .CO M

readmills have always been one of the most popular pieces of at-home workout equipment, but when gyms shut down in 2020, demand for a home treadmill went through the roof. As such, most home fitness brands have responded by developing better, more advanced models than their predecessors. Many of the best home treadmill options now have smart features, like full integration with streaming services, preset workouts and access to live workout programs with live incline and decline. Other manufacturers skipped the bells and whistles, and they focused on the running deck — developing advanced cushioning for improved shock absorption and biomechanically correct belts that help simulate the feel of outdoor running. Because every treadmill user has different needs and goals, we’ve included a variety of both categories on this list. We considered factors like design, incline (and decline), speed, price and size while making sure that no matter which home treadmill running machine you choose, you’ll still get a good machine that you’ll be happy with. That’s right, even the cheap treadmill on this list is a quality treadmill. If you’re looking to get a great cardio workout at home, consider one of CNET’s three favorite treadmills for 2021.

BEST SMART TREADMILL

NordicTrack Commercial 2950 The NordicTrack Commercial 2950 got a redesign for 2021, and the attention to customer feedback shows. This version is equipped with a 4.25-continuoushorsepower commercial motor and a 22-inch deck that sits on top of 2.5-inch precision nonflex rollers for frictionless movement, even at higher workout speeds. The RunnersFlex cushioning in the deck allows you to choose between a real road-feel or engaging dampers that soften impact on your joints and reduce the risk of injury. Like the Bowflex, this treadmill has an ultra-large 22inch touchscreen, but one thing that gives the NordicTrack an edge over the others is the live control offered through its iFit subscription. During live workouts, the treadmill will automatically adjust from a minus 3% decline to a 15% incline to simulate whatever you’re following along with on the screen. The iFit membership is a (worthwhile) additional monthly cost, but if you purchase this machine directly from the site, you’ll get a free monthly membership. At a retail price of $2,800, the NordicTrack treadmill is one of the most expensive options on this list, so you’ll have to figure out what’s important to you — a more intense manual workout or interaction with trainers and extra smart features.

BEST BUDGET-FRIENDLY SMART TREADMILL

ProForm Pro2000

BEST TREADMILL OVERALL

Bowflex Treadmill 22 The Treadmill 22 is the latest and most advanced model from Bowflex, and it’s designed to please (mostly) everyone. Built like an absolute tank, this treadmill has a 4-horsepower motor, a 22-inch-wide by 60-inch-long running path and Comfort Tech deck cushioning that helps absorb shock even at higher running-deck speeds. It has the largest incline range on this list, going from minus 5% decline up to a 20% incline to simulate running up and down hills, and supports the highest weight (400 pounds). It also has an adjustable 22-inch touchscreen that allows you to follow along with trainer-led workouts (via the JRNY, which requires a subscription) or lets you stream your favorite shows from a handful of popular streaming services. But before ordering this treadmill, make sure you have the space. At 85 inches long, 39.6 inches wide and 70 inches tall, it’s fairly large, but it does have a SoftDrop folding system that reduces its total footprint by more than 40%.

Another option from ICON Health & Fitness — the parent company of NordicTrack — this treadmill is a more budget-friendly option that still gives you access to iFit integration, if that’s what you’re looking for. The ProForm Pro has a 10-inch smart touchscreen embedded right into the console so you can follow along with trainers as you run while simultaneously tracking your calories, speed and heart rate. At minus 3% decline to 12% incline, it has a narrower incline range than the NordicTrack and a slightly less powerful 3.25-continuoushorsepower motor, but it’s more than sufficient for most runners (or walkers). The 20-inch tread belt is equipped with ReBound Pro Cushioning, ProForm’s patented shock-absorbing system that reduces impact and puts less stress on your feet, ankles, hips TRIBUNE NEWS and knees. SERVICE PHOTOS

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09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A29

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AUTOS

A30 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 09.26.2021

AUTOS | REVIEWS Hyundai Veloster N HYUNDAI MOTOR AMERICA

HOT

HATCH

Comparing the VW Golf GTI and Hyundai Veloster N CAMERON ROGERS | Edmunds

V

olkswagen’s redesigned 2022 Golf GTI will be arriving at dealerships this fall. It’s the latest generation of the car that pioneered the hot hatch segment when it launched in the U.S. for the 1983 model year. Nearly four decades later, the GTI still stands as a benchmark for sporty performance and everyday practicality on a budget. A key rival is the 2022 Hyundai Veloster N, Hyundai’s distinctive and high-performing three-door hatchback. Which Volkswagen Golf GTI one of these hot hatches is the better VOLKSWAGEN OF AMERICA buy? Edmunds’ experts put the two speedy compacts head-to-head to determine a winner.

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The Volkswagen Golf GTI’s turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder produces 241 horsepower and 273 lb-ft of torque, an increase of 13 horsepower and 15 lb-ft compared to the WINNER previous GTI. In Edmunds’ Veloster N testing, a 2022 Golf GTI with the automatic transmission accelerated from zero to 60 mph in a quick 5.9 seconds. The new GTI also boasts short braking distances, responsive steering and confidence-inspiring handling around turns. Impressive as the GTI is, it’s still slightly behind the Hyundai Veloster N. Powering the Veloster N is a turbocharged 2.0-liter engine good for 275 horsepower and 260 lb-ft of torque. At Edmunds’ test track, an automatic-equipped Veloster N ripped from zero to 60 mph in just 5.4 seconds. It also edges out the GTI with added handling grip and more steering feel. For driver enjoyment, Hyundai has come up with the better recipe.

Comfort is just as important as performance for daily use. To that end, both the Veloster N and Golf GTI offer adaptive suspension dampers so drivers can choose between a firm, performance-oriented setup or a more docile ride. They come standard on the Veloster N, but you do need to upgrade to the range-topping Autobahn trim to get them for the GTI. Springing for that trim might be worth it; it has a much more pleasant ride than the Veloster’s. You could even cruise around in the WINNER GTI’s Sport driving mode Golf GTI and not feel like you’re being punished. In contrast, the Veloster’s Comfort mode rides OK, but selecting any of the sportier settings reveals a harsh, bumpy quality. The GTI is also quieter at highway speeds.

Practicality Everyday usability is a requisite for every good hot hatch. The 2022 Volkswagen Golf GTI obliges with its four doors and classic upright hatchback roofline. Both aspects combine to offer easy access to the roomy back seat. With 19.9 cubic feet of cargo space behind the rear seats, the Golf GTI can also hold more stuff than a typical midsize sedan’s trunk. The Veloster N also offers 19.9 cubic feet of room, but the cargo area isn’t as helpfully shaped. Open the rear hatch and there’s a relatively WINNER high liftover and then a drop Golf GTI down to the load floor. That makes it harder to load and retrieve items. For passengers, the Veloster has a unique three-door layout with one door on the driver side and two doors on the passenger side. It’s an interesting idea, but the Golf GTI’s traditional four-door setup shows that this is something that didn’t need fixing.

Technology The Hyundai and VW come with a wellrounded set of technology features; the primary differentiator is execution. Both come with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, for instance, but the GTI offers wireless connecWINNER tivity as well. This means Golf GTI you don’t need to use a USB cord to mirror your phone’s apps on the touchscreen. The GTI’s voice controls also govern a wider set of functions, and its premium stereo sounds a bit crisper. And while the Veloster has a decent array of advanced driver aids as standard, traffic-adaptive cruise control is notably absent from the list.

Value The Golf GTI has always offered a lot for the money. Even the base trim, priced at $30,540 including destination, provides a bounty of grins and a well-appointed interior. But the $33,525 Veloster N has a similar set of features as a midtrim Golf GTI for a couple thousand dollars less. And remember WINNER how the GTI’s adaptive susVeloster N pension dampers only come on the $38,990 Autobahn trim? Hyundai then shuts the door with a lengthier warranty period and slightly more generous complimentary service visit schedule.

Edmunds says The 2022 Volkswagen Golf GTI and Hyundai Veloster N will both satisfy buyers looking for a fun-to-drive hot hatch, but the Golf GTI’s better mix of utility and comfort helps it earn the win. But the Veloster’s quicker acceleration and emphasis on value can’t be ignored.

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LIFESTYLE

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A31

® ® ®

®

®

PUMPKIN FOR DINNER We know pumpkin is a natural in sweets and desserts. Now it’s time to see how well it plays with savory flavors. Give it a go in soup, pasta, and even crispy falafel.

Start to finish 30 minutes

1 4 ¼ 1 ½ 8 1

Tbsp. olive oil cups chopped onions cloves garlic, minced cups reduced-sodium chicken broth medium russet potato, peeled and chopped 15-oz. can pumpkin oz. Gruyère cheese, shredded (1 cup) cup heavy cream tsp. coarse salt tsp. freshly ground black pepper oz. French baguette bread, cut into 1-inch cubes oz. Manchego cheese, finely shredded (¼ cup) Grated Manchego cheese (optional)

1. In a 4- to 5-qt. pot heat 1 Tbsp. of the olive oil over medium-high. Add onions and garlic. Cook and stir 4 minutes or until tender. Add broth, 1 cup water, and the potato. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, 15 minutes or until potato is tender. Stir in pumpkin. Using an immersion blender, blend until smooth. (Or working in batches, process in a blender.) Simmer over medium. Slowly add Gruyère cheese, stirring until melted. Stir in cream, salt, and pepper; heat through. 2. Meanwhile, for croutons, preheat oven to 400°F. Line a 15×10-inch baking pan with foil. Spread bread cubes in pan. Toss with remaining 2 Tbsp. olive oil. Sprinkle with shredded Manchego cheese. Bake 18 to 20 minutes or until golden brown, stirring once. 3. Top soup with croutons. If you like, drizzle with additional olive oil and sprinkle with grated Manchego cheese and black pepper. Makes 8 servings (1 cup each). PER SERVING 308 cal., 14 g fat (6 g sat. fat), 28 mg chol., 672 mg sodium, 34 g carb., 3 g fiber, 4 g sugars, 12 g pro.

Start to finish 25 minutes ¾ cup canned chickpeas, rinsed and drained ¾ cup canned pumpkin ⅓ cup chopped onion 1 egg 2 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh cilantro 3 cloves garlic, peeled 1 tsp. ground coriander ½ tsp. ground cumin ½ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. black pepper 1 cup panko 2 Tbsp. olive oil 4 soft pita flatbreads, toasted ¼ cup tahini (sesame seed paste) Chopped cucumber and/or tomato (optional) ¼ cup plain Greek yogurt ¼ cup chopped green onions

Pumpkin Soup with Manchego Croutons 3 1½ 4 3 1

Pumpkin Fall-afel

1. In a medium bowl mash chickpeas with a fork. Stir in pumpkin. 2. In a blender or food processor combine next nine ingredients (through pepper). Cover and blend or process until smooth. Add to the chickpea mixture; stir to combine. Stir in panko. 3. In a 12-inch skillet heat oil over medium. Shape chickpea mixture into eight balls; flatten slightly. Add to skillet. Cook falafel 5 to 6 minutes or until browned and heated through, turning once. 4. Spread flatbreads with tahini. Top with cucumber and/or tomato (if using). Add two falafel to each flatbread. Top with yogurt and green onions. Makes 4 filled flatbreads.

Bacon delivers bold, smoky flavor while pumpkin and Gouda add velvety creaminess.

PER FLATBREAD 461 cal., 18 g fat (3 g sat. fat), 48 mg chol., 751 mg sodium, 60 g carb., 6 g fiber, 5 g sugars, 16 g pro.

Pumpkin, Gouda, and Bacon Rigatoni Start to finish 25 minutes 1 lb. dried rigatoni pasta 8 oz. smoked bacon, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 1½ cups milk 1 15-oz. can pumpkin 8 oz. smoked Gouda cheese, shredded (2 cups) ½ cup heavy cream or half-and-half ¼ tsp. salt ½ tsp. black pepper Finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley (optional)

1. In a large pot cook pasta according to package directions; drain. Return pasta to pot; keep warm. 2. Meanwhile, cook bacon in a 12-inch skillet over medium until browned and crisp. Drain bacon on paper towels, reserving 2 Tbsp. drippings in skillet. Add garlic to skillet; cook 30 seconds. Whisk in the flour; cook 1 minute. Add milk. Cook and stir until boiling. Stir in pumpkin and Gouda, whisking until cheese is melted and sauce is smooth. Add sauce to cooked pasta. Stir in half of the cooked bacon, the cream, salt, and pepper until combined. Heat through. Serve topped with remaining bacon and parsley (if using). Makes 6 servings (1¼ cups each). PER SERVING 634 cal., 28 g fat (15 g sat. fat), 82 mg chol., 547 mg sodium, 68 g carb., 5 g fiber, 8 g sugars, 26 g pro.

SEASONAL FLAVORS For more fall flavors you’ll love, get your copy of Better Homes & Gardens® Best Pumpkin Recipes™ magazine on sale everywhere magazines are sold.

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NATION

A32 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

Survey: Parents rob retirement for college costs BY BOB FERNANDEZ AND ERIN ARVEDLUND

The Philadelphia Inquirer

One in four American parents who borrowed from the federal government to help pay for a child’s college education don’t expect to retire as planned because of the debt, according to a new survey. And one in five parent borrowers regret taking out the loans, the NerdWallet survey shows. “Parents take on whatever it takes to get their kids at college, including taking on unaffordable debt,” said Anna Helhoski, student loan expert at NerdWallet, a personal finance website based in San Francisco. Of the total $1.6 trillion in student loan debt, Americans borrowed roughly $103 billion in PLUS loans as of the second quarter of 2021. There are 3.6 million Parent Plus borrowers, and the average loan totals more than $28,000. But parents borrowing for

children’s college education are stealing future retirement dollars to help fund college, NerdWallet warned. One in three who borrowed under the government’s Parent PLUS loans say they’re counting on forgiveness to help wipe out a large portion of their debt. The government recently opted to extend collection actions on defaulted loans for four more months, until Jan. 31, 2022. But officials say that forbearance is unlikely to be offered again. “The payment pause has benefited parents, but it’s going to end. A great deal of them aren’t going to be ready,” Helhoski said. As for a larger debt amnesty, “counting on forgiveness is a mistake. They’re hearing about it in headlines. There’s hope there, but there’s no legislation currently. President Biden hasn’t committed to broad forgiveness,” Helhoski added. Other studies support the

study by NerdWallet. An October 2020 JPMorgan Chase report that analyzed the student loan debt of more than 300,000 Chase Bank customers found that “almost 40% of individuals involved in student loan repayment are helping someone else pay off their student loan debt.” A 2017 AARP survey of more than 3,000 adults found that a quarter of private student loan co-signers aged 50 and older had to make a loan payment because the student borrower failed to do so. While college students have borrowed heavily for their schooling, parents also borrow heavily to help their children, thus burdening two generations with debt. “Not only is their child going into debt, they are also going into debt,” said Anthony “Tony” D’Angelo, the executive producer for Collegiate Empow-

erment, a nonprofit educational firm. Because of the climbing cost of post-secondary education, and the easily available financing for those college degrees, D’Angelo compares college debt to the sub-prime housing market, which was fueled by easyto-get mortgages and constantly higher real estate prices. “At least you owned a shack in Miami,” D’Angelo said of the housing crash. “Now you have a kid with a sociology degree with a job in Starbucks with a tip jar.” NerdWallet found that student loan debt is affecting families across multiple life stages: young adults burdened with debt as they try to build their lives; others near retirement who see their financial lives upended; and retirement-aged parents and grandparents who took out loans to help a loved one get through school.

Federal Parent PLUS loans can carry higher fees than private student loans, according to PayForEd.com, a Newtown Square, Pa.-based consulting firm tracking the student loan industry. Many parents also do not understand that a PLUS loan is legally their responsibility and not the student’s. Parent PLUS loans have a standard interest rate for all borrowers established each May, which goes into effect each July 1. The 2021-’22 federal parent PLUS rate is 6.28%. The parent PLUS loan origination fees can be also higher than private loans, at 4.22%, according to PayForEd. com. Fred Amrein, CEO of PayforEd.com, which has developed digital tools to help families to navigate college costs, said that “people over 50 are the fastest growing debt borrowers.”

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STLTODAY.COM/LIFE • STLTODAY.COM/GO • SUNDAY • 09.26.2021 • B

ARTS + HOME + TRAVEL

PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN, POST-DISPATCH

Harry and Cindy Christakos of Manchester with their Australian shepherd mix, Bailey. Bailey has given them much-needed companionship during the months they spent at home during the pandemic.

Pandemic

AISHA SULTAN | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

puppy

W

hen Harry and Cindy Christakos of Manchester suddenly lost their border collie, Cosmo, two years ago, they were done with dog ownership. “We were heartbroken,” Cindy says. “We can’t do

it again.” The Christakoses do not have children, so Cosmo had been the center of their attention. He was a trained therapy dog and died at 11 years old when a tumor ruptured. They decided against adopting another pet because they are close to retirement age. Please see PUPPY, Page B6

boom

Animals fill void during a year of isolation. Local shelters say they have not seen surge in returns. See some of our staff favorites from the 2021 Cutest Pet contest. Page B6

Janet Kuebli was heartbroken by the sudden death of her dog, Emma, last spring. Her new dog, Bonnie, has helped fill the emptiness.

A milestone for Black composers — and for OTSL

What I learned about vaccines from my dog AISHA SULTAN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

KEN HOWARD, METROPOLITAN OPERA

Latonia Moore as Billie, center, and the cast during a rehearsal for “Fire Shut Up in My Bones,” opening the Metropolitan Opera season.

The Met will open season with ‘Fire Shut Up in My Bones,’ which has roots in St. Louis

BY CALVIN WILSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

“Fire Shut Up in My Bones” earned critical acclaim in 2019 when it premiered as part of the Opera Theatre of St. Louis season. And now the opera, which marked the company’s second

collaboration with jazz and film composer Terence Blanchard, is set to open New York’s Metropolitan Opera season on Sept. 27. Inspired by a memoir tracing a Black

Frankie, our 15-pound fluffy white pup, needs a little babying after he gets annual shots. He becomes lethargic and needs to sleep for a couple of hours. I keep extra treats on hand after those vet visits. Earlier this month, he got a clean bill of health, along with his rabies, bordetella and lepto vaccinations. As expected, he was a little more tired than usual. But a couple of hours later, he was limping. I called the vet’s office, and they said the injection site was likely sore. A few hours later, he stopped walking altogether. I called again, more panicked than before, and they said to bring him in.

Please see OPERA, Page B4

Please see SULTAN, Page B2

AT HOME

BOOKS

TRAVEL

ARTIST’S CWE CONDO IS FILLED WITH HIS OWN WORKS

A.E. HOTCHNER’S LAST NOVEL USES REAL-LIFE INSPIRATION

FULTON IS KNOWN FOR DUTCH WINDMILL BUT OFFERS MORE

Page B3

Page B8

Page B11 STLLIFE

1 1


ON OUR RADAR

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AMY BERTRAND lifestyle and features editor abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284

MORE AT STLTODAY.COM

GABE HARTWIG deputy features editor ghartwig@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8353

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

JANE HENDERSON books editor jhenderson@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8107

KEVIN HART advertising khart@stlpostmedia.com • 314-340-8508

Meet Elvis and Priscilla, a pair of unaltered 1-year-old white African geese. The Presleys are a bonded pair who “Can’t Help Falling in Love” and would be “All Shook Up” if separated. Longmeadow rarely receives geese and when it does, they are typically adopted very quickly. So, if you’re interested in the King and his Queen, please act quickly.

Nero is a 6-year-old domestic shorthair with black fur. Nero came to the Humane Society in early September and is a total sweetie. When he isn’t cuddling or negotiating for more belly rubs, he’s usually napping or playing. Nero is perfect for a family looking for a low-maintenance pet who can entertain themselves.

PETS OF THE WEEK

PREP SCHOOL You just can’t beat a good schnitzel, a cutlet, traditionally veal, that has been breaded and fried. In a favorite Prep School video, Daniel Neman shows how to make an extra-crispy version, with chicken. stltoday.com/food This pretty girl is Clara, a 4-year-old Catahoula leopard hound and pointer mix who was surrendered to the Humane Society of Missouri in late August after her owners lost their home and could no longer care for her. Clara is a sweet and curious girl who loves to cuddle and go outside for walks. She gets along well with children and other dogs and her sunny disposition would make a welcome addition to any family.

RUN, FIDO, RUN! Use our interactive guide to dog parks in the St. Louis area to find a space where your dog can play. stltoday.com/dogparks

To adopt • Call the Macklind Avenue Headquarters at 314-951-1562 or visit hsmo.org/adopt.

To adopt • Call Longmeadow Rescue Ranch in Union at 636-583-8759 to schedule an interview.

To adopt • Call the Best Buddy Pet Center in Maryland Heights at 314-951-1588 or visit hsmo.org/adopt.

Last week’s pets • A dog named Romi and a horse named Samm are still available. A dog named Miley has been adopted. More info • You can support these pets and others by making a donation at hsmo.org/donate.

NEW ON DVD MOVIES Coming Tuesday • “The Forever Purge”; “Blithe Spirit”; “Twist” Coming Oct. 5 • “Space Jam: A New Legacy”; “Escape Room: Tournament of Champions”; “Six Minutes to Midnight”; “Broken Diamonds”; “Fried Barry”

PARENT TO PARENT

Prioritize your needs when hiring a nanny

TV Coming Oct. 5 • “Clarice,” Season 1; “The Nevers,” Season 1; “The Stand”

GARDENING Q&A

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN

Knocking down webworms is simple

Q • We are trying to find a babysitter/nanny to come into our home to take care of our 2-month-old baby. My husband and I work from our home, but I will be returning to the office in four weeks. We’ve been interviewing people, but we really don’t know what questions to ask. Also, should we have a nanny camera for our baby’s protection? Do we ask her to wash a few dishes or to cook light meals?

From a reader • Whether you’re working from home or away, having a nanny camera in several rooms is definitely a good idea. It’s the only way we found out that the person we hired to take care of our children subcontracted her job out to others when she wanted or needed to. Total strangers came into our home

and their behavior in taking care of our two young children was lacking in many ways. Thank goodness no one was mean to the children, but the opportunity was there, as well as plenty of chances to steal from us. We were shocked to say the least. Be safe and get cameras. — L.L. in Fort Lauderdale, Florida From Jodie Lynn • Trying to find someone to come into your home to take care of your child/children is a very stressful task as well as a personal one. There are wellknown companies that do provide this service. One of the most trustworthy companies is NannyCare.com which has won multiple awards for their excellent work in finding just the right person for the right family and the right family for the nanny. I have a friend who has used them for many years and doesn’t have even one negative thing to say about them. The key is to first figure out exactly what is crucial to you and your family and prioritize that beforehand. If it’s essential to you to

have someone to not only look after your newborn but to also do a few other things, be sure that you find an individual who agrees to do them. Of course, a one-on-one interview is a must. Meeting the candidate in person is the best way to get to know them. Make sure that they are healthy enough to do the job, organized, calm and experienced with taking care of children, especially a baby in your case. Getting a nanny cam is up to you. It certainly can make you feel better. Check with your local or state guidelines on having one. Some require the homeowners to tell the babysitter/nanny about it. Take your time and interview several people before making a final decision. Checking their references is a very necessary step in the hiring process as well as perhaps hiring them for a day to see if they are actually a good fit. Finding someone you’re comfortable with for this very important job can be daunting but will offer a little peace

of mind once you’ve found the right person.

Can you help? This may seem like a simple question with a simple answer but so far there seems to be endless advice, which we find confusing. What is the best way to clean areas in our house where our 8-month-old twin babies crawl, roll, sit, sleep, etc? We’ve heard about using many different types of sprays, lotions, wipes and much more. Which ones are really safe for their lungs and skin and does this depend on how frequently we use them? What have other parents had the most success with in this situation? To share parenting tips or submit questions, write to: Parent to Parent, 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, Wildwood, MO 63040. Email: direct2contact@ parenttoparent.com, or go to www. parenttoparent.com, which provides a secure and easy way to submit tips or questions. All tips must have city, state and first and last name or initials to be included in the column. Jodie Lynn is an award-winning parenting columnist, author of five books and mother to three children. She and her family live in Wildwood.

BY AARON LYNN-VOGEL

Missouri Botanical Garden

Q • I have massive webs at the ends of the branches of my tree, and it is losing a crazy amount of leaves. What is defoliating my tree, and how do I protect it from them?

A • Autumn brings many things with it, including a type of caterpillar known as fall webworm. These native critters build communal web compounds for protection on a wide variety of hardwood trees, and feed on the leaves inside of their makeshift home. They typically aren’t harmful to trees since they remove the leaves so close to when trees naturally begin dropping their leaves. However, they may stick out like a sore thumb and can be a problem for younger trees that have yet to become established. Simply remove them with a sharp blast of water, or knock them off with a stick. Write to the Missouri Botanical Garden’s Center for Home Gardening at plantinformation@mobot.org or the Horticulture Answer Service, 4344 Shaw Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63110.

THINGS TO DO IN THE GARDEN THIS WEEK • Plant container-grown and balledand-burlapped trees and shrubs any time this month. Dig holes only as deep as the root ball is tall, but two to five times as wide to encourage lateral root spread. • Gain a few degrees of frost protection by covering tender plants with sheets of lightweight fabric row covers. • Watering plants the day before a frost is predicted can help reduce damage. • Browning of some interior needles of pines and other conifers is normal at this time of year. • Apply weather stripping to cracks in foundations and basements, openings around windows and doorways, and along the bottom strip of exterior siding to seal off entry points to keep nuisance insects from coming indoors.

Sultan From B1

I carried Frankie in his bed to the car. I made the mistake of Googling “reactions to rabies vaccines” and read something about rare cases of hind leg paralysis. The site I was reading looked like an earthy, naturalistic blog — unrelated to any veterinarian or animal science source. Regardless of its validity, it fed my anxiety and fears at that moment. I cried in the vet’s parking lot wondering if I had paralyzed my dog by getting him his shots. I also experienced a strange stab of empathy with a group I have spent the better part of a year trying to convince — the vaccine hesitant. In my heightened emotional state and fearful about harm to a beloved family member, I was susceptible to the exact kind of misinformation that has seduced millions of others. (There is actually an anti-vax movement among dog owners, as well.) It was an object lesson in humility. The public discourse around the current vaccine resistance too often devolves to labels like “selfish” or “ignorant.” That’s not helpful in convincing those we still need to reach. So, what might be more effective? Michelle Bach is a bioethicist with a doctorate in health care ethics and is completing her medical school training at St. Louis University. Bach recently wrote that in order

Aisha Sultan’s dog, Frankie to persuade anti-vaxxers, we have to stop talking about facts. Resistance and hesitancy around the vaccine has become part of an identity among a diverse group of people — including those who are anti-institutionalists and distrust medical institutions and naturalists who focus on one’s own control over health outcomes. Personal experiences and stories from their trusted sources hold far more influence than scientifically valid data. Humans are bad at separating close-occurring events and at accurately estimating risk, Bach explained. “We play the lottery, not thinking in accurate ways about probability,” she said.

Similarly, it can be difficult to look at vaccine safety and efficacy data and apply that to your life. “If you have a relationship to someone or have seen something in your life, it’s easier to anchor and hold onto that in your mind in terms of what’s safe or what’s not,” she said. The weeklong, international attention paid to Nicki Minaj’s tweet about her “cousin’s friend” experiencing swollen testicles after getting the vaccine demonstrates the power of celebrity and personal anecdote. The COVID vaccine does not affect fertility or testicles, but if you’ve read this far, you likely already know that.

BILL MCCLELLAN’S COLUMN WILL RETURN SOON.

Bach suggests talking to vaccine resisters in the language that speaks to their values and emotions. For example, public health officials can explain how the vaccine is not about “injecting a foreign substance” into your body, but a way of giving your own immune system a way to recognize a foreign invader and fight it more effectively. There are, of course, people who have had negative experiences with medical institutions and simply don’t trust them. The majority of Americans, however, support COVID vaccine mandates. The history of this country has long allowed the government to use compelling public health interests to require vaccines. Back in the vet’s office, Frankie rose from his formerly paralyzed state and hobbled over to her for a treat. My relief (and embarrassment) was palpable. He can be a little dramatic at times. Within a few hours, he was back to his normal crazy self. But when I was in the throes of panic before his complete recovery, I wondered if I would ever get him his shots again. Given that his groomer, doggy day care and any place he boards require up-to-date vaccination records, I would have had to overcome any lingering doubts. That realization brought home another lesson: When logic fails, mandates work. Aisha Sultan • 314-340-8300 Home and family editor @aishas on Twitter asultan@post-dispatch.com


HOME

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

The screened porch off the living room and overlooking the courtyard is a favorite spot to relax. The porch was there when the Kirchoffs moved in, but they extended it to make it larger and screened it in. Brian had plastic made to fit over the screens so they can use it year-round.

A large painting by Brian occupies a wall in the living room. Recessed lighting illuminates it from above. Brian’s art brightens the walls in nearly every room. The finished basement serves as an art and recording studio for Brian, who is also a voice-over artist.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B3

The master bathroom was originally divided up into smaller spaces. The Kirchoffs renovated it into one large space, which Brian designed. Gray porcelain tile floors are complemented by clean white cabinetry. The wet area includes an oversized freestanding tub and open shower with marble tile floor.

AT HOME WITH BRIAN AND BETSY KIRCHOFF

CENTRAL WEST END CONDO SERVES AS HOME, GALLERY, OFFICE BY AMY BURGER

Special to the Post-Dispatch

R

adio veteran and longtime voiceover artist Brian Kirchoff took up painting just three years ago — but in that short time, he’s honed his skills and amassed a large collection of abstract artwork. He has exhibited and sold his work at various art shows and on his website, and works out of a basement studio in the Central West End condo he shares with his wife, Betsy. Brian’s art also adorns the walls in nearly every room of their home. Built in 1904, the historic building was gutted and renovated in 1989. The Kirchoffs believe it was once a four-family but was converted to a two-family in that renovation with side-by-side townhouse units. The Kirchoffs purchased their unit six years ago, moving to the 1,100-square-foot per floor condo from their previous 3,500-squarefoot house in nearby University City as their daughter set off for college out of state. “I tend to just want to move every 10 years,” Brian says. “We’ve loved the Central West End forever. Every now and then I would just look to see what was available.” When the Kirchoffs saw the rehabbed condo, they knew it was perfect for them, with two stories of living space plus the finished basement for Brian’s art and recording studio. They also were delighted that it had a detached garage, and a small, fenced yard — both hard to find in a city condo. The home was well renovated with nice touches including beautiful hickory doors, staircases and trim, as well as built-in cabinetry and a marble front wood-burning fireplace in the living room. When they moved in, they worked with their neighbors to remodel the front façade of the building and replace its membrane roof. They also expanded and screened in the porch off the living room, as well as expanded a second-floor deck off the master suite and adding a full-width retractable awning. The kitchen, with ample space, got a minifacelift with new cabinet doors and hardware from RF Home in Kirkwood, Corian countertops, new

PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN, POST-DISPATCH

In the dining room, a large painting by Brian is flanked by framed full-length mirrors from IKEa. The dining set is from West Elm.

Brian Kirchoff stands in his basement studio, which has space for painting as well as a corner recording area for his voiceover work.

The modern kitchen is open to the hallway and living room. The Kirchoffs updated it with new cabinet fronts and hardware from RF Home in Kirkwood. as well as new Corian countertops baths. They replaced all of Brian does his voice-over and appliances. A bright red accent wall provides a pop of color and recessed can lighting jobs. the windows in the spabrightens the space. “This is a dead room — cious main bedroom with energy-efficient ones that there’s no echo — so it’s good for recording,” he overlook the small deck. Brian’s artwork. says. “Voice-overs don’t The room was already In the living room, the take long to do, so I spend painted a soothing shade Kirchoffs added a wall of blue that the Kirchoffs most of my time painting. of full-length windows I just listen to music and I with transoms that over- decided to keep. paint.” Brian designed the look the screened porch The basement also serene master bathroom and the small courtyard/ includes a full bathroom, himself, sourcing all of garden behind it. Brian home gym space and the materials and then had plastic made to fit working with a contractor laundry room, as well as a over the screens as well to complete it. The origi- storage area. so the porch can be used Having an outdoor year-round, and installed nal bathroom was divided up into small sections, so space was important to a wall-mounted TV. He loves to watch football out they opened it up into one the Kirchoffs, and they there on Sundays, and it’s large space with a double have made the most of the More of Brian’s artwork is on display in the dining room. In become a favorite spot to vanity and a wet area with small courtyard between the hallway a beautiful mission-style staircase of hickory the house and garage. a deep, freestanding tub relax for both of them. wood leads upstairs to the bedrooms and downstairs to the “I like to come out here and an open shower with Betsy has populated the finished basement. a marble tile floor. A large space with many native in the morning espeplants and perennials that LED-light mirror hangs cially,” says Betsy. “I get house keeps the space appliances and a bright she tends to, and she also above the all-white up early and just sit out red accent wall. Recessed bright and provides the keeps beehives and jars here and drink coffee and vanity. perfect illumination for lighting throughout the her own honey. They love Large canvases and read the paper.” the serenity and privacy acrylic paints fill most of The Kirchoffs have the basement studio, with they feel there. “It’s kind a mix of contemporary of like not really living in a small recording area and midcentury modern the city,” says Brian. inspired furnishings from set up in a corner, where various retailers including West Elm and IKEA. They like things that are simple and stylish but also Ages • Brian is durable and pet-friendly 61, and Betsy for their dog, Lola, and is 57 cat, Kitts. While Brian’s Occupations paintings fill most of the walls, they couple has also • Brian is a voice-over artcollected works by other ist as well as a local artists. “We both tend to agree visual artist/ on furnishings and art and painter. Betsy is the finance colors. We have similar director at the tastes,” Brian says. St. Louis Crisis A skylight on the roof Nursery. illuminates the missionstyle hickory staircase The Kirchoffs’ dog, Lola, poses in the living room, which features a marble-faced fireplace Home • Central West End leading up to the second surrounded by built-in bookshelves. A wall of windows across the back overlooks the Family • The Kirchoffs have a grown daughter and share the screened porch and courtyard. Furniture from West Elm and IKEA is pet-friendly and fits the floor, which has two home with their dog Lola, and their cat, Kitts. bedrooms and two full Kirchoffs’ casual, modern style.

Brian and Betsy Kirchoff


ARTS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

Opera From B1

man’s traumatic youth, the opera is co-directed by James Robinson, who is artistic director of OTSL and guided the original production. With a score by Blanchard and a libretto by filmmaker and St. Louis native Kasi Lemmons, the Met production of “Fire Shut Up in My Bones” — which has undergone changes to accommodate a significantly larger stage — stands to enhance OTSL’s already prominent status in the opera world. “It’s unobjectionable to say that the Metropolitan Opera is the largest and most important opera house not only, perhaps, in this country, but even in the world,” says Andrew Jorgensen, general director of Opera Theatre. “But any time a work goes from (OTSL) to another major opera house,” he says, “I think it’s a validation that we have this exciting process of creating new work and of advancing the art form. And that people are paying attention and want to bring these works to their audiences in other parts of the country.” Heather Hunt-Ruddy, an Opera Theatre board member and head of national sales for Wells Fargo Advisors — a sponsor of the 2019 “Fire Shut Up in My Bones” production — described it as “a beautiful opera and an unusual opera. It’s awesome that New York picked it up, and it’s going to get a much wider audience there.” Blanchard’s first opera, “Champion,” based on the life of boxer Emile Griffith, premiered at OTSL in 2013 and was such a success that it was subsequently produced by other companies. “I thought it would be unique to have an opera in jazz,” says Gene Dobbs Bradford, president and CEO of Jazz St. Louis, which co-commissioned with OTSL both of Blanchard’s operas. “Once we finished with the first one, we started talking about another one,” Bradford says. “And of the two, I think ‘Fire’ is actually the better opera. And the fact that it’s going to be at the Met is a great testament to that.” Not only is “Fire Shut Up in My Bones” the first opera originated at Opera Theatre to be presented at the Metropolitan Opera, but it’s also the first Met production of an opera by a Black composer. Blanchard says that creating the opera has “been an amazing journey that, sometimes, I don’t even

KEN HOWARD, METROPOLITAN OPERA

From left: Latonia Moore as Billie, Walter Russell III as Char’es-Baby and Will Liverman as Charles during a rehearsal for Terence Blanchard’s “Fire Shut Up in My Bones,” opening the Metropolitan Opera season on Sept. 27.

“Any time a work goes from (OTSL) to another major opera house, I think it’s a validation that we have this exciting process of creating new work and of advancing the art form.” Andrew Jorgensen, Opera Theatre of St. Louis general director think I can put into words.” On the other hand, he says, being the first Black composer to have an opera performed at the Met is “incredible and overwhelming and kind of sad at the same time. “I know that I’m not the first African American person who was qualified to be (at the Met),” Blanchard says, citing William Grant Still, a prominent figure in the Harlem Renaissance, as just one example of a Black composer whose work merited such recognition. “There’s a certain type of responsibility to make sure that ‘Fire Shut Up in My Bones’ will be the best that it can be,” Blanchard says. The opera is based on a 2014 memoir of the same name by New York Times columnist Charles M. Blow, in which he describes coming of age in small-town

from lyrical wistfulness to snappy declamations” and “dense big-band sonorities in the orchestra segue into lighter passages backed by a jazz rhythm section.” At the Metropolitan Opera, “Fire Shut Up in My Bones” is co-directed by Robinson and Camille A. Brown, who is also the production’s choreographer. The two previously collaborated on the Met’s 2019 production of “Porgy and Bess,” which Robinson directed and Brown choreographed. The Met production of “Fire Shut Up in My Bones” isn’t quite the same as the Opera Theatre version, Robinson says. “When we did it at Opera Theatre of St. Louis, it was an ensemble of about 12 people, with principal parts, and we had a small group of dancers — four or five,” he says. “When the Met decided to do it, we — Kasi Lemmons and Terence Blanchard and I — thought it would be a good idea to ERIC WOOLSEY, OPERA THEATRE OF ST. LOUIS expand it. “So now there are 36 Julia Bullock and Davóne Tines in the 2019 world premiere of people in the chorus, there Terence Blanchard and Kasi Lemmons’ “Fire Shut Up in My are 12 dancers and there are Bones” at Opera Theatre of St. Louis. four actors,” Robinson says. “The forces are larger. The Times praised the Opera rural Louisiana. The book Met stage is probably three Theatre production as a chronicles his struggle times the size of the Opera “subtly powerful work” with sexual abuse and Theatre stage. And the in which “vocal lines flow racism. In a review, the

other thing is, Terence and Kasi have made some revisions to the piece. With all operas, there are tweaks to be made. So that was part of the process for getting this to the Metropolitan Opera.” The Metropolitan Opera is co-producing “Fire Shut Up in My Bones” with LA Opera and Lyric Opera of Chicago, which also have the opera on their calendars. Opera Theatre of St. Louis is credited with commissioning the original production, with Jazz St. Louis as co-commissioner. Jorgensen explains that the Metropolitan Opera licensed “the piece itself” from Opera Theatre of St. Louis, “and the co-production between Chicago, Los Angeles and New York is not about the work, but rather about the splitting of the financial costs of the new physical sets and costumes of the larger physical production that will play in those theaters. “Everything that happens going forward is between the Met and their artists and the other theaters who are involved,” he says. Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 Theater critic @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

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STL LIFE

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

MADE IN ST. LOUIS

She turns gourds into works of art J. Bratcher Gourds Artist • Janet Bratcher Age • 61 Family • Husband, Jim Bratcher; three children: Kendra, Kayla and Michael; and three rescue cats: Mr. Bojangles, Polly and Leum, short for “petroleum” because he showed up at their gas station one day.

Windchimes, a new item for 2021, may be hung on a screened-in porch to catch the breeze. Gourds deteriorate PHOTOS COURTESY OF JANET BRATCHER

Three intricately carved gourds, including the Carved Peacock Feather gourd (far right) which was selected for the Missouri Art Now traveling exhibition celebrating Missouri’s bicentennial. Bratcher was one of only 60 Missouri artists selected for this show. shapes of gourds that Special to the Post-Dispatch dried hard as wood would become her sculptures and The gloriously carved her canvases. and masterfully painted “I have never gone to vases, lampshades, sculpart school. I’ve been self tures, wind chimes and more that self-taught art- taught in everything — painting, drawing, sewing, ist Janet Bratcher makes quilting — you name it from hard-shell gourds I’ve done it,” she says. “My bear little resemblance to mom and my grandparents the dusty and muddied gourds she takes in straight were all creative.” The from the fields. She trans- walls of her home are covered with her paintings, forms them into sleek, drawings and things she’s polished, works of art. made. “Once I started She accents their sinuous working with gourds three curves with intricate filiyears ago, I knew it was the gree carvings and painted only medium for me.” patterns to create sophisAn empty nest fuels a ticated artworks from an new career • When her unusual medium. A bird house in the hand last child left for college, Bratcher tackled empty• Bratcher’s interest in nest syndrome head on by gourds started when her sister-in-law grew gourds, learning about gourd art. “I saw a flowery painted then gifted her friends gourd. I love detail work. and relatives with gourd birdhouses she made. The I’ve been a gardener my whole life, and all my gourds pushed Bratcher’s paintings on canvas are creative buttons. She saw flowers. So — I spent three the beauty in these hardweeks researching gourds working plants that had on Google, reading and been used and decorated watching You Tube tutorifor centuries as useful als,” she says. objects and containers. “Wellburn Gourd Farm The fantastic, curvaceous BY PAT EBY

in California had great tutorials. Then I just bought everything — the drills, a table, the wood burners, the dyes. I set up a vacuum to take away the dust. I moved all my husband’s stuff out of the garage. I got all these packages in the mail. My husband said, ‘What are you doing?’ and I said ‘I’m going to be a gourd artist.’” Bratcher draws her patterns onto her gourd canvases, using their shapes to place the designs. She open them up and clean out the insides using different sanding tools to remove the dried pulp and seeds. She then carves the negative spaces for each gourd using a microcarver and dental drill bits. She define the lines of her pattern with a wood burner, then colors them using a transparent ink dye applied with Q-tips. She dries them using a heat gun, then seals them with varnish. She paints the insides black to both define the carvings and make the colors pop.

What she makes • Bratcher makes painted and intricately carved objects using gourds and inks as her medium. She makes small orbs, vases, wind chimes, intricately carved and colored lampshades, lamps, vessels, and decorative home goods from specially selected gourds. Home • Moberly, Missouri Where to buy • Bratcher’s gourds can be found at Mississippi Mud Gallery in Kimmswick and on her Facebook page, facebook.com/J-BratcherGourds-115966523134755 How much • Bratcher’s smaller gourds begin at $35 and go up to $800.

Small gourds suitable for display in bookcases, on mantles and side tables. “Before I knew it I had made 40 gourds,” she says. “Now I needed to do something with them.” To market, to market • When Bratcher saw a posting on Facebook for an upcoming fair in Macon, Missouri, about three years ago, she knew it was time to test the market for her creations. “I applied, and when the day came, my husband drove me to the show. He helped set up my rinky-dink $15 tent with about 40 gourds and then he left. “He told me later he went home and felt really

bad for me all day long, sitting with my gourds. He couldn’t imagine anyone buying gourds for $30, $60, $80 or $200. He didn’t think I’d sell one gourd. When he came back, I had just three gourds left. He was astounded. People loved them. They asked so many questions, I just loved working the show, and I made money.” Her second outing, the Red Barn show in Kirksville, Missouri, was also a success. “I bought a better tent. I was named best of show, won a $300 prize,

I nearly sold out, and a local gallery picked me up. About the same time I discovered the local gourd society.” Show Me Gourds • When she joined the Show Me Gourd society, Bratcher found kindred souls. The club validated her skills when she entered 10 gourds in its annual competition, taking home ribbons for each. “Today, I consider myself a master gourd artist,” she says, “but back then I was really surprised.” “Creating these gourds is my passion. I like to help people and share with them how to do things. Nothing has touched my life like these gourds,” she says. “It’s all gourds. Seven days a week.”


STL LIFE

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

MEET SOME OF THE 2021 CUTEST PET CONTEST CONTENDERS We received almost 1,000 entries in our 13th annual cutest pet contest. Here are some of our staff favorites.

M 1 • SUNDAY • 09.26.2021

Maxey Carla Ottersbach — O’Fallon, Mo.

Smokey Mark Spykerman — St. Louis

Nala Christine Johnston — St. Charles Summer Breeze Brooke Wecker — Park Hills

Morning coffee with Cola Denise Tadlock — Fairfield, Ill.

Dear Santa ... Christine Kimack — O’Fallon, Mo.

Murphy B. Allison Boss — Defiance

Luna and Sol Hannah Sterkel — Frontenac Peaches Lynn Davis — Waterloo

Hamlet Rachel Williams — Valley Park

Baby Holly Billie Derham — St. Charles

Chunky Boy Beth Joy — Edwardsville

Puppy From B1

“We wanted to be footloose and fancy free,” Cindy says. Then the pandemic hit. Travel plans got shelved, and social events canceled. Harry’s cousin started emailing him photos of dogs needing to be rescued. Harry suggested sending Cindy the emails instead. Three days later, 9-month-old Bailey showed up in her inbox. “I have to have this dog,” she thought. Cindy Christakos was hardly alone in getting puppy fever during the pandemic. Sarah Javier, president and CEO of Animal Protective Association of Missouri Adoption Center, said the average length of stay for shelter animals dropped down to one day at times during the pandemic. Demand for puppies has always been higher than for older animals, but it soared during the year of lockdowns and social isolation. Rescue organizations say they were worried about unscrupulous breeders capitalizing on that demand. “That’s absolutely a concern for us, especially in Missouri,” said Gary Lowder, spokesman for the Humane Society of Missouri. For nine years running, Missouri has topped the Horrible Hundred list produced by the Humane Society of the United States to draw attention to puppy mills and problem breeders. There are more puppy breeders and sellers in Missouri on the list than anywhere else in the country. Lowder cautioned that even breeders with “happy Facebook pages,” do not reveal what’s going on behind the scenes. The organization recently rescued dogs from a licensed breeder where the animals were starving and living among other dead dogs. Those concerns led some puppy seekers to stalk shelter websites and social media pages. The Fogarty family in west St. Louis County had been looking for a puppy for months before they found Dunkin through the APA. Carolyn and her husband, Patrick, are both teachers, and they have two teenage sons. When schools switched to virtual learning in the spring of 2020, they were all at home all day. Their older dog, Pepper, was sleeping much of the day. They wanted a playmate for her and figured they finally had time to train a puppy. “It’s like having a newborn,” Carolyn Fogarty says.

CHRISTAKOS FAMILY

Harry Christakos with Cosmo

COURTESY OF JANET KUEBLI

Janet Kuebli’s dog, Emma, died last spring.

HILLARY LEVIN, POST-DISPATCH

Cindy Christakos and her husband, Harry, got Bailey, an Australian shepherd mix, after suddenly losing their beloved dog, Cosmo, two years ago. Delayed travel plans during the pandemic encouraged them to try pet parenthood again. They lost sleep during the first six weeks of training. It also took Pepper a few weeks to warm up to the new pup. “Now they are best buds,” Carolyn Fogarty says. More than just the dogs, the entire family benefited. “It was fun to have something to look forward to during that hard time,” she says. They looked forward to walks and training and playing with Dunkin. “It was our joy,” she says. The Christakoses found Bailey through a rescue in Pacific. She has helped Cindy stay more physically fit and has given them much-needed companionship during the months they spent at home. Like much of the country, the operations of the region’s shelters were drastically impacted by the pandemic. Lowder said they closed to the public in March and eventually created a curbside adoption process after people applied through the website. Their adoption numbers, along with the APA’s,

declined in 2020 given the tight restraints on how they could operate. In fiscal year 2019, HSMO placed just under 10,000 animals. In 2020, that dropped to just under 8,000, Lowder says. “It’s pretty remarkable that we were able to maintain the numbers that we did,” he says. People couldn’t walk through and fall in love with an animal in person. That connection had to happen online. Their facilities have since reopened and require masks for visitors. Javier, with APA, says they experienced a similar decline, with about 500 fewer adoptions in 2020 than the previous year. This year, however, they are on pace to exceed their goal, surpassing the 4,000 pets placed in homes in 2019. Other shelters saw significant increases even with the additional barriers to adoption. The Belleville Area Humane Society saw a 44% increase in animal adoptions in 2020 and a 74% increase in fostering,

according to executive director Kim Vrooman. The organization also began to focus on helping families struggling financially keep their pets. They started a pet food pantry and a vaccine clinic. “We want to put supports in place to support pet owners,” Vrooman says. They don’t require any proof of hardship from pet owners to receive pet food or obtain subsidized vaccines for their animals. All three shelters countered the news reports that greater numbers of people were returning the animals they had adopted during the pandemic. “There was no surge in returns due to COVID,” Vrooman said. “The reasons for returns are still very diverse.” Javier, with the APA, agreed. Many of the reasons that typically lead people to surrender pets — divorce, deaths or relocation — are similar to what they saw throughout the pandemic. There was not an increase of returns due to people

COURTESY OF CAROLYN FOGARTY

The Fogarty family’s new puppy, Dunkin. returning to work, she says. The numbers of returns at HSMO have also remained consistent to prior years. Owners whose pets got used to having them around all day have had to adjust to a new normal as many people return to work. Janet Kuebli’s pandemic pup, Bonnie, is getting used to doggy day care as she returned to the office. Kuebli started thinking about getting a puppy within a week of losing her 14-year-old rescue, Emma. Kuebli, 66, is single and accustomed to a certain amount of solitude. “But I haven’t lived without a dog since 1994,” she says. Emma died abruptly when a mass on her spleen erupted. The loss hit Kuebli hard. Emma had been her constant companion during the

isolation of the pandemic. “Without a dog, life just seemed completely empty.” She found Bonnie through a rescue organization in Pacific. A family in St. Charles was fostering the pup, and when Kuebli went to visit her, the connection was instant. “There was a 180-degree change in how I felt when I brought her home,” she says. “I still miss Emma. I think about her often, but Bonnie helped fill that space.” The Christakoses also found peace through their unexpected pandemic puppy adoption. “We think Cosmo sent Bailey to us,” Cindy Christakos said. Aisha Sultan • 314-340-8300 Home and family editor @aishas on Twitter asultan@post-dispatch.com


09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

13TH H ANNUAL ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH POST DISPATC

Cutest Pet PHOTO CONTEST CONTE PRESENTED BY

Congratulations to the winners! CAT

❤ FIRST

DOG

❤ FIRST

BABY ASHER BA

❤ SECOND

Kara Savio

❤ SECOND

BARN CATS B Carla Felumb

❤ THIRD

PAWS IN

Lynn Davis

MAX

HAMLET LLOVES WATERMELON!

Tiffany Nighbor

PEACHES

SECOND

THIRD

Sherry Winter

❤ FIRST

BENTLEY AND BODIE BENT

Brian McGuire

OTHER CRITTER

Rachel Williams

❤ THIRD

BUDDY

MARGE THE FERRET MAR

Jennifer Parker

Julie Holley

Don’t miss out on your next chance to win! Sign up for our free Contests & Promotions newsletter!

STLtoday.com/newsletter


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BOOKS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

BESTSELLERS

FICTION

FICTION

Here are the bestselling books from Publishers Weekly for the week that ended Sept. 18.

Hotchner’s posthumous novel returns to real-life inspiration

Moriarty hits an ace with ‘Apples Never Fall’

HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Apples Never Fall” • Liane Moriarty 2. “Harlem Shuffle” • Colson Whitehead 3. “Vince Flynn: Enemy at the Gates” • Kyle Mills 4. “Beautiful World, Where Are You” • Sally Rooney 5. “Billy Summers” • Stephen King 6. “The Last Thing He Told Me” • Laura Dave 7. “Forgotten in Death” • J.D. Robb 8. “Empire of the Vampire” • Jay Kristoff 9. “A Slow Fire Burning” • Paula Hawkins 10. “The Midnight Library” • Matt Haig HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “An Unapologetic Cookbook” • Joshua Weissman 2. “American Marxism” • Mark R. Levin 3. “A Hunter-Gatherer’s Guide to the 21st Century” • Heying/Weinstein 4. “Take Back Your Time” • Christy Wright 5. “Countdown bin Laden” • Chris Wallace 6. “Once Upon a Chef” • Jennifer Segal 7. “Where Tomorrows Aren’t Promised” • Carmelo Anthony 8. “Cook Once Dinner Fix” • Cassy Joy Garcia 9. “Provoke” • Tuff/Goldbach/ Fishburne 10. “You Got Anything Stronger?” • Gabrielle Union MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS 1. “Walk the Wire” • David Baldacci 2. “A Country Affair” • Debbie Macomber 3. “Hidden” • Fern Michaels 4. “Texas Outlaw” • Patterson/Bourelle 5. “Royal” • Danielle Steel 6. “Keeping Secrets” • Nora Roberts 7. “A Time for Mercy” • John Grisham 8. “Marauder” • Cussler/ Morrison 9. “Maple Leaf Harvest” • Catherine Anderson 10. “Faithless in Death” • J.D. Robb TRADE PAPERBACKS 1. “Where the Crawdads Sing” • Delia Owens 2. “My Hero Academia, Vol. 29” • Kohei Horikoshi 3. “The Return” • Nicholas Sparks 4. “People We Meet on Vacation” • Emily Henry 5. “Given, Vol. 6” • Natsuke Kizu 6. “The Book of Two Ways” • Jodi Picoult 7. “The Dressmakers of Auschwitz” • Lucy Adlington 8. “Deadly Cross” • James Patterson 9. “The Sisters of Auschwitz” • Roxane van Iperan 10. “The Love Hypothesis” • Ali Hazelwood Here are the bestsellers at area independent stores for the week that ended Sept. 19. Stores reporting: the Book House, Left Bank Books, Main Street Books, the Novel Neighbor, Subterranean Books. ADULTS 1. “Harlem Shuffle” • Colson Whitehead 2. “Beautiful World, Where Are You” • Sally Rooney 3. “The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo” • Taylor Jenkins Reid 4. “The Year of the Witching” • Alexis Henderson 5. “The Song of Achilles” • Madeline Miller 6. “Dune” • Frank Herbert 7. “The Best of Me” • David Sedaris 8. “Project Hail Mary” • Andy Weir 9. “The Broken Heart of America” • Walter Johnson 10. “The Charm Offensive” • Alison Cochrun CHILDREN/YOUNG ADULTS 1. “They Both Die at the End” • Adam Silvera 2. “The King of Scars” • Leigh Bardugo 3. “Ace of Spades” • Faridah Abike-Iyimide 4. “Willodeen” • Katherine Applegate 5. “Spy School at Sea” • Stuart Gibbs 6. “The Hawthorne Legacy” • Jennifer Lynn Barnes 7. “Last Kids on Earth and the Doomsday Race” • Max Brallier 8. “These Violent Delights” • Chloe Gong 9. “A Wish in the Dark” • Christina Soontornvat 10. “Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls” • Lilly Work

“My salad was thickly covered with what looked little clusters of pine needles.... I A.E. Hotchner is best known for “Papa Hemingway,” his best- looked at my salad and saw that underneath the clusters were seller about the quintessential the arugula and lobster. I tried American author, as well as his memoir “King of the Hill,” about pushing the clusters away to get at the underneath, but his early days in St. the clusters wouldn’t Louis, and his partnermove.” ship in business and Later, water in his in philanthropy with toilet is covered by a actor Paul Newman. metallic-looking grid. A posthumously “Something ominous published, autobiowas obviously happengraphical novel, “Kissing to me, but what?” ing the Wind,” hints Tremaine’s doctor at a different side to has no good news for his life — how he conhim as far as a postracted and coped with “Kissing the sible cure. “I’m afraid a rare illness and how Wind” all I can do,” he says, the help and the love of A novel by “is to help you keep a woman who has her A.E. Hotchner protecting yourself own physical disability Published by with the reality that moved him toward Anchor Books, your brain is creating acceptance. 192 pages, $17 the hallucinations, that In the novel, Hotch- (paperback) they’re not something ner is recast as Chet generated by mysteriTremaine, a lawyer and ous forces with a reality of their author of mystery novels living own.” in New York City. As he is getThat advice helps somewhat, ting ready for a trial, Tremaine but it doesn’t keep the illusions suffers the injury that kicks off at bay. At one point, Tremaine the narrative. describes his visions as “almost In an accident during a how a great novel introduces high-powered doubles match characters who remain very real on the tennis court, Tremaine long after you’ve finished readis blinded in one eye. Not long ing the book.” after, he begins to experiBut with hallucinations ence hallucinations that are as unpleasant as the one he diagnosed as Charles Bonnet endures during an MRI that is syndrome — an affliction that designed to help diagnose his Hotchner himself had until his condition, no one would want to death last year at age 102. relive a minute of such a work: Tremaine suffers the first of “… to my rather frightened what he calls “invasions” in a amazement the MRI bolted meeting with a legal colleague, when he notices what he thinks forward toward a canal of water is “a large, glossy rubber plant” that appeared before me. It charged right up to the edge, in the corner of an elevator. It has disappeared when he takes a threatening me with immersion, then spinning away at the last return trip down to the lobby. second, running alongside the But that evening, at dinner, canal, weaving around obstacles another illusion appears.

BY DALE SINGER

Special to the Post-Dispatch

FICTION

‘The Magician’ imagines the life of Thomas Mann you, this is not covert peeping from behind a pillar. Mann ogles The American critic Malcolm so openly that when he is still Cowley summed up the German single, a fellow writer brings up the subject in a café. “Everyone writer Thomas Mann’s fiction at this table knows that maras “intricate formal structure” riage is not for you. Anyone who taken to its limit. Mann himfollows your eyes can see where self, who won the Nobel Prize they land.” in literature in 1929, called his Nonetheless, Mann craftsmanship “thormarries the attracoughgoing.” He packed tive and intelligent so much physical detail Katia Pringsheim, and psychological with whom he will acuity into his novels have six children. that some readers shy He takes a risk with away from such straphis novella “Death of ping productions as Venice” — the story “Buddenbrooks,” “The of an aging composer Magic Mountain” and whose infatuation with “Doctor Faustus.” “The Magician” a beautiful boy has Against this backA novel by fatal consequences — ground, the Irish Colm Tóibín but by the time of its novelist Colm Tóibín Published by publication in 1912, has managed to write Scribner, 512 Mann’s stature is such an incisive and witty that few readers notice novel that shows what pages, $28 how self-referential good company the the tale is. Nobelist and his family might One of the Mann daughters have been. eventually asks her mother why Tóibín did this sort of thing she married such a man. “My once before in his novel “The father was a philanderer,” Katia Master”: shadowing a great replies. “He could not stop writer — Henry James, in that himself. He wanted any woman case — as he works and plays. he saw. I have not had that What James and Mann have in problem with your father.” common besides the demands The Mann children regard they make on readers is a their father with both awe and fraught relationship with their homosexuality. James was afraid resentment. His nickname comes courtesy of his first to give his inclinations free rein — or, indeed, any rein at all. son, Klaus, whose nightmares Tóibín’s Mann is less repressed. Thomas alleviates by claiming to be a “famous magician,” As a schoolboy, Tom experiments with male classmates; as much feared by ghosts. Klaus and his siblings are quite bright, an adult he gazes at handsome and some of them will go on men who cross his path. Mind

BY DENNIS DRABELLE

Special to the Washington Post

while I shriveled in fright, unable to process what was happening, on the verge of passing out, feeling a kind of suffocation, until we suddenly stopped, the throbbing sounds turned off, and the cover of the MRI raised as the white-garbed men pushed a pedestal up to the hatch for me to use for departure.” Understandably, Tremaine searches everywhere for a cure, even traveling to Nepal when his doctor hears of a promising lead. The question of whether nontraditional medicine can succeed where more accepted procedure have failed takes up a large section of the novel. But when Tremaine returns to the United States, Bonnet tags along. Whenever a novel is based, loosely or otherwise, on the author’s real life, a guessing game is inevitable. Did Hotchner really go to Nepal seeking a cure for Bonnet’s? Did he really end a budding romance because of the affliction? Did he finally find love with someone who had a similarly intractable condition? But readers of “Kissing the Wind” needn’t and shouldn’t get hung up on such questions. Instead, they should heed what lawyer Chet Tremaine tells the jury in his triumphant return to the courtroom: “You know, there are two types of novelists — those that write about themselves and those who pretend not to.” So instead of trying to figure out what is real and what came from Hotchner’s imagination, simply appreciate what he was able to craft out of his condition in his final, well-done gift to readers. Dale Singer retired in 2017 after a 45-year career in journalism in St. Louis. He lives in west St. Louis County.

to publish books of their own. Tóibín seems determined to give the children their due, something their father never managed to do. Indeed, while Mann himself remains rather opaque, Klaus, his sister Erika and their four siblings come vividly alive. Wherever the Manns live — in Munich, Princeton, Los Angeles or Switzerland — they receive glittering guests, among them Alma Mahler, widow of the composer Gustav, who says whatever she pleases. Here she is at the Mann dinner table, reflecting on her famous husband: “I think people who say they are sick have a duty to actually be sick. If Gustav had a pimple on his nose, he was sure it was the end. And I suppose he had the courage of his convictions since he died young.” At 500-plus pages, “The Magician” is Mann-sized, but it canters along not only on the strength of Tóibín’s graceful prose, but also because the reader can hardly wait for the next bon mot from a family member or guest. At the end, Tóibín reminds us that his protagonist lightened up in his last novel, the racy “Confessions of Felix Krull,” published shortly before his death in 1955. Preparing to write it, Mann muses that Felix should embody his creator’s final thoughts on humans: “that [they] could not ever be trusted, that they could reverse their own story as the wind changed, that their lives were a continuous, enervating and amusing effort to appear plausible. And in that lay, he felt, the pure genius of humanity, and all the pathos.” No one fits that description better than Thomas Mann himself.

BY ROB MERRILL

Associated Press

Who knew there were so many tennis metaphors for life? Australian novelist Liane Moriarty shares them all and probably creates a few of her own in “Apples Never Fall.” Meet the Delaneys, who are sure to be an A-List ensemble cast in the years ahead: “Apples Never There’s Stan, Fall” stoic patriarch A novel by and erstwhile Liane Moriarty tennis coach, Published by his wife, Joy, Henry Holt, 480 his doubles pages, $28.99 partner on the court and in life, who managed the family tennis academy for years and is now trying to “retire with grace” and longing for grandchildren. They have four adult children — Troy, Brooke, Logan and Amy — whose childhoods were dominated by the sport that paid all the family’s bills, but who now earn livings outside tennis. The novel opens with the sibling quartet in a cafe, trying to figure out where their mother could be. She sent a cryptic text to them all and hasn’t been seen for days. She isn’t replying to messages or answering her phone. The narrative then jumps back and forth from the present to “September,” the month of Joy’s disappearance. We’re quickly introduced to a mystery character, Savannah, who shows up at the Delaneys’ door one night with a “fresh, deep cut just beneath her right eyebrow.” Joy invites her in and mothers her to the point where she’s soon eating casserole and spending the night in Amy’s childhood bed. We’re also treated to chapters from the perspective of Detective Senior Constable Christina Khoury and her partner, who at the request of two of the Delaney children are now investigating Joy as a “missing person.” Her interviews with all the key characters are intercut with flashbacks to September as the authorities try to piece together the puzzle. Moriarty goes deep into each character’s head as we learn all about their lives and relationships. Forgive the metaphor, but it’s irresistible — you feel like you’re reading a tennis match, turning your head left, right, left, right, as the story unspools. Moriarty is very good at constructing plot, dribbling out details that resurface chapters later to create “aha” moments. But what makes “Apples Never Fall” a real pleasure to read, and elevates it a little above Moriarty’s two most recent bestsellers and TV hits, “Big Little Lies” and “Nine Perfect Strangers,” are the insights into the complexity of family relationships. She’s created a character in Joy who feels real and relatable, whose inner monologue is filled with gems like, “You couldn’t share the truth of your marriage with your adult children. They didn’t really want to know, even if they thought they did.” By the end of the novel, of course, we all know. It’s a trip well worth taking on the page, before it shows up on a streaming service near you.

Arundhati Roy will accept St. Louis Literary Award in spring BY JANE HENDERSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Known for her lush, descriptive prose style and nonfiction social commentary, Arundhati Roy will receive the 2022 St. Louis Literary Award. She will accept the award April 28 at the Sheldon Concert Hall Roy & Art Galleries and talk about her work the following day at St. Louis University. Roy is best-known for her novel “The God of Small Things,” which received the 1997 Booker Prize. Her novel

“The Ministry of Utmost Happiness” made the Booker’s long list in 2017 and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. “First and foremost, Arundhati Roy is an exceptional writer whose work has made a profound impact culturally, socially and politically. What resonates through her writings as an essayist, novelist and screenwriter is a voice that is unwaveringly honest and compelling,” Edward Ibur, the award’s executive director, said in a statement Monday announcing

the award. “Ms. Roy has been a bright star in the literary universe for more than 30 years, and we are so fortunate to have her join our amazing roster of writers who have received the St. Louis Literary Award at SLU for more than 50 years.” Roy follows another Booker nominee, Zadie Smith, who is to accept her own St. Louis honor on Nov. 4 at the Sheldon. The event is free, but reservations are required. Smith is known for the novels “White Teeth,” “On Beauty” and “Swing Time” and for nonfiction essays, such as last year’s

“Intimations.” (Disclosure: This reporter is on the Literary Award committee that chose the winners.) Roy was born in 1961 in India (Shillong, Meghalaya) and studied architecture in Delhi. She later wrote screenplays but gained worldwide fame with “The God of Small Things,” semi-autobiographical fiction about an Indian family with its own hardships and secrets. Since then, much of Roy’s writing has focused on social activism, including criticism of India’s nuclear policies and American imperialism and capitalism.


09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

RIDES DRIVING WITH DAN

2022 Nissan Pathfinder

DAN WIESE Dan Wiese is a freelance automotive writer. You can e-mail him at: drivingwithdan@gmail.com

All-new edition of three-row SUV prioritizes passenger comfort The new Nissan Pathfinder assured me it had its priorities straight. As I drove around town on a latesummer day -- and a hot one -- I noticed at a red light that Pathfinder’s fuel-saving auto-stop/start function did not kill the engine. And then Pathfinder told me why. With the outside temperature hovering in the mid-90s, the gauge panel displayed the simple message: “Idle Stop System: Auto Stop/Start (Off); A/C Priority.” From the coolness of the driver’s seat, I gently patted the dashboard and cooed, “Pathfinder, you and I are going to get along just fine.” And so we did. Though boasting copious three-row passenger room and a muscular, three-ton towing capability, this big guy is a softie at heart -- more concerned with passenger comfort than gonzo adventure. It wasn’t always that way. Pathfinder started life in the mid-’80s as a bushwhacker -- a compact SUV based on the Nissan Hardbody pickup platform. I remember back in 1995 driving a truckbased Pathfinder to the 13,186-foot summit of the Colorado Rockies’ rugged Mosquito Pass 4WD trail. I’ll tell ya, in its youth Pathfinder was tough as a two-dollar steak. Since then, however, Nissan has taken it to finishing school. In 2022, it graduates. Longer, wider and taller than its 2013-2020 predecessor, this all-new fifthgeneration Pathfinder not only provides notably more interior room, it also jettisons its predecessor’s slushy CVT transmission in favor of a modern nine-speed automatic. Offered in trims of S, SV, SL and Platinum, each can be had with front- or all-wheel drive -- the latter christened “Intelligent 4WD” by Nissan. Regardless, every 2022 Pathfinder is powered by a carried-over 3.5-liter, 284-hp

2022 NissaN PaThfiNder VEHICLE TYPE: Four-door, front- or AWD, seven- or eight-passenger SUV BASE PRICE: S: $34,560; SV: $37,350; SL: $40,740; Platinum: $47,340 (prices are for FWD; add $1,900 to each model for AWD) PRICE AS DRIVEN: $50,290; a Platinum 4WD (AWD) with $795 Illuminated Kick Plates and Welcome Lighting; $255 Captain's Chair Floor Mats ENGINE: 3.5-liter V-6 HORSEPOWER: 284 at 6400 rpm TORQUE: 259 lb.-ft. at 4800 rpm RECOMMENDED FUEL: Regular TRANSMISSION: Nine-speed automatic EPA MPG: FWD: 21 city/27 hwy/23 combined; AWD: 21/26/23 (Platinum 4WD: 20/25/22)

The longer, wider and taller 2022 Nissan Pathfinder provides more interior room and better driving characteristics, the latter thanks largely to a new nine-speed automatic.

WHEELBASE: 114.2 inches LENGTH: 197.7 inches

V-6 now managed by the aforementioned nine-speed. That combo in our Platinum 4WD delivered to us 21 mpg in 275 miles of mixed city/hwy driving. On the road, the steering feels slightly over-boosted, but the cabin is quiet and the ride civil, even as the six-pack’s 259 lb.-ft. of torque helped launch our big, all-wheel drive ute to 60 mph in about 7 seconds. That grunt, which in 4WD models can be channeled to terra firma via drive modes of Sand, Mud/Ruts, Snow, Auto, Eco, Sport and Tow, also helps enable this guy to tow an impressive 6,000 pounds. Providing three rows of seats, Pathfinder’s interior can be finished in a seven- or eight-passenger arrangement. Our sumptuous Platinum boasted a 2/2/3

seven-seat layout, the middle row consisting of two captain’s chairs and a center console. Room is spectacular in rows one and two, with the third row roomy enough to accommodate kids or even average-stature adults. And the tilt-and-scoot middle row makes third-row access easier than you might expect. Our only interior squawk was a minor one -- an utter lack of side bolstering on the mid-row captain’s chairs. Infotainment stuff is delightfully straight-forward. Clearly marked hard buttons augmented our 9.0-inch touch screen, and big volume and tuning knobs for the radio were much appreciated. Finally, Pathfinder’s new styling is tough-guy chic: big, blocky grille, boxy profile and, from the rear, flaring hips and, in big-block letters, PATHFINDER boldly displayed on the liftgate. Our Platinum, riding 20-inch wheels, even had a two-tone paint job: red body, black roof and pillars. Although Pathfinder jettisoned its truck

CARGO (behind 3rd/2nd/1st rows): 16.6 cu. ft./45.0 cu. ft./80.5 cu. ft. TOWING MAX.: 6,000 lbs. BASE CURB WEIGHT: FWD: 4,317 lbs.; AWD: 4,469 lbs. WHERE BUILT: Smyrna, Tennessee

foundation generations ago, it’s this 2022 iteration, with its notable improvements in ride, driving characteristics (thank you nine-speed), interior materials and comfort, that really puts it on shopping lists with the likes of the Ford Explorer, Toyota Highlander and Kia Telluride. Prices start under 35 grand. Our loaded AWD Platinum rang the register at 50 large. This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. Brand Ave. Studios connects advertisers with a targeted audience through compelling content programs, from concept to production and distribution. For more information contact sales@ brandavestudios.com.

OLD CAR COLUMN

CAR TALK

A world without gas caps is here RAY MAGLIOZZI King Features Content cartalk@gmail.com

DEAR CAR TALK: In a recent column, you talked about how a vehicle’s emissions system monitors itself for leaks. And that if a gas cap is loose and lets vapors escape, that will turn on the check engine light. Well, neither my 2019 GMC Terrain nor my wife’s 2021 Honda Accord even have a gas cap. And I’m pretty sure they were not stolen! How is that possible? There is no way for the tank to be pressurized without a cap. And gas fumes can certainly evaporate and escape through the filler spout. What’s going on, Ray? -- Scott Oh no. GMC and Honda forgot to order gas caps! Actually, I think Ford was the first manufacturer to go “capless.” It’s not really capless. The cap is just on the inside now. It’s a spring-loaded flap located just inside the filler opening. When you insert the fuel nozzle, it pushes the cap out of the way and allows you to add fuel. When you remove the nozzle, the internal cap springs back into place. It has a rubber O-ring around it to seal the filler opening and keep both gasoline and vapors from escaping. So it works exactly like a gas cap does, except you never have to remove it, replace it, tighten it or go back to the gas station because you accidentally left it on top of the pump and drove away. A week ago. These capless filler necks have been around for years now, and they seem to work great. The only downside is that if you need to add emergency fuel -- from a can with a flexible hose, for instance -- you can damage the cap mechanism. So, several companies, like Ford and Honda, include a little plastic spout to use just for that purpose. You can check your owner’s manual to see if your car has one, and where it’s stored. Think of the world without gas caps like wireless internet, Scott. The lack of a wire doesn’t mean you can’t check your email. It just means you no longer have a wire to trip over. Got a question about cars? Write to Ray in care of King Features, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803, or email by visiting the Car Talk website at www.cartalk.com. (c) 2021 by Ray Magliozzi and Doug Berman Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

This fine Oldsmobile won’t last long! BRUCE KUNZ Brand Ave. Studios Contributing Writer the_fin_man@msn.com

I saw this ‘49 Oldsmobile 76 sedan at Kite’s Auto Center in Collinsville, Illinois a week ago. I looked the car over inside and out, and although it’s a 20-footer when it comes to the paint, it is very presentable and show-worthy, although I wouldn’t expect it to bring home a trophy.. This example is in better than average condition – including original Oldsmobile hub caps and beauty rings. Entering the cabin, one is pleasantly surprised to find a correctly restored interior from headliner to floorboard and everything in between. Getting behind the wheel of this Olds time machine is like a real trip back in time. The in-line, six cylinder flat head engine starts with the touch of a dashmounted pushbutton and the motor comes alive with a smooth response and a steady, quiet idle. Although this Oldsmobile 76 was the entry-level model for the 1949 model year, this one was fitted with the Deluxe option which included foam rubber seat cushions, front and rear floor mats, special external chrome moldings, clock, deluxe steering wheel, wheel trim rings and turn signals. I’m sold! A FIN MAN EXTRA! At RWFM V guest, Cliff Mueller, asked me about a certain automobile color name and questioned, “How in the world do they come up with these crazy names for colors on cars – like the Highlander Green on Jeremy Sanders Lincoln?” (OCC, 09-19-2021) My theory – the marketing team had been sitting around a lengthy conference table for hours trying to come up with creative names, and when the clock on the wall was nearing five, they had but one color left – black... and the boss said, “Oh hell, let’s just call it ‘black’ and be done with it!” But when you just bought a new car and were describing it to a friend, doesn’t Raven Black, Presidential Black, Jet Black or any one of the 11 listed in today’s trivia sound more impressive? So I’ll bet you are wondering, just what is that “Nankeen” reference in Oldsmobile’s color name for this car? Nankeen is a kind of pale yellowish cloth originally made in Nanking (modern Nanjing), China from a yellow variety of cotton, but subsequently manufactured from ordinary cotton that is then dyed. So there you have it and now you know. Oldsmobile was no slouch when it came to performance. The 1949 Oldsmobile 88, powered by the Rocket 88 V-8 engine, would do zero-to-60 in 12.2 seconds and run the quarter mile in 19.9 which was considered fast in those days. A 1949 Oldsmobile 88 convertible was chosen as the official pace car for the 1949 Indianapolis 500. The pace car featured a

Photo provided by Bruce Kunz

- As good as this 1949 Oldsmobile looks, it’s still just two years shy of its 75th birthday. That said, it has more than likely received a repaint or three during its long lifetime. Assuming the hue it wears now is the original, it appears to be nankeen cream, one of 18 colors on the 1949-1950 Oldsmobile palette.

special, clear Plexiglas hood to show off the Rocket 88 V-8 engine. This unique feature was made available as a factory option. Oldsmobile took home five NASCAR Grand National Races for the 1949 season. Oh, by the way... Cliff Mueller had a 1969 Corvette back in the day, but decided to get rid of it and has been wanting another Corvette ever since. It took him 50 years to reach his dream and in 2019, Cliff purchased a brand new C-7 Corvette in Blade Silver. Cliff is an active member of the Ozark Corvette Club and has now been on four Rollin’ with the FIN MAN tours. Thanks to all of you who attended RWFM V and kudos to Charles Gallagher for a wonderful day! Tri-Power Trivia: 1. Can you name the car makes which use the following names for their black hues? Raven; Formal; Tuxedo; Ebony; Regent; Jet; Classic; Sable; Velvet; Presidential; and Canyon. (All are from model year 1960.) 2. Name the song, dating back to 1905, in which the chorus contains the lyrics, “Down the road of life we’ll fly, Automobubbling, you and I, to the church we’ll swiftly steal, then our wedding bells will peal.” 3. A popular NBC television program premiered on January 3, 1949, with the first word of the title named after a popular toothpaste still on the market today. Fill in the blank: “_______” Theatre. Was it Flouristan; Pepsodent; Colgate or Rembrandt? Tri-Power Trivia answers: 1. Raven Black (Ford and Dodge), Formal Black (Chrysler/Imperial), Tuxedo Black (Chevrolet and Mercury), Ebony Black (Oldsmobile and Buick); Regent Black (Pontiac), Jet Black (Plymouth and Chevrolet trucks), Classic Black (Rambler), Sable Black (Buick), Black Velvet (Edsel), Presidential Black (Lincoln), Canyon Black (GMC commercial trucks) 2. “In My Merry Oldsmobile” 3. The Colgate Theatre was a 30 minute dramatic television anthology series telecast on NBC during 1949 and again in 1958, for a total of 50 episodes.

This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. Brand Ave. Studios connects advertisers with a targeted audience through compelling content programs, from concept to production and distribution. For more information contact sales@brandavestudios.com.

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TRAVEL

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

New York museum pays tribute to the poster BY COURTNEY LICHTERMAN

Special to the Washington Post

NEW YORK — Whether they encourage the purchase of baking powder or the start of an uprising, whether they hang in the bedrooms of preteens or on the walls of the subway, whether they center on travel or turmoil, posters are a universally used means of communication. Although they may not always be recognized as such, posters — both visually and in terms of their content — have been a vital part of all our lives, no matter what our age or where we live on the planet. That’s the essential philosophy behind the New York City museum that pays tribute to the art, effect and history of the poster. Opened in 2019, Poster House was conceived in 2015 by a group of poster collectors who realized there was something missing in the city’s museum scene. “There was not a poster museum in New York, whereas there were several poster museums around the world,” said museum director Julia Knight. “New York, being such a center of advertising and design, really seemed like a good place for it.” In fact, Poster House, located in the Chelsea neighborhood, is not just the first poster museum in New York, but also the first in the country. In the short period between opening its doors and shutting them because of the pandemic, the now-reopened museum managed to mount several shows. Among them: “Alphonse Mucha: Art Nouveau/Nouvelle Femme,” which celebrated the popular Czech artist whose style became one of the defining aesthetics of the time, and “Designing Through the Wall: Cyan in the 1990s,” a retrospective of the German design agency Cyan. Poster House’s exhibits span the popular and the obscure. The museum, which arranges two shows at a time alongside one mini-exhibit, specifically pairs seemingly disparate subjects. “One of the two shows we opened with was Alphonse Mucha, because we knew, as a new museum, people were already very familiar with his imagery,” said chief curator Angelina Lippert. “So we wanted to bring them in with something familiar. And then we surprised them with a corresponding show on Cyan, which was a 1990s East German graphic design group, which is something that most people would

POSTER HOUSE

Progressive proofs of a Jules Chéret poster. These are permanently installed in the museum’s stairwell. “Jules Chéret is known as the father of the poster,” says chief curator Angelina Lippert. take the books from the shelves and look through Where • 119 West 23rd Street them. I found myself surprisMore info • 1-917-722-2439; ingly affected by a group posterhouse.org of posters in the Push Pin Exhibits • “You Won’t Bleed exhibit. Designed by Push Me: How Blaxploitation Post- Pin artists Paul Davis ers Defined Cool & Delivered and James McMullan, they are a group of enorProfits” and “The Push Pin mous posters advertising Legacy” run through Feb. 6. “What’s The Score? The Post- works from the New York theater scene of the late ers of LeRoy Neiman” runs 20th century. Printed to through March 27. hang in the subways in Hours • Open Thursday to dimensions that sadly Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; are no longer used, they closed Monday to Wednesare displayed in a space day. deliberately designed to allow viewers to see the How much • Tickets $12 posters in their entirety, adults; $8 students, educators, people with disabilities with enough room to step back and grasp their scale. and seniors; those 18 and Instantly recognizing under free. Raúl Juliá’s haunting eyes in Davis’ 1976 poster for an immersive, imagina“The Threepenny Opera,” I tive experience it always experienced a rush of nosis, full of small, clever talgia for the era so strong touches that might be all MATHIEU BITTON, POSTER HOUSE but impossible at a larger that I’m surprised I didn’t “Cleopatra Jones and the Casino of Gold,” 1975, by Robert Tanenbaum, from the “You Won’t feel the rumble of a train. institution. Such touches Bleed Me: How Blaxploitation Posters Defined Cool & Delivered Profits” exhibit. Downstairs, in the include the bookshelves new “You Won’t Bleed in the current “The Push Me: How Blaxploitation Pin Legacy” exhibition, Posters Defined Cool & full of books that contain museums in the city that in a SoHo loft. In fact, not know about.” covers and/or illustrations Delivered Profits” exhibit, are often overrun with the space was designed I have to admit a cermuseumgoers can use the by artists who worked for tourists and visitors in to evoke the feeling of a tain bias in my coverage, record player to play vinyl general, Poster House feels the studio known for the sidewalk, to give visitors because I am what those albums of the soundtracks neither claustrophobic nor exuberant, kaleidoscopic the sense that the posters at Poster House might of films represented there. style that pushed back overwhelming; one never affectionately call a poster are being viewed in their Although the exhibit gets the sense they have to — so to speak — against natural habitat. Although nerd. My own interest has been in the making for the advertising aesthetic somewhat narrow, there is move along so that giant in posters was started in about three years, it seems tour group from wherever of the time. Founded in part by the art gallery and a distinct lightness to the especially timely now. “I 1954, Push Pin was home can read the museum museum exhibition post- space, and a combination think it would have been of materials and elements notes. Exhibits feel entirely to many lauded designers found on the doors of a timely show no matter — wood, brick, glass, light manageable and yet com- ers, including Seymour the bakeries, bookstores when we put it up, because Chwast, Reynold Ruffins, and dry cleaners of Paris, a — does evoke the outdoors. plete, as if no stone has these issues are so imporbeen left unturned in tell- Edward Sorel and Milton The feeling of calm is phenomenon I discovered tant to American society, Glaser, who was perhaps one that spills over into the ing the story of the existas a kid while on a family but yes, after 2020, it does best known for creating ing subject. exhibition spaces themtrip. Since then, posters take on an even deeper the iconic I [heart] NY Having now seen four selves, which are located have recorded time and level of significance,” she logo. Amazingly, visitors of its exhibits, I’ve been on the main floor and the place for me, much the said. repeatedly struck by what are welcome to actually lower level. Unlike many same way music does. When I travel, I bring with me — always — an expandable tube, knowing that, at some point, I will most likely be either purchasing a poster or, depending on where I’m going, trying to charm a dry cleaner out of theirs. As such, I thought 1 butterflies were going to fly out of my head the first time I visited this museum. I arrived excited, and Poster House did not disappoint. Instantly setting the tone, the airy lobby, which includes the requiAttend a virtual show site signifier of a cool New where travel specialists York space — an exposed from Holland America Line brick wall — feels like a chic art gallery housed will take you on an inspiring

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09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

TRAVEL

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B11

Towering windmill greets visitors to Fulton BY PAMELA SELBERT

Special to the Post-Dispatch

FULTON, ILLINOIS

I

f a Hollywood film director had orchestrated our first sight of De Immigrant in Fulton, Illinois, it couldn’t have been more dramatic. We’d made the nearly 300-mile trip north from St. Louis that day, and it was near sunset when we arrived. Driving west the few blocks on 10th Avenue toward the Mississippi River and the sturdy levee where the “Immigrant” stands, all we could see through the windshield was blinding sun. But then, as if on cue, the sun dipped below the horizon, and in its place an enormous windmill haloed in gold took shape against the sky. It was a breathtaking spectacle. That was 20 years ago, just a year after the 90-foot tall “beltmolen” (Dutch for mound mill) had arrived from the Netherlands. Friends living near Fulton thought we’d be interested. The windmill, at 10th and First streets, attracts some 10,000 visitors a year. Nicknamed “De Immigrant,” the eight-sided windmill, which cost $1 million, was purchased by the town of 3,200, along with a grant from the state, to honor Fulton’s Dutch heritage. An additional $200,000 bought the grinding apparatus that makes it a working windmill: blue basalt millstones — a “bed stone” and a “runner” — and a complex array of gears. It was new when it arrived here; historic windmills can’t be legally exported from the Netherlands. But it’s an exact replica of those that have stood in the Dutch landscape for centuries. De Immigrant was fully built in the Netherlands. Then the 30-metric-ton behemoth was dismantled, each piece numbered, shipped to Fulton and reassembled by Dutch millwrights. From the day it opened, volunteer millers have operated the windmill, grinding the grains — winter wheat, buckwheat, rye and corn — that can be purchased as flour at the Windmill Cultural Center across the street. Judy Holesinger, of the town’s tourism committee, is among the 15 volunteers trained for the work, which, she says, “if wind conditions are favorable,” is done on weekends. The volunteer millers also give hourlong tours, explaining the anatomy of the windmill and the ins and outs of operating it. On this recent occasion we took the tour, and from the volunteer millers that day, Pam VanZuiden and Barb Cunningham (millers work in pairs), learned that a serious flood in 1965 is in part responsible for the windmill’s presence. A Dutch-style levee to protect the town was built, and it seemed appropriate to have a Dutch windmill atop it, said Cunningham. The windmill, a cap winder, is made from bilinga wood, a dense South African species, that is “warp resistant, bug resistant and fire resistant,” she said. The “cap” rotates to turn the four sails into the wind. In a 15 mph or higher wind, a 50-pound bag of grain can be ground in 15 minutes, she added. Unfortunately, the wind was not favorable this day, but we’d watched the fascinating process on our earlier visit. De Immigrant was closed temporarily due to COVID-19, but is now open Saturdays 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays 1 to 5 p.m. Memorial Day through October. The 3,000-square-foot Windmill Cultural Center, across First Street, is a veritable windmill world, with 33 scale-model windmills on display. They range in size from 10 inches to more than 6 feet tall and represent windmills from 13 countries in Europe and the Middle East, explained volunteer guide Neal Luker. The meticulously detailed replicas were built by Henk Hielema of Indiana, originally from the Netherlands, who “had an early interest in windmills,” said Luker. After World War II and a stint in the Dutch marines, Hielema immigrated in the 1960s to the United States. Over the years he traveled extensively in Europe and elsewhere, seeking out historic windmills and photographing them, planning to build models. And for 30 or so years, Hielema crafted his engineering masterpieces, sometimes spending up to 800 hours on just one, said Luker. The earliest is a small

123RF

Nicknamed “De Immigrant,” the eight-sided windmill in Fulton, Illinois, honors the town’s Dutch heritage. It’s an exact replica of those that have stood in the Dutch landscape for centuries.

If you go Getting there • Fulton is about 280 miles north of St. Louis, about a four-hour drive. More info • 1-815-589-2616 or cityoffulton.us toward the church, a beautiful (and nonvenomous) eastern ribbon snake shot across the path in front of me. And at the doctor’s office, a tiny wren was busily feeding her young through a hole in a little bird house hanging on the porch. Donations are suggested, but there is a small charge on certain dates. A Fall Festival, with costumed crafters demonstrating 19th century life skills, is held here 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 2 and 3. The Andresen Nature Center, which overlooks the Mississippi, is adjacent the canyon, at 409 GUY SELBERT North Fourth Street. Named Enormous gears mesh tooth to cog overhead inside the windmill turning the “runner” stone on top of the for the family that donated stationary “bed” stone, to grind grain. the building and property, the three-acre site opened eight years ago, says director Kyle More to Fulton Kopf. Holesinger noted that long There are dozens of exhibits before De Immigrant or the for all ages, many of them crecultural center were here, the ated by local high school science famed Lincoln Highway (U.S. clubs, he said. Visitors learn Highway 30), one of the counabout the various fish native to try’s earliest transcontinental Illinois, the turtles, mammals, roads, had run along First Street where the attractions are insects and wildflowers, how to identify animals by their tracks now. The historic road, new in or scat, and more. 1913, was later rerouted, and Outside, visitors can see the today crosses the Mississippi Illinois prairie as it appeared just south of Fulton. Many of to early pioneers, at the the dozens of towns along the 10,000-square-foot re-created Lincoln’s nearly 3,400 miles, Fulton included, hold a “Lincoln tall-grass prairie, displaying such native species as willowy Buy-Way” the second weekend switchgrass, big and little bluein August, one of the country’s stem, bright purple asters, yelGUY SELBERT largest yard sales, she said. low coneflowers, goldenrod and Heritage Canyon, “a remnant A small valley opens up in Heritage Canyon for a small “town” of a store, others among the 50 different of the past,” according to the a shop, an old school and a biffy. species Kopf has planted. WalkFulton visitors guide, is a short ing paths wind through The drive north at 515 North Fourth Street. For a century, until 1954 nature center is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For information when it was abandoned, this call 815-208-7059. was a limestone quarry. Today, Lock and Dam 13, managed by the 12-acre canyon is thick with the U.S. Army Corps of Engitrees and bushes, and dotted neers, is three miles north of with 19th-century buildings, Fulton, off Highway 84. Located some original that were moved at the widest pool in the Upper here, others replicas. In 1967 Harold and Thelma Wierenga of Mississippi River Basin, the site is popular for watching barges Fulton created the mid-1800s and other boats locking through. American village to “preserve An observation platform overMidwestern history while looks the area and there’s plenty disturbing nature as little as possible,” according to a plaque of parking. Tours are available at 1 p.m. every Sunday, Memorial there. Now, Early American Crafters, a local group of volun- Day through Labor Day; call in advance, 815-259-3628. teers, maintain the site. The area is also popular for A stroll through the canyon bird watching. Pelicans, herons, GUY SELBERT GUY SELBERT begins at the Town Hall and seagulls, bald eagles and other A windmill crafted by Henk Hielema The tiny Canyon Church in Heritage Fire House building. Visitors waterfowl are often seen. Bald follow a series of yellow arrows at the Windmill Cultural Center in Canyon is a favorite spot for Eagle Watch is held either the across a swinging bridge, along Fulton. weddings. first or second Saturday in Janua dirt path to a tree-shrouded replica of a clever windmill built After a visit to De Immigrant, ary depending on the weather, hillside settlement of log cabaround 500 A.D. in today’s Iran. impressed with the town’s inter- ins, and across a 52-foot long said Holesinger. Call 815-259est in its Dutch heritage, the Most impressive is the large, covered bridge to a small church 3628 for information. handsome model of a 1513 Dutch Hielemas decided Fulton was Fulton, with a quaint, pic(popular for weddings, said the right place, he said. Donawindmill in South Holland, a turesque downtown, offers a Holesinger). The quintessentions from local residents and Netherlands province. tially rustic town also includes a number of shops and nearly a the city provided funding for the one-room schoolhouse, blackA few years before Hielema dozen restaurants. As RVers we culture center, which opened in smith shop and wagon works, died, in 2016, he and his wife, don’t often eat “out,” but we had 2010. It includes a gift shop sell- print shop, doctor’s office and June, toured the United States lunch one of our days in town at ing Delft pottery, books, Fulton in search of a fitting locaKrumpets, 1016 Fourth Street, others. souvenirs, flour from De Immition to donate their extensive You might also see some wild- and recommend it (try the windmill collection, said Luker. grant and more. mushroom-sausage soup). life along the way: as I walked


TRAVEL

B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

TRAVEL TROUBLESHOOTER

Fight jet lag with these tricks BY CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT

Special to the Washington Post

Cramped seats, mask requirements and surly service aren’t the worst part of international airline travel. No, it’s that awful feeling when they turn on the cabin lights in the middle of the night and try to serve you breakfast before landing. Fortunately, there are some new tricks for fighting jet lag. Jet lag is a sleep disorder that affects people crossing several time zones quickly. It leaves your body’s internal clock, better known as your circadian rhythm, out of sync with the local time zone. Christopher Lee, author of the book “Jet Lag,” says a disrupted circadian rhythm is becoming a more common problem — and not just because of air travel. “One way of thinking about jet lag is that it is part of a broader pattern of technological innovation and time acceleration in the present,” says Lee, an associate professor of history at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania. There are some new services aimed at combating jet lag, ranging from hotel programs to smartphone apps. But the best way to avoid nodding off on your first day of vacation is to take some common-sense steps beforehand. Jet lag leaves me feeling as if I’ve gotten half a night’s sleep each night for an entire week. Pamela Losey used to commute across the Atlantic frequently. She says she thinks of the red-eye to London as a missed night’s sleep. “I once nodded off very briefly during a client meeting,” says Losey, a garden designer from Croton-on-Hudson, New York. “But when they learned that I basically flew 24 hours just to be there, they were very kind.” Hotels are trying to help.

The Hoshinoya Tokyo hotel has a deep-breathing spa regimen for people who arrive in Japan feeling a little disoriented. It also offers a three-day regimen of body-warming herb treatments and open-air baths to help you get acclimated to the 13-hour time difference between Japan and the East Coast. The hotel adjusts the humidity and brightness of your room to ease the transition, and a massage therapist shows you deepbreathing techniques to help you sleep. In late 2019, Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts began collaborating with celebrity trainer Harley Pasternak to create an anti-jet-lag exercise routine for its hotels. The series of exercises, called Jet Lag Rescue, is meant to restore guests’ circadian balance. It includes simple activities to raise your heart rate and engage your glutes, quads, hamstrings and calves, as well as a restorative sequence of stretches to ease aching muscles. Of course, there’s also an app for jet lag. It’s called Timeshifter ($24.99 a year), and it allows you to create a personalized plan to avoid jet lag based on variables such as your sleep pattern and itinerary. You can even factor melatonin supplements into your regimen. The Minnesota-based business travel agency CWT announced last year a deal to distribute Timeshifter to all of its clients, so if you work for a large company with a managed business travel program, you might already have access to Timeshifter at no extra cost. There are new preventive measures for jet lag, too. Steven Lamm, medical director of NYU Langone Health’s Preston Robert Tisch Center for Men’s Health, says a study published in 2018 showed that

supplementing with the natural antioxidant Pycnogenol (a French maritime pine bark extract) reduced the duration and severity of jet-lag symptoms. “This research showed that supplementing with Pycnogenol actually reduced the duration of time individuals felt jet-lagged by nearly 50% and improved feelings of fatigue, visual impairment and inability to sleep,” Lamm says. Tried-and-true ways of warding off jet lag include melatonin supplements (which help regulate the circadian rhythm) and prescription sleeping pills. I used melatonin on a trip to Africa a few years ago and had almost no jet lag. On a recent flight from San Francisco to Lisbon, I tried a more natural approach. I bought a bag of pistachios, which are loaded with melatonin, and ate a handful every hour. I know it sounds, well, nuts, but my jet lag was minimal. It took me about two days to adjust to the eight-hour time difference. If you go with a sedative, be mindful of the side effects. Always consult a physician before taking pills before a flight — and, as you would on the ground, avoid combining them with alcohol. One of the best weapons against jet lag is common sense. The bone-dry aircraft cabin can dehydrate you quickly; drink lots of water. Don’t sit in your seat for nine straight hours; get up and move around. And, for the sake of yourself and the travelers around you, stay away from alcohol. The “free” wine that’s served in business class has a cost. When I was younger, I suffered from days of disrupted sleep after having a drink too many on a transatlantic flight.

2021

Virtual Author Event Series presented by St. Louis County Library Foundation and HEC Media Tune in on Facebook: www.facebook.com/STLCoLibrary

Full author schedule available at www.slcl.org/authors. VIRTUAL EVENT

Jackie Kay Tuesday, October 5, 7:00 p.m. “Bessie Smith: A Poet’s Biography of a Blues Legend” In Conversation with Gerald Early, Washington University– Chair of African and African American Studies

TEEN VIRTUAL EVENT

Roshani Chokshi Saturday, October 16, 2:00 p.m. “The Bronzed Beasts” The third installment in the bestselling “Gilded Wolves” fantasy series

VIRTUAL EVENT

David S. Reynolds Monday, October 18, 7:00 p.m. “Abe: Abraham Lincoln in His Times” In Conversation with Historian H. W. Brands

VIRTUAL EVENT

Todd Doughty Thursday, October 21, 7:00 p.m. “Little Pieces of Hope: Happy-Making Things in a Difficult World”

Christopher Elliott is a consumer advocate, journalist and co-founder of the advocacy group Travelers United. Email him at chris@elliott.org.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

Sunday • 09.26.2021 • C

SALT DEBATE WILL REVEAL TRUE COLORS Lifting the cap on the state and local tax deduction would be expensive and would mostly benefit the rich daVId nICKLauS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If Congressional Democrats mean what they say about making wealthy Americans pay for $3.5 trillion worth of national priorities, they need to skip the SALT.

The acronym is Washington shorthand for the state and local tax deduction, which may become a key sticking point as Democrats work out details of their big spending and tax package. The deduction was capped at $10,000 as part of the Republican-led tax cut of 2017. Many Democrats vowed to remove that limit when they returned to power.

Repeal of the cap isn’t in the package put together by the House Ways and Means Committee, but several Democratic representatives have said they won’t vote for a bill that doesn’t include it. Given its narrow majority, the party needs their votes to pass the package using budget reconciliation rules. There are two big problems with SALT-cap repeal: It’s expensive, and almost all the

benefits would flow to the richest Americans. You know, the folks whom Democrats always criticize for not paying enough in taxes. Repeal would cost about $85 billion a year. That’s triple the combined cost of universal preschool and free community college, two of President Joe Biden’s priorities. Looked at another way, lifting the SALT cap would eat up four-

St. Louis startup finds niche as farm-to-door delivery booms

fifths of the annual revenue from Democrats’ two big soak-the rich proposals, raising the corporate tax rate to 28% and lifting the top individual income tax rate to 39.6%. “It’s a bad policy and certainly it’s an unwise use of scarce resources,” said Marc Goldwein, senior vice president at the Center for a Responsible Federal Please see NICKLAUS, Page C3

‘They need help’: Another activist investor joins siege of Goedeker’s BY AUSTIN HUGUELET

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLTER PETERSON PHOTOS, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Chelsea Pudlowski makes a delivery for Find Your Farmer in the Central West End on Wednesday. Find Your Farmer was started during the coronavirus pandemic shutdown to give customers access to multiple local farmers in a one-stop online shopping platform. BY COLLEEN SCHRAPPEN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — Helene Urvoaz Farrell grew up in France, where she could pop into a grocer or roadside market to grab local produce anytime. When she moved to St. Louis, she missed that. Then, about a year ago, she discovered Find Your Farmer, a pandemic-inspired online-ordering system that links farmers to consumers. “I don’t have to run around town to find cheese curds,” said Urvoaz Farrell, of the Central West End. Find Your Farmer and other made-to-order, fresh-fromthe-fields delivery services tap a customer base already at-

tuned to the environmental and economic impact of their purchases. Within the past decade, a burgeoning awareness of food sourcing and an increased priority on time-saving transformed how people buy groceries: Farmers markets multiplied. Subscription boxes boomed. And food-delivery apps like Instacart were downloaded by the millions. When the coronavirus rattled the food chain, cooking at home replaced eating out. But people didn’t want to navigate pickedover grocery shelves. Online Noah Offenkrantz, co-founder of Find Your Farmer, unpacks a box of food sales jumped 80% from gourds delivered by a partner at the Find Your Farmer office in the Hill 2019, according to data analyzer neighborhood on Wednesday. Find Your Farmer partners with small local farms to provide a variety of products to their customers, many Please see FARMER, Page C3 on a seasonal basis.

ST. CHARLES — Albert Fouerti might dread opening the mail these days. Two weeks ago, the new Goedeker’s CEO got a letter from his third-largest shareholder telling him more than half his board needs to go. He and the company fired back with a list of all the good things the appliance retailer is doing, called the complaint a “disturbing” distraction and recommended other shareholdMoore ers be “extremely leery” of it. But on Wednesday, Fouerti got another letter from another big investor, Cannell Capital, telling him the first guy was right. “Accordingly, CC neither consents, nor approves of GOED allocating any cash to defend its position,” said J. Carlo Cannell, whose firm owns about 5% of Goedeker’s and rights to nearly double that. Goedeker’s days as a momand-pop store with Sundays off are over. The past 14 months have seen it go public, pull off a $210 million merger, watch its stock price soar and then crash. Now, despite a new CEO and promises to change, the company finds itself in the crosshairs of activist investors, careening toward a Wall Street special: the proxy fight. Whoever wins the votes at the company’s annual shareholder meeting in November will control the board of directors, which oversees operations and hires, fires, advises and sets the salaries of executives. David Kanen, a former A.G. Edwards broker who owns 5.5% of the company, kicked things off Please see GOEDEKER, Page C6

Body composting a ‘green’ alternative to burial, cremation BY THOMAS PEIPERT

Associated Press

LAFAYETTE, Colo. — In a suburban Denver warehouse tucked between an auto repair shop and a computer recycling business, Seth Viddal is dealing with life and death. He and one of his employees have built a “vessel” they hope will usher in a more environmentally friendly era of mortuary science that includes the natural organic reduction of human remains, also known as body composting. “It’s a natural process where the body is returned to an elemental level over a short period of time,” said Viddal, who likened the practice to backyard composting of food scraps and yard waste. “This is the same process but done with

a human body inside of a vessel, and in our case, in a controlled environment.” On Sept. 7, Colorado became the second state after Washington to allow human body composting. Oregon will allow the practice beginning next July. In Washington, the three businesses licensed to compost human remains have transformed at least 85 bodies since the law took effect in May 2020, and more than 900 people have signed up for the service as natural funerals become more popular. Viddal, who co-owns The Natural Funeral in Lafayette, lobbied the Colorado Legislature for the option and started building a prototype vessel in an industrial area soon after the bipartisan bill was

signed into law. Based on a design being used in Washington, the insulated wooden box is about 7 feet long, 3 feet wide and 3 feet deep, lined with waterproof roofing material and packed with wood chips and straw. Two large spool wheels on either end allow it to be rolled across the floor, providing the oxygenation, agitation and absorption required for a body to compost. Viddal calls the process an “exciting ecological option,” and in death, he also sees life. “Composting itself is a very living function and it’s performed by living organisms. ... There are billions of microbial, living things in

THOMAS PEIPERT, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seth Viddal, who co-owns The Natural Funeral, stands behind a nearly Please see BODY, Page C6 completed human body composting vessel on Aug. 11 in Arvada, Colo.

BUSINESS

1 M

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

Sunday • 09.26.2021 • C

SALT DEBATE WILL REVEAL TRUE COLORS Lifting the cap on the state and local tax deduction would be expensive and would mostly benefit the rich daVId nICKLauS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If Congressional Democrats mean what they say about making wealthy Americans pay for $3.5 trillion worth of national priorities, they need to skip the SALT.

The acronym is Washington shorthand for the state and local tax deduction, which may become a key sticking point as Democrats work out details of their big spending and tax package. The deduction was capped at $10,000 as part of the Republican-led tax cut of 2017. Many Democrats vowed to remove that limit when they returned to power.

Repeal of the cap isn’t in the package put together by the House Ways and Means Committee, but several Democratic representatives have said they won’t vote for a bill that doesn’t include it. Given its narrow majority, the party needs their votes to pass the package using budget reconciliation rules. There are two big problems with SALT-cap repeal: It’s expensive, and almost all the

benefits would flow to the richest Americans. You know, the folks whom Democrats always criticize for not paying enough in taxes. Repeal would cost about $85 billion a year. That’s triple the combined cost of universal preschool and free community college, two of President Joe Biden’s priorities. Looked at another way, lifting the SALT cap would eat up four-

St. Louis startup finds niche as farm-to-door delivery booms

fifths of the annual revenue from Democrats’ two big soak-the rich proposals, raising the corporate tax rate to 28% and lifting the top individual income tax rate to 39.6%. “It’s a bad policy and certainly it’s an unwise use of scarce resources,” said Marc Goldwein, senior vice president at the Center for a Responsible Federal Please see NICKLAUS, Page C3

‘They need help’: Another activist investor joins siege of Goedeker’s BY AUSTIN HUGUELET

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

COLTER PETERSON PHOTOS, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Chelsea Pudlowski makes a delivery for Find Your Farmer in the Central West End on Wednesday. Find Your Farmer was started during the coronavirus pandemic shutdown to give customers access to multiple local farmers in a one-stop online shopping platform. BY COLLEEN SCHRAPPEN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — Helene Urvoaz Farrell grew up in France, where she could pop into a grocer or roadside market to grab local produce anytime. When she moved to St. Louis, she missed that. Then, about a year ago, she discovered Find Your Farmer, a pandemic-inspired online-ordering system that links farmers to consumers. “I don’t have to run around town to find cheese curds,” said Urvoaz Farrell, of the Central West End. Find Your Farmer and other made-to-order, fresh-fromthe-fields delivery services tap a customer base already at-

tuned to the environmental and economic impact of their purchases. Within the past decade, a burgeoning awareness of food sourcing and an increased priority on time-saving transformed how people buy groceries: Farmers markets multiplied. Subscription boxes boomed. And food-delivery apps like Instacart were downloaded by the millions. When the coronavirus rattled the food chain, cooking at home replaced eating out. But people didn’t want to navigate pickedover grocery shelves. Online Noah Offenkrantz, co-founder of Find Your Farmer, unpacks a box of food sales jumped 80% from gourds delivered by a partner at the Find Your Farmer office in the Hill 2019, according to data analyzer neighborhood on Wednesday. Find Your Farmer partners with small local farms to provide a variety of products to their customers, many Please see FARMER, Page C3 on a seasonal basis.

ST. CHARLES — Albert Fouerti might dread opening the mail these days. Two weeks ago, the new Goedeker’s CEO got a letter from his third-largest shareholder telling him more than half his board needs to go. He and the company fired back with a list of all the good things the appliance retailer is doing, called the complaint a “disturbing” distraction and recommended other shareholdMoore ers be “extremely leery” of it. But on Wednesday, Fouerti got another letter from another big investor, Cannell Capital, telling him the first guy was right. “Accordingly, CC neither consents, nor approves of GOED allocating any cash to defend its position,” said J. Carlo Cannell, whose firm owns about 5% of Goedeker’s and rights to nearly double that. Goedeker’s days as a momand-pop store with Sundays off are over. The past 14 months have seen it go public, pull off a $210 million merger and watch its stock price soar and then crash. Now, despite a new CEO and promises to change, the company finds itself in the crosshairs of activist investors, careening toward a Wall Street special: the proxy fight. Whoever wins the votes at the company’s annual shareholder meeting in November will control the board of directors, which oversees operations and hires, fires, advises and sets the salaries of executives. David Kanen, a former A.G. Edwards broker who owns 5.5% of the company, kicked things off Please see GOEDEKER, Page C6

Body composting a ‘green’ alternative to burial, cremation BY THOMAS PEIPERT

Associated Press

LAFAYETTE, Colo. — In a suburban Denver warehouse tucked between an auto repair shop and a computer recycling business, Seth Viddal is dealing with life and death. He and one of his employees have built a “vessel” they hope will usher in a more environmentally friendly era of mortuary science that includes the natural organic reduction of human remains, also known as body composting. “It’s a natural process where the body is returned to an elemental level over a short period of time,” said Viddal, who likened the practice to backyard composting of food scraps and yard waste. “This is the same process but done with

a human body inside of a vessel, and in our case, in a controlled environment.” On Sept. 7, Colorado became the second state after Washington to allow human body composting. Oregon will allow the practice beginning next July. In Washington, the three businesses licensed to compost human remains have transformed at least 85 bodies since the law took effect in May 2020, and more than 900 people have signed up for the service as natural funerals become more popular. Viddal, who co-owns The Natural Funeral in Lafayette, lobbied the Colorado Legislature for the option and started building a prototype vessel in an industrial area soon after the bipartisan bill was

signed into law. Based on a design being used in Washington, the insulated wooden box is about 7 feet long, 3 feet wide and 3 feet deep, lined with waterproof roofing material and packed with wood chips and straw. Two large spool wheels on either end allow it to be rolled across the floor, providing the oxygenation, agitation and absorption required for a body to compost. Viddal calls the process an “exciting ecological option,” and in death, he also sees life. “Composting itself is a very living function and it’s performed by living organisms. ... There are billions of microbial, living things in

THOMAS PEIPERT, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seth Viddal, who co-owns The Natural Funeral, stands behind a nearly Please see BODY, Page C6 completed human body composting vessel on Aug. 11 in Arvada, Colo.

BUSINESS

2 M

31,761 SF Creative Office Space Available for Lease in West County 15830 Fountain Plaza Dr, Ellisville MO 63011 For More Information: John Sheahan | 314-994-4176 jsheahan@naidesco.com Commercial Real Estate Brokerage & Management

www.naidesco.com


C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

BUSINESS

Book your fall vacation rental with points Avoid wrong Vacation home rentals are information popular among travelers, especially during pandemic from Social Security

BY ERIN HURD

NerdWallet

Even before the pandemic, home booking sites like Airbnb and Vrbo were becoming increasingly popular with travelers. The opportunity to have a homelike experience, complete with full kitchen, extra living space and local flavor, was more appealing than a standard hotel room for many. Arlyce Melheim from Stillwater, Minnesota, likes to book homes for family trips rather than run-of-the-mill hotel rooms. “I like vacation rentals that feel more homey and are often in a neighborhood rather than on hotel row,” she says. During COVID-19 times, home rentals became even more appealing. Travelers could enjoy a much-needed change of scenery but not be surrounded by other people in a crowded hotel. They could rent a home large enough to accommodate friends and family in their “bubble” and take part in a comfortable shared experience. The problem? For many savvy travelers who like to use rewards points to cover the cost of lodging, most of the big vacation rental companies don’t have loyalty programs. That means when you book a trip, you can’t earn points that can be redeemed toward the next one. You can’t sign up for a co-branded credit card and earn rewards for your next home rental stay, either. But booking a home with points isn’t impossible. And with fall around the corner, you might be looking to book a cozy getaway for a weekend of foliagegazing and apple-picking. Here are some options to use your rewards from credit cards or hotels to help pay for your next vacation rental.

Use cash rewards One simple option is to take rewards earned from a cash-back credit card and put that money toward your home rental. If you have good credit, there are a variety of credit cards available that offer as much as 5% cash back on certain purchases, often for no annual fee. And as Winnie Sun, financial adviser and managing director of Sun Group Wealth Partners, notes, “Even if it’s not a cash-back credit card, you can often redeem your points for cash.” Many credit card points that are typically redeemed for travel can also be turned into cash, though you may not get the best value. Plus, unlike some travel rewards, when you use cash, you won’t be bound by any blackout dates or fine-print restrictions.

‘Erase’ your charges Some travel credit cards offer the ability to book any travel you like and “erase” the purchase with a statement credit. Here’s how it works: Use the card to pay for your vacation home rental. Then, after the charge goes through, log in to your credit card account, select the purchase and redeem your rewards to cover the cost. In some cases, there may be a limit on how long the charge is eligible to be erased with statement credit. Make sure you know the terms before you plan on this option.

Use flexible points Large credit card issuers like Chase, American Express and Citi have their own rewards points that cardholders can earn and use in a variety of ways. While most options you’ll find when redeeming points for travel are traditional hotels, it’s possible to find vacation rental bookings, too. Melheim used Chase Ultimate Rewards points to book a vacation home rental for her family’s trip to Switzerland. The home was available to rent directly through several home rental sites, but when she also found it on the Chase travel portal, she jumped at the chance to redeem her points. “I knew Switzerland was an incredibly expensive country,” she says. “Saving the cash and booking with points instead was helpful because our on-theground costs like food and trains added up quickly.” Certain Chase cards give up to 50% more redemption value when you use points toward travel booked through the issuer’s portal.

Deciding when to take benefits can make a huge difference in how much money you’ll receive BY LIZ WESTON

NerdWallet

WILFREDO LEE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Visitors spend a chilly day at the beach as a sailboat passes by on Dec. 1 in Miami Beach, Fla. Vacation home rentals are increasingly popular among travelers, especially during the pandemic. One problem for many savvy travelers is that it’s hard to use rewards points to cover the rental cost, but it’s not impossible.

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The cost of mistakes A lot of money is potentially at stake. The difference between the best claiming strategies and the worst could add up to $100,000 over the lifetime of a single person and $250,000 for married couples, says William Meyer, CEO of Social Security Solutions, a claiming strategies website. Even seemingly small decisions can have outsize consequences. People who apply for benefits may be told they’re eligible for six months of back payments and that claiming the lump sum reduces their monthly benefits only slightly. Over time, though, that reduction adds up, especially when cost-ofliving increases are factored in. “The agents are saying, ‘Hey, your monthly income only goes down $50,’ or whatever it is,” Meyer says. “They don’t tell you, ‘Hey, over your lifetime, that could be a reduction of $20,000.’”

Education, not advice Social Security employees aren’t supposed to give advice, just education, Franklin says. But she and other financial planners can relate many stories of people being encouraged to sign up early when waiting was a better strategy, or receiving bad information such as being told they weren’t eligible for certain benefits or that they couldn’t take actions that were in fact allowed. William Reichenstein, Social Security Solutions’ head of research, was eligible for a since-discontinued strategy called a restricted application that allowed him to receive spousal benefits based on his wife’s earnings record while his own benefit was left to grow. The Social Security agent who processed the application ignored Reichenstein’s directive and signed him up for retirement benefits instead. Reichenstein was able to withdraw the incorrect application and get the spousal benefits, but mistakes are often irreversible. He advises applicants to be informed and to respond quickly if Social Security makes a mistake. “Find out what you’re eligible for and make sure you get that,” Reichenstein says.

Where to get info

Reexamine the big chains While traditional hotel settings are still the bread and butter for most hotel chains, home rental options are quietly cropping up. Marriott, for instance, has a Homes & Villas offshoot that allows you to redeem Marriott points for home bookings. Wyndham has a partnership with Vacasa, a large home rental platform. Sun points out that it’s also possible to find homelike accommodations at some hotel properties. “If you’re looking for more space than standard hotel rooms offer, consider using your points to book a suite. Or, some hotels have options like casitas that are more private.” Certain hotel chains have brands that are fully apartment-style and offer extra space MARKETS • WEEK IN REVIEW and amenities, too. Booking a homelike accommodation through a hotel program can be smart, Dow Jones as there may be more flexible cancellation options. With many home booking platforms, +213.12 the host can choose a cancellation policy 34,798.00 that may not be fully refundable. Sun advises, “No matter what you book, make sure you read the cancellation policy SOURCE: Associated Press carefully.”

Few retirement decisions are as critical, or as easy to get wrong, as when and how to take your Social Security benefits. The rules can be so convoluted that many people rely on what they’re told by Social Security employees, but that could prove to be an expensive mistake. Certified financial planner Kate Gregory of Huntington Beach, California, uses sophisticated Social Security claiming software to recommend strategies that maximize clients’ lifetime benefits. Gregory advised one of her clients, a widow, to apply for her own small retirement benefit first so that her survivor benefit could grow, then switch to the larger benefit later. When the woman contacted Social Security, however, she was told she could get the survivor benefit only. “That left her really flustered,” Gregory says. The widow eventually was able to get the benefits she’s entitled to in the correct order, but Gregory and other financial planners worry about people who don’t get professional advice and who could be led astray. “Most people are going to say, ‘Well, that’s what the government told me,’ and let it drop. And that’s unfortunate,” says CFP Mary Beth Franklin, author of “Maximizing Social Security Retirement Benefits” and a contributing editor for Investment News.

The Bottom Line EMPTY TOWER: After another potential buyer decides not to purchase downtown’s AT&T tower, David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher discuss what might happen to the vacant property. It’s likely to remain empty for a long time, they conclude. Check it out at stltoday.com/ multimedia

Nasdaq

S&P 500

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MARKET WATCH: Page C4

People can educate themselves by visiting Social Security’s recently redesigned site and learning how the various benefits work, Franklin says. AARP has a free Social Security claiming calculator that allows people to model different strategies. Or you can spend $20 to $40 and up to use paid software, such as Social Security Solutions or Maximize My Social Security, that allows you to model more complicated situations, including those involving a minor child or a pension from a job that didn’t pay into Social Security. Consulting a financial planner who uses similar software also can be a smart move. Franklin urges people to learn as much as they can before approaching Social Security, then keep a record of all interactions with the agency, including the names of representatives and their direct phone numbers, in case they need to appeal or correct a decision. “I’m not here to bash Social Security representatives because most of them work very, very hard,” Franklin says. “But the rules are so complex.” Liz Weston is a certified financial planner and author of “Your Credit Score.”


BUSINESS

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

Farmer From C1

eMarketer. “The pandemic made a future reality come faster,” said Nick Carter, who founded the Indianapolis-based order-anddelivery service Market Wagon in 2015. Pre-pandemic, Market Wagon had six Midwestern hubs. In 18 months, it added two dozen more, including one in Maryland Heights. Food producers list their available products on the Market Wagon website, customers place their orders, and the crops are picked and sent to a warehouse. There, they are sorted and delivered within 24 hours by a fleet of the company’s drivers. Similar services in other cities — like Fresh Harvest in Atlanta and Good Eggs in the Bay Area — have been operating for the past 10 years. In its early days, Find Your Farmer planned a different approach. When the world ground to a halt in March 2020, Noah Offenkrantz was in the middle of his final semester at Washington University. Restaurants had shut down, and many of the small farms that supplied them — suddenly at loose ends — were testing out home delivery. Offenkrantz and four of his classmates decided to curate an online list to help consumers see what was available. But that became unwieldy: separate ordering, separate shipping and a variety of delivery days. Find Your Farmer pivoted last summer, combining the trend toward seasonal, regional eating with the convenience of one-click shopping and home delivery. They rented a space on the Hill for aggregating and packaging, and set up a schedule: Customers order by Monday, food comes in Tuesday and is sent out Wednesday. It seems straightforward, but even in the few days between order and delivery, problems crop up. A heat wave wilts all the red romaine lettuce. Shishito peppers drown in heavy rain. Corn comes in early. Or late. “We really didn’t understand how big of an undertaking it really was,” Offenkrantz said.

‘A lucky bounce’ Find Your Farmer turned to Preston Walker, owner of wholesaler Eat Here St. Louis, for advice and connections. Walker sources produce for restaurants from more than a hundred small farmers and has witnessed the evolution of the local-food movement. Eat Here St. Louis

COLTER PETERSON PHOTOS, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Noah Offenkrantz, co-founder of Find Your Farmer, unpacks a delivery of produce at the Find Your Farmer office in the Hill neighborhood on Tuesday. The day before deliveries go out, Offenkrantz and co-founder Spencer Stewart, not pictured, prep all of their products for the week to make packing each client’s order easier.

Locally sourced popcorn is one of the many products offered by Find Your Farmer. But selling their organic crops through an online platform was new for the urban farmers. At first, purchases trickled in. “It was a couple of these, a dozen of those,” said Forbes. Noah Offenkrantz, co-founder of Find Your Farmer, helps Jeff Bearden, “Then the orders got big.” left, with Farmstead Foods, unload a delivery of produce and other goods Leafy greens and tomatoes, at the Find Your Farmer office in the Hill neighborhood on Tuesday. especially, proved popular. The sales helped cover Good Life’s started in 2008, when “farm- its products; it also has direct re- payroll while they waited for to-table” had not yet become a lationships with about 30 farm- restaurants to recover. restaurant buzzword. ers. They dictate the price of their “Now, the number of restau- goods, and Find Your Farmer adds ‘Our North Star’ rants that are sourcing locally is a transaction fee to each order. Kayla Wisdom of Spring astronomical,” Walker said. The extra business provided Creek Farms in Salem, MisThe concept has migrated to a lift for farmers and food hubs souri, partnered with Find Your household eating. A quarter cen- after the pandemic decimated in- Farmer this summer. Since the tury ago, there were 200 farmers door dining. Eat Here lost 90% pandemic started, she and her markets in the United States. To- of its restaurant orders in spring husband have seen an increase in day, there are more than 8,600, 2020. So did Good Life Grow- demand for their beef, chicken according to the U.S. Department ing, an organic farm based in the and pork. of Agriculture. Vandeventer neighborhood of St. But their costs have spiked, too. Animal feed and processLarge grocers, like Schnucks Louis. and Dierbergs, trumpet the prodGood Life CEO James Forbes ing prices “shot way through ucts they stock from local growers counts the partnership with Find the roof,” Wisdom said. and artisans. Small shops, such as Your Farmer as “a lucky bounce Most of Spring Creek’s directCity Greens and Local Harvest, that came our way during CO- to-consumer sales had been at build their identity around their VID.” Tower Grove Farmers’ Market, a geographical exclusivity. Since opening in 2014, Good two-and-a-half hour drive for Hubs like Eat Here provide Find Life has expanded to six sites, the couple and their four young Your Farmer with the majority of including one in East St. Louis. children. Find Your Farmer has

Nicklaus

Why, then, are some Democrats pushing so hard for this? The proponents From C1 come from high-tax states such as New Jersey, New Budget. A lot of middleYork and California, and class taxpayers used to deduct their state and local presumably have contaxes but most now use the stituents who would benefit standard deduction, which from the change. Even in the highest-tax the 2017 tax law raised to states, though, the SALT $24,000. “Some advocates deduction mainly benefits of SALT cap repeal don’t understand this or are being the very rich. The cap only willfully misleading,” Gold- affects the wealthiest 5% of taxpayers in New Jersey, wein said. Ritz said. SALT now is entirely House Democrats may an issue for the well-off. eventually forge a SALT More than half the benefit compromise, such as raisof repealing the cap would ing the cap to $15,000. That go to the top 1%, and the wealthiest one-fifth of tax- would limit the cost, but would still be hard to reconpayers would reap 96% of the savings. “That’s going to cile with the party’s goal of be the challenge,” said Gar- making the tax code more rett Watson, a senior policy progressive. “It really is antithetical to analyst at the conservativeleaning Tax Foundation. “It everything the Democrats have been saying they supis undercutting the ability port,” Goldwein said. to make the tax code more If they really want to Build progressive.” America Better, as they say “It would be a huge tax in the title of their $3.5 trilcut for rich people in a lion package, Democratic package that is ostensibly supposed to be raising taxes leaders should just say no to their colleagues who insist on the rich,” echoed Ben on passing the SALT. Ritz, director of the Progressive Policy Institute’s David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 Center for Funding Ameri- @dnickbiz on Twitter ca’s Future. dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

From David Nicklaus’ blog about St. Louis business: stltoday.com/ moundcitymoney

Capital Innovators returns to in-person accelerator with 6 investments: Capital Innovators, an accelerator fund based in St. Louis, announced six new investments Thursday that highlight its global reach. Three of the six companies are based outside the United States. Capital Innovators will invest $50,000 in each firm and puts the founders through a 12-week program of mentoring and business development. The last two such programs have been onlineonly, but Capital Innovators said this fall’s accelerator would be a hybrid, with founders coming to St. Louis for some inperson sessions. The six companies have developed technologies ranging from computer graphics to plant-based butter. They are: • Libere of Guadalajara, Mexico, a logistics

platform for food service companies. • Repod of San Diego, a social podcasting app that lets content creators engage with their listeners. • TalentSensus of Belfast, Northern Ireland, a maker of talent management software that tries to remove unconscious bias from personnel decisions. • Tourlami, a New York company that has developed a plant-based butter. • Verb, a New York firm that uses artificial intelligence and automated messaging to help gyms and fitness brands communicate with their customers. • Visore Lab, a Parisbased creative agency that develops special-effects and 3D content. Capital Innovators, which just marked the 10th anniversary of its first investments, has invested more than $19 million in 170 firms that have created 2,649 jobs and raised $411 million of additional capital. It’s often ranked among the nation’s top-perform-

Sparrow Growth Fund Gerald Sparrow, MBA

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Gerry is frequently quoted by CNBC, MarketWatch, Barron’s, TheStreet and more.

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Average Average Annual Annual

Total Returns

YTD YTD

32.01% 1.79% 60.09%

yr 11 yr

29.10% 83.07% 53.30% 29.10%

29.10% 83.07% 53.30%

yr 33 yr

28.09% 29.90% 28.09% 31.76%

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yr 55 yr

15.52% 28.84% 15.52% 22.97%

105.68% 254.97% 181.16% 105.68%

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16.41% 17.34% 17.52% 16.41%

356.92% 402.28% 394.90% 356.92%

www.sparrowcapital.com The fund’s fund’s investment investmentobjectives, objectives,risks, risks,charges chargesand andexpenses expensesmust must The be considered considered carefully carefullybefore beforeinvesting. investing.The Theprospectus prospectuscontains contains be thisand andother otherimportant importantinformation information about investment company, this about thethe investment company, maybe beobtained obtainedby bycalling calling888-727-3301 888-727-3301 visiting and ititmay or or visiting www. www.sparrowcapital.com. it carefully before investing. sparrowcapital.com. Read itRead carefully before investing.

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allowed them to expand their customer reach without eating up an entire day. Lindsay Michalski of St. Louis tried Find Your Farmer after hearing about it from a colleague. She likes to buy local, but farmers markets overwhelm her. “You never know what you’re going to find when you get there,” Michalski said. And Community Supported Agriculture subscriptions — when she received a share of crops every week — proved too wasteful. “This is a nice balance,” she said. “I can get what I need from them and fill in the gaps at the grocery store.” In the past year, Find Your Farmer has built its customer base to about 90 orders a week. Offenkrantz and one other employee are now full-time. But to remain sustainable, Offenkrantz said, they would need about double those orders. “We’re still figuring out how to reach more people,” he said. The instability of the pandemic, which helped the business pick up steam, also keeps it off balance. It’s hard to predict peaks and valleys or know whether they are outside of Find Your Farmer’s control. “We’re trying not to focus on week-to-week fluctuations,” said Offenkrantz. “Our desire for a more ethical grocery delivery service is our North Star.”

Annual Expense Expense ratio 1.60% Ratio: 1.57% Inception 11/9/2000 Performance data quoted quoted reprepresents past past performance; performance;past past performance does not guarantee guarantee futurere sults.The Theinvestment investment future results. return and and principal principalvalue valueofof an investment investment will willfluctuate fluctuatesoso that an investor’s shares, when thatan redeemed, maybe may beworth worthmore more or redeemed, lessless than theirtheir original cost.cost. Curor than original rent performance of the may Current performance of fund the fund be lowerlower or higher thanthan the permaybe or higher the formance quoted. Performance performance quoted. Performance data current data current to tothe themost mostrecent recent month end month end may may be be obtained obtained by by calling 888-727-3301 calling 888-727-3301ororvisiting visiting www.sparrowcapital.com. www.sparrowcapital.com.

Important Risk Information Risks Risksassociated associatedwith withinvesting investingininthe theSparrow SparrowGrowth GrowthFund Fundare: are:Market MarketRisk, Risk,Company Company Risk, Growth Style Investing Risk, Value Style Investing Risk, Management Risk, Mid Cap Risk, Growth Style Investing Risk, Value Style Investing Risk, Management Risk, Mid Cap Risk, Small Cap Risk, Fixed Income Risk, Foreign and Emerging Market Securities Risk, Risk, Small Fixed Income Risk, Foreign and Emerging Market Securities Risk, Sector Risk, Cap ETF Risk, Risk, and Other Investment Company Portfolio Turnover Risk. Sector Risk, ETF Risk, and Other Investment Company Portfolio Turnover Risk. Rafferty Capital Markets, LLC, Distributor. Rafferty Capital Markets, LLC, Distributor.

ing accelerator programs. Nerdy is the St. Louis area’s newest public comSt. Louis health-care pany. startup wins funding from Its shares began trading Google: Provider Pool, Tuesday on the New York a St. Louis health-care Stock Exchange, and by staffing firm, has won a day’s end were up 3.2% at grant from Google’s Black $11.56. Founders Fund. Chuck Cohn, the onProvider Pool, founded line learning company’s in 2019 by former nurse founder and chief exadministrator Janna West- ecutive, rang the stock brook, is among 50 recipi- exchange’s opening bell, ents announced Tuesday accompanied by Nerdy board members and emby Google. Each will get a grant ployees. of up to $100,000 along In a telephone interwith up to $120,000 of view, he called the merger free Google search ads and that took Nerdy public “a up to $100,000 in Google transformational financing Cloud credits. opportunity.” Google launched the “Our mission stays the fund last year, contribut- same, to transform how ing $5 million to 76 Black- people learn,” Cohn said. led startups, and added $5 “We’ll now have more remillion this year. sources to go after that big “There could not be opportunity.” a more opportune time Nerdy went public by than now to connect with merging with a specialGoogle while solving the purpose acquisition comhealth care worker short- pany, TPG Pace Tech Opage,” Westbrook said in a portunities, in a transacstatement. tion that raised $750 mil“This support will help lion of new capital and valus amplify the voices ued Nerdy at $1.7 billion. of those serving on the “It’s an important frontlines while building milestone,” Cohn said of bell-ringing tools to ignite the potential Tuesday’s of the future health care ceremony. “An incredible workforce.” amount of time and enShe launched Provider ergy and sacrifice went Pool as a software platform into building this comto help health-care pro- pany.” viders fill staffing needs. Nerdy said in its secEarlier this year, she ond-quarter earnings added a program to help report that Varsity Tunon-degree health-care tors, its online tutoring professionals, such as platform, had grown to nurse assistants and tech- 54,000 active users, and nicians, obtain nursing Cohn said the back-toschool season had been degrees. Provider Pool won a strong. $50,000 Arch Grant in “We’ve seen demand 2019 and received a fol- for tutoring come roarlow-on growth grant of ing back as each different $100,000 this spring from wave of schools comes the Arch Grants organiza- back into session,” he said. tion. He added that more than Westbrook also par- 17 school districts have ticipated in the TechStars signed up for Varsity TuKansas City accelerator tors’ new school-based program last year. tutoring product, which is designed to reverse learnNerdy starts trading on ing loss caused by the CONYSE: Clayton-based VID-19 pandemic.


MARKET WATCH

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM/BUSINESS .com 15 BEST LARGE-CAP STOCKS W

M Acceleron Pharma Uber Technologies SoFi Technologies Brooks Automation Vail Resorts Expedia Inc CF Industries Snap Inc A Devon Energy Opendoor Technol Imperial Oil Ltd Lucid Group Inc Penske Auto Grp ConocoPhillips Cenovus Energy

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167.65 46.63 17.64 108.74 351.85 171.99 54.84 83.11 33.09 20.35 30.07 25.43 107.02 65.02 9.57

15 BEST MID-CAP STOCKS W

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30.05 6.88 2.55 14.60 43.35 19.71 5.74 8.35 3.30 2.02 2.95 2.47 10.31 6.10 0.90

21.8 17.3 16.9 15.5 14.1 12.9 11.7 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.9 10.8 10.7 10.4 10.4

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Dynavax Technologies Meredith Corp Pain Therapeutics Boston Omaha Corp Li-Cycle Holdings Herc Holdings Inc QuantumScape Crop InMode Ltd Enovix Corp Stitch Fix Inc Atea Pharmaceuticals Dutch Bros Inc Angi Inc Cl A AvisBudget Group PBF Energy Inc

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10 WORST LARGE-CAP STOCKS W

M Altice USA Inc Thoughtworks Hldg DraftKings Inc Braskem SA ADR First Solar Inc Americold Realty Tr Exact Sciences Corp FedEx Corp Deckers Outdoor Peloton Interactive

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10 WORST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

10 WORST MID-CAP STOCKS

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15 BEST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

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7.04 -14.93 -68.0 -68.0 | 0.0 7.20 -6.80 -48.6 -52.8 | 0.0 22.86 -13.62 -37.3 -34.1 | 0.0 26.15 -13.55 -34.1 -39.7 | 0.0 15.43 -7.48 -32.6 -46.4 |8321 10.4 1.31 -0.52 -28.4 -12.7 |9998765 77.6 20.62 -7.46 -26.6 -21.9 |9999953 108.7 5.56 -1.96 -26.1 -7.9 | 0.0 15.72 -5.28 -25.1 -5.1 | 0.0 20.70 -6.69 -24.4 -37.5 | 0.0

6.33 6.55 17.00 25.23 8.90 .60 4.58 5.65 13.95 16.32

Note: Stocks classified by market capitalization, the product of the current stock price and total shares outstanding. Ranges are $100 million to $1 billion (small); $1 billion to $8 billion (mid); greater than $8 billion (large).

S&P 500

W M

HOW TO READ THE TAB E D m w w N D

M

P

m w

m

w

m M D m

OOTNOTE

m

P

w

m %

w

m w w

m

m

m

m

w W w W

N w

m m

w

m m

w

w

U

m m

D

D

D

w

w

m

m

m

m

m %

m

W

W

M

W

W

W

AES Corp AFLAC AT&T Inc AbbottLab AbbVie Abiomed Accenture ActivsBliz AdobeInc AdvAuto AMD Agilent AirProd AkamaiT AlaskaAir Albemarle AlexREE AlignTech Allegion AlliantEg s Allstate Alphabet C Alphabet A Altria Amazon Amcor Ameren AmAirlines AEP AmExp AmIntlGrp AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen Amphenl s AnalogDev Ansys Anthem Aon plc APA Corp Apple Inc s ApldMatl Aptiv ArchDan AristaNetw Assurant ATMOS Autodesk AutoData AutoZone AvalonBay AveryD BakHugh BallCorp BkofAm BkNYMel Baxter BectDck

W

M

.60 ... 29.07 17.42 23.44 -1.16 1.32 6 57.64 33.37 52.63 -1.36 2.08 ... 33.88 26.35 27.13 -.40 1.80 35 129.70 100.34 124.37 -2.42 5.20 37 121.53 79.11 107.07 -.66 cc 387.40 242.73 350.36 -4.64 3.88f 36 345.52 210.42 339.23 +3.83 .47f 25 104.53 71.19 75.26 -4.30 54 673.88 420.78 622.71 -31.77 4.00 30 217.69 142.46 215.66 +9.86 37 122.49 72.50 105.80 +1.92 .78 54 179.57 95.44 172.40 -1.54 6.00 31 327.89 245.75 259.56 -2.27 31 124.91 92.64 110.13 +.64 ... 74.25 34.83 60.79 +3.87 1.56 68 253.10 79.06 226.40 -.45 4.48f 29 209.76 150.08 195.39 +1.52 cc 737.45 297.44 725.24 +5.86 1.28f ... 148.70 94.01 137.34 -1.10 1.61 23 62.35 45.99 57.11 -.72 3.24f 11 140.00 86.51 130.50 -.53 38 2936.41 1406.55 2852.66 +23.39 86 2925.08 1402.15 2844.30 +28.30 3.60f 20 52.59 35.83 48.46 -.15 65 3773.08 2871.00 3425.52 -37.00 .46 20 12.92 10.26 11.79 -.06 2.20 23 90.77 69.79 83.57 -.03 .40 ... 26.09 10.63 21.39 +1.66 2.96 17 94.21 74.80 82.05 -2.05 1.72 20 179.67 89.11 175.72 +11.80 1.28 11 55.79 25.57 54.81 +1.00 5.24f 57 303.72 197.50 282.18 -11.57 2.41 45 189.35 131.01 176.79 -1.25 4.52 31 277.95 141.82 271.40 +1.85 1.76 ... 128.87 92.00 122.30 -1.17 .80 34 140.10 94.90 129.61 -.53 7.04 18 276.69 210.28 213.61 -5.77 34 77.25 50.85 77.49 +1.92 2.76 39 177.79 110.66 178.53 +7.01 69 413.19 292.79 361.55 -3.08 4.52 21 406.00 244.10 381.33 +1.81 2.04 33 302.33 179.52 299.17 +9.94 .25f cc 21.89 7.45 17.22 .88 40 157.26 103.10 146.92 +.86 .96 25 146.00 54.15 141.92 +1.12 .22 23 170.47 82.12 151.03 +4.60 1.48 15 69.30 44.58 59.76 -2.63 21 384.00 192.96 360.15 +1.02 2.52 21 172.22 116.40 161.16 -.28 2.30 16 104.99 84.59 88.22 -.87 50 344.39 215.83 294.67 +6.52 3.72f 33 217.15 127.31 202.22 +3.55 19 1704.02 1085.85 1694.83+101.95 6.36 29 233.48 131.38 226.41 +6.52 2.72f 25 228.88 115.77 216.94 +2.26 .72 ... 26.57 12.13 24.22 +.28 .80f 35 102.76 77.95 92.30 -.06 .84 18 43.49 22.95 42.14 +1.64 1.36f 13 56.64 32.65 51.55 +.40 1.12 37 88.32 73.12 80.85 -2.76 3.16 40 267.37 219.50 253.18 -8.77

-4.7 -2.5 -1.5 -1.9 -.6 -1.3 +1.1 -5.4 -4.9 +4.8 +1.8 -.9 -.9 +.6 +6.8 -.2 +.8 +.8 -.8 -1.2 -.4 +.8 +1.0 -.3 -1.1 -.5

Berkley BerkH B BestBuy BioRadA BioTechne Biogen BlackRock Boeing BookingHl BorgWarn BostProp BostonSci BrMySq BroadcInc BroadrdgF BrownFB CBOE Glb CBRE Grp CDW Corp CF Inds CH Robins CME Grp CMS Eng CSX s CVS Health CabotO&G Cadence CaesarsEnt CampSp CapOne CardnlHlth CarMax Carnival CarrGlb Catalent Caterpillar Celanese Centene CenterPnt Cerner ChRvLab ChartCm Chevron Chipotle ChubbLtd ChurchDwt Cigna CinnFin Cintas Cisco Citigroup CitizFincl CitrixSy Clorox CocaCola CognizTch ColgPalm Comcast Comerica ConAgra ConocoPhil

+8.4 -2.4 +7.2 +1.9 -3.9 -.7 +.7 -.9 -.4 -2.6 +2.5 +4.1 -.8 +.5 +3.4 +.6 +.8 +3.1 -4.2 +.3 -.2 -1.0 +2.3 +1.8 +6.4 +3.0 +1.1 +1.2 -.1 +4.0 +.8 -3.3 -3.3

W

W

.52f 15 82.43 58.84 73.31 +1.12 +1.6 38 295.08 197.81 277.87 +1.11 +.4 2.80 12 128.58 95.93 104.74 -4.88 -4.5 6 832.70 490.73 802.96 +14.61 +1.9 1.28 cc 543.85 228.67 538.88 +4.53 +.8 12 468.55 223.25 291.71 -8.48 -2.8 16.52 25 959.89 531.39 874.62 -2.01 -.2 ... 278.57 141.58 221.39 +8.03 +3.8 cc 2516.00 1589.00 2491.35+165.98 +7.1 1.36 22 55.55 34.30 43.83 +.91 +2.1 3.92 58 124.24 69.69 112.77 +2.78 +2.5 cc 46.29 32.99 44.70 +.33 +.7 1.96 ... 69.75 56.75 60.23 -1.08 -1.8 14.40 47 510.70 343.48 504.92 +2.52 +.5 2.56f 36 177.16 126.77 169.01 +2.45 +1.5 .72 37 82.24 67.74 68.64 -.89 -1.3 1.92f 28 139.00 77.63 125.84 +2.23 +1.8 39 99.73 43.17 96.52 +.74 +.8 1.60 33 203.82 105.87 193.06 +1.92 +1.0 1.20 29 57.19 25.30 54.84 +5.74 +11.7 2.04 62 106.75 84.67 88.51 +1.07 +1.2 3.60 37 221.82 146.89 198.01 +9.36 +5.0 1.74 19 67.98 53.19 60.76 -.90 -1.5 21 52.44 29.49 30.42 +.11 +.4 2.00 15 90.61 55.36 84.71 -.80 -.9 .44 30 20.33 14.28 20.34 +.93 +4.8 78 168.61 97.45 163.55 -.08 ... 114.60 43.07 112.35 +6.28 +5.9 1.48 16 53.77 40.05 42.43 -.76 -1.8 2.40f 7 177.95 66.46 166.17 +6.60 +4.1 1.96 13 62.96 44.65 51.19 -1.38 -2.6 32 144.84 84.70 144.42 +4.13 +2.9 ... 31.52 12.11 25.44 +1.89 +8.0 .08p ... 58.89 28.79 53.12 -1.88 -3.4 cc 142.64 79.65 141.34 +5.19 +3.8 4.44f 25 246.69 142.73 196.82 -2.93 -1.5 2.72 7 171.00 103.30 152.85 +3.94 +2.6 51 75.59 53.60 62.82 -1.82 -2.8 .64 19 27.20 18.60 25.41 +.98 +4.0 .88 29 84.20 66.75 72.98 -1.84 -2.5 62 458.27 205.97 458.30 +17.85 +4.1 42 825.62 572.46 739.17 -24.31 -3.2 5.36f 54 113.11 65.16 100.60 +3.84 +4.0 ... 1958.55 1172.29 1937.22 +28.20 +1.5 3.12e 10 187.90 111.93 176.75 -3.80 -2.1 1.01 26 96.31 77.62 82.98 -.61 -.7 4.00 9 272.81 158.84 203.89 -1.73 -.8 2.52 6 125.67 69.92 116.62 +.17 +.1 3.80 44 409.80 307.65 401.47 +8.61 +2.2 1.45 23 60.27 35.28 56.73 -.12 -.2 2.04 10 80.29 40.49 71.18 +1.22 +1.7 1.56 13 51.14 23.46 45.32 +1.64 +3.8 1.48 34 146.94 94.66 110.19 -1.38 -1.2 4.64 23 231.11 159.32 164.56 -1.53 -.9 1.68 29 57.56 47.30 53.89 -.55 -1.0 .96 23 82.73 65.58 77.62 +2.14 +2.8 1.80 24 86.41 74.14 76.63 +.40 +.5 1.00 27 61.80 40.97 56.24 -.87 -1.5 2.72 10 79.86 35.76 78.44 +4.37 +5.9 1.25f 14 39.09 32.25 33.35 -.12 -.4 1.84f cc 64.12 27.53 65.02 +6.10 +10.4

Mutual funds HOW TO READ THE TAB E w

m

m

G GR G HM H H H B W

m

R M

m M

U U V m A D

mm

fi

D D D D D D D D D D

D m H W P

m m

O

M

O

R

w

mm

% UND OB ECT VE A % AM M BB mm B BM M A % m D D m H m m m R M m V DP D B m M M D

m

m V MA MB M MG M M M N M M N MQ M MR M M M N MU M MV M ND N M N N N P R D RR B m mm

M

M

N W V UB U VD V VO W W XM XO XQ XR O X XP m

w

G O P

m m

K

B

m

A B

G H

% w m

D

% D W M

D

m m D m

m

m M m

M G Q R V X G NAME

%

X OOTNOTE

m w m m

M M

m

G m H H M M N N P

w m

FRI NAV

m w

+21.0 +21.0

+24.5 +23.7 LG +10.3 +12.9 LV

2 2

+16.1

+14.8 +14.6 LV

3

+21.8 +21.6

+21.8 +22.6 LG +21.5 +22.2 LG

5 5

+20.4 +12.9 +10.8 +19.8 +19.7

+23.1 +22.4 +14.1 +22.4 +26.5

+22.9 +19.7 +13.1 +22.2 +26.3

LG MG FG LG LG

3 3 3 3 1

+19.4 +11.0 +7.6 +15.3 -.8 +11.3 +9.7 -3.4 +8.0 +16.6 +7.6 +16.1 +5.1 +11.5 -.5 +18.0 +8.0 +14.9 +15.9 +12.4 +1.7 +17.7

+16.3 +11.0 +7.0 +10.5 +6.5 +12.4 +7.8 +4.9 +14.3 +14.3 +9.3 +20.4 +6.4 +9.1 +4.3 +13.8 +16.4 +20.0 +20.4 +18.1 +5.0 +12.8

+17.6 +11.0 +6.7 +11.8 +3.6 +12.3 +6.8 +2.5 +12.4 +15.6 +7.8 +20.8 +4.7 +8.8 +2.3 +14.3 +13.7 +18.8 +18.5 +19.3 +3.2 +14.5

LG MA HY LV CI WB IH IB FG LB IH LG HM AL CS LB EM WG SW WG MI LB

3 4 1 5 2 4 3 3 2 4 4 2 3 5 4 4 1 2 2 3 2 5

+3.8 +10.4 +14.1 +3.9 -.9 -.5 -.7 +.1 -.4 +17.3 +30.2 +16.8 +16.6 +6.6 +6.4 +5.3 +5.3 +8.6 +.4 +18.6 +1.9 +1.5 +4.8 +11.5 -.1

+2.3

+3.5 MU

+17.4 +14.9 FR +10.5 +10.0 FB +23.6 +23.5 SG +6.2 +6.4 +5.1 +3.3

+3.5 +3.9 +2.9 +2.3

CI PI CI CS

3 4 3 3

+12.4 +9.9 EM +21.3 +21.8 MG -8.0 +10.4 +10.1 +11.9 +11.5 +6.8 +7.0 +14.0 +3.0 +25.3 +4.9 +5.3 +4.0 +35.1 +6.5

-1.0 +12.8 +12.5 +9.8 +9.4 +6.7 +6.9 +15.6 +2.3 +26.1 +3.3 +4.4 +3.4 +35.0 +3.8

w

M

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR

AB LgCpGrAdv 100.10 -.14 ReltvValA m 6.92 +.04 AMG YacktmanI 24.69 +.33 Akre FocInstl d 67.05 +.42 FocRetail m 65.07 +.40 American Century GrInv 55.99 +.13 HeritageA m 25.47 +.17 IntlGrA m 17.07 +.01 SelA m 117.15 +.43 UltraInv 90.88 +.45 American Funds AMCpA m 45.04 +.23 AmrcnBalA m 33.04 -.04 AmrcnHiIncA m 10.58 -.02 AmrcnMutA m 50.82 +.23 BdfAmrcA m 13.52 -.06 CptWldGrIncA m 65.35 +.05 CptlIncBldrA m 67.90 +.06 CptlWldBdA m 20.46 -.12 EuroPacGrA m 71.85 -.02 FdmtlInvsA m 77.91 +.04 GlbBalA x 39.77 -.18 GrfAmrcA m 78.44 +.16 HiIncMuniBdA m17.07 -.03 IncAmrcA m 25.76 +.05 IntrmBdfAmrA m13.82 -.03 InvCAmrcA m 51.48 +.13 NewWldA m 95.02 -.29 NwPrspctvA m 69.52 +.23 SmCpWldA m 92.21 -.36 TheNewEcoA m 66.86 +.08 TxExBdA m 13.66 -.03 WAMtInvsA m 56.66 +.22 Angel Oak MltStratIncIns 10.38 -.02 Artisan IntlSmMdInv 22.29 +.06 IntlValueInstl 45.47 +.39 SmCpInvs 52.54 -.34 Baird AggrgateBdInstl x11.50 -.06 CorPlusBdInstl x 11.88 -.06 IntermBdInstl x 11.47 -.05 ShrtTrmBdInstl x 9.85 -.02 Baron EmMktsInstl 18.86 -.10 GrInstl 128.55 +2.42 BlackRock AlCpEngyRsInvA m8.46 +.39 EqDivInstl 22.55 +.26 EqDivInvA m 22.45 +.26 GlbAllcIncInstl 21.85 GlbAllcIncInvA m21.66 HYBdInstl 7.92 -.02 HYBdK 7.93 -.02 HthSciOpIns 81.96 -.53 LowDurBdInstl 9.72 -.01 MidCpGrEqInstl 50.40 +.47 NtnlMnInstl 11.43 -.02 StrIncOpIns 10.35 -.02 StratMuOpIns 11.94 -.02 TechOppsInstl 70.13 +.59 TtlRetInstl 12.02 -.05

NA

w

EE LV LV IH IH HY HY SH CS MG MI NT MI ST PI

5 3 3 2 2 4 2 1 1 2 1 2

NAME

FRI NAV

CGM Rlty 28.55 Calamos MktNetrlIncIns 14.35 Causeway IntlValInstl 17.70 ClearBridge AggresivGrA m 191.35 ApprecA m 33.62 LgCpGrI 79.39 Cohen & Steers InstlRltys 54.25 PrfrdScInc,IncI 14.53 Rltys 76.51 Columbia DivIncIns 29.89 IntDivIncA m 20.95 SelM/CValA m 13.55 SlgCmsInfoA m 130.38 DELAWARE IvyGlbGrA m 62.04 IvySci&TecA m 102.79 DFA EMktCorEqI 25.58 EmMktsInstl 33.57 EmMktsValInstl 32.05 FvYrGlbFIIns 10.90 GlbEqInstl 32.08 GlbRlEsttSec 12.92 InflProtSecIns 13.47 IntlCorEqIns 16.42 IntlRlEsttScIns 5.01 IntlSmCoInstl 23.45 IntlSmCpValIns 22.14 IntlValInstl 19.39 ItmGovtFIIns 12.95 LgCpIntlInstl 27.73 OneYearFIInstl 10.30 RlEsttSecInstl 46.95 ShTrmExQtyI 11.01 TMdUSMktwdVl 38.26 TwYrGlbFIIns 9.95 USCorEq1Instl 35.30 USCorEqIIInstl 32.27 USLgCo 33.50 USLgCpValInstl 45.02 USMicroCpInstl 28.50 USSmCpInstl 47.12 USSmCpValInstl 44.68 USTrgtedValIns 30.47 Davis NYVentureA m 32.95 Delaware Inv ValInstl 24.39 Diamond Hill LgCpI 35.94 Dodge & Cox Bal 116.03 GlbStk 15.72 Inc 14.38 IntlStk 47.86 Stk 240.39 DoubleLine CorFII 11.13 LowDurBdI 9.96 TtlRetBdI 10.54

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR +.02 +17.5

+2.6

+6.3 LB

5

+.01 +3.7

+4.7

+4.7 RV

3

+5.4

+.27 +9.0

+7.4 FV

1

-.31 +9.0 +.12 +16.5 +.51 +17.0

+10.5 +11.3 LB +15.6 +15.8 LB +20.8 +20.8 LG

5 5 5

-.66 +26.3 -.04 +4.1 -.94 +26.4

+15.5 +8.1 +15.4

+9.8 SR +6.2 RR +9.6 SR

3 3 3

+13.2 +14.4 LV +7.9 +8.0 FV +11.8 +11.6 MV +32.6 +28.8 ST

5 4 3 1

-.01 -.19 +.15 +1.08

+17.2 +8.5 +18.8 +25.0

+.58 +14.2 +.49 +15.1

+13.5 +14.4 WG 4 +24.4 +24.6 ST 4

-.14 -.24 -.13 -.03 +.12 -.14 -.09 -.03 -.06 -.08 -.06 +.07 -.08 -.03

+9.6 +8.7 +5.9 +2.3 +12.6 +10.6 +7.9 +8.0 +5.7 +9.2 +4.8 +3.7 +5.5 +8.5 +1.3 +13.5 +2.6 +9.2 +1.6 +15.0 +14.4 +17.2 +8.3 +8.4 +9.8 +7.5 +9.0

+6.1 +3.5 +12.3 +.1 +17.6 +20.2 +3.6 +14.0 +10.4 +16.0 +16.1 +16.6 -2.6 +12.3

-.49 +25.8 -.02 +.1 +.23 +19.5 +.1 +.23 +19.7 +.23 +20.4 +.17 +19.8 +.25 +20.9 +.39 +25.0 +.61 +23.2 +.76 +30.3 +.47 +30.0 +.27 +14.3 +.04 +13.3 -.02 +17.6 +.49 +.01 -.05 -.10 +2.41

+16.4 +18.2 -.2 +9.5 +26.5

-.04 +.4 -.01 +1.0 -.02 +.5

+8.9 +8.8 +7.9 +1.5 +13.7 +6.8 +4.5 +9.5 +4.1 +10.2 +7.2 +7.7 +2.4 +9.6 +1.2 +8.3 +1.8 +12.2 +1.3 +16.5 +15.8 +17.7 +11.7 +12.4 +12.5 +10.8 +11.7

EM EM EM WH WB GR IP FB GR FQ FA FV GI FB UB SR CS LV WH LB LB LB LV SB SB SV SV

+11.0 +13.5 LB +6.4

1 2 1 4 1 2 3 1 4 2 3 1 5 2 5 3 4 2 4 1 1 3 1 1 2 2 2 2

+9.4 LV

5

+13.2 +14.4 LV

3

+11.1 +11.6 MA 1 +10.4 +11.9 WV 1 +6.4 +4.3 PI 2 +6.1 +7.3 FV 1 +13.3 +15.7 LV 1 +4.9 +2.7 +4.1

+3.2 PI +2.4 UB +2.8 PI

1 4

W

W

W

W

HCA Hldg HP Inc Hallibrtn Hanesbds HartfdFn Hasbro HlthpeakPr HSchein Hershey Hess HP Ent Hilton Hologic HomeDp HonwllIntl Hormel HostHotls HowmetAer Humana HuntJB HuntBncsh HuntgtnIng IdexxLab IHS Mark IPG Photon IQVIA Hldg IDEX ITW Illumina Incyte IngerRand Intel IntcntlExc IBM IntFlav IntPap Interpublic Intuit IntSurg Invesco IronMtn JPMorgCh JackHenry JacobsEng JohnJn JohnContl JnprNtwk KLA Cp KC Southn Kellogg Keycorp Keysight KimbClk Kimco KindMorg KraftHnz Kroger L3Harris LKQ Corp LabCp LamResrch LambWst LVSands LeggPlat LeidosHld LennarA LincNat Linde LiveNatn LockhdM Loews Lowes LumenTch LyonBas A M&T Bk MGM Rsts MSCI Inc MarathnO MarathPt MktAxess MarIntA MarshM MartMM Masco MasterCrd McCorm s McDnlds McKesson Medtrnic Merck MetLife MettlerT Microchp MicronT Microsoft MidAApt

W NAM NA H Eaton Vance AtlntCptSMIDCI 43.07 +.49 FltngRtInstl 8.85 Edgewood GrInstl 66.19 +.36 FPA Crescent d 40.33 +.42 NewInc 10.02 USVal 16.25 +.01 Federated InsHYBdIns 10.03 -.03 KaufmannR b 7.79 -.05 TtlRetBdInstl 11.39 -.04 UltraShrtBdIns 9.22 Fidelity 500IdxInsPrm 155.07 +.80 AsstMgr50% 22.47 -.01 BCGrowth 182.32 +1.41 BCGrowth 16.79 +.13 BCGrowthK 182.91 +1.41 Balanced 31.99 +.09 BalancedK 32.00 +.10 Cap&Inc 11.44 -.02 ChinaRegion 49.62 -.84 CmdtyStrat 4.08 +.07 Contrafund 19.66 -.02 ContrafundK 19.71 -.02 ConvertibleSecs 43.78 +.26 CptlApprec 49.36 +.06 DivGro 34.88 +.16 DiversIntl 53.77 -.19 EmergMketsOpps24.63 -.27 EmergingAsia 65.21 -.66 EqIncome 71.92 +.52 ExMktIdxInPr 90.58 +.43 Fidelity 74.61 +.29 FltngRtHiInc 9.48 FourinOneIdx 62.59 +.12 Frdm 2020 17.66 -.03 Frdm 2025 16.18 -.02 Frdm 2030 20.35 -.02 Frdm 2035 17.84 Frdm 2040 12.81 +.01 Frdm 2045 14.67 +.01 Frdm 2050 14.79 +.01 GlbexUSIdxInsPr 15.72 -.07 GlobalexUSIdx 15.47 -.06 GrDiscv 55.89 -.04 GroCo 39.65 +.01 GroCo 27.66 +.01 GroCoK 39.77 +.01 Growth&Inc 50.46 +.59 IntlCptlApprec 30.80 -.06 IntlGr 20.60 -.01 IntlIdxInstlPrm 50.63 -.12 IntlVal 11.45 +.03 InvmGradeBd 11.74 -.05 InvmGradeBd 8.44 -.03 LargeCapValIdx 15.66 +.11 LgCpValEnhIdx 17.03 +.12 LowPrStk 53.46 +.06 Magellan 14.88 +.07 MidCapStock 41.85 +.53 NasdCmpIdx 189.68 +.08 NewMktsInc 14.65 -.18 OTCPortfolio 19.75 +.10 OTCPortfolioK 20.14 +.10 Overseas 69.79 -.50 Puritan 29.55 +.18 PuritanK 29.53 +.19 RealEstInv 48.92 -.62 SCValue 21.28 +.32 SmCpOpps 14.48 +.18 StkSelorAllCp 67.37 +.32 TotalBond 11.17 -.05 TtlMktIdxInsPrm128.03 +.65 USBdIdxInsPrm 12.13 -.05 Value 15.17 +.15 Worldwide 40.14 +.13 Fidelity Advisor GrowthOppsI 181.94 +.55 NewInsA m 42.95 NewInsC m 34.96 NewInsI 44.38 StgInc 12.99 -.05 StgIncC m 12.77 -.05 TotalBondI 11.15 -.05 Fidelity Select Biotechnology 22.88 -.59 ConsumerStaples 97.16 -.65 Energy 32.63 +1.60 HealthCare 34.03 -.44 MedTech&Devcs 88.41 +.09 NaturalRes 26.19 +.82 Semicon 20.45 +.28 Swre&ITSvcs 31.93 +.34 Technology 29.59 +.26 First Eagle GlbA m 67.47 +.26 Franklin Templeton CATxFrIncA1 m 7.77 -.03 DynaTechA m 167.28 +.30 DynaTechR6 175.81 +.33 FdrTFIncA1 m 12.33 -.03 Gr,IncA m 25.12 +.27 GrA m 159.13 +.78 IncA1 m 2.49 IncAdv 2.47 +.01 IncC m 2.53 MsrTxFrIncA1 m 11.95 -.02 MutBeaconA m 18.53 +.06 MutBeaconC m 18.51 +.06 MutBeaconZ 18.76 +.06 MutEuropeanC m21.67 +.04 MutGlbDiscvA m 32.62 +.20 RisingDivsA m 94.19 +.38 UtlsA1 m 20.58 -.22 Gabelli SmCpGrAAA m 50.39 +.50 Goldman Sachs SmCpValA m 60.30 +.79 Guggenheim MgdFutsStratP b18.78 +.06

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LV EM MA WG IH SP HM FG LB

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LG LG FB LV LV

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5 5 5

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HM HM MI MS

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5

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4 4 4 4 4

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W M

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TV HY WH MU MU MU MU TW TW CS NT IP UB PI PI

3 3 1 1 2 1

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Moderna Mohawk MolsCoorB Mondelez MonPwSys MonstrBv Moodys MorgStan Mosaic MotrlaSolu NOV Inc NRG Egy NVR NXP Semi Nasdaq NetApp Netflix NewellBr NewmntCp NewsCpA NewsCpB NextEraEn NiSource Nielsen plc NikeB NorflkSo NorTrst NorthropG NortonLife NorwCruis Nucor Nvidia s OReillyAu OcciPet OldDomFrt Omnicom ONEOK Oracle Organon n OtisWrlW PNC PPG PPL Corp PTC Inc PVH Corp Paccar PackAmer ParkerHan Paychex PaycomSft PayPal PnnNtGm Pentair PeopUtdF PepsiCo PerkElm Perrigo Pfizer PhilipMor Phillips66 PinWst PioNtrl Pool Corp PriceTR PrinFncl ProLogis ProctGam ProgsvCp Prudentl PSEG PubStrg PulteGrp Qorvo Qualcom QuantaSvc QstDiag RLauren RJames s RaythTch RltyInco RgcyCtrs Regenrn RegionsFn RepubSvc ResMed RobtHalf RockwlAut Rollins s Roper RossStrs RylCarb S&P Glbl SBA Com SVB FnGp Salesforce Schlmbrg

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... 497.49 63.64 430.14 +.09 4 231.80 90.98 184.39 +2.57 +1.4 1.36 ... 61.48 32.11 46.51 +.71 +1.6 1.40f 23 65.60 52.51 60.36 -.58 -1.0 2.40 cc 521.67 247.87 517.92 +20.40 +4.1 35 99.89 75.45 92.74 -1.90 -2.0 2.48 34 388.81 253.17 376.27 +6.27 +1.7 2.80f 13 105.81 45.86 102.91 +1.16 +1.1 .30 13 38.23 16.01 35.86 +2.25 +6.7 2.84 42 246.97 149.81 240.77 +3.35 +1.4 ... 18.02 7.70 12.96 -.43 -3.2 1.30 34 46.10 28.22 42.96 +.88 +2.1 17 5332.08 3823.31 4952.96-117.78 -2.3 2.25 ... 228.72 117.25 216.67 +7.34 +3.5 2.16 47 199.88 118.01 196.78 +3.88 +2.0 2.00 29 93.68 40.46 93.64 +3.63 +4.0 cc 615.60 463.41 592.39 +3.04 +.5 .92 14 30.10 16.56 23.67 -1.14 -4.6 2.20 15 75.31 53.52 53.87 -1.35 -2.4 .20 ... 27.97 12.79 24.37 +2.02 +9.0 .20 ... 26.21 12.68 24.14 +2.41 +11.1 1.54 50 87.69 66.79 80.70 -.94 -1.2 .88 44 26.60 21.09 24.01 -.02 -.1 .24 dd 28.42 13.13 19.72 -.27 -1.4 1.10 39 174.38 111.74 149.59 -6.83 -4.4 4.36f 23 295.14 196.15 245.07 -.97 -.4 2.80 19 123.10 74.03 109.33 +1.13 +1.0 6.28 13 379.03 282.88 355.70 +5.46 +1.6 .50 ... 28.92 17.98 25.82 +.13 +.5 ... 34.49 14.15 28.10 +2.51 +9.8 1.62 10 128.81 44.05 100.92 -3.97 -3.8 79 230.43 115.67 220.81 +1.81 +.8 23 629.40 424.03 625.54 +26.20 +4.4 .04 ... 33.50 8.52 28.10 +1.16 +4.3 .80 54 304.22 176.34 302.97 +13.32 +4.6 2.80 17 86.38 44.50 74.73 +2.34 +3.2 3.74 42 57.67 23.28 57.47 +2.30 +4.2 1.28 93 91.78 55.14 89.94 +3.55 +4.1 .28p 5 36.49 27.25 33.69 -.34 -1.0 .96 ... 92.84 58.67 84.86 -.16 -.2 5.00f 10 203.88 101.58 194.50 +5.58 +3.0 2.36f 30 182.97 116.95 148.58 +1.84 +1.3 1.66 ... 30.81 25.47 28.42 -.26 -.9 61 153.73 79.36 123.52 +.38 +.3 .15 cc 121.94 57.35 110.48 +.50 +.5 1.36 20 103.19 78.72 80.53 -1.02 -1.3 4.00 21 156.54 102.76 141.87 +.85 +.6 4.12 24 324.68 192.25 287.84 +.21 +.1 2.64 38 118.22 75.08 109.98 +1.20 +1.1 cc 513.07 265.00 515.48 +33.11 +6.9 cc 310.16 174.08 278.11 +1.77 +.6 cc 142.00 52.09 75.72 +1.13 +1.5 .80 27 80.40 44.07 77.23 +1.01 +1.3 .73 13 19.62 9.74 16.73 +.71 +4.4 4.30 29 159.63 128.32 154.20 +.07 .28 17 192.00 114.75 182.88 -4.68 -2.5 .96 ... 49.91 38.20 43.00 -.94 -2.1 1.56 19 51.86 33.36 43.94 +.05 +.1 5.00f 18 106.51 68.93 101.82 -.04 3.60 ... 94.34 43.27 68.04 +2.02 +3.1 3.32 15 91.88 69.29 72.55 -1.27 -1.7 3.02f ... 175.37 76.58 162.03 +4.98 +3.2 3.20 83 500.85 294.56 465.49 +1.45 +.3 4.32 18 224.56 121.58 211.22 -2.29 -1.1 2.52f 11 68.40 37.03 64.45 -.71 -1.1 2.52 70 139.60 93.08 127.90 -2.21 -1.7 3.48f 26 147.23 121.54 143.55 -.79 -.5 .40e 8 107.59 84.89 91.56 -1.05 -1.1 4.60 15 109.17 60.16 103.75 +.61 +.6 2.04 16 65.33 50.32 60.70 -1.21 -2.0 8.00 45 332.95 212.22 303.88 -7.16 -2.3 .56 8 63.91 39.92 47.49 -1.15 -2.4 cc 201.68 123.08 174.05 -1.25 -.7 2.72 19 167.94 108.30 133.88 +.28 +.2 .24 34 119.70 48.53 117.29 -1.13 -1.0 2.48 9 160.56 108.28 153.09 -1.68 -1.1 2.75 ... 142.06 65.20 116.47 +4.12 +3.7 1.04 17 95.43 45.11 93.13 +3.99 +4.5 2.04 60 89.98 51.92 87.16 +3.77 +4.5 2.83f 69 72.75 57.00 66.46 -1.22 -1.8 2.38 78 69.60 33.29 68.30 -.01 21 686.62 441.00 638.90 -12.98 -2.0 .68f 8 23.81 10.60 20.65 +.82 +4.1 1.84f 36 126.25 86.18 124.81 +1.37 +1.1 1.68f 60 301.34 165.72 279.48 -6.47 -2.3 1.52 27 104.73 48.29 103.16 +2.10 +2.1 4.28 23 327.20 206.57 302.57 -8.98 -2.9 .32 55 43.00 31.44 37.49 +.35 +.9 2.25 46 499.21 362.90 466.00 -.65 -.1 1.14 31 134.22 84.68 115.99 +1.37 +1.2 2.80 ... 99.24 51.33 90.69 +6.90 +8.2 3.08 47 456.63 303.50 453.08 +6.66 +1.5 2.32 cc 369.56 232.88 344.93 -7.77 -2.2 48 643.17 221.55 649.96 +39.55 +6.5 60 279.39 201.51 285.63 +25.10 +9.6 .50 40 36.87 13.70 29.01 +.70 +2.5

W NAM NA H Gr 50.09 +.47 Stk 42.64 +.55 Parnassus CorEqInv 64.37 +.16 Performance StrBd 23.03 -.07 Pioneer Am 41.34 +.39 CorEqA m 26.66 +.23 Putnam DiversIncA m 6.45 +.01 GrOppsA m 61.66 +.12 IncA m 6.94 -.02 LrgCpValA m 31.37 +.29 SustLeadersA m134.53 -.05 Royce SmlrCoGrSvc m 12.52 +.25 SpecEqInvm d 20.66 +.25 Schwab FdmtlUSLgCIdx 22.51 +.18 HC 30.41 -.09 IntlIdx 24.42 -.04 SP500Idx 68.82 +.36 Schwab1000Idx 99.37 +.49 SmCpIdx 39.08 +.20 TtlStkMktIdx 79.08 +.40 Segall Bryant & Hami PlusBdRtl 11.05 -.05 State Farm Gr 115.95 -.13 T. Rowe Price All-Cap Opps 80.78 +.60 BCGr 196.79 +.63 Comm&TeInv 211.77 +.52 CptlAprc 38.98 +.15 DivGr 69.98 +.45 EMBd 11.27 -.15 EmergEurope 18.28 -.07 EqIdx500 118.02 +.61 EqInc 36.92 +.31 FinclSvcs 35.32 +.48 GlbTech 33.44 -.01 GrStk 116.41 +.44 HlthSci 113.78 -1.42 InsLgCpCorGr 77.59 +.25 InsMdCpEqGr 82.93 +.39 InsSmCpStk 35.35 +.33 IntlDiscv 102.02 -.88 LatinAmerica 21.91 -.13 LrgCpGrI 74.50 +.32 MdCpGr 129.04 +.60 MdCpVal 34.59 +.34 NewHorizons 98.10 +.62 OverseasStk 13.41 QMUSSmCpGrEq 52.86 +.52 RlEstt 20.41 +.01 Rtr2020 24.84 +.01 Rtr2025 21.38 +.02 Rtr2030 31.83 +.06 Rtr2035 24.06 +.07 Rtr2040 34.83 +.12 Rtr2045 24.20 +.09 Rtr2050 20.50 +.08 SciandTech 61.85 -.41 SmCpVal 63.70 +.98 TFInc 10.50 -.02 Val 50.82 +.42 TCW TtlRetBdI 10.19 -.05 TIAA-CREF BdIdxIns 11.29 -.05 EqIdxIns 33.02 +.16 IntlEqIdxIns 23.53 -.04 Lfcycl2040I 12.88 +.03 LgCpGrIdxIns 59.01 +.18 LgCpValIdxIns 24.18 +.16 SP500IdxI 49.40 +.26 SclChEqI 29.43 +.19 Thornburg LtdTrmIncI 13.85 -.03 Thrivent LgCpStkA m 31.98 +.22 MidCpStkA m 34.72 +.42 MnBdA m 11.63 -.02 Torray Torray 55.49 +.37 Tweedy, Browne GlbVal 30.50 -.03 USAA Gr 39.66 +.25 Inc 13.70 -.07 PrcMtlsMnral 17.17 -.51 SP500IdxRwd 60.86 +.14 VALIC Co I StkIdx 56.00 +.28 Vanguard 500IdxAdmrl 412.53 +2.12 BalIdxAdmrl 48.35 -.09 BalIdxIns 48.35 -.10 CAITTxExAdm 12.27 -.02 CptlOppAdmrl 213.30 +.88 DevMIdxAdmrl 16.69 -.03 DevMIdxIns 16.71 -.03 DivGrInv 37.78 +.15 EMStkIdxInAdm 41.88 -.37 EMStkIdxIns 31.85 -.28 EqIncAdmrl 91.52 +.52 EqIncInv 43.67 +.24 ExplorerAdmrl 138.82 +.93 ExtMktIdxAdmrl142.73 +.48 ExtMktIdxIns 142.72 +.47 ExtMktIdxInsPls352.21 +1.16 FAWexUSIAdmr 38.74 -.13 FAWexUSIIns 122.80 -.43 FSocialIdxIns 31.42 +.11 GNMAAdmrl 10.62 -.03 GNMAInv 10.62 -.03 GlbEqInv 42.96 +.07 GrIdxAdmrl 156.49 +.52 GrIdxIns 156.50 +.52 GrandIncAdmrl 111.76 +.41 HCAdmrl 100.13 -.07

+18.1 +21.3

N N O +11.8 +17.0 LG 1 +13.1 +15.7 LB 1

+20.2

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+1.8

4

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1

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4 3

-3.1 +17.9 -2.7 +20.2 +19.6

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3 5 5 3 3

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1 5

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-.2

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LV SH FB LB LB SB LB

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-.7

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+5.5 +17.2 +8.5 +12.2 +24.1 +10.5 +17.2 +17.6

-.3 +17.3 +21.4 +1.7

+4.7

W M

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LG LG SC MA LB EB MQ LB LV SF ST LG SH LG MG SG FR LS LG MG MV MG FB SG SR TE TG TH TI TJ TK TN ST SB ML LV

4

1 5 3 1 4 1 2 3 1 2 2 2 1 4 4 2 3 2 1 4 5 2 2 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 3 1

+3.1 PI +2.9 +17.6 +9.3 +13.1 +23.9 +11.4 +17.7 +17.7

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+15.9 +.9 -18.1 +19.5

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5 1 4 2

+19.6

+16.9 +17.3 LB

3

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3 3 3 4 1 2 2 5 4 4 4 4 2 1 1 1 4 4 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 5

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LB MA MA MF LG FB FB LB EM EM LV LV SG MG MG MG FB FB LB GI GI WB LG LG LB SH

3

W

W

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Schwab .72 29 76.37 33.96 75.59 +5.16 +7.3 SealAir .80 18 62.04 36.27 57.30 +1.03 +1.8 SempraEn 4.40 10 144.93 112.33 129.77 -2.51 -1.9 ServcNow cc 681.10 446.20 666.31 +15.28 +2.3 Shrwin s 2.20 37 310.43 218.06 291.80 -1.94 -.7 SimonProp 6.00f 38 137.38 59.35 133.85 +2.58 +2.0 SkywksSol 2.24f 29 204.00 131.44 172.65 -2.61 -1.5 SmithAO 1.04 24 73.81 51.04 64.06 -1.22 -1.9 Smucker 3.96f 15 140.65 108.10 119.11 -3.89 -3.2 SnapOn 4.92 15 259.99 138.94 214.59 +.99 +.5 SouthnCo 2.64 21 67.54 52.01 63.16 -.98 -1.5 SwstAirl .72 ... 64.75 35.82 52.85 +3.77 +7.7 StanBlkDk 3.16f 17 225.00 152.19 185.36 -.88 -.5 Starbucks 1.80 cc 126.32 81.75 114.11 +.70 +.6 StateStr 2.28f 14 94.64 56.63 85.74 +.92 +1.1 Steris plc 1.72f 48 226.00 164.19 220.21 +5.12 +2.4 Stryker 2.52 51 281.16 196.09 276.64 +3.61 +1.3 Synchrony .88 22 52.14 24.20 50.23 +1.79 +3.7 Synopsys 70 340.66 193.55 321.94 -3.60 -1.1 Sysco 1.88 ... 86.73 53.85 80.48 +4.39 +5.8 T-MobileUS 49 150.20 107.56 129.43 +1.43 +1.1 TE Connect 2.00 28 153.54 90.88 144.05 +2.22 +1.6 TJX 1.04 35 76.16 50.06 71.10 +.69 +1.0 TakeTwo 35 214.91 144.58 147.36 -4.30 -2.8 Tapestry 1.00m 13 49.67 15.23 39.46 -.94 -2.3 Target 3.60 28 267.06 146.45 241.44 -5.23 -2.1 Teledyne 45 465.40 301.76 433.49 +10.34 +2.4 Teleflex 1.36 52 449.38 312.33 388.09 +2.52 +.7 Teradyn .40 23 147.90 74.50 119.33 -2.02 -1.7 Tesla Inc cc 900.40 351.30 774.39 +14.90 +2.0 TexInst 4.60 28 199.10 134.12 200.65 +4.40 +2.2 Textron .08 23 74.80 31.82 71.08 +2.62 +3.8 ThermoFis 1.04 28 614.13 412.80 609.78 +12.98 +2.2 3M Co 5.92 18 208.95 156.13 181.04 -.45 -.2 TractSupp 2.08 57 213.68 127.78 210.72 +3.56 +1.7 TraneTch 2.36 33 207.06 117.13 183.24 -.56 -.3 TransDigm 24.00 cc 688.03 453.76 644.42 +34.48 +5.7 Travelers 3.52 14 163.29 105.67 156.46 +.17 +.1 Trimble 43 96.49 46.78 87.70 -2.89 -3.2 TruistFn 1.92f ... 62.69 34.86 58.00 +2.67 +4.8 Twitter ... 80.75 38.93 67.22 +4.75 +7.6 TylerTech cc 498.98 324.67 482.51 +14.95 +3.2 Tyson 1.78 13 82.45 55.82 76.22 +.41 +.5 UDR 1.45 cc 56.31 29.34 53.55 +.37 +.7 UltaBeauty 45 414.98 200.50 382.13 +3.08 +.8 UndrArm 83 26.45 10.51 21.50 +.43 +2.0 UnAr C wi 72 22.16 9.21 18.68 +.26 +1.4 UnionPac 4.28 23 231.26 171.50 203.80 +2.33 +1.2 UtdAirlHl ... 63.70 31.22 48.79 +4.25 +9.5 UPS B 4.08 27 219.59 154.76 188.02 -2.01 -1.1 UtdRentals 26 364.30 159.01 356.51 +15.05 +4.4 US Bancrp 1.84f 16 62.47 34.17 59.79 +2.78 +4.9 UtdhlthGp 5.80f 23 431.36 289.64 407.08 -13.08 -3.1 UnivHlthS .80 11 165.00 99.47 144.76 -1.16 -.8 UnumGrp 1.20f 6 31.98 15.79 24.34 +.07 +.3 VF Corp 1.96e 26 90.79 65.34 67.96 -1.59 -2.3 ValeroE 3.92 ... 84.95 35.44 67.63 +2.03 +3.1 Ventas 1.80 ... 61.09 37.83 55.38 -1.72 -3.0 Verisign 48 234.56 184.60 217.77 -1.00 -.5 Verisk 1.16 48 210.66 159.79 207.97 +6.87 +3.4 VerizonCm 2.56f 11 61.95 53.83 54.37 +.09 +.2 VertxPh 18 280.99 182.60 183.61 -4.69 -2.5 ViacmCBSB .96 ... 101.97 26.99 39.99 Viatris n .44p ... 18.86 12.97 13.38 -.19 -1.4 Visa 1.28 47 252.67 179.23 231.59 +9.84 +4.4 Vornado 2.12 ... 50.91 29.79 44.10 +2.82 +6.8 VulcanM 1.48 35 194.17 124.58 176.06 +6.18 +3.6 WEC Engy 2.71 2 W W M W W M W W W w W m W W W W W Wm W wW W m m mm

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3


SEPTEMBER.26.2021 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C5

JOBS Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Adobe Experience Manager (AEM) Engineers in St. Louis, MO to create sw apps and utilize AEM widgets & comp., troubleshoot perf or onnectivity issues, and other customizations to author UI envrt. Req deg in any field + exp. Send resumes to Sigma-Aldrich Corp., 400 Summit Dr., Burlington, MA 01803 (Attn: Req# 228728)

Agile Product Management Sr Advisor/Mgr - (Express Scripts Services Co., St. Louis, MO): Ovrse wrtg & modfng cmplx tech fnctnl reqs for pharm procssng prodct; collab w /Agile tms to bld & mnge new feats & capabs while dlvring desird biz impct & prvdng thot ldrship to prog govrnce acts; ~25% dom trvl req. May wrk rmtly. Req BS or frgn equiv in Comp/Electrcl/Electrnc Engg, or rel'd & 5 yrs exp in rel'd occu. Reqs incl exp defng biz archt & detld biz reqs; mdlng biz procs; anlyzng biz procs to drv imprvmnt

& dsgning sol'ns to add biz needs; bldng biz autom & integ pltfrms; w/ CI/CD; defng integ archt frmwrk & ensuring adh; crtng case dsgn, logic & mock UIs; & using: Pega Pltfrm, SW AG Universal Messaging & Integ Srvr, Jenkins, & API Mgmt prods. Drug scrn/BGC req. CV: Sumana_Gopalakrishna@ express-scripts.com

Application Development Manager (Accenture LLP; St. Louis, MO): Manage project execution to ensure adherence to budget, schedule, and scope. Must have willingness and ability to travel domestically approximately 50% of the time to meet client needs. Multiple Positions Available. For complete job description, list of requirements, and to apply, go to: www.accentur e.com/us-en/careers (Job# R00045474). Equal Opportunity Employer – Minorities/Women/Vets /Disabled.

Employment Opportunity O’Fallon Fire Protection District The O’Fallon Fire Protection District is currently seeking qualified applicants to establish a hiring pool for the position of Firefighter/EMT-P. Application packets may be picked up at the O’Fallon Fire Protection District Administration Office located at 111 Laura K Drive, O’Fallon, MO 63366 beginning September 27, 2021 through October 1, 2021 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. CST, and must be returned to the Administration Office beginning October 4, 2021 through October 8, 2021 between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. CST. Packets may also be accessed from our website: ofallonfire.org by clicking on the link located on the first page; the hiring packet may be downloaded and printed. Your completed packet may be returned in person or returned via US Mail or other carrier. The O’Fallon Fire Protection District is not responsible for any correspondence or mail that is lost or misdirected, or received after October 8, 2021, 2:00p.m. CST.

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Help Wanted Asbestos Removal Technician (Wentzville, Mo) 3 open pos. Identify, remove, pack & dispose of hazardous materials, incl asbestos. Build containment areas prior to beginning abatement or decontamination work. Remove asbestos or lead from surfaces using hand or power tools such as scrapers, vacuums or highpressure sprayers. Prep hazardous material for removal or storage. Comply w/prescribed safety procedures or federal laws regulating waste disposal methods. Reqmts are: 3 months of exp in job offered or asbestos removal, construction or closely related position. Must be able to lift/carry 75 pounds. Must have annual Asbestos Contractor /Supvr Refresher certificate, Mo. Asbestos Abatement Supvr license & OSHA 10hr construction certificate. Daily travel reqd to various job sites in St. Charles & St. Louis counties in Mo, as well as to St. Clair County in IL. Employer will provide free round-trip transport to cleint’s sites & back from the employer’s main address. Employer will provide for free any reqd tools or eqpmt. Mail resume to Crossroad Construction Services, Inc. (dba: Crossroad Construction), Attn. Jeremy Rodriguez, President, 1736 Flint Hill Park Ln, Wentzville, Mo. 63385.

Charter Communications, Inc. in Maryland Heights, MO seeks Sr. SW Dvlpr to dvelp, test, & implmnt new code & scrpts prior to prodctin dploymnt & implmnt into prodctin & provd supprttheraftr. Req Bach deg, or forgn equiv in IT, CS, MIS, or rel + 5 yrs exp: anlyzng & rslvng DB servr issues; dvlpng &

TO PLACE AN AD, CALL 314-621-6666

Help Wanted spprtngUNIX & LINUX scrpts; & communctng issues & reslutins to IT & Bsnss Teams. 4 yrs exp dvlpng & spprtng Oracle PL SQL code. 3 yrs exp dvlpng & spprtng Atunity Rplcaton Jbs for rplcatng near real time frm one DB to anthr. Apply at www.charter.com, ref code 289585BR.--

Clinical Research Associates — 1 Position Clinical Data Manager. Design and develop the following key indicator reports to measure business performance for operational and management purposes: Productivity, Accounts Receivable, Payer Mix Analysis. Audit progress notes and claims to validate if correct coding initiatives are being followed. Research and suggest Medicare Merit-based Incentive Program (MIPS) measures, specific to practice specialty for earning positive payment adjustment in the coming years. Review Medicare's National and Local Coverage Determinations (NCDs & LCDs) policies and educate support staff and providers about them. Regularly attend webinars for compliance and continuing education on industry topics. Support Revenue Cycle Management as needed. Requirements: Master's Degree Required; Skills for effective project management. Resumes should be emailed to cpoupard@longtermpsych.com

Contract Specialist. Bachelor’s in Legal Studies. Resume: ITF LLC dba ITF GROUP LLC., 11990 Missouri Bottom Rd., Hazelwood, MO 63042

WAREHOUSE WORKER Work ASAP in Edwardsville, IL

EARN UP TO $18.50 PER HOUR!! Fast Packaging of products! Good Attention to detail • Fast Paced Environment Lift up to 25 pounds SIGN ON AND REFERRAL BONUS AVAILABLE All shifts available, Start Today! Apply in person: - or - Elite Staffing Elite Staffing 3701B Nameoki, Granite City, IL

7120 Page Avenue, St Louis, MO

618-876-3924

314-714-6410

The O’Fallon Fire Protection District is an Equal Opportunity Employer

TSI Holding Company Title: Warehouse Operator Department Name: Operations Reports to: Plant Foreman/Manager Position Summary • Unload, move and store a variety of materials, parts and/or products

Experienced Machinists Mechanical Dynamics & Analysis Ltd. (MD&A), the largest independent turbine repair organization in the U.S., is seeking skilled candidates for the position of Machinist/Field Machinist associated with our St. Louis Repairs Division facility. Our position can require extensive travel during peak periods in the Spring & Fall. We are seeking qualified candidates for: Machinist/Field Machinist requiring at least 3 years’ experience in the set up and operation of Bridgeport type mills, Engine lathes, VTL, Horizontal bar mills, XY mills, drills, boring bars, turning devices, grinders, stationary journal equipment etc. MD&A is looking for individuals with a strong work ethic, mechanical aptitude, willingness to learn and support a team atmosphere. On the job training will be part of the work experience to expand your knowledge as an employee. MD&A offers competitive wages and an excellent full range of benefits package including medical, dental, vision, life & disability insurance and a very competitive 401K savings plan. Email resume and salary requirements to dcasey@mdaturbines.com or fax to D. Casey @ 314-667-0765.

Licensed Practical Nurse Full time position available at the St. Louis City Family Court Juvenile Division Includes full benefit package, plus no cost retirement plan. Detailed info at www.stlcitycircuitcourt.com

click employment opportunities. PRN LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE positions also available. EOE

Essential Responsibilities • Unload incoming materials, check identification, report shortages or damaged materials, move to storage area • Move materials between departments, following routing, delivery tickets, or orders • Fill orders from inventory and warehouse stock and deliver to dock for loading • Operate power lift truck to move materials and stack loaded pallets • Operate overhead crane, large forklift, and steel cutting equipment • Perform truck and order checks • Implement the QMS as it pertains to their daily tasks and actively pursue Continuous Improvement, including the Plan-Do-Check-Act approach and risk-based thinking • Participates in training other employees • Evaluates workloads across multiple days or multiple shifts • Computer duties to include pick listing; outbound truck and CPU processing; inbound truck receiving Qualifications • 1-3 years of general labor experience • Consistently performs at or above standards • Runs or actively participates in Operation Functional and safety meetings/ committees • Consistently shows positive attitude and carries the company flag • Willingness to master all equipment in the facility Contact: Mike.Forbes@4mmetalsupply.onmicrosoft.com Warehouse Operator

Sales

TSI Holding Company The ideal candidate will have experience in industrial sales, preferably steel tubing and pipe along with value-add services. You must be comfortable making dozens of calls per day, working with partners, generating interest, qualifying prospects, and closing sales.

Help Wanted Customer Accounts Specialist. Bachelor’s in Business and Financial Management. Resume: ITF Logistics Group LLC., 11990 Missouri Bottom Rd., Hazelwood, MO 63042.

DevOps Eng., St. Louis, MO. Supp DevOps Tools and app infrastruc /processes for SW product. Provide full app dev support. Dev & improve app infrastruc/arch. Bld, integrate, & test SW apps/products. Deliver deployment solutions for app/installations. Must possess at least bachelor’s or equiv in Comp Sci, Comp Engng, or rltd tech fld, & at least 3 yrs work exp in DevOps Engng. Must possess at least 2 yrs exp w/ Puppet or Chef & at least 1 yr exp w/: working on Azure environ. & offerings (PaaS, SaaS or IaaS), PowerShell, Load balancing, Firewall & DNS; tools such as VSTS or Jenkins & setting up CI /CD pipeline; & using cloud APIs to automate provisioning, deployments, improving sys. performance, & stability. Fwd resume to: James Krzywicki, HR Dir., Global Sales, Eng. & and SW Tech, Aclara Tech., 30400 Solon Rd., Solon, OH 44139.

Director, Data Management, Data Stewardship and Quality @ Mastercard (O'Fallon, MO) F/T: Guide Data Qualty and decisions prjcts incldng strategizing and dfning KPIS, metrics and measures for data mngmnt and data qulty initiativs. Frmlate entrprse data strategies for data mngmnt and data qualty activities. Pstn req a Mstr's deg, or frgn equ, in Com Sci, Cmptr Engg, Elctrcl Engg, Elctrnc Engg or rltd, and 3 yrs of exp, in the job offrd, as Sftwre Dvlpr, IT Cnsltnt, or rltd. Altrntvly, emp wll accpt a Bchlr's degand 6 yrs of prgrssvly rspnsble exp. Qualfing exp mst inclde 2 years of exp wth ech of the fllwng: Agile; SCRUM; Safe Agile; Enterprise Data; Enterprise Platform Developments for Global programs like GDPR and Data control establishment; Data Structure and modelling; Informatica Suite; Hadoop; Impala; Microsoft SQL Server; Microsoft Office 2007 suite; MS Exchange; JIRA; Confluence; SharePoint; Microsoft Visio; MS Excel; Sales force Agile Vision. Employer will accept any suitable combination of education, training, or experience. Ability to work from a home office is available. Mail resume to Jennifer Trevor Hochman. Jennifer.Trevor Hochman@mastercard.com, 2000 Purchase Street; Purchase, NY 10577-2405. Reference MC75-2021.

Electric Power Systems International seeks Protection & Control Design Engineer III in Maryland Heights, MO to perform conceptual & detail design services for physical, protection & ctrl., as well as cost estimates rel’d to the dvlpmt of new transmission & distribution substations, & the modification or expansion of existing substations. Req’s Master’s or Bachelor’s deg. & exp. as an Electrical Engineer (protection system design). Must hold an active Professional Engineer license. For full details on all reqs & to apply, visit: https:// wp.me/PatWHX-rb Full time registered nurse to do part time clinical supervision plus work in community outreach programs doing health assessments, education and case management. Send inquires and resumes to dpupillo@faithnurses.org HighQuartile LLC seeks to fill multiple job positions for its head office in Chesterfield, MO: Sr. SW Engineer: Design develop test s/w apps Req MS & 3 yrs rel exp| Technical Engineer/Lead: Lead develop architect s/w apps Req BS & 5 yrs rel exp| S/W QA Engineer /Analyst: Perform QA/testing & develop tests on/for s/w/web/mobile apps/progms Req BS & 5 yrs rel exp| All jobs may req travel| Mail resumes to 117 Chesterfield Business Pkwy Ste 107 Chesterfield MO 63005

Responsibilities • Source new sales opportunities through inbound lead follow-up and outbound cold calls and emails • Prospect call preparation including company background research and other pertinent lead information • Identify customer’s buying trends and provide reports to management • Enter, update, and maintain CRM information on leads, prospects, and opportunities

Infrastructure Service Manager sought by Refinitiv US LLC (St. Louis, MO). Write &/or approve customer service statements, perform service improvements & guide continuous service improvement, & build & maintain a Service Improvement Plan for key services. Apply send resume to HR R0034339, Refinitiv US LLC, 28 Liberty St, New York, NY 10005

Qualifications • Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience in Business • At least 1 - 3 years of sales experience • Excellent written and verbal communication skills • Ability to multi-task, organize, and prioritize work

Landscape Laborer (multiple positions) needed by Chesterfield Valley Nursery in Chesterfield, MO to landscape or maintain properties using tools or equipment. Tasks may include to plant, water, fertilize, dig, rake, seed, mulch, lay sod, haul & spread topsoil, trim, prune, blow leaves, mow, install sprinklers and mortarless segmental concrete masonry wall units, leaf cleanup, pick up/clear fallen debris from storms. Possible snow shoveling in the winter months. Exposed to weather. Must be capable of doing physically strenuous labor for long hours, occasionally in extreme heat or cold. Perform physical activities such as stoop, handle, lift, carry and move materials up to 50 LBS. Must be able to show legal authority to work in the US. Apply by mailing resume to Amy Pusatera, 16825 N. Outer 40 Road, Chesterfield, MO 63005.

Employment Type: Full-time Contact: craig@tsiholding.com

Maintenance Worker Starting salary $30,684 + excellent benefit package The maintenance worker performs routine, entry-level duties related to the maintenance of the state’s roadways and facilities. Responsibilities are performed under direct supervision. • • • •

Minimum/Required Qualifications: High School Diploma or GED Valid Driver’s License Class B Commercial Driver’s License (Permit) w/tanker endorsement - no air brake restriction Locations: St. Louis city and county, St. Charles, Franklin and Jefferson County Increase Pay Market Adjustment for Winter/Emergency Operations! Apply: www.modot.mo.gov/careers

MoDOT supports equality and advancement for all people based on their qualifications and actions alone without regard to color, race, ethnicity, gender, age, religion, national origin, or disability. EOE/AA/M/F/D/V

Landscape Laborer (multiple positions) needed by Meyer Tree Service, Inc. in St. Louis, MO to maintain grounds of property using hand or power tools or equipment. Possible snow shoveling in the winter months. Exposed to weather. Must be capable of doing physically strenuous labor for long hours, occasionally in extreme heat or cold. Perform physical activities such as stoop, handle, lift, carry and move materials up to 50 LBS. Must be able to show legal authority to work in the US. Apply by mailing resume to Brad Meyer, 1560 Fairview Ave., St. Louis, MO 63132

Landscape Laborers (multiple positions) needed by M & P Landscaping, Inc. in St. Louis, MO to landscape & maintain properties using tools & equipment. Possible snow shoveling in the winter

Help Wanted months. Exposed to weather. Must be capable of doing physically strenuous labor for long hours, occasionally in extreme heat or cold. Perform physical activities such as stoop, handle, lift, carry and move materials up to 50 LBS. Must be able to show legal authority to work in the US. Apply by mailing resume to Brad Meyer, 1604 Fairview Ave., St. Louis, MO 63132.

Lead Software Developer for St. Louis, MO to build, deploy & supt sw apps. Requires Bachelor’s in C.S. or closely-related fld & 6 yrs progressive post-Bachelor’s exp implementing Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) capabilities for supply chains w/ SAP ECC, SCM /APO, SAP IBP & third party supply chain providers Oracle & SAS; bldng processes & tools for prod planning & mfg, demand planning, supply network planning, global availability & plant ops scheduling; using Core Interface, SAP Cloud Platform Integration & Smart Data Connection to integrate data b/w sys; bldng data models w/ busn warehouse sys Teradata, SAP HANA & Oracle; performing data ansys & rpt generation w/ Spotfire, Tableau & Busn Objects; processing & anlyzng lg datasets; performing cloud-based dvlpmnt incl supt’ing automated, continuous delivery deployments; & working in an Agile dvlpmt enviro. Mail resume to Jill Martin, Bayer U.S. LLC, 800 N. Lindbergh Blvd. E2NE, St. Louis, MO 63167.

Lead Software Development Engineer in Test @ Mastercard (O'Fallon, MO) F/T Prfrm systms dsgn & anlyss, soltn defntn, dvlpmnt, tstng nd implmtn of various clnt-srvr, web-bsd sftwr applctn systm of Intrnl Mstrcrd Prdcts & sftwr soltns offrngs, intndd to reach & spprt billions of crdt card trnsctns pr mnth. Rspnsbl for drivng bst practcs around qlty & prfrmnc engg, functnl & prfrmnc tst automtn, in-the-wild & explortry tstng, & adoptn of dvlpmnt srvcs amongst various dlvry teams wthn Mstrcrd. Reqs a Bachelor's deg, or frgn equiv, in Cmptr Science, Infomn Technlgy or rltd, & 2 yrs of exp in job offrd, or as a Snr Test Anlyst, QA Enginr, UAT Testr or rltd. In lieu of a Bachelor's deg, emplyr wll accpt 5 yrs of rltd wrk exprnc to satsfy the eductnl rqrmnt. Exp must inclde 2 yrs w/ each: Java, Spring, JUnit, Eclipse IDE, Selenium, Jbehave/Cucumber frameworks, Databases, APIs (REST/SOAP), Continuous Delivery concepts, and exposure to tools such as Jenkins /Bamboo, Maven, SVN/GIT; Agile and waterfall delivery, life-cycle management tools (JIRA/Rally), software testing standards, methods and conventions; Cross device testing tools including Browserstack and strategizes including 'in the wild testing'; Cloud, Infrastruct ure-as-a-code concept, and tools including Chef and Puppet. Employer will accept any suitable combination of education, training, or experience. Mail resume to Rachel van Meter @ Mastercard, 4250 North Fairfax Drive,11th Floor, Arlington, VA 22201. Ref MC87-2021.

Logistics Analyst. Bachelor’s in Economics. Resume: ITF LLC dba ITF GROUP LLC., 11990 Missouri Bottom Rd., Hazelwood, MO 63042

Looking for Software Developer(Job-1) Java/DevOps Engineer (Job-2)Programmer Analyst (Job-3) at Unikpros Inc, 11812 Borman Dr, Saint Louis, MO 63146. Willing to travel to client sites throughout the US. EOE. E m a i l : s r i h a r i @ unikpros.com. Job-1:Automate/ orchestrate data movement implement/extract/transform/create load data/clusters and notebooks/data pipelines/write PySpark scripts.Dev /shell/scripts/troubleshoot/resolve/ software cases/—oc/test cases;work on ETL/SQL/ADF/ADLS /Hive/ShellScripts/PySpark/Python. Req: BS in MGT info systems. Ex: 2 yr. Alt Occ: Sr. Software DevorAssociate. Job-2: work on cloud environ/AWS/*tlassian. Build CI-CD pipelines to automate webapplication deployments. Using DevOps tools Terraform/Git/Codecommit/ Codebuild/ Codedeploy /Jenkins/*nsible. Work on web-app front-end and backend using languages like Java/Typescript/Angular/CSSetc. Req: MS in CSC.Job-3: Dev software app/ deploy/ automate/ maintain & manage both on premise and cloud infrastructure with high quality/ reliability/ performance/ scalability/ security/ and user experience. Develop automate/ create CI/CD and DevOps processes include Infra as code /configuration mgt/containerization

Continued on Page C6

Write Your Own Best Seller

314-621-6666 STLtoday.com/classifieds


BUSINESS

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Goedeker From C1

with a press release Sept. 9. The Florida-based investor wanted control of the board. He included a list of five nominees for the ninemember panel, including multiple veterans of CarParts.com, which recorded a dramatic turnaround after Kanen pushed for a change in leadership. He also included himself, noting his experience on boards at CarParts.com, Build-A-Bear and other public companies. He told the Post-Dispatch it was nothing personal. He was happy to see Fouerti replace previous head Doug Moore, who had overseen a 70 percent decline in the stock price. But the board members who hired Moore remained. They were on duty when leadership made the decision in May to sell shares — well below market value — to raise money for the Appliances Connection acquisition, sending the share price tumbling. And a few days later, they gave Moore a raise and a $150,000 bonus. “They’ve demonstrated the ability to consistently make bad decisions,” Kanen

Body From C1

our digestive tracts and just contained in our body. And when our one life ceases, the life of those microbes does not cease,” he said. After about three months, the vessel is opened and the “soil” is filtered for medical devices like prosthetics, pacemakers or joint replacements. The remaining large bones are then pulverized and returned to the vessel for another three months of composting. Teeth are removed to prevent contamination from mercury in fillings. The vessel must reach 131 degrees Fahrenheit for 72 continuous hours to kill any bacteria and pathogens. The high temperature occurs naturally during the breakdown of the body in an enclosed box. In six months, the body, wood chips and straw will transform into enough soil to fill the bed of a pickup truck. Family members can keep the soil to spread in their yards, but Colorado law forbids selling it and using it commercially to grow food for human consumption and only allows licensed funeral homes and crematories to compost human bodies. “It accomplishes the conversion of the body back into a very beneficial substance — soil, earth,” said Viddal, who envisions building more than 50 body composting vessels. The Natural Funeral charges $7,900 for body composting, compared with $2,200 for flame cremation, and Viddal notes that a traditional burial and service in the Denver area can run well north of $10,000. The company has not yet composted any bodies, but several people have signed up and paid for the service. AJ Killeen, 40, of Boulder, has already expressed interest in having his body composted when he dies, even though he is relatively young. After a car accident a couple years ago, a doc-

Continued from Page C5 Help Wanted /orchestration using Kubernetes using tech like Java/HTML/JavaScript/CSS/*zure/PCF/GCP/UrbanCodeDeploy/uDeploy/*RM/Terraform/Maven, Jenkins Pipeline & etc. Req: MS in CSC or related.

Navvis & Company, LLC seeks Sr. Technical Account Manager in St. Louis, MO to manage Data Flow, Validate end to end data for healthcare plans. Requires BS in IT, CS, or related, 5 years of experience in data integration, data management, data engineering; 2 years of experience in population health; 3 years of project management experience; demonstrated ability with SQL, Python and R Language. Resumes to V Jones, Navvis, 555 Maryville University, Ste. 240, St. Louis, MO 63141

said. “They need help.” Fouerti, who spent 20 years building Appliances Connection, a company Goedeker’s valued at $210 million, saw things differently. His company’s public response cast Kanen as a snake who launched a hostile takeover just days after telling executives in private he wanted to work together. It trashed his nominees, saying they lacked the skills to oversee the business. And Fouerti said the effort ignored progress the company is making on rebranding itself and beefing up its system for delivering appliances to customers. “We are still in the initial phases of accelerating growth,” he said, “and my goal is to avoid unwarranted disruptions and focus on value creation.” Fouerti went quiet for the next week. Then on Tuesday, he wrote another letter. In it, he told shareholders he wants to build a “worldclass business” and said his work has only just begun. He said the company is in a good place with an expansive selection competitors can’t match. He acknowledged struggles with shortterm supply chain issues, but said he expects demand

to remain strong long-term. He also said the company is working to improve: on customer service, on product shipping and on the board. He pointed out the company added one new board member this summer and said a broader “refresh” is ongoing. He took another swipe at Kanen, too, telling shareholders that the investor was trying to take control of “your company.” He also wrote that he looked forward to hearing from shareholders “big and small” on further improvement. Cannell wrote in the next day. The longtime investor said it was hard to say much about Fouerti’s letter because Cannell Capital’s inquiries have gotten the cold shoulder recently. But he said his firm had reviewed Kanen’s board nominees and considered most of them better than Goedeker’s. Given that, he wrote, the company shouldn’t spent a dime of shareholders’ money lawyering up for a proxy fight over board seats. “For the benefit of all owners,” he wrote, “CC calls on GOED to immediately reach a fair and reasonable

tor discovered Killeen had a heart condition. That got Killeen thinking about what would happen to his body after he dies, and composting seemed like a natural fit. “It’s what’s going to happen anyway, right? I mean, we’re all going to turn to dust, basically. So this is just a little more natural,” he said. “They’re going to control the humidity. They’re going to control the soil amendments and hopefully some worms and some mushrooms find a good home in me for a few months. And, you know, at the other end of it, I’ll be just a few bags of dirt.” Killeen, who manages commercial real estate, said his concern for the environment played a large role in considering the option. Flame cremation burns fossil fuels that can contribute to climate change, and the process also releases toxic, mercury-laden fumes into the atmosphere. Traditional burial takes up space in a cemetery that will use additional resources to keep the plot constantly watered and mowed. “I always joke that I hope I expire on trash day if that’s just easier for my family,” said Killeen, who composts food scraps and yard waste through the city’s collection program. Killeen is among a growing number of people considering more natural funeral options, especially since the pandemic began, and he thinks the option will become more accepted once people get over “the ick factor.” The Colorado Catholic Conference, a group of bishops aimed at molding public policy, opposed the bill, saying body composting “does not promote human dignity.” Some rabbis also are against body composting because they say it violates Jewish religious law. Other opponents are concerned there is not enough research on whether the compost contaminates soil, and there is no way to prevent people from using it in home vegetable gardens. “We don’t know what

they’re going to do with it if they take it all home,” said Stacey Kleinman, a board member of the Colorado Funeral Directors Association. They helped craft the legislation, but the group’s stance is neutral. Even with the opposition, several states are considering the option as Americans become more open to afterlife alternatives. According to a Choice Mutual Insurance Agency survey of 1,500 Americans this summer, when many were burying loved ones killed by the coronavirus, 21% said the pandemic changed how they want their body disposed of. Traditional burial and cremation remained the frontrunners, but 11% said they would opt for burial involving natural decomposition without a casket. Only 4% said they would choose that option in a similar survey conducted in 2020. Choice Mutual, which specializes in burial insurance, did not specifically ask about body composting, but the survey highlights an increased interest in more natural and environmentally friendly options. Micah Truman, CEO and founder of Return Home south of Seattle, runs an 11,500-square-foot facility that includes 74 vessels. So far, his company has composted 16 bodies in what he describes as an “extremely precise scientific operation” that takes only 60 days. Truman said that because the composting option is so new, “it’s really a matter of changing hearts and minds right now.” But he has been surprised by how many young people are interested, including someone who recently signed up their 8-year-old child. “Our young people are going to teach us how to die better. It’s been really powerful for us,” Truman said. “I think what’s happened is that the younger generation really genuinely understands that we have to make sure that our Earth can stay whole.”

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Noura, LLC (DBA Bekdash Sweets, Bakery, & Restaurant) seeks 2 Specialty Pastry & Sweets Chefs for bakery in St. Louis, create & prepare Middle Eastern goods & sweets, utilizing traditional Middle Eastern recipes, must have 2 yrs exp. as Middle Eastern Baker. Call Adam (314) 395-9518 to apply.

Sales Sales office on Watson Road has immediate openings for phone clerks. AM,PM,EVE shifts. Earn up to $10-18 per hour with guaranteed hourly and incentive plans. 401k plan. Great way to make extra cash. No experience necessary. 373 Watson Plaza, Webster Groves 63126 next to Shop n Save. Call 314-961-6200 and ask for Mr Watson.

St. Charles sales office has immediate openings on 3 shifts. Our reps earn $10-$18 per hour with guaranteed hourly wage and incentives. Students and moonlighters welcomed. We've got cash and we're ready to give it to you. 401k plan. 2085 Collier Corp Pkwy, St. Charles 63303. Call 636-940-8868 and ask for Mrs. Wheeler

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, POST-DISPATCH

Jack Findley, right, a sales associate at Goedeker Appliance, helps customer John Markham of Hazelwood shop for a washer and dryer on Jan. 31, 2018, at the company’s Ballwin showroom. settlement with (Kanen Wealth Management).” Fouerti responded on Thursday. He said Cannell has plenty of access to executives, most recently with an hour-and-a-half private conversation with company leaders after a public quarterly earnings call. Fouerti argued that granting more access, as Cannell requested this month, would be unfair to other shareholders. “While you and Kanen may find it beneficial in the

Help Wanted Sales

Wentzville location is looking for money motivated individuals, good personality, polite and talkative, experience is great but NOT required! Flexible schedules, paid training, weekly paychecks, guaranteed hourly and incentives…… SO THE HARDER YOU WORK, THE MORE YOU MAKE! Average Reps earning up to $10-$18 per hour!!Casual Dress Code, additional cash incentives weekly, competitive, fun atmosphere!! Call for more information! (636) 327-7043

Sales office in Arnold next to Fox High School is now hiring. Great after school job. Earn up to $10-$18 per hour with guaranteed hourly wage incentives. No experience necessary. 665 Jeffco Blvd, Arnold 63010. Call 636-282-3733 and ask for Mr. Edwards.

Festus sales office located across the street from the YMCA is hiring sales and customer service clerks right now to fill 3 shifts. Paid training. No experience necessary. Work part-time or full and earn up to $10-18 per hour with guaranteed hourly and incentives. Clean, professional working atmosphere and a 401k plan. 1320 YMCA Dr. Festus 63028. Call 636-931-2737 today to set up an interview and ask for Mr. Hawkes.

short-term to grandstand and engage in public hostilities,” Fouerti said, “I am confident that a majority of my fellow stockholders will look unfavorably upon efforts to distract the Company’s leadership from the pursuit of sustainable, profitable growth and longterm value.” Cannell did not respond to a request for comment. “He’s not talking to the public about this right now,” a spokesperson said. Kanen chuckled at the

comment about his “grandstanding.” He said he’s been through a few activist campaigns and can tell when someone is posturing before a shareholder election. “Has anybody ever run for office and said, ‘Hey, we think we’re going to lose?’” he asked. Kanen is open to compromise, though. He said a fight at the shareholder meeting could mean expensive legal bills for both sides. “I’m an owner of the company,” he said, “I don’t want the management team that owns less stock than me to burn up $1 million in a ridiculous proxy contest when we could work out something by all compromising.” Fouerti said he’s also open to negotiation. “If you would like to schedule a call with leadership or send us a constructive, private note about your specific input into our ongoing director refresh,” Fouerti wrote to Cannell in his most recent letter, “we would be happy to receive that feedback.” Shareholders vote Nov. 10. Austin Huguelet • 314-788-1651 @ahuguelet on Twitter ahuguelet@post-dispatch.com

(314) 219-5814

SALES

Sales Sales

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

Sales South County Mehlville office needs reliable sales and customer service clerks to fill 3 shifts. Paid training. No experience necessary. Work part-time or full and earn $10-$18 per hour with guaranteed hourly and incentives. We're giving $$$ away. Come see for yourself. 3912 Ritz Center, St. Louis 63125. A block south of the mall. Call 314-845-2825 and ask for Brian. Senior BizOps Engineer @ Mastercard (O'Fallon, MO) F/T Docmnt strctr of dgtl bsnss data. Evalt & reprt agnst bsnss intllgnc digtl data. Reqs a Master's deg, or frgn equiv, in Cmptr Scinc, Cmptr Engnrng, Infrmtn Scinc & Tchnlgy or rltd, & 2 yrs of exp in job offrd, or rltd. Altrntivly, emplyr will accpt a Bachlr's deg, or frgn equiv, & 5 yrs of prgrssvly rspnsbl exp. Exp must inclde 1 yr w/ each: Implementation of Secure Socket Layer (SSL); Configuration management database (CMDB); ITSM; Linux; TABLEAU; Adobe analytics; Splunk;

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

SAP BW; ETL. Employer will accept any suitable combination of education, training, or experience. Ablty to wrk frm a home offc is avlble. Mail resume to Joel Harrison @ Mastercard, 2200 Mastercard Blvd, O'Fallon, MO 63368- 7263. Ref MC76-2021.

Tomcat, JBoss, WebSphere); Kafka; PCF & OAuth 2; SOAP UI, Postman, Junit; CI/CD tools (i.e. GIT, Jira, Confluence); Jenkins; & Agile meth using Scrum, Kanban. Drug scrn/BGC req. CV: MKandasamy@ express-scripts.com

Senior Virtualization Engineers in St. Louis, MO resp for solution design, implmnt, sppt, & svc imprvmt. Plan, instll, & upgrd physcl & virtual servers to meet capacity demand. Req deg in CS/related + exp. Travel 1 wk int’l & 2 wks domst /year. Mail resumes to Sigma Aldrich Corp, Attn: Req# 228730, 400 Summit Drive, Burlington, MA 01803

Solution Architects SAP in St. Louis, MO to dsgn, dvlp and implmnt SAP app dvlpmt solutions using the SAP HANA Database for enterprise critical systs. Req deg in CompSci /rel + exp. Send resumes to Sigma-Aldrich Corp., 400 Summit Dr., Burlington, MA 01803 (Attn: Req# 228729)

Software Engineering Advisor (Express Scripts Services Co, St. Louis, MO) Dsgn app sols based on dtl'd app reqs & def data strctres & srcs to satfy app sol; imprv app qual & reliabty by implmntng good strds & procs; dsgn & bld protos. May wrk rmtly. Reqs: MS or frgn equiv in Comp Sci or rel'd & 3 yrs exp in rel'd occu (or BS in CS or rel'd & 5 yrs exp); exp wrking w/healthcare/PBM ind; using dvlpmnt meth; blding & consming RESTful or SOAP web srvs; dvlping SW using strd J2EE frmwrks (ie Spring, Hibernate, CI /CD); & using Java, Spring Boot, SOA; Ent app srvrs (i.e. Apache

Compass Health, Inc. is seeking a Therapist with M.S. in Social Work and LMSW, LCSW, LPC or LMFT Missouri License for position in St. Charles, MO. Send C.V. to Ms. Diane Coletta Vice President, HR, 111 Mexico Court, St. Peters, MO 63376.

THERAPIST

WE ARE HIRING DRIVERS!!!! JOIN US FOR OUR OPEN HOUSE MONDAY 9/27/2021 6-8PM / THE SYNERGY CENTER 5377 HWY N, COTTLEVILLE, MO 63304 Requirements: • Over 21 • Cell phone • Pass a DOT screening


BUSINESS

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Goedeker From C1

with a news release Sept. 9. The Florida-based investor wanted control of the board. He included a list of five nominees for the ninemember panel, including multiple veterans of CarParts.com, which recorded a dramatic turnaround after Kanen pushed for a change in leadership. He also included himself, noting his experience on boards at CarParts.com, Build-A-Bear and other public companies. He told the Post-Dispatch it was nothing personal. He was happy to see Fouerti replace previous head Doug Moore, who had overseen a 70% decline in the stock price. But the board members who hired Moore remained. They were on duty in May when the company sold shares — well below market value — to raise money for competitor Appliances Connection, sending the share price tumbling. And a few days later, they gave Moore a raise and a $150,000 bonus. “They’ve demonstrated the ability to consistently make bad decisions,” Kanen said. “They need help.”

Body From C1

our digestive tracts and just contained in our body. And when our one life ceases, the life of those microbes does not cease,” he said. After about three months, the vessel is opened and the “soil” is filtered for medical devices like prosthetics, pacemakers or joint replacements. The remaining large bones are then pulverized and returned to the vessel for another three months of composting. Teeth are removed to prevent contamination from mercury in fillings. The vessel must reach 131 degrees Fahrenheit for 72 continuous hours to kill any bacteria and pathogens. The high temperature occurs naturally during the breakdown of the body in an enclosed box. In six months, the body, wood chips and straw will transform into enough soil to fill the bed of a pickup truck. Family members can keep the soil to spread in their yards, but Colorado law forbids selling it and using it commercially to grow food for human consumption and only allows licensed funeral homes and crematories to compost human bodies. “It accomplishes the conversion of the body back into a very beneficial substance — soil, earth,” said Viddal, who envisions building more than 50 body composting vessels. The Natural Funeral charges $7,900 for body composting, compared with $2,200 for flame cremation, and Viddal notes that a traditional burial and service in the Denver area can run well north of $10,000. The company has not yet composted any bodies, but several people have signed up and paid for the service. AJ Killeen, 40, of Boulder, has already expressed interest in having his body composted when he dies, even though he is relatively young. After a car accident a couple years ago, a doc-

Continued from Page C5 Help Wanted /orchestration using Kubernetes using tech like Java/HTML/JavaScript/CSS/*zure/PCF/GCP/UrbanCodeDeploy/uDeploy/*RM/Terraform/Maven, Jenkins Pipeline & etc. Req: MS in CSC or related.

Navvis & Company, LLC seeks Sr. Technical Account Manager in St. Louis, MO to manage Data Flow, Validate end to end data for healthcare plans. Requires BS in IT, CS, or related, 5 years of experience in data integration, data management, data engineering; 2 years of experience in population health; 3 years of project management experience; demonstrated ability with SQL, Python and R Language. Resumes to V Jones, Navvis, 555 Maryville University, Ste. 240, St. Louis, MO 63141

Fouerti, who spent the past 20 years building New Jersey-based Appliances Connection into one of the largest firms of its kind, saw things differently. His company’s public response cast Kanen as a snake who launched a hostile takeover just days after telling executives in private he wanted to work together. It trashed his nominees, saying they lacked the skills to oversee the business. And Fouerti said the effort ignored progress the company is making on rebranding itself and beefing up its system for delivering appliances to customers. “We are still in the initial phases of accelerating growth,” he said, “and my goal is to avoid unwarranted disruptions and focus on value creation.” Fouerti went quiet for the next week. Then on Tuesday, he wrote another letter. In it, he told shareholders he wants to build a “worldclass business” and said his work has only just begun. He said the company is in a good place with an expansive selection competitors can’t match. He acknowledged struggles with shortterm supply chain issues but said he expects demand

to remain strong long-term. He also said the company is working to improve: on customer service, on product shipping and on the board. He pointed out the company added one new board member this summer and said a broader “refresh” is ongoing. He took another swipe at Kanen, too, telling shareholders that the investor was trying to take control of “your company.” He also wrote that he looked forward to hearing from shareholders “big and small” on further improvement. Cannell wrote in the next day. The longtime investor said it was hard to say much about Fouerti’s letter because Cannell Capital’s inquiries have gotten the cold shoulder recently. But he said his firm had reviewed Kanen’s board nominees and considered most of them better than Goedeker’s. Given that, he wrote, the company shouldn’t spend a dime of shareholders’ money lawyering up for a proxy fight over board seats. “For the benefit of all owners,” he wrote, “CC calls on GOED to immediately reach a fair and reasonable settlement with (Kanen

tor discovered Killeen had a heart condition. That got Killeen thinking about what would happen to his body after he dies, and composting seemed like a natural fit. “It’s what’s going to happen anyway, right? I mean, we’re all going to turn to dust, basically. So this is just a little more natural,” he said. “They’re going to control the humidity. They’re going to control the soil amendments and hopefully some worms and some mushrooms find a good home in me for a few months. And, you know, at the other end of it, I’ll be just a few bags of dirt.” Killeen, who manages commercial real estate, said his concern for the environment played a large role in considering the option. Flame cremation burns fossil fuels that can contribute to climate change, and the process also releases toxic, mercury-laden fumes into the atmosphere. Traditional burial takes up space in a cemetery that will use additional resources to keep the plot constantly watered and mowed. “I always joke that I hope I expire on trash day if that’s just easier for my family,” said Killeen, who composts food scraps and yard waste through the city’s collection program. Killeen is among a growing number of people considering more natural funeral options, especially since the pandemic began, and he thinks the option will become more accepted once people get over “the ick factor.” The Colorado Catholic Conference, a group of bishops aimed at molding public policy, opposed the bill, saying body composting “does not promote human dignity.” Some rabbis also are against body composting because they say it violates Jewish religious law. Other opponents are concerned there is not enough research on whether the compost contaminates soil, and there is no way to prevent people from using it in home vegetable gardens. “We don’t know what

they’re going to do with it if they take it all home,” said Stacey Kleinman, a board member of the Colorado Funeral Directors Association. They helped craft the legislation, but the group’s stance is neutral. Even with the opposition, several states are considering the option as Americans become more open to afterlife alternatives. According to a Choice Mutual Insurance Agency survey of 1,500 Americans this summer, when many were burying loved ones killed by the coronavirus, 21% said the pandemic changed how they want their body disposed of. Traditional burial and cremation remained the frontrunners, but 11% said they would opt for burial involving natural decomposition without a casket. Only 4% said they would choose that option in a similar survey conducted in 2020. Choice Mutual, which specializes in burial insurance, did not specifically ask about body composting, but the survey highlights an increased interest in more natural and environmentally friendly options. Micah Truman, CEO and founder of Return Home south of Seattle, runs an 11,500-square-foot facility that includes 74 vessels. So far, his company has composted 16 bodies in what he describes as an “extremely precise scientific operation” that takes only 60 days. Truman said that because the composting option is so new, “it’s really a matter of changing hearts and minds right now.” But he has been surprised by how many young people are interested, including someone who recently signed up their 8-year-old child. “Our young people are going to teach us how to die better. It’s been really powerful for us,” Truman said. “I think what’s happened is that the younger generation really genuinely understands that we have to make sure that our Earth can stay whole.”

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Noura, LLC (DBA Bekdash Sweets, Bakery, & Restaurant) seeks 2 Specialty Pastry & Sweets Chefs for bakery in St. Louis, create & prepare Middle Eastern goods & sweets, utilizing traditional Middle Eastern recipes, must have 2 yrs exp. as Middle Eastern Baker. Call Adam (314) 395-9518 to apply.

Sales Sales office on Watson Road has immediate openings for phone clerks. AM,PM,EVE shifts. Earn up to $10-18 per hour with guaranteed hourly and incentive plans. 401k plan. Great way to make extra cash. No experience necessary. 373 Watson Plaza, Webster Groves 63126 next to Shop n Save. Call 314-961-6200 and ask for Mr Watson.

St. Charles sales office has immediate openings on 3 shifts. Our reps earn $10-$18 per hour with guaranteed hourly wage and incentives. Students and moonlighters welcomed. We've got cash and we're ready to give it to you. 401k plan. 2085 Collier Corp Pkwy, St. Charles 63303. Call 636-940-8868 and ask for Mrs. Wheeler

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, POST-DISPATCH

Jack Findley, right, a sales associate at Goedeker Appliance, helps customer John Markham of Hazelwood shop for a washer and dryer on Jan. 31, 2018, at the company’s Ballwin showroom. Wealth Management).” Fouerti responded on Thursday. He said Cannell has plenty of access to executives, most recently with an hour-anda-half private conversation with company leaders after a public quarterly earnings call. Fouerti argued that granting more access, as Cannell requested this month, would be unfair to other shareholders. “While you and Kanen may find it beneficial in the short-term to grandstand

Help Wanted Sales

Wentzville location is looking for money motivated individuals, good personality, polite and talkative, experience is great but NOT required! Flexible schedules, paid training, weekly paychecks, guaranteed hourly and incentives…… SO THE HARDER YOU WORK, THE MORE YOU MAKE! Average Reps earning up to $10-$18 per hour!!Casual Dress Code, additional cash incentives weekly, competitive, fun atmosphere!! Call for more information! (636) 327-7043

Sales office in Arnold next to Fox High School is now hiring. Great after school job. Earn up to $10-$18 per hour with guaranteed hourly wage incentives. No experience necessary. 665 Jeffco Blvd, Arnold 63010. Call 636-282-3733 and ask for Mr. Edwards.

Festus sales office located across the street from the YMCA is hiring sales and customer service clerks right now to fill 3 shifts. Paid training. No experience necessary. Work part-time or full and earn up to $10-18 per hour with guaranteed hourly and incentives. Clean, professional working atmosphere and a 401k plan. 1320 YMCA Dr. Festus 63028. Call 636-931-2737 today to set up an interview and ask for Mr. Hawkes.

and engage in public hostilities,” Fouerti said, “I am confident that a majority of my fellow stockholders will look unfavorably upon efforts to distract the Company’s leadership from the pursuit of sustainable, profitable growth and long-term value.” Cannell did not respond to a request for comment. “He’s not talking to the public about this right now,” a spokesperson said. Kanen chuckled at the comment about his “grand-

standing.” He said he’s been through a few activist campaigns and can tell when someone is posturing before a shareholder election. “Has anybody ever run for office and said, ‘Hey, we think we’re going to lose?’” he asked. Kanen is open to compromise, though. He said a fight at the shareholder meeting could mean expensive legal bills for both sides. “I’m an owner of the company,” he said, “I don’t want the management team that owns less stock than me to burn up $1 million in a ridiculous proxy contest when we could work out something by all compromising.” Fouerti said he’s also open to negotiation. “If you would like to schedule a call with leadership or send us a constructive, private note about your specific input into our ongoing director refresh,” Fouerti wrote to Cannell in his most recent letter, “we would be happy to receive that feedback.” The annual meeting will take place Nov. 10. Austin Huguelet • 314-788-1651 @ahuguelet on Twitter ahuguelet@post-dispatch.com

(314) 219-5814

SALES

Sales Sales

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

Sales South County Mehlville office needs reliable sales and customer service clerks to fill 3 shifts. Paid training. No experience necessary. Work part-time or full and earn $10-$18 per hour with guaranteed hourly and incentives. We're giving $$$ away. Come see for yourself. 3912 Ritz Center, St. Louis 63125. A block south of the mall. Call 314-845-2825 and ask for Brian. Senior BizOps Engineer @ Mastercard (O'Fallon, MO) F/T Docmnt strctr of dgtl bsnss data. Evalt & reprt agnst bsnss intllgnc digtl data. Reqs a Master's deg, or frgn equiv, in Cmptr Scinc, Cmptr Engnrng, Infrmtn Scinc & Tchnlgy or rltd, & 2 yrs of exp in job offrd, or rltd. Altrntivly, emplyr will accpt a Bachlr's deg, or frgn equiv, & 5 yrs of prgrssvly rspnsbl exp. Exp must inclde 1 yr w/ each: Implementation of Secure Socket Layer (SSL); Configuration management database (CMDB); ITSM; Linux; TABLEAU; Adobe analytics; Splunk;

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

SAP BW; ETL. Employer will accept any suitable combination of education, training, or experience. Ablty to wrk frm a home offc is avlble. Mail resume to Joel Harrison @ Mastercard, 2200 Mastercard Blvd, O'Fallon, MO 63368- 7263. Ref MC76-2021.

Tomcat, JBoss, WebSphere); Kafka; PCF & OAuth 2; SOAP UI, Postman, Junit; CI/CD tools (i.e. GIT, Jira, Confluence); Jenkins; & Agile meth using Scrum, Kanban. Drug scrn/BGC req. CV: MKandasamy@ express-scripts.com

Senior Virtualization Engineers in St. Louis, MO resp for solution design, implmnt, sppt, & svc imprvmt. Plan, instll, & upgrd physcl & virtual servers to meet capacity demand. Req deg in CS/related + exp. Travel 1 wk int’l & 2 wks domst /year. Mail resumes to Sigma Aldrich Corp, Attn: Req# 228730, 400 Summit Drive, Burlington, MA 01803

Solution Architects SAP in St. Louis, MO to dsgn, dvlp and implmnt SAP app dvlpmt solutions using the SAP HANA Database for enterprise critical systs. Req deg in CompSci /rel + exp. Send resumes to Sigma-Aldrich Corp., 400 Summit Dr., Burlington, MA 01803 (Attn: Req# 228729)

Software Engineering Advisor (Express Scripts Services Co, St. Louis, MO) Dsgn app sols based on dtl'd app reqs & def data strctres & srcs to satfy app sol; imprv app qual & reliabty by implmntng good strds & procs; dsgn & bld protos. May wrk rmtly. Reqs: MS or frgn equiv in Comp Sci or rel'd & 3 yrs exp in rel'd occu (or BS in CS or rel'd & 5 yrs exp); exp wrking w/healthcare/PBM ind; using dvlpmnt meth; blding & consming RESTful or SOAP web srvs; dvlping SW using strd J2EE frmwrks (ie Spring, Hibernate, CI /CD); & using Java, Spring Boot, SOA; Ent app srvrs (i.e. Apache

Compass Health, Inc. is seeking a Therapist with M.S. in Social Work and LMSW, LCSW, LPC or LMFT Missouri License for position in St. Charles, MO. Send C.V. to Ms. Diane Coletta Vice President, HR, 111 Mexico Court, St. Peters, MO 63376.

THERAPIST

WE ARE HIRING DRIVERS!!!! JOIN US FOR OUR OPEN HOUSE MONDAY 9/27/2021 6-8PM / THE SYNERGY CENTER 5377 HWY N, COTTLEVILLE, MO 63304 Requirements: • Over 21 • Cell phone • Pass a DOT screening


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 09.26.2021 • D

DELIBERATELY DIFFERENT JEFF CHIU, AP PHOTO

The Giants’ Brandon Crawford, bottom, scores the winning run as Brandon Belt celebrates during the 11th inning of a game on Sept. 17.

The Giants, a surprise power, took an unlikely path to get to that point BY CHELSEA JANES

The Washington Post

SAN FRANCISCO — Alyssa Nakken’s new “Built for October” shirt was already soaked with beer and champagne by the time she reached into the tub of stillcorked bottles nearby in the San Francisco Giants’ clubhouse at Oracle Park earlier this month. No one looked askance when Nakken added another bottle to the waves of alcoholic precipitation unleashed that evening. In fact, a few coaches and players held up their phones to get a picture. “We saw the bottles there. They needed to be popped,” Nakken, a Giants coach since 2020, said with a shrug the next day. “No hesitation.”

Even when they are drenched in the friendly haze of shared celebration, major league clubhouses are not traditionally places women find themselves free of hesitation. But most major league clubhouses are not like the Giants’, where everyone seems capable of improving and no one seems stuck in any old ways. It seems almost certain, for example, that Nakken, who became the first woman to coach on the field in an MLB game last year, is also the first woman to cover a big league uniform with one of those October T-shirts, pull down her goggles and pop a bottle or two. In the Giants’ clubhouse, though, — as on the field during batting practice or in the GREGORY BULL, AP PHOTO Please see GIANTS, Page D3

An elite DC pole vaulting center is setting a high bar for success

Catcher Buster Posey celebrates a win with relief pitcher Tyler Rogers on Tuesday.

Male practice players return to WNBA after a pandemic pause

CRAIG HUDSON, FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

Ian Hoffman sports a devilish painting on his back at the start of Moon Vault, DC Vault’s late-night competition featuring LED lighting. BY VICKY HALLETT

Special to The Washington Post

When friends ask Christian Di Nicolantonio about the sport he competes in for Catholic University, he tells them, “It’s the one with the big stick at the Olympics.” To most folks, that’s likely the extent of their understanding of pole vault. That is, unless they walk across the street from the Stadium-Armory Metro station in Washington and over to the outdoor training facility for DC Vault, the club that trains Di Nicolantonio and other serious big stick holders in the region. What started as a single runway in an Events DC parking lot in 2016 has gradually developed into a highflying fantasyland. And from this spot, DC Vault founder Edward Luthy wants to make

sure all of Washington gets properly introduced to his favorite activity. “We try to set the bar very high,” Luthy says while standing near what is indeed a very high bar perched above a thickly padded landing area. The quality of this setup, designed for the sport’s elite performers, helped DC Vault recently become one of the only independent pole vault facilities in the country certified by World Athletics, an international sports federation, for national and world records. That’s a status that’s already attracting attention from stars, such as Canadian Olympian Anicka Newell, who swung by in June in the run-up to the Tokyo Games. Three pits, three state-of-the-art rubber runways and all sorts of strength Please see VAULT, Page D6

KAREEM COPELAND, WASHINGTON POST

The Mystics practice against men during the second half of the season. Men bring a physicality to practice that goes beyond what other women present. BY KAREEM COPELAND

The Washington Post

Jamil Ludd hasn’t had a full-time job since 2015, and that’s exactly how he likes it. The 36-year-old D.C. native has worked with the Washington Mystics since 2017 and wants to make sure he’s available whenever the team calls. Driving ride-shares in the evenings, at times, allowed for flexibility. Ludd is one of a handful of men in every WNBA city who dedicates their time to what is generally considered the worst part of sports — practice. With WNBA teams limited to just 12 players on a roster, they regularly employ men to practice against and help prepare for opponents. “I love to be a part of [it], whatever I can do,” Ludd said. “I literally revolve my life around being ready for whatever they need from me.

“It’s crazy. I don’t make a living from it, but it’s the thing I look forward to the most.” As much as Ludd looks forward to the opportunity, teams around the league felt the same way in August. Due to health and safety guidelines stemming from the coronavirus pandemic, the WNBA prohibited teams from using men as practice players during the first half of the season. As the prevalence of vaccines increased, including the league being 99% fully vaccinated, the league adjusted its guidelines at the Olympic break in mid-July. Those tweaks included allowing teams to use men during practices for the first time since 2019 since they weren’t permitted in the bubble for the 2020 season. Please see WNBA, Page D7

SPORTS

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 09.26.2021 • D

A ROLL FOR THE AGES

PAUL BEATY PHOTOS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Yadier Molina celebrates with Harrison Bader after the Cardinals’ come-from-behind victory over the Cubs on Saturday, their franchise-best 15th consecutive win.

Cardinals roar back vs. Cubs, win team-record 15th straight BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Cards 8, Cubs 5

CHICAGO — After the pitch left T. J. McFarland’s fingertips, six teammates of the eight on the > Up next: 1:20 field would touch the baseball beSunday at Cubs, fore the final out of an unerring, BSM uncanny double play that sped > Woodford these Cardinals toward a win(3-3, 3.92) vs. ning streak no other Cardinals Thompson ever reached. When the final tag (3-3, 3.40) of that pivotal rundown was applied in the eighth inning Saturday and Nolan Arenado launched > Nootbaar into the air to celebrate, all nine finds small ways Cardinals were in the infield. to make big They had all converged at the impact. D5 right time to their right places to

HISTORIC STREAK Longest win streaks by NL teams in the integration era (since 1947): 16: NY Giants, Aug. 12-27, 1951 15: Cardinals, Sept. 11-25, 2021 15: Braves, April 16-May 2, 2000

3

The Cards’ magic number to clinch a playoff berth.

allow the assertive, aggressive move and pull off, together, the incredible and unexpected. The play of the game was a Paul DeJong celebrates with teammate Lars Nootbaar at home plate after snapshot of their September. hitting a two-run home run in the ninth Please see CARDINALS, Page D5 inning Saturday.

Misery for Mizzou in an OT loss at Boston College BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHESTNUT Hill, Mass. — Missouri wasn’t going to leave anything to chance. On the road in front of a juiced Boston College crowd, in a game that already had seven lead changes, the Tigers decided if they scored in overtime, they’d go for the kill shot. “We had to score a touchdown,” quarterback Connor Bazelak later said. “We were going to go for 2, too.” Instead, Mizzou never got the chance. His team down by seven points, Bazelak uncorked a pass for Keke Chism in the end zone on MU’s first play

Some streak statistics are difficult to believe

Get up, baby, and applaud Shannon, his 50-year career

Boston College 41, Mizzou 34, OT > Up next: 11 a.m. Saturday vs. Tennessee, SEC Network > Missed chance early in the game haunts Drinkwitz. D8 of overtime. But Boston College’s Brandon Sebastian got there first and snared an interception for a 41-34 victory. Like their running backs did all day, BC students faced zero resistance as they charged the field at Alumni Stadium, Please see MISSOURI, Page D8

POST-DISPATCH FILE

Mike Shannon, pictured in 2013, enters his final week broadcasting Cardinals games this week.

Harrison Bader crammed every single play he could into Saturday’s historic 8-5 win at Wrigley Field. The Cardinals’ center fielder extended his five-game hitting streak and began a career-first four-for-for day by dropping Cubs starter Adrian Sampson’s full-count sinker over the ivy. He sprinted in from the grass to assist a phone-number double play. By now I’m sure some Cardinals fans out there have looked into changing their digits to (314) 325-4286.

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

> Chat with BenFred: 11 a.m. Tuesdays at Please see FREDERICKSON, Page D6 STLtoday.com

Blues give GM Armstrong 5-year contract extension BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In Doug we trust. That was the message from Blues chairman and governor Tom Stillman on Saturday, when he announced that general manager Doug Armstrong had signed a five-year contract extension. “I could not be more pleased,” Stillman said. “As you all know, Doug is one of the top GMs in the league. In my view the top GM, and I’m just really happy having him committed to the Blues for the next five years. “Doug’s record speaks for itself. In the last 11 years here, he has the most wins of any GM

in the NHL. He’s guided us to nine postseason appearances, three division titles, one conference title and of course he is the man that put together the team that won the Blues’ first Stanley Cup.” The Blues have been knocked out of the playoffs in the first round of the past two COVIDshortened seasons. But in a business in which GMs come and go quickly, it’s hard to argue with the sustained success during Armstrong’s tenure. Especially in this free-agent, salary-cap era in which success is difficult to maintain over an extended period of time. Please see BLUES, Page D7

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

MARY SCHWALM, AP PHOTO

Boston College’s Brandon Sebastian intercepts a pass intended for Mizzou’s Keke Chism to win the game in overtime Saturday.

He is ours. Mike Shannon is befittingly and undeniably St. Louis … and St. Louis’. He’s been ours for hours and hours of innings and innings, throughout seasons of the calendars and seasons of the Cardinals. He’s just always been there, the narrator of Cardinals baseball, infusing our city with his enthusiasm, permeating our culture with his personality. And now, it’s the bottom of the ninth. After 50 years in the broadcast booth, following nine seasons as a Cardinals player, the St. Louis native Please see HOCHMAN, Page D6

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Blues goalie Charlie Lindgren makes a save in the second period Saturday. See D7 for coverage of the exhibition opener. > Sanford dealt to Ottawa for St. Louisan Logan Brown. D7 > Next exhibition: 7 p.m. Monday vs. Stars

SPORTS

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SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals (KMOX 1120 AM) • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 9/25 at Cubs 1:20 p.m. BSM

Sunday 9/26 at Cubs 1:20 p.m. BSM

Tuesday 9/28 vs. Brewers 6:45 p.m. BSM

Wednesday 9/29 vs. Brewers 6:45 p.m. BSM

Blues (WXOS 101.1 FM) • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 *Exhibition Saturday 9/25 vs. Wild* 7 p.m.

Monday 9/27 vs. Stars* 7 p.m.

Wednesday 9/29 Friday 10/1 at Blue Jackets* at Blackhawks* 7:30 p.m. 6 p.m.

Mizzou football (KTRS 550 AM) • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 9/25 at Boston College 11 a.m. ESPN2

Saturday 10/2 vs. Tennessee 11 a.m. SEC Network

Saturday 10/9 vs. North Texas Time, TV TBA

Saturday 10/16 vs. Texas A&M Time, TV TBA

Illinois football (KFNS 590 AM) • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 9/25 at Purdue 2:30 p.m. BTN

Saturday 10/2 vs. Charlotte 11 a.m. BTN

Saturday 10/9 vs. Wisconsin 2:30 or 3 p.m. TV TBA

Saturday 10/23 at Penn State 11 a.m. TV TBA

LOCAL PLAY-BY-PLAY RADIO STATIONS Cardinals: KMOX (1120 AM) SLU MBB: KMOX (1120 AM) Illinois (FB, MBB): KFNS (590 AM) SIUC (FB, MBB): KATZ (1600 AM)

Blues: WXOS (101.1 FM) Mizzou (FB, MBB): KTRS (550 AM) SIUE (MBB): WSIE (88.7 FM) Mo. St. (FB, MBB): WGNU (106.9/920)

ON THE AIR Saturday AUTO RACING 6:55 a.m. Formula One: Russian Grand Prix, Qualyfing, ESPN2 2 p.m. IndyCar: Grand Prix of Long Beach, qualifying, NBCSN 4 p.m. IMSA Weathertech Sportscars: Long Beach, NBCSN 6:30 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity: Alsco Uniforms 302, NBCSN BASEBALL 1 p.m. Cardinals at Cubs, BSM 3 p.m. Yankees at Red Sox, MLB Network 6 p.m. Braves at Padres, KTVI (2) 9 p.m. Mariners at Angels (joined in progress), MLB Network FOOTBALL • College 11 a.m. Missouri at Boston College, ESPN2 11 a.m. Texas Tech at Texas, KDNL (30) 11 a.m. Boise State at Utah State, KMOV (4) 11 a.m. Notre Dame vs. Wisconsin, KTVI (2) 11 a.m. Louisiana State at Mississippi State, ESPN 11 a.m. Villanova at Penn State, BTN 11 a.m. Ohio at Northwestern, BTN alt. 11 a.m. Southern Methodist at Texas Christian, FS1 11 a.m. Georgia at Vanderbilt, SEC Network 11 a.m. Miami (Ohio) at Army, CBSSN 11 a.m. Bowling Green at Minnesota, ESPNU 11:30 a.m. Central Connecticut State at Miami (Fla.), BSM+ 2:30 p.m. Rutgers at Michigan, KDNL (30) 2:30 p.m. Texas A&M vs. Arkansas, KMOV (4) 2:30 p.m. Iowa State at Baylor, KTVI (2) 2:30 p.m. Illinois at Purdue, BTN 2:30 p.m. Kent State at Maryland, BTN alt. 2:30 p.m. Clemson at North Carolina State, ESPN 2:30 p.m. Louisville at Florida State, ESPN2 2:30 p.m. Colorado State at Iowa, FS1 2:30 p.m. Kent State at Maryland, BTN 2:30 p.m. Wyoming at Connecticut, CBSSN 2:30 p.m. Texas-San Antonio at Memphis, ESPNU 3 p.m. Georgia State at Auburn, SEC Network 6 p.m. Tennessee at Florida, ESPN 6 p.m. Kentucky at South Carolina, ESPN2 6 p.m. Nebraska at Michigan State, FS1 6 p.m. Navy at Houston, ESPNU 6:30 p.m. West Virginia at Oklahoma, KDNL (30) 6:30 p.m. Akron at Ohio State, BTN 6:30 p.m. Southern Mississippi at Alabama, SEC Network 7 p.m. Florida Atlantic at Air Force, FS2 7 p.m. Indiana at Western Kentucky, CBSSN 9:15 p.m. South Florida at Brigham Young, ESPN2 9:30 p.m. Arizona at Oregon, ESPN 9:30 p.m. Oregon State at Southern California, FS1 9:30 p.m. Colorado at Arizona State, ESPNU GOLF 7 a.m. Ryder Cup: Day 2, Golf 8 a.m. Ryder Cup: Day 2, KSDK (5) 12 p.m. LPGA: NW Arkansas Championship, second round, Golf 1 p.m. Ryder Cup: Day 2, Four Ball Matches, KSDK (5) 3 p.m. Champions: PURE Insurance Championship, second round, Golf HOCKEY 6 p.m. Exhibition: Canadiens at Maple Leafs, NHL Network HORSE RACING 11:30 a.m. America’s Day at the Races, FS2 MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 7 p.m. UFC 266: Volkanovski vs. Ortega, Prelims, ESPNews SOCCER 6:30 a.m. English Premier League: Chelsea vs. Manchester City, NBCSN 9 a.m. English Premier League: Leicester City vs. Burnley, NBCSN 11:30 a.m. English Premier League: Brentford vs. Liverpool, NBCSN TENNIS 12 p.m. Laver Cup: Day session, Tennis 6 p.m. Laver Cup: Night session, Tennis 3:30 a.m. (Sun.) Nur-Sultan-ATP, Singles final, Tennis TRACK AND FIELD 2 a.m. (Sun.) Berlin Marathon, NBCSN

Sunday AUTO RACING 6:55 a.m. Formula One: Russian Grand Prix, ESPN2 1 p.m. NHRA: Midwest Nationals, FS1 2:30 p.m. IndyCar: Grand Prix of Long Beach, NBCSN 6 p.m. NASCAR: South Point 400, NBCSN BASEBALL 1 p.m. Cardinals at Cubs, BSM 1:30 p.m. Mets at Brewers, TBS 4 p.m. Braves at Padres (joined in progress), MLB Network 6 p.m. Yankees at Red Sox, ESPN FOOTBALL • NFL 12 p.m. Chargers at Chiefs, KMOV (4) 12 p.m. Bears at Browns, KTVI (2) 3:25 p.m. Buccaneers at Rams, KTVI (2) 7:20 p.m. Packers at 49ers, KSDK (5) GOLF 11 a.m. Ryder Cup: Day 3, singles matches, KSDK (5)

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314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-744-5725

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

NFL NOTEBOOK

Wild Card Weekend will feature Monday night game ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — The NFL is adding Monday night to its Wild Card Weekend. The league announced Friday that it will play one of its first six playoff games on Monday night, beginning with this season. The NFL added a third wild-card team in each conference last season, and then played three wildcard games on Saturday and three on Sunday during its first weekend of the playoffs. The new schedule means the league will play two games on Saturday (3:35 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. Central), three on Sunday (12:05 p.m., 3:40 p.m., and 7:15 p.m.) and one on Monday (7:15 p.m.). Wild Card Weekend for this postseason runs from Jan. 15-17.

Browns’ Beckham cleared for return versus Bears BEREA, Ohio — Odell Beckham Jr. has been cleared for takeoff. The star Browns wide receiver made it full through a full week of practice without any issues with his reconstructed knee and coach Kevin Stefanski said Friday that Beckham will make his return Sunday against the Chicago Bears. Beckham hasn’t played since tearing his anterior cruciate ligament on Oct. 25 against Cincinnati, an injury that kept him out during the Browns’ playoff run. He’s been inactive for Cleveland’s first two games.

coach Matt Rhule said Friday that the 2019 All-Pro running back Christian McCaffrey is expected to miss “a few weeks” with a strained hamstring. Rhule said the injury could sideline McCaffrey up to four weeks, but said he doesn’t know at this point if McCaffrey will go on injured reserve. “They are still doing a bunch of diagnostic testing so I can’t tell you if that is one, two, three or four weeks,” Rhule said Friday on a Zoom call. “Obviously Christian will decide the best course of action for him getting back as soon as possible.”

Rams RB Henderson questionable for Sunday THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. — Los Angeles Rams running back Darrell Henderson will be a game-time decision against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sunday. Coach Sean McVay said Henderson’s availability would likely depend on pain tolerance after hurting his ribs on the first play of the fourth quarter in the Rams’ 27-24 win at Indianapolis.

Packers’ OL Jenkins doubtful for Sunday

GREEN BAY, Wis. — Green Bay Packers offensive lineman Elgton Jenkins, who has capably replaced 2020 All-Pro left tackle David Bakhtiari to start the season, is doubtful for SunMcCaffrey out ‘a few weeks’ day night’s game against the San Francisco 49ers. with hamstring injury Jenkins injured an ankle during CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Panthers Monday night’s victory over De-

troit. While he played every snap in that game, he didn’t practice this week.

Jets’ Coleman out, Crowder doubtful FLORHAM PARK, N.J. — Zach Wilson and the New York Jets’ offense will likely be without two veteran playmakers in Denver. Running back Tevin Coleman was ruled out Friday for the game against the Broncos on Sunday with a non-COVID-19 illness. Wide receiver Jamison Crowder is doubtful after not practicing all week because of a groin injury.

Titans’ Lewan set for return versus Colts NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Tennessee left tackle Taylor Lewan practiced fully all week and is set to play Sunday against the Indianapolis Colts after being scratched for the Titans’ win in Seattle. Outside linebacker Bud Dupree is questionable after not practicing Friday. Starting tight end Anthony Firkser (knee), rookie cornerback Caleb Farley (shoulder) and outside linebacker Derick Roberson (knee) all are out against the Colts (0-2).

Ravens place four defensive players on COVID list OWINGS MILLS, Md. — The Baltimore Ravens put linebackers Jaylon Ferguson and Justin Houston and defensive linemen Brandon Williams and Justin Madubuike on the reserve/COVID-19 list Friday.

Post-Dispatch Mizzou beat writer Matter earns national award when he was a student journalist on campus. “Dave has full ownership of his beat across all platforms, driven by an Matter unflinching commitment to shine a light on Mizzou athletics — good and bad — with readers,” said Cameron Hollway, Post-Dispatch deputy sports editor who oversees college coverage. “He delivers consistently outstanding coverage while also helping to guide others who are on the Mizzou coverage team, including columnists and an annual student campus correspondent.” Matter’s decorated career in-

cludes two Associated Press Sports Editors Top Ten beat writer awards and three from the National Sports Media Association. Matter summed up the FWAA honor this way: “This award isn’t possible without the editors who have turned me loose on the Mizzou beat over the last two decades: Roger Hensley and Cameron Hollway at the PostDispatch, and from the Columbia Tribune, Joe Walljasper and the late Kent Heitholt, who gave me my first paying job in journalism and someone we’ve dearly missed since we lost him 20 years ago this fall. I proudly dedicate this award to his memory.”

Basketball Players Association rebuking all efforts from the NBA to mandate that they be vaccinated. About 85% of players were vaccinated at the end of last season. The NBA has denied Andrew The leaguewide figure is believed Wiggins’ request for a coronavirus to have increased since. vaccination exemption, leaving the Golden State Warriors swingman Three tied after one round of LPGA ineligible to play home games until event: A Lim Kim, Katherine Kirk he meets San Francisco’s vaccina- and Eun-HI Ji each shot 8-untion requirement. der 63 Friday for a one-shot lead The ruling was announced over Sarah Burnham after the first Friday hours after the New York round of the Walmart Northwest Knicks said their entire roster is Arkansas Championship, in Rogvaccinated, making all their play- ers, Ark. ers eligible to play in their home Five others — Nasa Hataoka, Lindsey Weaver, Pajaree Anangames. Because of local coronavirus narukarn, Aditi Ashok and Klara regulations in New York and San Spilkova — were another stroke Francisco, the Knicks, Brooklyn back after 6-under 65s at Pinnacle Nets and Warriors are required to Country Club. Kim, of South Korea, and Burnbe vaccinated to play in their home arenas unless exemptions for med- ham posted career-low rounds, while Ji, the 2009 U.S. Women’s ical or religious reasons apply. Wiggins sought an exemption Open champ, matched her career from the league for religious rea- best. sons. Kim, the 2020 U.S. Women’s Unvaccinated players are al- Open winner, didn’t make her lowed to play this season, though first birdie until the seventh hole, the NBA has said that they will and that kicked off a run of five have to be tested daily on practice straight. She added another birdie and travel days and at least once at the 16th and punctuated her — possibly more — on game days, round with an eagle on the par-5 while fully vaccinated players will 18th. not be subject to daily testing. However, the Knicks, Nets and Appleby, Cejka tied for lead in Warriors face stricter rules be- Champions golf: Stuart Appleby cause of their local regulations, and Alex Cejka each shot six-under which the NBA has told teams do 66 to hold the lead at the PURE Innot apply to clubs visiting them. surance Championship in MonterThe Knicks are the first of those rey Peninsula Calif. The event runs teams to say they have met the through Sunday. mandate. Tom Lehman and K.J. Choi are Wiggins still has time, as San tied for third at five under 67s Francisco’s mandate doesn’t take while Glen Day, Esteban Toledo, effect until the middle of next Larry Mize and Kirk Triplett all month. finished Friday’s round with 68s. The NBA has struck agreements this offseason to have virtually all Eckes drives truck to victory: parties involved in games — ref- Rookie Christian Eckes held off erees, coaches, stat-crew work- teammate Ben Rhodes and crossed ers and anyone else who will be in the finish line under a caution flag close proximity to players on or off for his first career win in the NASthe court in NBA arenas — vacci- CAR Trucks Series at Las Vegas nated in order to participate. Motor Speedway on Friday night. The one exception: The playIn addition to Eckes and Rhodes, ers themselves, with the National their Thorsport Racing teammates

Matt Crafton and Johnny Sauter finished third and fourth respectively. The sweep marked the first time in truck series history the top four finishes represented the same team. With his second-place finish, Rhodes moved into first for the playoff lead. John Hunter Nemechek, Friday’s pole winner, won Stage 1 on Lap 30, marking his series-best 11th stage win of the season. The Round of 8 continues Oct. 2 at Talladega (Ala.) Superspeedway.

BY STAFF REPORT

Dave Matter of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch has been named the Steve Ellis Beat Writer of the Year by the National Football Writers Association of America for his coverage of the University of Missouri football team during a pandemic-ravaged 2020-21. “As our industry evolves, I take more pride in being a newspaper beat writer in 2021 than ever before,” Matter said. “To be recognized for that work is deeply appreciated, especially by my peers in the FWAA.” Matter has covered Mizzou athletics for the Post-Dispatch since 2013 but has been on the beat for more than two decades, dating to

DIGEST

Wiggins’ vaccination exemption request is denied by NBA

Ironman shifts from Hawaii to Utah: The Ironman World Championship will be held outside Hawaii for the first time in four decades because of uncertainty over whether the Big Island will be able to host the triathlon as scheduled in February during the coronavirus pandemic. Competitors will head to St. George, Utah, on May 7 instead, West Hawaii Today reported. Organizers plan to bring the contest back to the islands in October 2022. The first race was held in Honolulu in the 1970s. The competition moved to Kailua-Kona on the Big Island in 1981. Organizers cancelled last year’s race because of coronavirus concerns and the risks of international travel. It was the first time in the triathlon’s history that the event wasn’t held. U.S. Open tennis champ Raducanu seeks new coach: Emma Raducanu has split from her coach, less than two weeks after winning the U.S. Open as a qualifier. Andrew Richardson coached Raducanu for two years at youth level and linked up with her again in July on a short-term deal for the duration of her time in the United States ahead of and during the U.S. Open. The 18-year-old Briton said she wants a more experienced coach now she will be playing in bigger events on the WTA Tour. Associated Press


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

NHRA MIDWEST NATIONALS

Cardinals (KMOX 1120 AM) • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 9/26 at Cubs 1:20 p.m. BSM

Tuesday 9/28 vs. Brewers 6:45 p.m. BSM

Wednesday 9/29 vs. Brewers 6:45 p.m. BSM

Thursday 9/30 vs. Brewers 12:15 p.m. BSM

Blues (WXOS 101.1 FM) • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 *Exhibition Monday 9/27 vs. Stars* 7 p.m.

Wednesday 9/29 Friday 10/1 at Blue Jackets* at Blackhawks* 7:30 p.m. 6 p.m.

Saturday 10/2 vs. Blackhawks* (Independence, Mo.), 7 p.m.

Mizzou football (KTRS 550 AM) • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 10/2 vs. Tennessee 11 a.m. SEC Network

Saturday 10/9 vs. North Texas Time, TV TBA

Saturday 10/16 vs. Texas A&M Time, TV TBA

Saturday 10/30 at Vanderbilt Time, TV TBA

Illinois football (KFNS 590 AM) • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 10/2 vs. Charlotte 11 a.m. BTN

Saturday 10/9 vs. Wisconsin 2:30 or 3 p.m. TV TBA

Saturday 10/23 at Penn State 11 a.m. TV TBA

Saturday 10/30 vs. Rutgers Time, TV TBA

LOCAL PLAY-BY-PLAY RADIO STATIONS Cardinals: KMOX (1120 AM) SLU MBB: KMOX (1120 AM) Illinois (FB, MBB): KFNS (590 AM) SIUC (FB, MBB): KATZ (1600 AM)

Blues: WXOS (101.1 FM) Mizzou (FB, MBB): KTRS (550 AM) SIUE (MBB): WSIE (88.7 FM) Mo. St. (FB, MBB): WGNU (106.9/920)

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 6:55 a.m. Formula One: Russian Grand Prix, ESPN2 1 p.m. NHRA: NHRA Midwest Nationals, FS1 2:30 p.m. IndyCar: Grand Prix of Long Beach, NBCSN 6 p.m. NASCAR: South Point 400, NBCSN BASEBALL 1 p.m. Cardinals at Cubs, BSM 1:30 p.m. Mets at Brewers, TBS 4 p.m. Braves at Padres (joined in progress), MLB Network 6 p.m. Yankees at Red Sox, ESPN BASKETBALL 2 p.m. WNBA playoffs: Phoenix at Seattle, KDNL (30) 4 p.m. WNBA playoffs: Chicago at Minnesota, ESPN2 FOOTBALL • NFL 12 p.m. Chargers at Chiefs, KMOV (4) 12 p.m. Bears at Browns, KTVI (2) 3:25 p.m. Buccaneers at Rams, KTVI (2) 7:20 p.m. Packers at 49ers, KSDK (5) GOLF 11 a.m. Ryder Cup: Day 3, Singles matches, KSDK (5) 11 a.m. LPGA: NW Arkansas Championship, final round, Golf 2 p.m. Champions: PURE Insurance Championship, final round, Golf HOCKEY 4 p.m. Exhibition: Bruins at Capitals, NHL Network 7 p.m. Exhibition: Senators at Jets, NHL Network 10 p.m. Exhibition: Sharks at Golden Knights, NHL Network HORSE RACING 11:30 a.m. America’s Day at the Races, FS2 SOCCER 8 a.m. English Premier League: Southampton vs. Wolverhampton, NBCSN 10:30 a.m. English Premier League: Arsenal vs. Tottenham Hotspur, NBCSN 11 a.m. Serie A: Lazio vs. AS Roma, CBSSN 11 a.m. College women: Georgia at LSU, ESPNU 3 p.m. College women: Tennessee at Missouri, SEC Network 6 p.m. MLS: Seattle at Sporting KC, FS1 8:30 p.m. MLS: LA Galaxy at Austin, ESPN2 11 p.m. College women: Georgia at LSU, ESPNU SOFTBALL 3 p.m. Athletes Unlimited, CBSSN 7:30 p.m. Athletes Unlimited, FS2 TENNIS 7:30 a.m. Metz-ATP, Ostrava-WTA, Tennis 11 a.m. Laver Cup, Day 3 Day Session, Tennis VOLLEYBALL 11 a.m. College women: Arkansas at Tennessee, SEC Network 12 p.m. College women: Florida State at Louisville, ESPNews 1 p.m. College women: South Carolina at Texas A&M, SEC Network 3 p.m. College women: Ohio State at Penn State, BTN

DIGEST Usyk unanimously wins heavyweight title In just his third fight since stepping up from the cruiserweight boxing division, Oleksandr Usyk delivered a clinic in movement and fast punching to claim a unanimous points win over Anthony Joshua in front of 66,267 stunned fans inside Tottenham Hotspur Stadium in London on Saturday to win the world heavyweight crown. Usyk became the third man, after Evander Holyfield and David Haye, to win world titles at cruiserweight then heavyweight. The judges scored the fight 117-112, 116-112 and 115-113 in favor of Usyk. Dominated by a smaller, lighter opponent, Joshua lost his WBA, WBO and IBF titles for a second time — more than two years after a defeat to Andy Ruiz Jr. in New York that he immediately avenged in Saudi Arabia. ”I had no objective to knock him out because my corner pushed me not to do that,” Usyk said. “At the start, I hit him and tried to knock him out but my trainer said, ‘Just stop and do your job.’” Boxer on undercard seriously injured: Lenin Castillo, a Dominican, was taken to a hospital after being carried out of the ring on a stretcher following a devastating knockout by British opponent Callum Smith in a preliminary bout to the UsykJoshua fight. Event promoter Eddie Hearn said Castillo, 33, was “responsive” after needing treatment by medical staff in the ring. Castillo’s legs appeared to spasm after he hit the canvas and referee Bob Williams quickly called off the fight in the second round. Hataoka leads in golf event: Japan’s Nasa Hataoka made a holein-one for the second straight day and shot a 6-under 65 to move into a tie with Australia’s Minjee Lee after two rounds of the LPGA’s NW Arkansas Championship, in Rogers. Wizards’ Hachimura is sidelined: Washington Wizards forward Rui Hachimura will miss the start of training camp for personal reasons. The team said it is an excused absence and there will be more updates when appropriate. Hachimura averaged 13.8 points over 57 games last season. Associated Press

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MICHAEL ALLIO PHOTOS, ICON SPORTSWIRE

Erica Enders, near lane, and and Greg Anderson do their burnouts during the pro stock division of the NHRA Midwest Nationals on Friday in Madison, Illinois.

Anderson nears career wins record in pro stock BY STU DURANDO

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Greg Anderson worked for Warren Johnson for 12 years, serving as crew chief for the NHRA’s all-time winningest pro stock driver. He achieved his pro stock license only because Johnson forced him to attend driving school in the mid-1990s so that Anderson would understand the challenges of operating the vehicle. “The last couple of years working for Warren, he got disgusted with myself and his son because we were always picking on him,” Anderson said. “He said, ‘I’m sending you guys to driving school so you can get inside a car and learn how difficult it is from the inside.’ The next week, Curt (Johnson) had a ride. I didn’t have any money and didn’t have an opportunity to race.” Approaching his 40th birthday, Anderson took a chance two years later. He wanted to find out if he could have a fraction of the success driving that he did at the helm for Johnson, who went on to win 97 NHRA events. Anderson warned his boss he might be back, begging for his job, but that wasn’t necessary. Now 60, he is tied with Johnson with 97 wins and trying to break the mark at this weekend’s Midwest Nationals at World Wide Technology Raceway. Although he has won two fewer season championships than Johnson, Anderson freely acknowledges his desire to break he record because it would mean another boost toward a possible fifth title. “A few races ago I thought I wasn’t going to make too much out of this deal,” he said “First of all, I didn’t know if I’d get there, and I probably had more important things to concentrate on. I’m trying to find a way to win a championship. “But I can’t stop thinking about it. So, it’s become important and it’s cool. I don’t think I’m going to

The parachutes come out on the Joey Haas top fuel dragster during qualifying Saturday. hurt myself thinking about it because if I find a way to break the record, I win a race and get the most points.” Anderson did as well as possible in qualifying, posting the best time in all three runs and taking the No. 1 spot for Sunday’s eliminations with a best of 6.519 seconds at 209.10 mph Saturday. In top fuel, Mike Salinas held onto the top qualifying spot at 3.652 seconds and 327.74 mph. Matt Hagan ended up atop the funny car qualifying at 3.868 seconds and 333.25 mph. Anderson has not won a season championship since 2010, capping a decade in which he dominated the division and began his pursuit of Johnson’s record by beating him more often than he lost in headto-head meetings. He has been chasing younger drives the last 10 years but still winning plenty. Just not as regularly as from 2003 to 2005 — all championship years — when he won 35 of 69 events. For whatever reason, WWTR has not been among the tracks that

he’s had great success. He won in 2004 and 2017 while Erica Enders has ruled at the track with four wins in the last nine years. “There’s no reason,” Anderson said of his inability to win more at WWTR. “It’s a great track for pro stock and there’s never been a problem. I can’t answer why other than it must be something I did.” Anderson is just happy to be racing after starting the season on shaky ground in terms of sponsorships. He was admittedly “on thin ice” as he tried to get enough backing to compete each week. He was patching things together when he got the idea to call Rick Hendrick of Hendrick Motorsports. Anderson met Hendrick 10 years ago and had kept in touch enough to feel comfortable making the call. Hendrick signed on for the remainder of the season. “I called to see if he had any interest at all, and he didn’t bat an eyelash,” Anderson said. “He’s a smart businessman and saw this whole record deal coming down and wants to be on the side of the car with the record. He’s no dummy.” In addition, Hendrick allowed Anderson to use the color scheme that Hendrick’s son, Ricky, used during his NASCAR days. Ricky Hendrick was one of eight people who died in 2004 when a plane owned by Hendrick Motorsports crashed en route to a race. What started out as a season of uncertainty has gone unexpectedly well. If Anderson was thinking about retirement, he’s probably thinking about it a lot less. “It’s been a good year and I probably should have a lot more wins,” he said. “In two or three, I dropped the ball and in a couple the car didn’t get it done. I’ve led the points from the start, so I can’t say anything bad.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

NASCAR

Larson back in Vegas seeking another win BY JENNA FRYER

Associated Press

Overlooked in the post-race spat between Kevin Harvick and Chase Elliott was yet another trip to victory lane for Kyle Larson, NASCAR’s championship favorite. As Larson celebrated his Cup Series-high sixth points win of the season last week, Hendrick Motorsports teammate Elliott jawed with Harvick following their on-track dustup at Bristol Motor Speedway. A flat tire had ruined Elliott’s own shot at the win, so he deliberately slowed Harvick to help his teammate beat his new rival. Their heated feud injected some excitement into NASCAR’s 10-race playoff series, which shifts Sunday to Las Vegas Motor Speedway for the opening race of the second round. But the dustup between Harvick and Elliott distracted from the results; Larson potentially jumpstarted another streak, and Hendrick Motorsports slid all four of its drivers into the next playoff round. It’s a shift in momentum from the first round, when Joe Gibbs Racing opened with a pair of wins from Denny Hamlin and Martin Truex Jr., while Hendrick seemed vulnerable with both William Byron and Alex Bowman in danger of playoff elimination just one week

ago. Instead, all four Hendrick drivers go to Las Vegas with their title chances still intact and Larson returning to the site of his first victory of the season. The playoffs started with talk of Rick Hendrick’s four Chevrolets claiming all four spots in the championship round, but it faded after the pair of JGR wins. Now it’s a reset and the Hendrick drivers are back in business. “I think there’s a lot of strength in the individual (Hendrick) teams,” Byron said this week. “We had a difficult stretch there with the start of the playoffs ... (but) we all ran well at Bristol and that was a really good sight to see. I think we’re poised to do really good things and we’ve overcome some things and there will be a lot more as we go through the playoffs.” Larson dominated in March by leading a race-high 103 laps for his first victory driving for Hendrick. It opened what has been a breakout season in which Larson through 29 races has career bests in wins (six), top fives (16) and top 10s (21). His 1,905 laps led is also a career best, and he needs just 95 more laps out front to become only the 20th driver in NASCAR history to lead more than 2,000 laps in a season. There are only three active drivers to hit that mark: Harvick,

Truex and Kyle Busch.

Busch at home Kurt Busch returned to his home track a year ago and scored a surprise victory to advance into the third round of the playoffs. He’ll be making his 750th career start in Sunday’s race — but with much smaller stakes. Busch was eliminated from playoff contention last week, ending Chip Ganassi Racing’s chance to win a Cup championship before the team shutters its 20-year NASCAR operation in November. Busch made his Cup debut in 2000 driving for Roush Fenway Racing. He has collected 33 victories, a championship and a Daytona 500 win. He will move to 23XI Racing next season. “It is hard to imagine, 20-plus years in the NASCAR Cup Series,” Busch said. “To have been able to compete at this level with some of the best teams in the sport and against the level of competition is such a privilege. It is like aging, the years seem to go faster, it seems like 700 starts was just a few weeks ago. “I feel like I have some race wins still out in front of me and I am looking forward to whatever the next milestone will be that I have a privilege to accomplish.”


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

M 3 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

NHRA MIDWEST NATIONALS

Cardinals (KMOX 1120 AM) • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 9/26 at Cubs 1:20 p.m. BSM

Tuesday 9/28 vs. Brewers 6:45 p.m. BSM

Wednesday 9/29 vs. Brewers 6:45 p.m. BSM

Thursday 9/30 vs. Brewers 12:15 p.m. BSM

Blues (WXOS 101.1 FM) • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 *Exhibition Monday 9/27 vs. Stars* 7 p.m.

Wednesday 9/29 Friday 10/1 at Blue Jackets* at Blackhawks* 7:30 p.m. 6 p.m.

Saturday 10/2 vs. Blackhawks* (Independence, Mo.), 7 p.m.

Mizzou football (KTRS 550 AM) • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Saturday 10/2 vs. Tennessee 11 a.m. SEC Network

Saturday 10/9 vs. North Texas Time, TV TBA

Saturday 10/16 vs. Texas A&M Time, TV TBA

Saturday 10/30 at Vanderbilt Time, TV TBA

Illinois football (KFNS 590 AM) • fightingillini.com | 217-333-3470 Saturday 10/2 vs. Charlotte 11 a.m. BTN

Saturday 10/9 vs. Wisconsin 2:30 or 3 p.m. TV TBA

Saturday 10/23 at Penn State 11 a.m. TV TBA

Saturday 10/30 vs. Rutgers Time, TV TBA

LOCAL PLAY-BY-PLAY RADIO STATIONS Cardinals: KMOX (1120 AM) SLU MBB: KMOX (1120 AM) Illinois (FB, MBB): KFNS (590 AM) SIUC (FB, MBB): KATZ (1600 AM)

Blues: WXOS (101.1 FM) Mizzou (FB, MBB): KTRS (550 AM) SIUE (MBB): WSIE (88.7 FM) Mo. St. (FB, MBB): WGNU (106.9/920)

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 6:55 a.m. Formula One: Russian Grand Prix, ESPN2 1 p.m.

MICHAEL ALLIO PHOTOS, ICON SPORTSWIRE

NHRA: NHRA Midwest Nationals, FS1

Erica Enders, near lane, and and Greg Anderson do their burnouts during the pro stock division of the NHRA Midwest Nationals on Friday in Madison, Illinois.

2:30 p.m. IndyCar: Grand Prix of Long Beach, NBCSN 6 p.m.

NASCAR: South Point 400, NBCSN

Anderson nears career wins record in pro stock

BASEBALL 1 p.m.

Cardinals at Cubs, BSM

1:30 p.m.

Mets at Brewers, TBS

4 p.m.

Braves at Padres (joined in progress), MLB Network

6 p.m.

Yankees at Red Sox, ESPN

BASKETBALL 2 p.m.

WNBA playoffs: Phoenix at Seattle, KDNL (30)

4 p.m.

WNBA playoffs: Chicago at Minnesota, ESPN2

BY STU DURANDO

FOOTBALL • NFL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

12 p.m.

Chargers at Chiefs, KMOV (4)

12 p.m.

Bears at Browns, KTVI (2)

3:25 p.m. Buccaneers at Rams, KTVI (2) 7:20 p.m. Packers at 49ers, KSDK (5) GOLF 11 a.m.

Ryder Cup: Day 3, Singles matches, KSDK (5)

11 a.m.

LPGA: NW Arkansas Championship, final round, Golf

2 p.m.

Champions: PURE Insurance Championship, final round, Golf

HOCKEY 4 p.m.

Exhibition: Bruins at Capitals, NHL Network

7 p.m.

Exhibition: Senators at Jets, NHL Network

10 p.m.

Exhibition: Sharks at Golden Knights, NHL Network

HORSE RACING 11:30 a.m. America’s Day at the Races, FS2 SOCCER 8 a.m.

English Premier League: Southampton vs. Wolverhampton, NBCSN

10:30 a.m. English Premier League: Arsenal vs. Tottenham Hotspur, NBCSN 11 a.m.

Serie A: Lazio vs. AS Roma, CBSSN

11 a.m.

College women: Georgia at LSU, ESPNU

3 p.m.

College women: Tennessee at Missouri, SEC Network

6 p.m.

MLS: Seattle at Sporting KC, FS1

8:30 p.m. MLS: LA Galaxy at Austin, ESPN2 11 p.m.

College women: Georgia at LSU, ESPNU

SOFTBALL 3 p.m.

Athletes Unlimited, CBSSN

7:30 p.m. Athletes Unlimited, FS2 TENNIS 7:30 a.m. Metz-ATP, Ostrava-WTA, Tennis 11 a.m.

Laver Cup, Day 3 Day Session, Tennis

VOLLEYBALL 11 a.m.

College women: Arkansas at Tennessee, SEC Network

12 p.m.

College women: Florida State at Louisville, ESPNews

1 p.m.

College women: South Carolina at Texas A&M, SEC Network

3 p.m.

College women: Ohio State at Penn State, BTN

DIGEST Usyk unanimously wins heavyweight title In just his third fight since stepping up from the cruiserweight boxing division, Oleksandr Usyk delivered a clinic in movement and fast punching to claim a unanimous points win over Anthony Joshua in front of 66,267 stunned fans inside Tottenham Hotspur Stadium in London on Saturday to win the world heavyweight crown. Usyk became the third man, after Evander Holyfield and David Haye, to win world titles at cruiserweight then heavyweight. The judges scored the fight 117-112, 116-112 and 115-113 in favor of Usyk. Dominated by a smaller, lighter opponent, Joshua lost his WBA, WBO and IBF titles for a second time — more than two years after a defeat to Andy Ruiz Jr. in New York that he immediately avenged in Saudi Arabia. (AP) Hataoka, Choi lead in golf events: Japan’s Nasa Hataoka made a hole-in-one for the second straight day and shot a 6-under 65 to move into a tie with Australia’s Minjee Lee after two rounds of the LPGA’s NW Arkansas Championship, in Rogers. • K.J. Choi shot a 4-under 68 for a two-stroke lead over Alex Cejka and Bernhard Langer after two rounds of the PGA Tour Champions PURE Insurance Championship, in Pebble Beach, Calif. (AP) SLU romps in soccer: St. Louis University scored three times in the second half in a dominant performance to beat George Mason 4-0 in an Atlantic 10 soccer game at Hermann Stadium. Kipp Keller. Kevin Komodi, Isaiah Parker snd Simon Becher scored for the 16th-ranked Billikens (2-0 in the A-10, 5-0-3 overall), who outshot George Mason 25-6. Patrick Schulte made two saves for the shutout. (Stu Durando) Berry wins Xfinity race: Josh Berry moved teammate Justin Allgaier out of the way with 42 laps remaining to win the Xfinity Series race at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. In the opener of the seven-race playoffs, Allgaier finished second and was followed by Noah Gragson. AJ Allmendinger, the top seed and regular season champion, was seventh. (AP)

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

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314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-744-5725

Greg Anderson worked for Warren Johnson for 12 years, serving as crew chief for the NHRA’s all-time winningest pro stock driver. He achieved his pro stock license only because Johnson forced him to attend driving school in the mid-1990s so that Anderson would understand the challenges of operating the vehicle. “The last couple of years working for Warren, he got disgusted with myself and his son because we were always picking on him,” Anderson said. “He said, ‘I’m sending you guys to driving school so you can get inside a car and learn how difficult it is from the inside.’ The next week, Curt (Johnson) had a ride. I didn’t have any money and didn’t have an opportunity to race.” Approaching his 40th birthday, Anderson took a chance two years later. He wanted to find out if he could have a fraction of the success driving that he did at the helm for Johnson, who went on to win 97 NHRA events. Anderson warned his boss he might be back, begging for his job, but that wasn’t necessary. Now 60, he is tied with Johnson with 97 wins and trying to break the mark at this weekend’s Midwest Nationals at World Wide Technology Raceway. Although he has won two fewer season championships than Johnson, Anderson freely acknowledges his desire to break he record because it would mean another boost toward a possible fifth title. “A few races ago I thought I wasn’t going to make too much out of this deal,” he said “First of all, I didn’t know if I’d get there, and I probably had more important things to concentrate on. I’m trying to find a way to win a championship. “But I can’t stop thinking about it. So, it’s become important and it’s cool. I don’t think I’m going to

The parachutes come out on the Joey Haas top fuel dragster during qualifying Saturday. hurt myself thinking about it because if I find a way to break the record, I win a race and get the most points.” Anderson did as well as possible in qualifying, posting the best time in all three runs and taking the No. 1 spot for Sunday’s eliminations with a best of 6.519 seconds at 209.10 mph Saturday. In top fuel, Mike Salinas held onto the top qualifying spot at 3.652 seconds and 327.74 mph. Matt Hagan ended up atop the funny car qualifying at 3.868 seconds and 333.25 mph. Anderson has not won a season championship since 2010, capping a decade in which he dominated the division and began his pursuit of Johnson’s record by beating him more often than he lost in headto-head meetings. He has been chasing younger drives the last 10 years but still winning plenty. Just not as regularly as from 2003 to 2005 — all championship years — when he won 35 of 69 events. For whatever reason, WWTR has not been among the tracks that

he’s had great success. He won in 2004 and 2017 while Erica Enders has ruled at the track with four wins in the last nine years. “There’s no reason,” Anderson said of his inability to win more at WWTR. “It’s a great track for pro stock and there’s never been a problem. I can’t answer why other than it must be something I did.” Anderson is just happy to be racing after starting the season on shaky ground in terms of sponsorships. He was admittedly “on thin ice” as he tried to get enough backing to compete each week. He was patching things together when he got the idea to call Rick Hendrick of Hendrick Motorsports. Anderson met Hendrick 10 years ago and had kept in touch enough to feel comfortable making the call. Hendrick signed on for the remainder of the season. “I called to see if he had any interest at all, and he didn’t bat an eyelash,” Anderson said. “He’s a smart businessman and saw this whole record deal coming down and wants to be on the side of the car with the record. He’s no dummy.” In addition, Hendrick allowed Anderson to use the color scheme that Hendrick’s son, Ricky, used during his NASCAR days. Ricky Hendrick was one of eight people who died in 2004 when a plane owned by Hendrick Motorsports crashed en route to a race. What started out as a season of uncertainty has gone unexpectedly well. If Anderson was thinking about retirement, he’s probably thinking about it a lot less. “It’s been a good year and I probably should have a lot more wins,” he said. “In two or three, I dropped the ball and in a couple the car didn’t get it done. I’ve led the points from the start, so I can’t say anything bad.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

NASCAR

Larson back in Vegas seeking another win BY JENNA FRYER

Associated Press

Overlooked in the post-race spat between Kevin Harvick and Chase Elliott was yet another trip to victory lane for Kyle Larson, NASCAR’s championship favorite. As Larson celebrated his Cup Series-high sixth points win of the season last week, Hendrick Motorsports teammate Elliott jawed with Harvick following their on-track dustup at Bristol Motor Speedway. A flat tire had ruined Elliott’s own shot at the win, so he deliberately slowed Harvick to help his teammate beat his new rival. Their heated feud injected some excitement into NASCAR’s 10-race playoff series, which shifts Sunday to Las Vegas Motor Speedway for the opening race of the second round. But the dustup between Harvick and Elliott distracted from the results; Larson potentially jumpstarted another streak, and Hendrick Motorsports slid all four of its drivers into the next playoff round. It’s a shift in momentum from the first round, when Joe Gibbs Racing opened with a pair of wins from Denny Hamlin and Martin Truex Jr., while Hendrick seemed vulnerable with both William Byron and Alex Bowman in danger of playoff elimination just one week

ago. Instead, all four Hendrick drivers go to Las Vegas with their title chances still intact and Larson returning to the site of his first victory of the season. The playoffs started with talk of Rick Hendrick’s four Chevrolets claiming all four spots in the championship round, but it faded after the pair of JGR wins. Now it’s a reset and the Hendrick drivers are back in business. “I think there’s a lot of strength in the individual (Hendrick) teams,” Byron said this week. “We had a difficult stretch there with the start of the playoffs ... (but) we all ran well at Bristol and that was a really good sight to see. I think we’re poised to do really good things and we’ve overcome some things and there will be a lot more as we go through the playoffs.” Larson dominated in March by leading a race-high 103 laps for his first victory driving for Hendrick. It opened what has been a breakout season in which Larson through 29 races has career bests in wins (six), top fives (16) and top 10s (21). His 1,905 laps led is also a career best, and he needs just 95 more laps out front to become only the 20th driver in NASCAR history to lead more than 2,000 laps in a season. There are only three active drivers to hit that mark: Harvick,

Truex and Kyle Busch.

Busch at home Kurt Busch returned to his home track a year ago and scored a surprise victory to advance into the third round of the playoffs. He’ll be making his 750th career start in Sunday’s race — but with much smaller stakes. Busch was eliminated from playoff contention last week, ending Chip Ganassi Racing’s chance to win a Cup championship before the team shutters its 20-year NASCAR operation in November. Busch made his Cup debut in 2000 driving for Roush Fenway Racing. He has collected 33 victories, a championship and a Daytona 500 win. He will move to 23XI Racing next season. “It is hard to imagine, 20-plus years in the NASCAR Cup Series,” Busch said. “To have been able to compete at this level with some of the best teams in the sport and against the level of competition is such a privilege. It is like aging, the years seem to go faster, it seems like 700 starts was just a few weeks ago. “I feel like I have some race wins still out in front of me and I am looking forward to whatever the next milestone will be that I have a privilege to accomplish.”


BASEBALL

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

Name drop: Cleveland set to say goodbye to Indians for good BY TOM WITHERS

Associated Press

CLEVELAND — There’s no more debate or decisions forthcoming. There’s still some anger and disbelief, but also the excitement that comes along with change. The Cleveland Indians are about to become history. On Monday, one of the American League’s charter members will play its final home game of 2021, and also its last at Progressive Field as the Indians, the team’s name since 1915, when “Shoeless” Joe Jackson was the starting right fielder on opening day. Much more than the makeup of a rainout against the Kansas City Royals, the home finale will signify the end of one era and beginning of a new chapter for the team, which will be called the Cleveland Guardians next season. That’s going to take some time getting used to. The Indians are all Clevelanders have ever known. “I’m not a betting man,” longtime radio play-by-play broadcaster Tom Hamilton said, pondering what’s ahead. “But I have to guess the over-under on how many times we’ll say Indians is one million.” After the Oct. 3 season finale in Texas and with no postseason for a team that hasn’t won the World Series since 1948, there will be a transition period before Indians — a named deemed racist by some — is dropped and Guardians appears on new uniforms with logos that were unveiled in July to mixed reviews. At some point, Guardians merchandise will go on sale and the massive script “Indians” logo crowning the ballpark’s massive left-field scoreboard will be taken down, a moment many Clevelanders could have never imagined possible. And while the end of Indians has been known for a while, it still seemed to sneak up on some fans. “It kind of hit us when we came in,” Kathy Wainwright of Elyria, Ohio, said as she and her husband, Mark, grabbed a bite to eat and a couple pregame beers before the Indians hosted the Royals.

Giants From D1

dugout during games — she blends in as one piece of a uniquely crafted puzzle. “I feel like one of the guys, although sometimes I’m like, do I want to feel that way?” Nakken joked. “I think my point is, everybody is different in there.” No one — not even the Giants — expected San Francisco to be the first team to clinch a playoff spot in 2021. They were supposed to be a couple of years away from making a legitimate run to October, particularly because the Los Angeles Dodgers and San Diego Padres looked far more ready. But somehow, the Giants got themselves ready. After Thursday’s games, San Francisco owns the most wins in baseball, 100, and is on pace for more than 100 victories for the first time since 2003. The Giants lead the Dodgers in the National League West. They have blown away expectations from start to finish, something few teams in recent baseball history have

TONY DEJAK, ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Indians sign hangs at Progressive Field before the first baseball game of a doubleheader against the Chicago White Sox, on Thursday, in Cleveland. Before entering the ballpark, the couple walked to the corner of Ontario Street and Carnegie Avenue to take a photo of the home plate entrance where a lighted “Indians” sign welcomes fans. “I knew it was the last time I’d get to see it that way,” Mark said. The team is not planning any ceremony to honor the Indians’ final performance at home. Unfortunately for many Cleveland fans, it’s happening at the same time that the Browns are hosting the Chicago Bears just one mile away at FirstEnergy Stadium. The Indians’ last home at-bat has been another delicate line to navigate for the club, whose decision to change the name elicited heavy criticism from fans who felt the team caved to a small, vocal minority. Others thought it was long overdue, and probably should have happened when the team ditched the contentious Chief Wahoo logo a few years back. The name change became in-

been able to do quite so emphatically. But these Giants are different — intentionally, deliberately different. President of Baseball Operations Farhan Zaidi and Manager Gabe Kapler built the largest coaching staff in baseball and did not shy away from hires who, like Nakken or bench coach Kai Correa, had never played in the big leagues. That staff has overseen unfamiliar levels of consistency from very familiar names. On the San Francisco Bay, catcher Buster Posey, shortstop Brandon Crawford and first baseman Brandon Belt are known as “the old guys,” the holdovers from the teams that won World Series titles in 2012 and 2014. Teammates wear T-shirts that read “let the old guys play,” though no lobbying is needed. Posey, 34, is hitting .305 with a .900 on-base-plusslugging, his highest OPS since his MVP season in 2012. Crawford, 34, known more for his steadily shimmering defense than for being one of the game’s top offensive infielders, is hitting

evitable last year when owner Paul Dolan announced his intention to examine the use of Indians after being moved by the social unrest sweeping America in the wake of the George Floyd murder in Minneapolis. Cleveland’s steps toward the change don’t really matter at this point. There’s no turning back. It’s happening. For Sandy Alomar Jr., the end is conflicting. A six-time All-Star catcher and current first-base coach for Cleveland, Alomar has a personal attachment to Indians, the name he’s worn across his chest for 23 seasons — 11 as a player, 12 as coach. He respects the team’s decision and understands the rationale behind the change, but that doesn’t make this any easier for him. “It’s an emotional time for me,” he said. “All I’ve known is being a Cleveland Indian. I’m an Indian forever.”

JEFF CHIU, AP PHOTO

.298 with an .889 OPS. Belt, 33, who busted through for a career year in 2020, owns a .938 OPS, which would be second among first baseman behind only American League MVP candidate Vladimir Guerrero Jr. if Belt had enough at-bats to qualify. The Giants’ pitching staff,

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as the Guardians, it’s going to be here. That’s going to be more interesting.” Before summer faded completely, Don and Julie MacDonald of Fairview Park, Ohio, made one last family trip to the ballpark this week. It was their son Josh’s 10th birthday, and they made sure to grab some new Indians merchandise, at least until the Guardians is available. As his kids ate pizza slices along a railing in the right-field corner, MacDonald mulled how things might be different going forward and how they may stay the same. The Indians might have a new name. Their fans aren’t changing. “It’s going to be hard to not say Indians for a while,” he said. “It’s been so natural for so long and I don’t see Chief Wahoo going away any time soon. There are still so many fans wearing it. The name might be Guardians, but I think people will still say Indians.”

The Giants’ LaMonte Wade Jr., right, celebrates his home run with third base coach Ron Wotus earlier this month.

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Alomar was a driving force behind powerful Cleveland teams in the 1990s, when after they moved from their lakefront ballpark, the Indians went from downtrodden to dominant and won five straight division titles. “Those moments are irreplaceable, so I guess this won’t hit me as hard as it will when I have to wear the new uniform,” said Alomar, who is planning to keep the one he wears in this season’s last game as a souvenir. “I may not wash that one,” he said. “I’m just going to take it home the way it is.” Hamilton, who called his first Indians game in 1990, doesn’t know what type of reaction to expect from Cleveland fans on Monday. He thinks the name change will have a bigger impact next season — when the Indians don’t take the field. “I think it’s going to be a bigger deal on opening day, the home opener,” he said. “The first game isn’t going to be in Kansas City

SINCE 1950

too, has transformed from an unheralded group of lowpriced reclamation projects to one of baseball’s best. The San Francisco bullpen has the lowest ERA in baseball. While other teams are building bullpens on high velocity and high spin rate, the Giants are averaging the lowest fastball velocity of any MLB bullpen. They own the best strikeout-to-walk ratio in the National League, in large part because they walk the fewest batters in baseball. “This started in spring training; you remember we started talking about ‘push the pace, pound the zone, know your plan,’ “ Kapler said. The Giants appear to be a team in sync, disciplined without being dogmatic, comfortable without being complacent. Many players credit their coaches for success when they find it, politely checking the box of spreading praise around the room. But few teams do so as often the Giants. And few teams have a manager as averse to box-checking for its own sake than this one. The 46-year-old Kapler has always been known for rethinking baseball norms, but his unusual approach had often earned him more criticism than success. As manager of the Philadelphia Phillies in 2018 and 2019, Kapler finished two games under .500 in two seasons and was in charge when clubhouse turmoil spilled out into the press. Veteran first baseman Carlos Santana later told ESPN

that he liked Kapler, but “sometimes the manager cannot control the clubhouse because everybody [is] doing their thing.” He has faced even more serious questions about his leadership, too. A 2019 Washington Post investigation found that as head of player development for the Dodgers in 2015, Kapler was accused of failing to report a woman’s accusations of assault against one of his players to the proper authorities and instead trying to mediate a conversation between the alleged victim and players. Kapler later wrote on his website he was not aware the allegations included sexual assault and he would have handled them differently if he had known. But his past has not stalled progress in San Francisco, where his emphasis on “the process” and the present seem to have clicked with a franchise looking for rebirth. As Kapler and his coaches see it, the game is hard enough: Why add the weight of preconceived routine to aching backs when they can lighten the load instead? “Kap has a way of making everybody feel psychologically safe in this environment that can be tough at times,” Nakken said. “Fans, media, being in the public eye. When we’re in the dugout and in the clubhouse, there’s a sense of safety there.” Giants hitters take batting practice on the field when they want to, and they don’t

when they don’t. Players speak to the media from a Zoom room where a candle burns on the table. Veterans such as Posey know when they will play and when they won’t, and Giants coaches make sure they adhere to those schedules. Giants pitching coaches — noteworthy in part because there are more than one — emphasize strike-throwing. Walks cause trouble, but walks are avoidable. And Kapler wants his pitchers to work quickly not only because it hurries hitters but also because it exudes confidence. Given the choice to look confident or not, why would anyone choose the latter? In addition to hitters doing what they need when they need, Giants coaches emphasize taking as much extraneous thought as possible out of the process. One aspect of the approach is looking for a pitch in a certain tunnel. If you see it there, swing. If not, hold off. Like so much of the Giants’ approach, the plan is not necessarily novel, but the buy-in has been. “Early on in my career, everyone is telling me, ‘Stop swinging at a slider low and away.’ I was like, ‘Yeah, I’d love to, but . . .’” outfielder Darin Ruf said. “Now if I train my eyes to look up and in against guys that might be trying to spin it down and away, it can help me a little bit to lay off.” None of this is as simple as it seems, of course. But these Giants have made it look that way. “Going into this year, I think our staff and our players as well, we resonate really well when there’s a clear and cohesive North Star,” Nakken said. Entering this season, Giants veterans placed that North Star squarely over a division title for which no one expected them to contend. If some higher power rewound the baseball season and ran it through again with the same coaching staff and same attitude, perhaps none of this would have clicked quite so completely. Perhaps the Giants wouldn’t have a chance to hold off the mighty Dodgers. But no one in San Francisco would even consider pushing rewind at this point. If anything, the Giants decided to push fast forward.


GOLF

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

Americans in historically great shape at Ryder Cup BY DOUG FERGUSON

AP Golf Writer

SHEBOYGAN, Wis. — The pressure and drama so typical of the Ryder Cup finally arrived on Saturday, with one big difference. The suspense was whether Europe could try to make a game of it. The Americans held their own over the final hour as Dustin Johnson completed a perfect week of team play and Scottie Scheffler delivered the biggest putt of his young career. That staked them to an 11-5 lead, their largest ever against Europe and their biggest in the Ryder Cup since 1975. No one has ever come back from more than a four-point deficit in Ryder Cup history. That’s the order facing Europe, which has yet to win a session at Whistling Straits. The Europeans tried, getting another big win from Jon Rahm and a clutch moment from Shane Lowry, who holed a 10-foot par putt on the 18th green and was pumpUnited States 11 ing his arms Europe 5 so furiously in celebration that he finally dropped his putter on the ground. So much was as stake. So little was gained. “We’re not in a good position and it’s going to take a beyond monumental effort,” said Ian Poulter, who has failed to deliver a point in two matches. “So we need a couple of miracles.” “We’re out there fighting as hard as we can,” Lowry said. The Americans routed Europe again in foursomes Saturday morning — a third straight 3-1 margin — to build a 9-3 lead. And while Europe was ahead in three of the afternoon fourballs, Scheffler’s 15-foot birdie putt on the 15th hole and his nifty up-anddown for birdie on the next hole carried him and Bryson DeChambeau to victory in the final match on the course. Next up is the final session of 12 singles matches, historically an American strength. They need to reach 14 ½ points to win back that gold trophy. “I think we have a lot of guys on this team that really hate losing, and so individual matches tomorrow, I think guys are going to be fired up and ready to play,” Scheffler said. “Hopefully, finish this thing off.” The U.S. team led 12 ½-3 ½ going into Sunday in 1975 when it played against only Britain and Ireland. Dating to the modern era of 1979, when continental Europe joined the party, its largest lead was 10 ½ -5 ½ in 1981 at Walton Heath. The six-point lead ties the modern record Europe set in 2004 at Oakland Hills in a record rout.

Ryder Cup

JEFF ROBERSON, AP PHOTOS

Jordan Spieth reacts after making a putt during his morning alternate-shot foursomes victory with teammate Justin Thomas. Spieth went 1-1 on Saturday.

Team USA’s Brooks Koepka hits from a bunker on the eighth hole during Saturday’s foursomes match at Whistling Straits in Sheboygan, Wis. Despite the United States dominance, Koepka lost both of his matches Saturday. Rahm was unbeaten in team play. The world’s No. 1 player, looking every bit the part, teamed with Ryder Cup record-setter Sergio Garcia to win foursomes in the morning and then hold out to beat Brooks Koepka and coldputting Jordan Spieth in fourballs. Right when it looked as though the Americans might square the match, Rahm made a 30-foot

birdie on the 16th hole and Spieth missed from 12 feet — the sixth time in fourballs he missed from that range or closer, including one that mysteriously circled the entire cup and came out. Even so, the climb is steeper than some of the wild dunes dotting the landscape of this rugged terrain along the Lake Michigan shores.

The top five players in the world have gone 15-0-2 in team play at this Ryder Cup. The problem for Europe is four of those players are Americans. Johnson became the first American since Larry Nelson in 1979 to go 4-0 in team play. He went out twice with Collin Morikawa, the two-time major champion who drove the sixth green and deliv-

ered plenty of big putts of his own in the afternoon fourballs. Johnson was the only American to play all four matches. A 9-3 lead through three sessions made it easy for U.S. captain Steve Stricker to rest Xander Schauffele and Patrick Cantlay, who won another foursomes match, and Justin Thomas, who delivered another clutch shot into the par-5 16th to set up a foursome win with Spieth. The goal for the Americans after their best opening day in 46 years was to wipe the slate clean and play as though the Ryder Cup was just starting. For a time, it started to feel as if this Ryder Cup was over. Johnson and Morikawa never trailed in either of their two matches. Schauffele and Cantlay flipped their match during a sixhole stretch in the middle of their round. Spieth and Thomas rallied from an early 3-down deficit. Already the leading pointsscorer in Ryder Cup history, Garcia won both his matches with Rahm, the latest European version of a Spanish Armada. He now has won 25 matches, breaking the record held by Nick Faldo. “What we did is not enough, not (with) the situation we are in,” Garcia said after his morning foursomes match. It felt better in the afternoon, a board finally filled with mostly European blue. But when it ended, Europe had not made up any ground from the morning.

Record a bittersweet milestone for Garcia BY EDDIE PELLS

Associated Press

SHEBOYGAN, Wis. — Nobody has collected more wins at the Ryder Cup than Sergio Garcia. Not in history. And, when it comes to his underperforming European teammates, certainly not this week. Garcia won twice with fellow Spaniard Jon Rahm on Saturday to surpass

Nick Faldo with his 24th and 25th career victories at the event Garcia treasures the most. But the wins and the record came on a day in which Europe fell even further behind — 11-5 to an American team that’s not encountering trouble with many players outside of Spain. “It’s great but it’s not,” Garcia said shortly after

he and Rahm closed out their 3-and-1 victory in the morning over Brooks Koepka and Daniel Berger. “We need more wins and unfortunately we are not getting them.” Though the newest version of the Spanish Armada moved to 3-0 for the week, they are virtually the only ones enjoying any success for Europe. Shane Lowry and Tyrell CHARLIE NEIBERGALL, ASSOCIATED PRESS

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SINCE 1950

Team Europe’s Sergio Garcia reacts after making a putt on the ninth hole during Saturday’s foursomes match at the Ryder Cup in Sheboygan, Wis. Hatton are the only other combination to produce a European victory over the first 16 matches. This is America’s biggest lead since 1975 — four years before players from continental Europe were brought into the Ryder Cup. “Obviously, I’m very proud to win another match for our team,” Garcia said following the afternoon victory, a 2-and-1 win over Koepka and Jordan Spieth. “But we have a big task tomorrow.” One could only imagine Garcia’s morning performance fitting into one of Europe’s clever social-media videos if the rest of this week weren’t shaping up as such a complete disaster. There was Garcia, looking chilled and old before his early starting time — then doing nothing inspired as he and Rahm limped their way to a 3-down deficit after three holes. And then, there he was, starting a putt perfectly on

line on No. 7 but leaving it a foot short, then burying his face in his hand. But then, there he was, holing out from in front of the green on No. 9 to suddenly pull the Spaniards back to even. And there he was, laughing so hard he spit out his drink while Koepka argued with the rules officials on 15. And then came the shot Garcia ripped from 250 yards out to 5 feet to set up an eagle on the par-5 16th. It came just after he heard someone in the crowd shout out that he was going to choke. Instead, he all but put the match away. “It was nice to prove him wrong, I guess,” Garcia said. It was more of the same in the afternoon, as Rahm’s putter heated up again, much the way it had Friday. Rahm’s 29-foot birdie putt on the 16th hole gave the Europeans an insurmountable lead. He also made birdies from 27 and 45 feet to stake himself and Garcia to an early 3-up lead.

“We support each other all throughout, and even at the bad times, we were making each other smile and I think that was the biggest part,” Rahm said. Garcia improved to 2512-7 in his 10 Ryder Cup appearances. With every win, he expands on both his records in victories (25) and points (28 ½), leaving the likes of Faldo, Bernhard Langer and Arnold Palmer even further in the dust. But Garcia knows this as well as anyone: More than any event in golf, the Ryder Cup is not about individual numbers. And unless he gets some historic help in Sunday’s singles matches, he will stay stuck on the number six. That’s the number of winning Ryder Cup teams he’s been part of. “We are trying to win the match so we can take points in our favor and take points away from the U.S.,” Garcia said. “But we need more. At the moment, we are not getting them.” Ryder Cup Results At Whistling Straits Sheboygan, Wis. Yardage: 7,387; Par: 71 Saturday UNITED STATES 11, EUROPE 5 Foursomes United States 3, Europe 1 Sergio Garcia and Jon Rahm, Europe, def. Brooks Koepka and Daniel Berger, United States, 3 and 1. Dustin Johnson and Collin Morikawa, United States, def. Paul Casey and Tyrrell Hatton, Europe, 2 and 1. Justin Thomas and Jordan Spieth, United States, def. Viktor Hovland and Bernd Wiesberger, Europe, 2 up. Patrick Cantlay and Xander Schauffele, United States, def. Lee Westwood and Matt Fitzpatrick, Europe, 2 and 1. Fourballs Europe 2, United States 2 Jon Rahm and Sergio Garcia, Europe, def. Brooks Koepka and Jordan Spieth, United States, 2 and 1. Shane Lowry and Tyrrell Hatton, Europe, def. Tony Finau and Harris English, United States, 1 up. Scottie Scheffler and Bryson DeChambeau, United States, def. Tommy Fleetwood and Viktor Hovland, Europe, 3 and 1. Dustin Johnson and Collin Morikawa, United States, def. Ian Poulter and Rory McIlroy, Europe, 4 and 3.


BASEBALL

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAY’S GAMES

AMERICAN LEAGUE East z-Tampa Bay Boston New York Toronto Baltimore Central x-Chicago Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Minnesota West Houston Seattle Oakland Los Angeles Texas

W L Pct 95 59 .617 88 66 .571 87 67 .565 85 69 .552 49105 .318 W L Pct 87 67 .565 75 78 .490 74 79 .484 70 83 .458 69 85 .448 W L Pct 91 62 .595 84 69 .549 82 71 .536 73 80 .477 56 98 .364

GB — 7 8 10 46 GB — 11½ 12½ 16½ 18 GB — 7 9 18 35½

WC L10 — 6-4 — 7-3 — 7-3 2 4-6 38 3-7 WC L10 — 4-6 11½ 5-5 12½ 7-3 16½ 5-5 18 6-4 WC L10 — 7-3 2½ 7-3 4½ 5-5 13½ 3-7 31 2-8

Str W-2 L-1 W-4 L-3 L-1 Str W-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 W-4 Str L-1 W-5 L-4 W-1 W-1

Home 50-29 49-30 45-33 43-31 24-52 Home 49-27 38-40 41-37 36-39 36-40 Home 47-28 42-33 40-38 39-40 33-42

Away 45-30 39-36 42-34 42-38 25-53 Away 38-40 37-38 33-42 34-44 33-45 Away 44-34 42-36 42-33 34-40 23-56

x-clinched division; z-clinched playoff berth

Thursday’s results Chi. White Sox 7, Cleve. 2 (7), 1st Seattle 6, Oakland 5 Cleve. 5, Chi. White Sox 3 (7), 2nd Baltimore 3, Texas 0 Minnesota 7, Toronto 2 L.A. Angels 3, Houston 2

Friday’s results Chicago White Sox 1, Cleveland 0 Tampa Bay 8, Miami 0 Kansas City 3, Detroit 1 Texas 8, Baltimore 5 N.Y. Yankees 8, Boston 3 Minnesota 3, Toronto 1 Seattle at L.A. Angels (n) Houston at Oakland (n)

Saturday’s games Houston (Valdez 11-5) at Oakland (Manaea 10-10), 3:07 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Cortes Jr. 2-2) at Boston (Pivetta 9-7), 3:10 p.m. Kansas City (Heasley 0-1) at Detroit (Skubal 8-12), 5:10 p.m. Miami (Alcantara 9-13) at Tampa Bay (McClanahan 9-6), 5:10 p.m. Texas (Lyles 9-12) at Baltimore (Means 6-7), 6:05 p.m. Toronto (Ray 12-6) at Minnesota (TBD), 6:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Lynn 10-5) at Cleveland (Morgan 3-7), 6:15 p.m. Seattle (Anderson 7-9) at L.A. Angels (Barria 2-4), 8:07 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE East W L Pct GB Atlanta 80 72 .526 — Philadelphia 80 74 .519 1 New York 73 80 .477 7½ Miami 64 89 .418 16½ Washington 64 90 .416 17 Central W L Pct GB z-Milwaukee 92 62 .597 — St. Louis 85 69 .552 7 Cincinnati 79 75 .513 13 Chicago 67 87 .435 25 Pittsburgh 57 96 .373 34½ West W L Pct GB z-San Francisco10054.649 — z-Los Angeles 98 55 .641 1½ San Diego 78 75 .510 21½ Colorado 71 82 .464 28½ Arizona 49104 .320 50½

WC L10 Str Home — 4-6 L-2 37-37 5 8-2 W-4 46-33 11½ 2-8 L-3 44-33 20½ 4-6 L-3 40-38 21 5-5 L-1 35-43 WC L10 Str Home — 3-7 W-1 43-36 —10-0W-1442-33 6 4-6 W-1 41-37 18 2-8 L-4 39-40 27½ 5-5 L-2 34-41 WC L10 Str Home — 6-4 W-1 49-26 — 8-2 W-1 52-23 6½ 4-6 W-2 45-33 13½ 6-4 L-2 46-30 35½ 2-8 W-1 29-46

Away 43-35 34-41 29-47 24-51 29-47 Away 49-26 43-36 38-38 28-47 23-55 Away 51-28 46-32 33-42 25-52 20-58

z-clinched playoff berth

Thursday’s results St. Louis 8, Milwaukee 5 Arizona 6, Atlanta 4 L.A. Dodgers 7, Colorado 5, 10 inn. San Diego 7, San Fran. 6, 10 inn. Washington 3, Cincinnati 2 Philadelphia 12, Pittsburgh 6

Friday’s results St. Louis 8, Chi. Cubs 5 (7), 1st Tampa Bay 8, Miami 0 Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh 6 St. Louis 12, Chi. Cubs 4 (7), 2nd San Diego 6, Atlanta 5 (7), 1st Cincinnati 8, Washington 7 (11) Milwaukee 5, N.Y. Mets 1 San Francisco 7, Colorado 2 L.A. Dodgers at Arizona (n) Atlanta at San Diego (n), 2nd

Saturday’s games St. Louis (Lester 7-6) at Chicago Cubs (Sampson 1-2), 1:20 p.m. Pittsburgh (Crowe 4-7) at Philadelphia (Suárez 6-5), 3:05 p.m. Miami (Alcantara 9-13) at Tampa Bay (McClanahan 9-6), 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Hill 6-7) at Milwaukee (Burnes 10-4), 6:10 p.m. Washington (Fedde 7-9) at Cincinnati (Gutierrez 9-6), 6:10 p.m. Atlanta (Ynoa 4-5) at San Diego (TBD), 6:15 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 10-7) at Arizona (Gallen 2-10), 7:10 p.m. San Francisco (DeSclafani 12-7) at Colorado (Gray 8-11), 7:10 p.m.

INDIANS: Cleveland activated reigning AL Cy Young Award winner Shane Bieber from the 60-day injured list for a start Friday against the Chicago White Sox. Bieber retired all nine hitters he faced. RAYS: Tampa Bay rookie Wander Franco was reinstated from the 10-day injured list on Friday after missing two weeks with a right hamstring injury. Franco extended his on-base streak to 39 games, then exited in the first inning against Detroit on Sept. 10. He went 1-for-4 on Friday. PADRES: Austin Nola is finishing this season where he started it: on the injured list. The 31-year-old catcher has a left thumb strain that will require surgery. TIGERS: Left-hander Matthew Boyd will undergo surgery Monday to repair the flexor tendon in his throwing arm. ASTROS: Right-hander Zack Greinke was scratched from Friday’s start and placed on the 10-day IL with neck soreness. BLUE JAYS: Toronto reliever Ryan Borucki had his suspension for plunking Tampa Bay outfielder Kevin Kiermaier reduced to two games after an appeal. — Wire reports

61

Max Scherzer might win another Cy Young Award, but unless he reaches base in his final start he’ll claim a dubious batting record — most plate appearances without reaching base in a season. Scherzer has been to bat 61 times and made 61 outs — 0-for-57 with four sacrifices. The record for season-long ineptitude is 49 set by Marlins pitcher Wei-Yin Chen in 2016. — Tribune News Service

Yankees pull within a game of Red Sox ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — Gerrit Cole took a two-hit shutout into the sixth inning and Giancarlo Stanton hit a three-run homer to lead the Yankees to an 8-3 victory Friday night, snapping Boston’s seven-game winning streak and pulling New York within one game of the Red Sox atop the wild-card standings. With Boston in its lucky yellow jerseys and Fenway Park sold to capacity for just the third time this season, Cole no-hit the Red Sox for 3 2/3 innings and New York coasted to its fourth straight win. In a potential preview of the AL wild-card matchup, Nathan Eovaldi barely made it out of the first inning and couldn’t get through the third. CARDINALS 8, CUBS 5, 1ST CARDINALS 12, CUBS 4, 2ND: St. Louis emphatically matched a team record with their 14th straight win, pounding Chicago in the second game of doubleheader behind Tyler O’Neill’s three-run homer and a pair of solo shots by Lars Nootbaar. The Cardi-

Giants 7, Rockies 2 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. La Stella 2b 5 1 3 1 0 0 .247 Belt 1b 5 1 2 1 0 2 .265 Posey c 4 0 1 1 1 1 .305 Wade Jr. rf-lf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .264 Bryant lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Crawford ss 3 2 3 1 1 0 .303 Longoria 3b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .285 Yastrzemski cf-rf 3 1 1 3 1 1 .223 Wood p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Dickerson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Flores ph 1 1 0 0 0 0 .257 Duggar ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Totals 37 7 11 7 3 8 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tapia lf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .274 Rodgers 2b 5 1 3 0 0 1 .289 Story ss 5 0 0 0 0 3 .247 Blackmon rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .269 Cron 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .277 Díaz c 4 0 2 1 0 0 .236 Hilliard cf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .220 Welker 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .154 McMahon ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Lambert p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Hampson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Ruiz ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .194 Totals 38 2 11 2 0 12 San Francisco 110 001 400 — 7 11 0 Colorado 200 000 000 — 2 11 1

LOB — San Francisco 6, Colorado 10. 2B — Rodgers (19). HR — La Stella (7), off Lambert; Crawford (22), off Lambert; Belt (27), off Goudeau; Yastrzemski (25), off Goudeau. RBIs — La Stella (25), Crawford (84), Belt (55), Yastrzemski 3 (65), Posey (50), Blackmon (78), Díaz (42). San Francisco IP H R Wood 4 6 2 Castro, W, 1-0 2 1 0 Watson 1 0 0 Rogers 1 3 0 Doval 1 1 0 Colorado IP H R Lambert 32/3 4 2 Goudeau, L, 1-1 21/3 4 4 Stephenson 1 2 1 Almonte 1 1 0 Fernández 1 0 0

ER BB SO ERA 2 0 7 4.00 0 0 2 0.00 0 0 0 2.82 0 0 2 2.13 0 0 1 3.68 ER BB SO ERA 2 1 2 4.91 4 0 2 5.02 0 0 2 3.32 0 1 1 8.00 0 1 1 11.57

T — 3:06. Att. — 41,613.

TWINS 3, BLUE JAYS 1: Byron Buxton’s two-run homer spoiled José Berríos’ return to Minnesota and dealt a blow to Toronto’s postseason hopes. PHILLIES 8, PIRATES 6: Didi Gregorius hit a go-ahead, three-run home run in the seventh inning, Bryce Harper had an RBI double and Philadelphia pulled closer in the NL East with a home win over Pittsburgh. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Yankees designated hitter Giancarlo Stanton, left, celebrates his three-run homer with teammate Rougned Odor in the third inning Friday in Boston. nals won the opener, riding O’Neill’s and Paul Goldschmidt’s 30th homers and José Rondon’s pinch-hit two-run shot.

ami in St. Petersburg, Fla.

ROYALS 3, TIGERS 1: Carlos Hernandez pitched five shutout innings and Whit Merrifield drove in a pair of WHITE SOX 1, INDIANS 0: runs as Kansas City won in Chicago starter Dylan Cease Detroit. left after being struck on the PADRES 6, BRAVES 5, 1ST: right arm by a comebacker Fernando Tatis Jr. homered in the sixth inning of a vicleading off the top of the tory in Cleveland. seventh inning and host San RAYS 8, MARLINS 0: Randy Diego beat NL East-leading Arozarena got Tampa Bay Atlanta in the resumption of rolling with a three-run a game that was suspended double in the first inning, due to rain in Atlanta on July and Ryan Yarbrough pitched 21. The Braves’ lead over the six solid innings to beat Mi- Phillies fell to one game.

GIANTS 7, ROCKIES 2: Mike Yastrzemski hit a threerun homer, one of four long balls by San Francisco, to beat Colorado in Denver for its 100th win. BREWERS 5, METS 1: Eric Lauer turned in a strong outing and Milwaukee hit three home runs in snapping a five-game skid with a home win over New York. RANGERS 8, ORIOLES 5: Texas used a five-run ninth to win in Baltimore and snap a five-game losing streak. REDS 8, NATIONALS 7 (11): Cincinnati got a walk-off win over Washington on Aristides Aquino’s RBI single in the 11th inning.

BOX SCORES Cardinals 8, Cubs 5

Brewers 5, Mets 1

GAME 1 St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Edman 2b 4 2 3 1 0 0 .267 Goldschmidt 1b 4 1 2 3 0 1 .293 O’Neill lf 4 1 1 2 0 0 .278 Arenado 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .256 Carlson rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .261 Carpenter ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .174 Sosa ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .274 DeJong pr-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .195 Bader cf 3 2 2 0 0 1 .256 Knizner c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .186 Rondón ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .275 Nootbaar rf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .198 Totals 30 8 10 8 2 8 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Contreras c 3 0 1 1 1 1 .228 Schwindel 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .361 I.Happ rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Deichmann ph-rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .160 Wisdom lf 3 0 0 0 1 3 .233 Duffy 3b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .267 Hoerner ss 1 0 0 0 1 0 .308 Alcántara ph-ss 1 1 1 2 0 0 .203 Bote 2b 2 1 1 0 1 1 .196 T.Thompson cf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .143 Steele p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .100 Martini ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .136 Romine ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .192 Totals 26 5 6 5 6 11 St. Louis 002 042 0 — 8 10 0 Chicago 000 005 0 — 5 6 0 2B — Bader (19), Schwindel (15), Romine (2), Contreras (16). HR — Goldschmidt (30), off Steele; Rondón (2), off Steele; O’Neill (30), off Steele; Alcántara (4), off Reyes. RBIs — Goldschmidt 3 (96), Rondón 2 (7), O’Neill 2 (72), Edman (54), Alcántara 2 (13), Romine 2 (5), Contreras (51). SB — Edman (28). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO ERA J.Happ 4 2 0 0 4 6 3.97 Reyes, W, 10-8 12/3 2 4 4 2 3 3.28 1 McFarland /3 2 1 1 0 0 2.70 Gallegos, S, 13-21 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.14 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Steele, L, 3-4 5 7 6 6 2 5 4.86 Nance 1 3 2 2 0 0 6.33 Adam 1 0 0 0 0 3 7.27 T — 2:39. Att. — 29,030.

Cardinals 12, Cubs 4

AROUND THE MAJORS

STAT OF THE DAY

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

GAME 2 St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Edman 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .265 Goldschmidt 1b 5 2 3 1 0 2 .296 O’Neill lf 5 2 2 3 0 1 .280 Arenado 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .257 Molina c 3 0 1 2 1 0 .254 Bader cf 4 2 3 2 0 0 .262 Nootbaar rf 4 2 3 3 0 1 .221 DeJong ss 4 2 2 1 0 0 .199 Hudson p 2 1 1 0 1 1 .500 Rondón ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .271 Totals 36 12 16 12 3 8 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ortega cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .279 Schwindel 1b 3 2 2 0 0 0 .366 Wisdom 3b-lf-3b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .233 I.Happ rf 1 0 0 2 1 0 .225 Martini lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .167 Bote ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .195 Hoerner ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .302 Romine c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .182 Alcántara 2b-p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Deichmann ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .154 Duffy ph-3b-2b 2 1 2 0 0 0 .272 Totals 27 4 7 4 1 5 St. Louis 332 010 3 — 12 16 0 Chicago 201 010 0 — 4 7 0 2B — Molina (19), Bader (20), Goldschmidt (34), Schwindel (16), Ortega (13), Duffy (9). HR — O’Neill (31), off Davies; Nootbaar (4), off Rucker; DeJong (18), off Rucker; Bader (13), off Morgan; Nootbaar (5), off Morgan; Wisdom (28), off Flaherty. RBIs — Molina 2 (66), Bader 2 (46), O’Neill 3 (75), Nootbaar 3 (13), DeJong (42), Goldschmidt (97), Wisdom 2 (61), I.Happ 2 (59). SF — I.Happ. St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO ERA 1 Flaherty /3 2 2 2 1 1 3.30 Hudson, W, 1-0 32/3 4 2 2 0 2 4.91 Cabrera 2 0 0 0 0 2 3.59 J.Miller 1 1 0 0 0 0 6.16 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Davies, L, 6-12 2 7 6 6 2 2 5.78 Rucker 1 2 2 2 0 2 7.82 Effross 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.97 Brothers 1 2 1 1 1 0 5.37 Megill 1 1 0 0 0 1 8.86 2 /3 4 3 3 0 2 4.18 Morgan 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Alcántara T — 2:41. Att. — 35,020.

White Sox 1, Indians 0 Chicago AB R H BI BB Anderson ss 4 0 1 0 0 Moncada 3b 4 0 1 0 0 Abreu 1b 4 0 1 0 0 Jiménez lf 4 0 0 0 0 Robert cf 3 1 1 1 0 Sheets dh 3 0 0 0 0 Hernandez 2b 3 0 0 0 0 Vaughn rf 3 0 0 0 0 Collins c 3 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 1 4 1 0 Cleveland AB R H BI BB Zimmer cf 4 0 1 0 0 Rosario ss 4 0 1 0 0 Ramírez 3b 4 0 2 0 0 Reyes dh 4 0 0 0 0 Bradley 1b 4 0 0 0 0 Ramirez lf 3 0 1 0 0 Miller 2b 3 0 1 0 0 Pérez c 3 0 0 0 0 Mercado rf 3 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 0 6 0 0 Chicago 000 010 000 — Cleveland 000 000 000 —

SO 0 3 0 1 1 0 3 2 1 11 SO 2 2 1 3 2 1 1 2 2 16 1 0

Avg. .305 .263 .263 .245 .355 .227 .230 .239 .204 Avg. .225 .279 .267 .256 .220 .267 .202 .148 .216 4 1 6 1

LOB — Chicago 3, Cleveland 5. 2B — Miller (8). HR — Robert (10), off Stephan. RBIs — Robert (37). SB — Ramírez (25). Chicago IP Cease, W, 13-7 51/3 2 Burr, H, 3 /3 Bummer, H, 21 1 Kimbrel, H, 6 1 Hendriks, S, 35-41 1 Cleveland IP H Bieber 3 0 Stephan, L, 3-1 2 2 2 Wittgren 1 /3 1 Gose 11/3 0 Parker 1 1

H R ER BB SO 3 0 0 0 9 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 R ER BB SO 0 0 0 3 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0

T — 2:48. Att. — 18,576.

ERA 3.95 2.67 3.71 5.14 2.69 ERA 3.17 4.62 4.91 3.00 2.45

New York AB R H Nimmo cf 3 1 1 Lindor ss 4 0 0 Báez 2b 4 0 1 Alonso 1b 4 0 0 Conforto rf 3 0 0 Villar 3b 4 0 1 McCann c 4 0 0 McNeil lf 3 0 1 Megill p 1 0 0 Pillar ph 1 0 0 Peraza ph 1 0 0 Totals 32 1 4 Milwaukee AB R H Wong 2b 2 2 1 Adames ss 4 1 1 Yelich lf 3 2 2 García rf 3 0 0 Narváez c 4 0 0 Escobar 3b 3 0 1 Vogelbach 1b 3 0 1 Peterson 1b 1 0 0 Cain cf 2 0 0 Lauer p 2 0 0 Totals 27 5 6 New York 100 000 Milwaukee 103 010

BI BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 BI BB 1 2 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 5 000 — 00x —

SO 0 0 3 1 0 2 2 0 1 1 0 10 SO 0 1 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 1 7 1 5

Yankees 8, Red Sox 3 Avg. .299 .230 .265 .258 .222 .254 .235 .255 .192 .224 .206 Avg. .274 .290 .245 .267 .274 .247 .210 .252 .253 .167 4 0 6 1

E — Adames (11). LOB — New York 6, Milwaukee 5. 3B — Nimmo (2), Yelich (2). HR — Wong (14), off Megill; Adames (18), off Megill; Yelich (9), off Megill. RBIs — Lindor (55), Wong (49), Adames 2 (54), Yelich (49), García (85). SB — Wong (11). SF — García. S — Lauer. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Megill, L, 3-6 4 5 4 4 4 2 4.78 Hand 1 1 1 1 0 1 4.15 Hembree 1 0 0 0 0 2 5.83 Castro 1 0 0 0 1 0 3.66 Díaz 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.56 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lauer, W, 7-5 62/3 3 1 1 2 9 2.93 Suter 11/3 1 0 0 0 0 3.07 Hader 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.32

Inherited runners-scored — Suter 1-0. T — 2:56. Att. — 27,452.

Rays 8, Marlins 0 Miami AB R H BI Rojas ss 3 0 0 0 Chisholm Jr. 2b 4 0 0 0 De La Cruz cf 1 0 0 0 Sierra cf 2 0 0 0 Sánchez rf 3 0 1 0 Brinson lf 3 0 1 0 L.Díaz 1b 3 0 0 0 Fortes dh 3 0 0 0 Alvarez 3b 2 0 0 0 Henry c 3 0 0 0 Totals 27 0 2 0 Tampa Bay AB R H BI Lowe 2b 5 0 0 0 Franco ss 4 0 1 0 Choi 1b 4 1 0 0 Cruz dh 5 1 1 0 Meadows lf 4 2 1 0 Arozarena rf 4 1 2 3 Wendle 3b 3 2 1 0 Mejía c 3 1 2 2 Kiermaier cf 3 0 3 3 Totals 35 8 11 8 Miami 000 000 000 Tampa Bay 300 220 10x

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 BB 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 6 — —

SO Avg. 0 .267 1 .247 1 .311 0 .234 1 .246 1 .231 2 .213 1 .462 0 .167 0 .111 7 SO Avg. 2 .234 1 .284 2 .233 3 .271 1 .232 2 .273 1 .272 0 .253 0 .255 12 0 2 0 8 11 0

LOB — Miami 2, Tampa Bay 9. 2B — Sánchez (8), Arozarena (31), Mejía (15), Kiermaier (18), Franco (16). 3B — Kiermaier (6). RBIs — Arozarena 3 (68), Kiermaier 3 (36), Mejía 2 (34). CS — Rojas (3). Miami IP H R ER BB SO Cabrera, L, 0-3 3 2 3 3 4 6 Guenther 2 6 4 4 1 2 Thompson 1 0 0 0 1 2 Pop 1 2 1 1 0 1 León 1 1 0 0 0 1 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO Robertson 1 0 0 0 1 1 Yarbrough, W, 9-6 6 2 0 0 0 4 Enns 2 0 0 0 0 2

ERA 5.79 7.78 3.30 4.26 0.00 ERA 5.00 5.09 2.82

HBP — Yarbrough (Alvarez). WP — Guenther. T — 2:59. Att. — 15,340.

Padres 6, Braves 5 Completion of suspended game San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Grisham cf 3 2 1 0 1 2 .240 Tatis Jr. ss 3 2 1 1 1 2 .286 Cronenworth 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .268 Hosmer 1b 3 0 0 1 0 1 .270 Myers rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .254 Profar lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Pham lf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .234 Kim 3b 3 0 1 2 0 0 .207 Caratini c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .216 Knehr p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 O’Grady lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .157 Totals 26 6 6 5 6 7 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pederson rf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .233 Soler ph-rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .258 Swanson ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .246 Freeman 1b 1 0 0 0 3 1 .302 Albies 2b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .258 Riley 3b 2 1 0 0 1 1 .300 Vogt c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .195 d’Arnaud c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Heredia cf 2 1 1 1 0 1 .225 e-Duvall ph-cf 1 1 1 1 0 0 .235 Arcia lf 1 0 1 1 0 0 .181 Rosario ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Adrianza ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .246 Totals 24 5 5 5 6 6 San Diego 410 000 1 — 6 6 0 Atlanta 040 001 0 — 5 5 0

LOB — San Diego 6, Atlanta 5. 2B — Grisham (23), Kim (11), Heredia (26), Adrianza (9). HR — Tatis Jr. (41), off W.Smith; Duvall (38), off Hudson. RBIs — Hosmer (64), Kim 2 (33), Cronenworth (66), Tatis Jr. (95), Heredia (26), Arcia (12), Adrianza (26), Pederson (58), Duvall (110). SB — Grisham (11). SF — Hosmer, Arcia. San Diego Knehr Camarena Crismatt, H, 3 Hill, H, 18 Johnson, H, 12 Hudson, W, 5-2 Melancon, S, 38-43 Atlanta IP Wilson 2 Tomlin 2 Chavez 2 W.Smith, L, 3-7 1

T — 3:17.

IP H 12/3 1 1 /3 2 11/3 1 2 /3 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 H R 4 5 0 0 0 0 2 1

R ER BB SO 3 3 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 ER BB SO 5 4 2 0 0 2 0 2 2 1 0 1

ERA 4.95 9.64 2.99 3.79 3.18 3.14 2.30 ERA 5.35 6.57 2.37 3.71

New York AB R H BI LeMahieu 3b 4 1 1 0 Rizzo 1b 5 2 2 0 Judge rf 4 2 1 1 Stanton dh 5 1 3 4 Gallo lf 5 1 1 0 Torres 2b 5 1 3 2 Urshela ss 5 0 1 0 Gardner cf 4 0 2 0 Higashioka c 4 0 1 1 Totals 41 8 15 8 Boston AB R H BI Hernández cf 3 1 2 0 Schwarber 1b 3 1 1 0 Dalbec ph-1b 1 0 0 0 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 Devers 3b 4 1 1 3 Martinez dh 2 0 1 0 Verdugo lf 4 0 0 0 Renfroe rf 4 0 1 0 Vázquez c 3 0 0 0 Iglesias 2b 3 0 1 0 Shaw ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 32 3 7 3 New York 304 000 100 Boston 000 003 000

Royals 3, Tigers 1

BB SO Avg. 1 0 .268 0 2 .259 1 1 .286 0 0 .272 0 1 .204 0 0 .261 0 1 .263 1 1 .223 0 1 .186 3 7 BB SO Avg. 2 0 .253 0 1 .298 0 1 .246 0 1 .301 0 1 .275 2 0 .287 0 1 .287 0 2 .262 1 0 .261 0 1 .000 0 1 .243 5 9 — 8 15 0 — 3 7 0

2B — Judge (23), Rizzo (6), Gardner (14), Stanton (17), Martinez (40). HR — Stanton (32), off Eovaldi; Torres (8), off Pérez; Devers (35), off Cole. RBIs — Judge (90), Stanton 4 (87), Torres 2 (49), Higashioka (27), Devers 3 (108). CS — Torres (6). New York IP H R ER BB Cole, W, 16-8 6 5 3 3 3 2 Holmes /3 2 0 0 0 1 Peralta 1 /3 0 0 0 1 Green 1 0 0 0 1 Boston IP H R ER BB Eovaldi, L, 10-9 22/3 7 7 7 2 Sawamura 21/3 3 0 0 1 Barnes 1 1 0 0 0 Pérez 3 4 1 1 0

SO 6 0 1 2 SO 0 2 2 3

ERA 3.08 1.96 3.20 3.30 ERA 3.88 3.16 3.81 4.78

T — 3:32. Att. — 36,026.

Rangers 8, Orioles 5 Texas AB R H BI Kiner-Falefa ss 5 1 3 0 Ibáñez dh 4 1 0 0 García rf 5 2 3 2 Lowe 1b 4 2 2 2 Solak 2b 4 0 2 1 Culberson 3b 2 0 0 0 Holt ph-3b 3 0 0 0 Peters lf 4 1 2 1 Heim c 3 0 0 0 Calhoun ph 0 0 0 1 Taveras cf 4 1 1 0 Totals 38 8 13 7 Baltimore AB R H BI Mullins cf 3 1 1 3 Mountcastle 1b 5 1 2 0 Hays lf 4 0 1 0 Mancini dh 4 0 0 0 Severino c 3 1 1 0 McKenna rf 4 0 1 1 Valaika 2b 4 0 1 0 R.Martin ss 4 1 0 1 Gutierrez 3b 4 1 2 0 Totals 35 5 9 5 Texas 200 100 005 Baltimore 040 000 010

BB 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 BB 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 — —

SO Avg. 0 .274 1 .261 0 .244 0 .262 0 .238 0 .238 1 .206 0 .208 0 .188 0 .259 1 .163 3 SO Avg. 0 .300 1 .261 0 .257 1 .252 0 .240 3 .185 2 .200 0 .238 1 .212 8 8 13 0 5 9 0

2B — Solak (18), García (25). 3B — Peters (1). HR — Lowe (16), off A.Wells; Mullins (30), off Howard. RBIs — Lowe 2 (70), Peters (31), Calhoun (22), García 2 (85), Solak (48), R.Martin (8), Mullins 3 (59), McKenna (12). Texas IP Howard 4 Anderson 3 Sborz, W, 4-3 1 Barlow, S, 8-9 1 Baltimore A.Wells Tate, H, 8 Abad, H, 2 Krehbiel, H, 1 Sulser, H, 6 T.Wells Greene, L, 1-3, BS Hanhold

H 6 1 2 0

R ER BB SO ERA 4 4 0 4 9.17 0 0 1 2 3.50 1 1 1 1 3.95 0 0 1 1 1.69 IP H R ER BB SO ERA 5 5 3 3 1 1 7.61 1 /3 2 0 0 0 0 4.55 1 1 /3 0 0 0 0 1 5.51 2 /3 1 0 0 0 0 0.00 2 /3 1 0 0 0 0 2.79 0 1 1 1 0 0 4.11 1 /3 3 4 4 1 0 7.97 2 /3 0 0 0 1 1 3.86

T — 3:33. Att. — 7,935.

Reds 8, Nationals 7 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Thomas cf 4 1 1 0 2 2 .241 Escobar ss 6 2 2 2 0 1 .287 Soto rf 2 3 0 0 4 1 .324 Bell 1b 4 0 1 1 1 0 .257 García 2b 6 0 1 2 0 1 .236 Ruiz c 5 1 3 2 0 0 .286 Mercer 3b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .262 Stevenson lf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .218 Espino p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .143 Zimmerman ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Totals 41 7 9 7 9 10 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. India 2b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Schrock lf 3 1 1 2 0 1 .313 Stephenson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Castellanos rf 5 1 2 2 0 1 .308 Votto 1b 3 0 0 0 2 0 .268 Farmer ss 5 1 1 0 0 2 .260 Suárez 3b 5 1 2 2 0 1 .185 Barnhart c 5 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Friedl cf 5 3 2 0 0 0 .400 DeShields ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .226 Aquino pr-lf 2 0 2 1 0 0 .188 Totals 41 8 12 8 3 7 Washington 112 000 003 00 — 7 9 0 Cincinnati 002 013 100 01 — 8 12 0

2B — Bell (23), Thomas (12), Escobar (19), India (30). HR — Ruiz (2), off S.Gray; Escobar (3), off S.Gray; Schrock (3), off Espino; DeShields (1), off Espino; Castellanos (30), off Baldonado; Suárez (28), off Machado. Washington IP H R ER BB SO Espino 5 5 3 3 0 2 Baldonado, BS, 0-4 1/3 1 2 2 1 1 2 Machado /3 1 1 1 0 1 1 /3 1 1 1 1 0 Murphy 2 Nolin /3 1 0 0 0 1 Romero 1 0 0 0 0 0 Finnegan 1 1 0 0 0 1 Voth 1 1 0 0 1 1 Thompson, L, 1-2 0 1 1 0 0 0 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO S.Gray 4 5 4 4 4 3 Garrett 1 0 0 0 0 2 Santillan 1 0 0 0 1 1 Lorenzen, H, 11 1 0 0 0 0 0 Sims, H, 8 1 1 0 0 0 0 Givens, BS, 8-11 2/3 3 3 3 2 1 1 Wilson /3 0 0 0 0 0 Cessa 1 0 0 0 0 1 Warren, W, 3-0 1 0 0 0 2 2

T — 4:24. Att. — 16,021.

ERA 4.01 7.71 3.66 6.14 4.64 0.00 3.52 5.60 3.09 ERA 3.99 5.68 2.68 3.76 4.57 3.12 3.29 1.59 1.45

Kansas City AB R H BI BB Merrifield 2b 2 0 0 2 0 Lopez ss 4 0 0 0 0 Perez c 4 0 0 0 0 Benintendi lf 4 0 0 0 0 C.Santana 1b 4 0 0 0 0 Mondesi 3b 4 1 1 0 0 O’Hearn dh 2 1 2 1 1 Dozier rf 3 0 0 0 0 Isbel cf 3 1 2 0 0 Totals 30 3 5 3 1 Detroit AB R H BI BB Baddoo lf 3 0 0 0 0 Schoop 1b 3 0 1 0 0 Grossman rf 1 1 0 0 3 Cabrera dh 4 0 1 0 0 Candelario 3b 2 0 0 0 2 H.Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 Haase c 3 0 1 1 1 Goodrum ss 4 0 1 0 0 Reyes cf 4 0 2 0 0 Totals 29 1 6 1 6 Kansas City 001 000 110 — Detroit 000 001 000 —

SO 1 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 6 SO 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 4 3 1

Avg. .278 .301 .274 .274 .211 .265 .224 .212 .300 Avg. .257 .275 .236 .257 .274 .281 .226 .214 .255 5 0 6 1

E — H.Castro (3). LOB — Kansas City 3, Detroit 8. 2B — Isbel (4), Goodrum (10), Reyes (10). 3B — Mondesi (1), Isbel (2). RBIs — Merrifield 2 (72), O’Hearn (29), Haase (57). SF — Merrifield 2. Kansas City IP Hernández 5 Tapia, W, 4-0 1 2 Brentz, H, 16 /3 Staumont, H, 15 11/3 Barlow, S, 15-21 1 Detroit IP H Mize 3 2 Ureña 2 0 Lange, L, 0-3 11/3 2 2 Funkhouser /3 0 D.Holland 1 1 Jiménez 1 0

H R ER BB SO 2 0 0 3 1 2 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 R ER BB SO 1 1 0 3 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

ERA 3.68 1.76 3.55 3.03 2.40 ERA 3.63 5.57 4.36 3.22 5.40 6.00

Inherited runners-scored — Staumont 1-0, Funkhouser 1-0. HBP — Hernández (Schoop). T — 3:07. Att. — 24,877.

Twins 3, Blue Jays 1 Toronto AB R H BI BB Springer cf 4 0 0 0 0 Semien 2b 4 1 2 1 0 Guerrero Jr. 1b 4 0 0 0 0 Bichette ss 4 0 0 0 0 Hernández rf 4 0 0 0 0 Kirk dh 3 0 0 0 0 Dickerson lf 2 0 1 0 1 Espinal 3b 3 0 1 0 0 McGuire c 3 0 0 0 0 Totals 31 1 4 1 1 Minnesota AB R H BI BB Arraez 3b 4 1 2 1 0 Buxton cf 3 1 1 2 1 Polanco 2b 4 0 0 0 0 Donaldson dh 4 0 0 0 0 Sanó 1b 3 0 0 0 1 Gordon lf 4 0 1 0 0 Rooker rf 3 0 1 0 0 Jeffers c 3 0 1 0 0 Simmons ss 2 1 0 0 1 Totals 30 3 6 3 3 Toronto 000 001 000 — Minnesota 003 000 00x —

SO 0 0 1 4 1 0 1 0 2 9 SO 0 0 2 3 2 1 1 2 0 11 1 3

Avg. .234 .269 .319 .289 .301 .245 .278 .291 .256 Avg. .284 .294 .271 .247 .219 .263 .206 .201 .223 4 0 6 0

LOB — Toronto 4, Minnesota 6. 2B — Semien (39), Espinal (10), Jeffers (10). 3B — Arraez (6). HR — Semien (42), off Ober; Buxton (15), off Berríos. RBIs — Semien (98), Arraez (39), Buxton 2 (27). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO Berríos, L, 12-9 6 5 3 3 2 10 Richards 1 1 0 0 0 0 Pearson 1 0 0 0 1 1 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO Ober, W, 3-3 51/3 4 1 1 0 6 2 /3 0 0 0 0 1 Alcala, H, 11 Minaya, H, 6 1 0 0 0 1 0 Duffey, H, 19 1 0 0 0 0 1 Colomé, S, 16-23 1 0 0 0 0 1

ERA 3.48 3.19 5.73 ERA 4.19 4.15 2.63 3.39 3.92

T — 2:38. Att. — 18,861.

Phillies 8, Pirates 6 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Hayes 3b 5 0 1 0 0 1 Tsutsugo rf-1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 Reynolds cf 4 1 2 0 1 1 Moran 1b 3 1 0 0 1 0 e-Tucker ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 Gamel lf-rf 3 1 0 0 1 2 Newman 2b 5 1 2 2 0 1 Perez c 3 0 1 2 1 1 Park ss 3 1 1 0 1 1 Yajure p 2 0 0 0 0 2 b-Difo ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 Alford lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 Totals 35 6 8 6 6 11 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Herrera cf 2 0 1 0 0 1 Vierling cf-lf 3 1 1 0 0 2 Segura 2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 Harper rf 3 1 1 1 1 1 Realmuto c 3 0 0 0 0 0 B.Miller 1b 3 1 1 1 0 1 Williams ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 McCutchen lf 3 2 1 0 1 0 Gregorius ss 3 2 2 3 1 0 Galvis 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 Gibson p 2 1 1 1 0 1 Torreyes ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 Jankowski ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 Totals 33 8 9 7 4 9 Pittsburgh 000 400 200 — 6 Philadelphia 001 112 30x — 8

Avg. .259 .222 .295 .264 .213 .257 .224 .144 .188 .000 .271 .225 Avg. .258 .340 .295 .312 .268 .231 .245 .223 .214 .239 .160 .247 .246 8 0 9 1

E — Gregorius (18). LOB — Pittsburgh 9, Philadelphia 6. 2B — Newman (22), Vierling (3), Harper (40). HR — Difo (4), off Bedrosian; Gibson (1), off Yajure; B.Miller (20), off Yajure; Gregorius (13), off Shreve. RBIs — Newman 2 (36), Perez 2 (21), Difo 2 (22), Gibson (2), B.Miller (47), Harper (81), Torreyes (40), Gregorius 3 (52). SB — Hayes (9). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO ERA Howard 1 0 0 0 0 3 5.66 Yajure 32/3 5 3 3 2 2 4.85 2 S.Miller, H, 1 /3 1 2 2 1 1 11.42 2 Mears, BS, 0-3 /3 1 0 0 0 1 5.40 Shreve, L, 3-2, BS, 0-2 1 2 3 3 1 1 3.08 K.Keller 1 0 0 0 0 1 6.75 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gibson 6 3 4 4 2 6 4.87 Bedrosian, BS, 0-1 1/3 3 2 2 0 1 5.25 Neris, W, 4-6 12/3 1 0 0 3 3 3.33 Kennedy, S, 10-13 1 1 0 0 1 1 4.50

Inherited runners-scored — S.Miller 2-0, Mears 2-2, Neris 1-0. IBB — off Neris (Reynolds). T — 3:39. Att. — 20,548.


BASEBALL

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SATURDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East W L Pct GB Atlanta 81 72 .529 — Philadelphia 81 74 .523 1 New York 73 80 .477 8 Miami 64 90 .416 17½ Washington 64 90 .416 17½ Central W L Pct GB z-Milwaukee 92 62 .597 — St. Louis 86 69 .555 6½ Cincinnati 79 75 .513 13 Chicago 67 88 .432 25½ Pittsburgh 57 97 .370 35 West W L Pct GB z-San Francisco10054.649 — z-Los Angeles 99 55 .643 1 San Diego 78 76 .506 22 Colorado 71 82 .464 28½ Arizona 49105 .318 51

WC L10 Str Home — 5-5 W-1 37-37 5 8-2 W-5 47-33 12 2-8 L-3 44-33 21½ 3-7 L-4 40-38 21½ 5-5 L-1 35-43 WC L10 Str Home — 3-7 W-1 43-36 —10-0W-1542-33 6½ 4-6 W-1 41-37 19 1-9 L-5 39-41 28½ 4-6 L-3 34-41 WC L10 Str Home — 6-4 W-1 49-26 — 8-2 W-2 52-23 7½ 4-6 L-1 45-34 14 6-4 L-2 46-30 36½ 2-8 L-1 29-47

Away 44-35 34-41 29-47 24-52 29-47 Away 49-26 44-36 38-38 28-47 23-56 Away 51-28 47-32 33-42 25-52 20-58

z-clinched playoff berth

Friday’s results St. Louis 8, Chi. Cubs 5 (7), 1st Tampa Bay 8, Miami 0 San Diego 6, Atlanta 5 (7), 1st St. Louis 12, Chi. Cubs 4 (7), 2nd Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh 6 Milwaukee 5, N.Y. Mets 1 San Francisco 7, Colorado 2 Cincinnati 8, Washington 7 (11) L.A. Dodgers 4, Arizona 2 Atlanta 4, San Diego 0, 2nd

Saturday’s results St. Louis 8, Chicago Cubs 5 Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 0 Tampa Bay 7, Miami 3 N.Y. Mets at Milwaukee, (n) Washington at Cincinnati, (n) Atlanta at San Diego, (n) L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, (n) San Francisco at Colorado, (n)

Sunday’s games Pittsburgh (Kranick 1-3) at Philadelphia (TBD), 12:05 p.m. Miami (Luzardo 5-8) at Tampa Bay (Baz 1-0), 12:10 p.m. Washington (Rogers 2-0) at Cincinnati (Mahle 12-6), 12:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Carrasco 1-3) at Milwaukee (Peralta 9-5), 1:10 p.m. St. Louis (Woodford 3-3) at Chicago Cubs (Thompson 3-3), 1:20 p.m. San Francisco (Gausman 14-6) at Colorado (Senzatela 4-9), 2:10 p.m. Atlanta (TBD) at San Diego (Musgrove 11-9), 3:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Urías 18-3) at Arizona (Mejía 0-2), 3:10 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East x-Tampa Bay Boston New York Toronto Baltimore Central x-Chicago Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Minnesota West Houston Seattle Oakland Los Angeles Texas

W L Pct 96 59 .619 88 67 .568 88 67 .568 85 69 .552 50105 .323 W L Pct 87 67 .565 75 78 .490 75 79 .487 70 84 .455 69 85 .448 W L Pct 91 64 .587 85 69 .552 84 71 .542 73 81 .474 56 99 .361

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

GB — 8 8 10½ 46 GB — 11½ 12 17 18 GB — 5½ 7 17½ 35

WC L10 — 6-4 — 7-3 — 7-3 2½ 4-6 38 4-6 WC L10 — 4-6 12 5-5 12½ 7-3 17½ 4-6 18½ 6-4 WC L10 — 6-4 2½ 7-3 4 6-4 14½ 3-7 32 2-8

Str W-3 L-2 W-5 L-3 W-1 Str W-1 L-1 W-1 L-1 W-4 Str L-3 W-6 W-2 L-1 L-1

Home 51-29 49-31 45-33 43-31 25-52 Home 49-27 38-40 42-37 36-39 36-40 Home 47-28 42-33 42-38 39-41 33-42

Away 45-30 39-36 43-34 42-38 25-53 Away 38-40 37-38 33-42 34-45 33-45 Away 44-36 43-36 42-33 34-40 23-57

Stanton’s grand slam sinks Red Sox ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — Giancarlo Stanton hit a go-ahead grand slam over the Green Monster in the eighth inning and the New York Yankees beat Boston 5-3 on Saturday to tie the Red Sox for the top spot in the AL wild-card race. The Yankees, who began the day with a two-game lead over Toronto and Seattle for the second wild card, now have a chance to nudge in front of their longtime rivals in Sunday night’s series finale at Fenway Park. Stanton connected off reliever Darwinzon Hernandez with two outs to give the Yankees a 5-2 lead. The slugger also had three hits and a three-run homer Friday night to help New York win the opening AP PHOTOS game of the series. Yankees designated hitter Giancarlo Stanton watches his eighth-inning grand slam against RAYS 7, MARLINS 3: Tampa the Red Sox on Saturday in Boston. Bay clinched its second straight AL East title, with Mike Zunino hitting a goahead homer and Brandon Lowe later adding a pair of RBI doubles to beat Miami in St. Petersburg, Fla.

Oakland got a walk-off win over Houston on Starling Marte’s RBI double in the ninth inning. Elvis Andrus scored without a throw, but sustained an undisclosed injury on the play and was ATHLETICS 2, ASTROS 1: helped off the field.

PHILLIES 3, PIRATES 0: Ranger Suarez pitched a four-hit shutout, Bryce Harper homered and Philadelphia kept the pressure on NL East-leading Atlanta with a home victory over Pittsburgh. Suarez allowed just

four singles, walked none and struck out seven in his first major league complete game. TIGERS 5, ROYALS 1: Miguel Cabrera drove in four runs in Detroit’s home victory over Kansas City.

BOX SCORES

x-clinched division; z-clinched playoff berth

Friday’s results Chicago White Sox 1, Cleveland 0 Tampa Bay 8, Miami 0 Kansas City 3, Detroit 1 Texas 8, Baltimore 5 N.Y. Yankees 8, Boston 3 Minnesota 3, Toronto 1 Seattle 6, L.A. Angels 5 Oakland 14, Houston 2

Saturday’s results Oakland 2, Houston 1 N.Y. Yankees 5, Boston 3 Tampa Bay 7, Miami 3 Detroit 5, Kansas City 1 Baltimore 3, Texas 2 Toronto at Minnesota, (n) Chi. White Sox at Cleveland, (n) Seattle at L.A. Angels, (n)

Sunday’s games Kansas City (Bubic 5-6) at Detroit (Peralta 4-3), 11:10 a.m. Texas (Dunning 5-9) at Baltimore (Means 6-7), 12:05 p.m. Chi. White Sox (Giolito 10-9) at Cleveland (McKenzie 5-7), 12:10 p.m. Miami (Luzardo 5-8) at Tampa Bay (Baz 1-0), 12:10 p.m. Toronto (Manoah 7-2) at Minnesota (Jax 3-4), 1:10 p.m. Houston (Odorizzi 6-7) at Oakland (Blackburn 1-3), 3:07 p.m. Seattle (Gonzales 9-5) at L.A. Angels (Ohtani 9-2), 3:07 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Montgomery 6-6) at Boston (Rodríguez 11-8), 6:08 p.m.

AROUND THE MAJORS

Giants look beyond 100 wins DENVER — Aside from winning World Series titles, the 2010, 2012 and 2014 Giants have another striking similarity. Those clubs are considered the greatest in the history of the franchise, but most fans don’t remember how many regular season games each team won. The 2010 club finished with 92 wins, the 2012 team won 94 games and the 2014 squad hoisted a trophy despite winning just 88 regular season games. So after securing their 100th win of the 2021 season on Friday night with a 7-2 victory over the Rockies, the Giants acknowledged that regular season success can only bring them so much pride. “It feels like we’ve got to be on our game every single night,” manager Gabe Kapler said. The 2021 club is the eighth team in Giants franchise history to win 100 games and the fourth since the franchise moved west from New York in 1958. The 1962 and 1993 teams each finished the regular season with 103 victories, but a club led by Willie Mays and Willie McCovey lost in the World Series while the club led by Barry Bonds and Will Clark will go down as one of the greatest teams in MLB history to miss the playoffs.

Trout gives up on returning in ’21 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Los Angeles Angels star Mike Trout is officially shut down for the season. The three-time AL MVP suffered a calf strain on May 17 and hasn’t returned to the lineup since. The original prognosis was six to eight weeks of rehabilitation, but the injury was worse than originally thought. Trout hit .333 with eight home runs, 18 RBIs and a 1.090 OPS in 36 games. BRIEFLY YANKEES: Infielder DJ LeMahieu was out of the lineup Saturday with a “hip/groin” issue. ANGELS: Shohei Ohtani walked four times in Friday’s loss to the Mariners, becoming the first player since Barry Bonds in 2003 to draw at least three walks in three consecutive games. He’s drawn a total of 11 walks — four intentional — in those games. — Wire reports

Phillies pitcher Ranger Suárez is doused in the dugout after his complete-game victory against the Pirates on Saturday in Philadelphia. Suárez a 1.75 ERA in 11 starts since moving to the rotation. Yankees 5, Red Sox 3 New York Gardner cf Judge rf Rizzo 1b Stanton dh Gallo lf Torres 2b Sánchez c Odor 3b Wade ss Urshela ss-3b Totals Boston Hernández cf Renfroe rf Devers 3b Bogaerts ss Martinez dh Schwarber lf Dalbec 1b Plawecki c Iglesias 2b Totals

AB 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 3 1 3 30 AB 5 4 3 4 4 4 4 2 4 34

R 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 R 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 3

H 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 H 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 2 1 7

BI BB SO Avg. 0 1 0 .224 0 1 0 .285 0 0 0 .253 4 1 1 .275 0 1 3 .203 0 0 2 .259 0 0 3 .208 0 0 1 .203 0 0 1 .268 0 0 1 .263 4 4 12 BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 2 .251 0 0 2 .262 0 0 1 .275 0 0 1 .299 0 0 2 .285 0 0 0 .297 1 0 2 .246 1 1 0 .289 0 0 1 .000 2 1 11

New York 000 001 040 — 5 4 0 Boston 001 010 001 — 3 7 0

LOB — New York 3, Boston 7. 2B — Gardner (15). HR — Stanton (33), off Hernandez; Plawecki (3), off Cortes Jr.; Dalbec (24), off Chapman. RBIs — Stanton 4 (91), Plawecki (15), Dalbec (77). SB — Gardner (4). New York Cortes Jr. King Luetge Severino, W, 1-0 Chapman, S, 29-33 Boston Pivetta Robles, H, 17 Houck, L, 1-5, H, 1 Hernandez, BS, 0-4 Brasier

IP H 41/3 4 11/3 2 1 /3 0 2 0 1 1 IP H 51/3 3 2 /3 0 12/3 0 1 /3 1 1 0

R 2 0 0 0 1 R 1 0 2 2 0

ER 2 0 0 0 1 ER 1 0 2 2 0

BB 0 0 0 1 0 BB 0 0 4 0 0

SO 4 2 0 4 1 SO 7 0 3 1 1

ERA 2.85 3.20 2.73 0.00 3.54 ERA 4.52 4.76 3.77 3.40 2.57

Inherited runners-scored — King 2-1, Luetge 1-0, Robles 2-1, Hernandez 2-2. T — 3:33. Att. — 36,103.

Phillies 3, Pirates 0 Pittsburgh AB R H BI Hayes 3b 4 0 0 0 Newman ss 3 0 0 0 Reynolds cf 3 0 1 0 Tsutsugo 1b 3 0 1 0 Alford lf 3 0 0 0 Difo 2b 3 0 0 0 Tucker rf 3 0 0 0 Davis c 3 0 2 0 Crowe p 1 0 0 0 Gamel ph 1 0 0 0 Moran ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 28 0 4 0 Philadelphia AB R H BI Vierling cf-lf 3 1 2 1 Segura 2b 4 1 1 0 Harper rf 3 1 1 1 Realmuto c 4 0 2 0 B.Miller 1b 4 0 1 1 McCutchen lf 2 0 0 0 Gregorius ss 3 0 0 0 Torreyes 3b 3 0 1 0 Suárez p 2 0 0 0 Totals 28 3 8 3

BB SO Avg. 0 0 .256 0 0 .223 0 1 .295 0 1 .224 0 2 .219 0 1 .267 0 2 .207 0 0 .667 0 0 .063 0 0 .256 0 0 .263 0 7 BB SO Avg. 1 1 .357 0 0 .295 1 0 .313 0 1 .270 0 0 .231 2 0 .222 1 0 .212 1 0 .247 0 1 .200 6 3

Pittsburgh 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 Philadelphia 002 010 00x — 3 8 0

STAT OF THE DAY

34

The Phillies have blown 34 save opportunities, tying a major league record set by the 2004 Colorado Rockies. The 34th came Friday when Cam Bedrosian gave up a seventh-inning lead against the Pirates in a game the Phillies rallied to win. — Tribune News Service

LOB — Pittsburgh 1, Philadelphia 8. HR — Vierling (1), off Crowe; Harper (34), off Crowe. RBIs — Vierling (4), Harper (82), B.Miller (48). S — Suárez. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO ERA Crowe, L, 4-8 42/3 8 3 3 4 2 5.77 1 Howard /3 0 0 0 0 0 5.62 Kuhl 1 0 0 0 2 0 4.94 Banda 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.55 De Los Santos 1 0 0 0 0 0 6.68 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Suárez, W, 7-5 9 4 0 0 0 7 1.45

Inherited runners-scored — Howard 3-0. WP — Kuhl. T — 2:33. Att. — 28,135.

Athletics 2, Astros 1

Tigers 5, Royals 1

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .278 Bregman 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Alvarez dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .278 Tucker rf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .293 Gonzalez 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .202 Meyers lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Siri cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .173 Totals 30 1 3 1 1 9 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Harrison 2b 5 0 1 1 0 2 .272 Marte cf 5 0 1 1 0 2 .324 Olson 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .273 Pinder rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .237 Kemp ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .261 Canha lf-rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .231 Chapman 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .215 Davis dh 2 0 1 0 1 0 .209 Bolt pr-dh 0 1 0 0 0 0 .096 Brown ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .208 Murphy c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .215 Andrus ss 3 1 2 0 0 0 .243 Totals 31 2 7 2 6 7

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .277 Lopez ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .303 Perez c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .272 Benintendi lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .274 C.Santana 1b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .210 Mondesi dh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .260 Dozier rf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .215 Alberto 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .269 Isbel ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Olivares cf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .238 Totals 30 1 7 1 3 4 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Baddoo lf-cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .258 Schoop 1b 3 2 2 0 1 0 .277 Grossman rf-lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .237 Cabrera dh 4 1 3 4 0 0 .261 Candelario 3b 4 0 2 1 0 2 .276 H.Castro ss 2 0 1 0 0 0 .282 Goodrum ph-ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .213 Paredes 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Garneau c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .226 Reyes cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Cameron rf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .195 Totals 32 5 11 5 3 6 Kansas City 000 010 000 — 1 7 0 Detroit 000 003 02x — 5 11 0

Houston Oakland

000 000

000 000

100 101

— —

1 2

3 7

0 0

One out when winning run scored. LOB — Houston 4, Oakland 11. 2B — Altuve (30), Marte (16). HR — Tucker (28), off Manaea. RBIs — Tucker (88), Harrison (21), Marte (28). Houston IP H Valdez 62/3 3 Graveman, BS 11/3 2 1 /3 2 Pressly, L, 5-3 Oakland IP H R Manaea 7 3 1 Trivino 1 0 0 Chafin, W, 2-1 1 0 0

R 1 0 1 ER 1 0 0

ER BB SO ERA 1 4 3 2.98 0 2 3 1.67 1 0 1 2.32 BB SO ERA 1 8 3.94 0 0 3.21 0 1 1.32

Inherited runners-scored — Graveman 2-1. HBP — Manaea (Siri), Valdez (Andrus). T — 2:49. Att. — 13,037.

LOB — Kansas City 7, Detroit 6. 2B — Dozier (27), Lopez (20), H.Castro (11), Cabrera (15), Candelario (42), Schoop (29). 3B — Dozier (5). RBIs — Dozier (50), Cabrera 4 (75), Candelario (66). SB — Lopez (21). CS — Olivares (2), Benintendi (9). SF — Dozier. S — Mondesi. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Heasley 51/3 3 0 0 2 3 3.86 Tapia, L, 4-1, BS, 0-3 1/3 4 3 3 0 0 2.61 1 Brentz /3 0 0 0 0 0 3.53 G.Holland 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.16 E.Santana 0 3 2 2 1 0 4.99 Coleman 1 1 0 0 0 2 0.00 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Skubal 4 1 0 0 0 1 4.13 Hutchison, W, 3-1 22/3 3 1 0 2 0 1.50 Funkhouser, H, 9 1 2 0 0 1 1 3.17 Fulmer, S, 12-16 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 3.06

E.Santana pitched to 4 batters in the 8th Inherited runners-scored — Tapia 1-0, Brentz 1-0, Coleman 2-0, Funkhouser 1-0, Fulmer 2-0. PB — Garneau (3). T — 3:00. Att. — 16,424.

Rays 7, Marlins 3 Miami Rojas ss Panik 2b Chisholm Jr. 2b-ss De La Cruz cf Sánchez rf Brinson lf L.Díaz 1b Fortes dh Alvarez 3b León c-3b Totals Tampa Bay AB Lowe 2b 5 Choi 1b 5 Arozarena lf 3 Meadows dh 3 Cruz ph-dh 1 Wendle ss 4 Y.Díaz 3b 4 Kiermaier cf 4 Phillips rf 3 Zunino c 4 Totals 36 Miami 001 Tampa Bay 000

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 1 1 1 0 0 .267 1 0 0 0 0 0 .150 5 1 2 0 0 1 .248 4 0 3 1 1 0 .322 5 1 3 0 0 0 .255 5 0 1 0 0 2 .230 4 0 1 0 0 0 .215 2 0 2 0 2 0 .533 4 0 0 1 0 2 .150 4 0 0 0 0 1 .184 38 3 13 3 3 6 R H BI BB SO Avg. 0 4 2 0 0 .239 0 0 0 0 1 .228 0 0 0 1 1 .272 1 1 0 0 0 .233 0 0 0 0 0 .270 1 2 1 0 0 .274 1 2 1 0 0 .259 1 1 0 0 2 .255 1 0 1 0 2 .203 2 2 2 0 1 .216 7 12 7 1 7 001 100 — 3 13 2 121 12x — 7 12 0

E — Chisholm Jr. (24), Alvarez (1). LOB — Miami 11, Tampa Bay 7. 2B — Chisholm Jr. (19), Lowe 3 (29), Wendle (30), Kiermaier (19). 3B — Meadows (3). HR — Rojas (9), off McClanahan; Zunino (32), off Alcantara. RBIs — Rojas (46), Alvarez (4), De La Cruz (19), Wendle (54), Zunino 2 (61), Y.Díaz (61), Lowe 2 (88), Phillips (43). SB — Fortes (1). SF — Phillips. Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Alcantara, L, 9-14 6 9 5 3 0 6 3.09 Bleier 1 0 0 0 1 1 3.15 Bender 1 3 2 2 0 0 2.79 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO ERA McClanahan, W, 10-6 5 6 1 1 1 3 3.44 McHugh, H, 6 11/3 5 2 2 0 1 1.60 Feyereisen, H, 6 12/3 0 0 0 1 2 2.36 Fairbanks 1 2 0 0 1 0 3.70

Inherited runners-scored — Bleier 1-0, Feyereisen 1-0. IBB — off Bleier (Arozarena). WP — McClanahan. T — 2:59. Att. — 23,783.

LEADERS THROUGH FRIDAY AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Guerrero Jr., Toronto, .319; Brantley, Houston, .315; Gurriel, Houston, .315; Ti.Anderson, Chicago, .305; Bogaerts, Boston, .301; T.Hernández, Toronto, .301; N.Lopez, Kansas City, .301; Mullins, Baltimore, .300; Tucker, Houston, .294; France, Seattle, .293. RUNS—Guerrero Jr., Toronto, 120; Altuve, Houston, 113; Bichette, Toronto, 113; Semien, Toronto, 110; J.Ramírez, Cleveland, 105; Haniger, Seattle, 104; Correa, Houston, 100; Olson, Oakland, 99; Ohtani, Los Angeles, 96; Devers, Boston, 95. RBI—S.Perez, Kansas City, 115; J.Abreu, Chicago, 113; T.Hernández, Toronto, 110; Olson, Oakland, 109; Devers, Boston, 108; Guerrero Jr., Toronto, 105; Meadows, Tampa Bay, 103; Alvarez, Houston, 101; Seager, Seattle, 100; Bichette, Toronto, 98; Semien, Toronto, 98. HITS—Guerrero Jr., Toronto, 183; Bichette, Toronto, 176; Merrifield, Kansas City, 174; Mullins, Baltimore, 173; Kiner-Falefa, Texas, 167; Semien, Toronto, 166; Schoop, Detroit, 162; Gurriel, Houston, 161; S.Perez, Kansas City, 161; D.Fletcher, Los Angeles, 160. HOME RUNS—Guerrero Jr., Toronto, 46; S.Perez, Kansas City, 46; Ohtani, Los Angeles, 45; Semien, Toronto, 42; Gallo, New York, 38; Olson, Oakland, 38; Judge, New York, 36; J.Ramírez, Cleveland, 35; Devers, Boston, 35; Seager, Seattle, 35; Haniger, Seattle, 35. STOLEN BASES—Merrifield, Kansas City, 40; Mullins, Baltimore, 30; Straw, Cleveland, 27; J.Ramírez, Cleveland, 25; Ohtani, Los Angeles, 24; Bichette, Toronto, 23; S.Marte, Oakland, 23; Moore, Seattle, 21; Kiner-Falefa, Texas, 20; N.Lopez, Kansas City, 20. PITCHING—G.Cole, New York, 16-8; Flexen, Seattle, 13-6; Cease, Chicago, 13-7; Matz, Toronto, 13-7; Montas, Oakland, 13-9; Ryu, Toronto, 13-9; Bassitt, Oakland, 12-4; McCullers Jr., Houston, 12-5; Rodón, Chicago, 12-5; Ray, Toronto, 12-6. ERA—Ray, Toronto, 2.72; G.Cole, New York, 3.08; Bassitt, Oakland, 3.16; McCullers Jr., Houston, 3.17; Berríos, Toronto, 3.48; Montas, Oakland, 3.48; Flexen, Seattle, 3.56; Giolito, Chicago, 3.70; Eovaldi, Boston, 3.88; Cease, Chicago, 3.95. STRIKEOUTS—Ray, Toronto, 238; G.Cole, New York, 237; Cease, Chicago, 221; Montas, Oakland, 200; Berríos, Toronto, 197; Giolito, Chicago, 192; Eovaldi, Boston, 188; McCullers Jr., Houston, 181; Rodón, Chicago, 181; Manaea, Oakland, 180.

NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Soto, Washington, .324; T.Turner, Los Angeles, .320; B.Harper, Philadelphia, .312; N.Castellanos, Cincinnati, .308; A.Frazier, San Diego, .305; Winker, Cincinnati, .305; Crawford, San Francisco, .303; Riley, Atlanta, .302; F.Freeman, Atlanta, .300; Goldschmidt, St. Louis, .296. RUNS—F.Freeman, Atlanta, 117; Soto, Washington, 109; Goldschmidt, St. Louis, 99; Albies, Atlanta, 98; Tatis Jr., San Diego, 98; B.Harper, Philadelphia, 97; T.Turner, Los Angeles, 96; Cronenworth, San Diego, 92; Muncy, Los Angeles, 91; C.Taylor, Los Angeles, 90. RBI—Duvall, Atlanta, 111; Arenado, St. Louis, 103; Albies, Atlanta, 101; Riley, Atlanta, 98; Goldschmidt, St. Louis, 97; M.Machado, San Diego, 96; Tatis Jr., San Diego, 95; J.Aguilar, Miami, 93; Votto, Cincinnati, 92; Soto, Washington, 92. HITS—T.Turner, Los Angeles, 180; F.Freeman, Atlanta, 172; Goldschmidt, St. Louis, 172; Riley, Atlanta, 168; A.Frazier, San Diego, 167; Edman, St. Louis, 163; N.Castellanos, Cincinnati, 157; Reynolds, Pittsburgh, 157; Albies, Atlanta, 154; Soto, Washington, 154. HOME RUNS—Tatis Jr., San Diego, 41; Duvall, Atlanta, 38; Muncy, Los Angeles, 35; Alonso, New York, 35; Votto, Cincinnati, 33; B.Harper, Philadelphia, 33; Arenado, St. Louis, 33; Riley, Atlanta, 32; O’Neill, St. Louis, 31; Báez, New York, 31; F.Freeman, Atlanta, 31. STOLEN BASES—T.Turner, Los Angeles, 31; Edman, St. Louis, 28; Tatis Jr., San Diego, 25; Chisholm Jr., Miami, 22; S.Marte, Oakland, 22; Tapia, Colorado, 20; Story, Colorado, 19; Albies, Atlanta, 18; Báez, New York, 18; Acuña Jr., Atlanta, 17; Hampson, Colorado, 17. PITCHING—J.Urías, Los Angeles, 18-3; Wainwright, St. Louis, 16-7; Scherzer, Los Angeles, 15-4; Buehler, Los Angeles, 14-4; Gausman, San Francisco, 14-6; Hendricks, Chicago, 14-7; Wheeler, Philadelphia, 14-9; Morton, Atlanta, 13-6; Fried, Atlanta, 13-7; Suter, Milwaukee, 12-5. ERA—Scherzer, Los Angeles, 2.28; Burnes, Milwaukee, 2.34; Woodruff, Milwaukee, 2.52; Buehler, Los Angeles, 2.58; Wheeler, Philadelphia, 2.79; Gausman, San Francisco, 2.92; Stroman, New York, 3.00; Alcantara, Miami, 3.05; Wainwright, St. Louis, 3.06; J.Urías, Los Angeles, 3.10. STRIKEOUTS—Wheeler, Philadelphia, 240; Scherzer, Los Angeles, 232; Burnes, Milwaukee, 221; Aa.Nola, Philadelphia, 219; Gausman, San Francisco, 211; Woodruff, Milwaukee, 208; Morton, Atlanta, 203; Mahle, Cincinnati, 198; Buehler, Los Angeles, 196; Darvish, San Diego, 193.


BASEBALL

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SATURDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East W L Pct GB Atlanta 81 72 .529 — Philadelphia 81 74 .523 1 New York 73 81 .474 8½ Miami 64 90 .416 17½ Washington 64 91 .413 18 Central W L Pct GB z-Milwaukee 93 62 .600 — St. Louis 86 69 .555 7 Cincinnati 80 75 .516 13 Chicago 67 88 .432 26 Pittsburgh 57 97 .370 35½ West W L Pct GB z-San Francisco10054.649 — z-Los Angeles 99 55 .643 1 San Diego 78 76 .506 22 Colorado 71 82 .464 28½ Arizona 49105 .318 51

WC L10 Str Home — 5-5 W-1 37-37 5 8-2 W-5 47-33 12½ 1-9 L-4 44-33 21½ 3-7 L-4 40-38 22 4-6 L-2 35-43 WC L10 Str Home — 4-6 W-2 44-36 —10-0W-1542-33 6 5-5 W-2 42-37 19 1-9 L-5 39-41 28½ 4-6 L-3 34-41 WC L10 Str Home — 6-4 W-1 49-26 — 8-2 W-2 52-23 7½ 4-6 L-1 45-34 14 6-4 L-2 46-30 36½ 2-8 L-1 29-47

Away 44-35 34-41 29-48 24-52 29-48 Away 49-26 44-36 38-38 28-47 23-56 Away 51-28 47-32 33-42 25-52 20-58

z-clinched playoff berth

Friday’s results St. Louis 8, Chi. Cubs 5 (7), 1st Tampa Bay 8, Miami 0 San Diego 6, Atlanta 5 (7), 1st St. Louis 12, Chi. Cubs 4 (7), 2nd Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh 6 Milwaukee 5, N.Y. Mets 1 San Francisco 7, Colorado 2 Cincinnati 8, Washington 7 (11) L.A. Dodgers 4, Arizona 2 Atlanta 4, San Diego 0, 2nd

Saturday’s results St. Louis 8, Chicago Cubs 5 Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 0 Tampa Bay 7, Miami 3 Milwaukee 2, N.Y. Mets 1 Cincinnati 7, Washington 6 Atlanta at San Diego, (n) L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, (n) San Francisco at Colorado, (n)

Sunday’s games Pittsburgh (Kranick 1-3) at Philadelphia (TBD), 12:05 p.m. Miami (Luzardo 5-8) at Tampa Bay (Baz 1-0), 12:10 p.m. Washington (Rogers 2-0) at Cincinnati (Mahle 12-6), 12:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Carrasco 1-3) at Milwaukee (Peralta 9-5), 1:10 p.m. St. Louis (Woodford 3-3) at Chicago Cubs (Thompson 3-3), 1:20 p.m. San Francisco (Gausman 14-6) at Colorado (Senzatela 4-9), 2:10 p.m. Atlanta (TBD) at San Diego (Musgrove 11-9), 3:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Urías 18-3) at Arizona (Mejía 0-2), 3:10 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East x-Tampa Bay Boston New York Toronto Baltimore Central x-Chicago Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Minnesota West Houston Seattle Oakland Los Angeles Texas

W L Pct 96 59 .619 88 67 .568 88 67 .568 85 69 .552 50105 .323 W L Pct 87 68 .561 76 78 .494 75 79 .487 70 84 .455 69 85 .448 W L Pct 91 64 .587 85 69 .552 84 71 .542 73 81 .474 56 99 .361

M 3 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

GB — 8 8 10½ 46 GB — 10½ 11½ 16½ 17½ GB — 5½ 7 17½ 35

WC L10 — 6-4 — 7-3 — 7-3 2½ 4-6 38 4-6 WC L10 — 4-6 11½ 5-5 12½ 7-3 17½ 4-6 18½ 6-4 WC L10 — 6-4 2½ 7-3 4 6-4 14½ 3-7 32 2-8

Str W-3 L-2 W-5 L-3 W-1 Str L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 W-4 Str L-3 W-6 W-2 L-1 L-1

Home 51-29 49-31 45-33 43-31 25-52 Home 49-27 39-40 42-37 36-39 36-40 Home 47-28 42-33 42-38 39-41 33-42

Away 45-30 39-36 43-34 42-38 25-53 Away 38-41 37-38 33-42 34-45 33-45 Away 44-36 43-36 42-33 34-40 23-57

Stanton’s grand slam sinks Red Sox ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — Giancarlo Stanton hit a go-ahead grand slam over the Green Monster in the eighth inning and the New York Yankees beat Boston 5-3 on Saturday to tie the Red Sox for the top spot in the AL wild-card race. The Yankees, who began the day with a two-game lead over Toronto and Seattle for the second wild card, now have a chance to nudge in front of their longtime rivals in Sunday night’s series finale at Fenway Park. Stanton connected off reliever Darwinzon Hernandez with two outs to give the Yankees a 5-2 lead. The slugger also had three hits and a three-run homer Friday night to help New York win the opening game of the series.

AP PHOTOS

Yankees designated hitter Giancarlo Stanton watches his eighth-inning grand slam Saturday in Boston.

without a throw, but sustained an undisclosed injury on the play and was helped RAYS 7, MARLINS 3: Tampa off the field. Bay clinched its second straight AL East title, with PHILLIES 3, PIRATES 0: Mike Zunino hitting a go- Ranger Suarez pitched a ahead homer and Brandon four-hit shutout, Bryce Lowe later adding a pair of Harper homered and PhilaRBI doubles to beat Miami delphia kept the pressure on in St. Petersburg, Fla. NL East-leading Atlanta with ATHLETICS 2, ASTROS 1: Oak- a home victory over Pittsland got a walk-off win over burgh. Suarez allowed just Houston on Starling Mar- four singles, walked none and te’s RBI double in the ninth struck out seven in his first inning. Elvis Andrus scored major league complete game.

INDIANS 6, WHITE SOX 0: Eli Morgan allowed one hit in six innings and José Ramirez drove in three runs, powering Cleveland to a home victory over Chicago.

ORIOLES 3, RANGERS 2: Kelvin Gutierrez homered to BREWERS 2, METS 1: Corbin cap a three-run seventh inBurnes burnished his NL ning as host Baltimore beat Cy Young Award creden- Texas. tials with a seven-inning, nine-strikeout performance REDS 7, NATIONALS 6: Nick to lead host Milwaukee past Castellanos’ ninth-inning New York. The Brewers can homer gave Cincinnati its wrap up the NL Central second straight walk-off crown Sunday. victory over Washington.

BOX SCORES Phillies 3, Pirates 0 Pittsburgh Hayes 3b Newman ss Reynolds cf Tsutsugo 1b Alford lf Difo 2b Tucker rf Davis c Crowe p Gamel ph Moran ph Totals Philadelphia Vierling cf-lf Segura 2b Harper rf Realmuto c B.Miller 1b McCutchen lf Gregorius ss Torreyes 3b Suárez p Totals Pittsburgh Philadelphia

x-clinched division; z-clinched playoff berth

Friday’s results Chicago White Sox 1, Cleveland 0 Tampa Bay 8, Miami 0 Kansas City 3, Detroit 1 Texas 8, Baltimore 5 N.Y. Yankees 8, Boston 3 Minnesota 3, Toronto 1 Seattle 6, L.A. Angels 5 Oakland 14, Houston 2

Saturday’s results Oakland 2, Houston 1 N.Y. Yankees 5, Boston 3 Tampa Bay 7, Miami 3 Detroit 5, Kansas City 1 Baltimore 3, Texas 2 Cleveland 6, Chicago White Sox 0 Toronto at Minnesota, (n) Seattle at L.A. Angels, (n)

Sunday’s games Kansas City (Bubic 5-6) at Detroit (Peralta 4-3), 11:10 a.m. Texas (Dunning 5-9) at Baltimore (Means 6-7), 12:05 p.m. Chi. White Sox (Giolito 10-9) at Cleveland (McKenzie 5-7), 12:10 p.m. Miami (Luzardo 5-8) at Tampa Bay (Baz 1-0), 12:10 p.m. Toronto (Manoah 7-2) at Minnesota (Jax 3-4), 1:10 p.m. Houston (Odorizzi 6-7) at Oakland (Blackburn 1-3), 3:07 p.m. Seattle (Gonzales 9-5) at L.A. Angels (Ohtani 9-2), 3:07 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Montgomery 6-6) at Boston (Rodríguez 11-8), 6:08 p.m.

AROUND THE MAJORS

Giants look beyond 100 wins DENVER — Aside from winning World Series titles, the 2010, 2012 and 2014 Giants have another striking similarity. Those clubs are considered the greatest in the history of the franchise, but most fans don’t remember how many regular season games each team won. The 2010 club finished with 92 wins, the 2012 team won 94 games and the 2014 squad hoisted a trophy despite winning just 88 regular season games. So after securing their 100th win of the 2021 season on Friday night with a 7-2 victory over the Rockies, the Giants acknowledged that regular season success can only bring them so much pride. “It feels like we’ve got to be on our game every single night,” manager Gabe Kapler said. The 2021 club is the eighth team in Giants franchise history to win 100 games and the fourth since the franchise moved west from New York in 1958. The 1962 and 1993 teams each finished the regular season with 103 victories, but a club led by Willie Mays and Willie McCovey lost in the World Series while the club led by Barry Bonds and Will Clark will go down as one of the greatest teams in MLB history to miss the playoffs.

Trout gives up on returning in ’21 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Los Angeles Angels star Mike Trout is officially shut down for the season. The three-time AL MVP suffered a calf strain on May 17 and hasn’t returned to the lineup since. The original prognosis was six to eight weeks of rehabilitation, but the injury was worse than originally thought. Trout hit .333 with eight home runs, 18 RBIs and a 1.090 OPS in 36 games. BRIEFLY YANKEES: Infielder DJ LeMahieu was out of the lineup Saturday with a “hip/groin” issue. ANGELS: Shohei Ohtani walked four times in Friday’s loss to the Mariners, becoming the first player since Barry Bonds in 2003 to draw at least three walks in three consecutive games. He’s drawn a total of 11 walks — four intentional — in those games. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

34

The Phillies have blown 34 save opportunities, tying a major league record set by the 2004 Colorado Rockies. The 34th came Friday when Cam Bedrosian gave up a seventh-inning lead against the Pirates in a game the Phillies rallied to win. — Tribune News Service

TIGERS 5, ROYALS 1: Miguel Cabrera drove in four runs in Detroit’s home victory over Kansas City.

AB R H BI BB SO 4 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 28 0 4 0 0 7 AB R H BI BB SO 3 1 2 1 1 1 4 1 1 0 0 0 3 1 1 1 1 0 4 0 2 0 0 1 4 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 28 3 8 3 6 3 000 000 000 — 0 002 010 00x — 3

Avg. .256 .223 .295 .224 .219 .267 .207 .667 .063 .256 .263 Avg. .357 .295 .313 .270 .231 .222 .212 .247 .200 4 0 8 0

LOB — Pittsburgh 1, Philadelphia 8. HR — Vierling (1), off Crowe; Harper (34), off Crowe. RBIs — Vierling (4), Harper (82), B.Miller (48). S — Suárez. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO ERA Crowe, L, 4-8 42/3 8 3 3 4 2 5.77 1 Howard /3 0 0 0 0 0 5.62 Kuhl 1 0 0 0 2 0 4.94 Banda 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.55 De Los Santos 1 0 0 0 0 0 6.68 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Suárez, W, 7-5 9 4 0 0 0 7 1.45

Phillies pitcher Ranger Suárez is doused in the dugout after his complete-game victory against the Pirates on Saturday in Philadelphia. Suárez a 1.75 ERA in 11 starts since moving to the starting rotation. Brewers 2, Mets 1

Yankees 5, Red Sox 3 New York AB R H BI Gardner cf 3 1 1 0 Judge rf 3 1 0 0 Rizzo 1b 3 1 0 0 Stanton dh 3 1 2 4 Gallo lf 3 0 0 0 Torres 2b 4 0 0 0 Sánchez c 4 0 0 0 Odor 3b 3 0 0 0 Wade ss 1 0 0 0 Urshela ss-3b 3 1 1 0 Totals 30 5 4 4 Boston AB R H BI Hernández cf 5 0 0 0 Renfroe rf 4 0 1 0 Devers 3b 3 0 1 0 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 Martinez dh 4 0 0 0 Schwarber lf 4 1 1 0 Dalbec 1b 4 1 1 1 Plawecki c 2 1 2 1 Iglesias 2b 4 0 1 0 Totals 34 3 7 2 New York 000 001 040 Boston 001 010 001

BB 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 — —

SO 0 0 0 1 3 2 3 1 1 1 12 SO 2 2 1 1 2 0 2 0 1 11 5 3

Avg. .224 .285 .253 .275 .203 .259 .208 .203 .268 .263 Avg. .251 .262 .275 .299 .285 .297 .246 .289 .000 4 0 7 0

LOB — New York 3, Boston 7. 2B — Gardner (15). HR — Stanton (33), off Hernandez; Plawecki (3), off Cortes Jr.; Dalbec (24), off Chapman. RBIs — Stanton 4 (91), Plawecki (15), Dalbec (77). SB — Gardner (4). New York Cortes Jr. King Luetge Severino, W, 1-0 Chapman, S, 29-33 Boston Pivetta Robles, H, 17 Houck, L, 1-5, H, 1 Hernandez, BS, 0-4 Brasier

IP H 41/3 4 11/3 2 1 /3 0 2 0 1 1 IP H 51/3 3 2 /3 0 12/3 0 1 /3 1 1 0

R 2 0 0 0 1 R 1 0 2 2 0

ER 2 0 0 0 1 ER 1 0 2 2 0

BB 0 0 0 1 0 BB 0 0 4 0 0

SO 4 2 0 4 1 SO 7 0 3 1 1

ERA 2.85 3.20 2.73 0.00 3.54 ERA 4.52 4.76 3.77 3.40 2.57

Inherited runners-scored — King 2-1, Luetge 1-0, Robles 2-1, Hernandez 2-2. T — 3:33. Att. — 36,103.

Athletics 2, Astros 1 Houston AB R H BI Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 Bregman 3b 4 0 0 0 Alvarez dh 4 0 0 0 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 Tucker rf 4 1 1 1 Gonzalez 1b 3 0 1 0 Meyers lf 3 0 0 0 Siri cf 2 0 0 0 Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 3 1 Oakland AB R H BI Harrison 2b 5 0 1 1 Marte cf 5 0 1 1 Olson 1b 2 0 0 0 Pinder rf 3 0 1 0 Kemp ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Canha lf-rf 3 0 1 0 Chapman 3b 3 0 0 0 Davis dh 2 0 1 0 Bolt pr-dh 0 1 0 0 Brown ph-dh 1 0 0 0 Murphy c 3 0 0 0 Andrus ss 3 1 2 0 Totals 31 2 7 2 Houston 000 000 100 Oakland 000 000 101

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 BB 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 6 — —

SO 0 0 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 9 SO 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 7 1 2

Avg. .278 .281 .278 .278 .293 .202 .252 .289 .173 Avg. .272 .324 .273 .237 .261 .231 .215 .209 .096 .208 .215 .243 3 7

0 0

One out when winning run scored. LOB — Houston 4, Oakland 11. 2B — Altuve (30), Marte (16). HR — Tucker (28), off Manaea. RBIs — Tucker (88), Harrison (21), Marte (28). Houston IP H Valdez 62/3 3 Graveman, BS 11/3 2 1 /3 2 Pressly, L, 5-3 Oakland IP H R Manaea 7 3 1 Trivino 1 0 0 Chafin, W, 2-1 1 0 0

R 1 0 1 ER 1 0 0

ER BB SO ERA 1 4 3 2.98 0 2 3 1.67 1 0 1 2.32 BB SO ERA 1 8 3.94 0 0 3.21 0 1 1.32

Inherited runners-scored — Graveman 2-1. HBP — Manaea (Siri), Valdez (Andrus). T — 2:49. Att. — 13,037.

New York AB R H BI BB Nimmo cf 4 0 3 0 0 Lindor ss 4 0 0 0 0 Conforto rf 4 1 1 0 0 Alonso 1b 3 0 0 0 1 Báez 2b 4 0 1 1 0 Villar 3b 3 0 0 0 1 McNeil lf 3 0 0 0 0 Peraza ph 1 0 0 0 0 McCann c 3 0 0 0 0 Hill p 2 0 1 0 0 Smith ph 1 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 1 6 1 2 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB Wong 2b 3 0 1 0 1 Adames ss 3 1 0 0 1 García rf 3 1 0 0 1 Yelich lf 4 0 1 0 0 Escobar 1b 3 0 2 2 0 Urías 3b 2 0 0 0 2 Taylor cf 3 0 0 0 0 Piña c 3 0 0 0 0 Burnes p 2 0 0 0 0 Vogelbach ph 0 0 0 0 1 Totals 26 2 4 2 6 New York 000 100 000 — Milwaukee 002 000 00x —

SO 0 4 1 0 1 2 0 1 2 0 0 11 SO 1 1 3 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 8 1 2

Rays 7, Marlins 3 Avg. .305 .228 .222 .257 .265 .252 .253 .205 .233 .105 .244 Avg. .274 .287 .266 .245 .249 .248 .243 .193 .154 .210 6 0 4 0

LOB — New York 6, Milwaukee 7. 2B — Conforto (19). RBIs — Báez (85), Escobar 2 (85). CS — Nimmo (4). New York IP H R Hill, L, 0-4 5 2 2 Loup 1 1 0 May 1 1 0 Lugo 1 0 0 Milwaukee IP H Burnes, W, 11-4 7 5 Boxberger, H, 23 1 1 Hader, S, 34-35 1 0

ER BB SO 2 4 6 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 R ER BB SO 1 1 1 9 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1

ERA 3.86 0.98 3.62 3.43 ERA 2.29 3.41 1.29

HBP — Hill (Escobar). WP — Burnes. T — 3:16. Att. — 35,388.

Tigers 5, Royals 1 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .277 Lopez ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .303 Perez c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .272 Benintendi lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .274 C.Santana 1b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .210 Mondesi dh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .260 Dozier rf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .215 Alberto 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .269 Isbel ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Olivares cf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .238 Totals 30 1 7 1 3 4 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Baddoo lf-cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .258 Schoop 1b 3 2 2 0 1 0 .277 Grossman rf-lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .237 Cabrera dh 4 1 3 4 0 0 .261 Candelario 3b 4 0 2 1 0 2 .276 H.Castro ss 2 0 1 0 0 0 .282 Goodrum ph-ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .213 Paredes 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Garneau c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .226 Reyes cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Cameron rf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .195 Totals 32 5 11 5 3 6 Kansas City 000 010 000 — 1 7 0 Detroit 000 003 02x — 5 11 0

LOB — Kansas City 7, Detroit 6. 2B — Dozier (27), Lopez (20), H.Castro (11), Cabrera (15), Candelario (42), Schoop (29). 3B — Dozier (5). RBIs — Dozier (50), Cabrera 4 (75), Candelario (66). SB — Lopez (21). CS — Olivares (2), Benintendi (9). SF — Dozier. S — Mondesi. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Heasley 51/3 3 0 0 2 3 3.86 Tapia, L, 4-1, BS, 0-3 1/3 4 3 3 0 0 2.61 1 Brentz /3 0 0 0 0 0 3.53 G.Holland 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.16 E.Santana 0 3 2 2 1 0 4.99 Coleman 1 1 0 0 0 2 0.00 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Skubal 4 1 0 0 0 1 4.13 Hutchison, W, 3-1 22/3 3 1 0 2 0 1.50 Funkhouser, H, 9 1 2 0 0 1 1 3.17 Fulmer, S, 12-16 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 3.06

E.Santana pitched to 4 batters in the 8th Inherited runners-scored — Tapia 1-0, Brentz 1-0, Coleman 2-0, Funkhouser 1-0, Fulmer 2-0. PB — Garneau (3). T — 3:00. Att. — 16,424.

Miami Rojas ss Panik 2b Chisholm Jr. 2b-ss De La Cruz cf Sánchez rf Brinson lf L.Díaz 1b Fortes dh Alvarez 3b León c-3b Totals Tampa Bay AB Lowe 2b 5 Choi 1b 5 Arozarena lf 3 Meadows dh 3 Cruz ph-dh 1 Wendle ss 4 Y.Díaz 3b 4 Kiermaier cf 4 Phillips rf 3 Zunino c 4 Totals 36 Miami 001 Tampa Bay 000

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 1 1 1 0 0 .267 1 0 0 0 0 0 .150 5 1 2 0 0 1 .248 4 0 3 1 1 0 .322 5 1 3 0 0 0 .255 5 0 1 0 0 2 .230 4 0 1 0 0 0 .215 2 0 2 0 2 0 .533 4 0 0 1 0 2 .150 4 0 0 0 0 1 .184 38 3 13 3 3 6 R H BI BB SO Avg. 0 4 2 0 0 .239 0 0 0 0 1 .228 0 0 0 1 1 .272 1 1 0 0 0 .233 0 0 0 0 0 .270 1 2 1 0 0 .274 1 2 1 0 0 .259 1 1 0 0 2 .255 1 0 1 0 2 .203 2 2 2 0 1 .216 7 12 7 1 7 001 100 — 3 13 2 121 12x — 7 12 0

E — Chisholm Jr. (24), Alvarez (1). LOB — Miami 11, Tampa Bay 7. 2B — Chisholm Jr. (19), Lowe 3 (29), Wendle (30), Kiermaier (19). 3B — Meadows (3). HR — Rojas (9), off McClanahan; Zunino (32), off Alcantara. RBIs — Rojas (46), Alvarez (4), De La Cruz (19), Wendle (54), Zunino 2 (61), Y.Díaz (61), Lowe 2 (88), Phillips (43). SB — Fortes (1). SF — Phillips. Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Alcantara, L, 9-14 6 9 5 3 0 6 3.09 Bleier 1 0 0 0 1 1 3.15 Bender 1 3 2 2 0 0 2.79 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO ERA McClanahan, W, 10-6 5 6 1 1 1 3 3.44 McHugh, H, 6 11/3 5 2 2 0 1 1.60 Feyereisen, H, 6 12/3 0 0 0 1 2 2.36 Fairbanks 1 2 0 0 1 0 3.70

Inherited runners-scored — Bleier 1-0, Feyereisen 1-0. IBB — off Bleier (Arozarena). WP — McClanahan. T — 2:59. Att. — 23,783.

Orioles 3, Rangers 2 Texas AB R H BI Calhoun lf 4 0 1 0 Kiner-Falefa ss 4 0 0 0 García dh 4 0 0 0 Lowe 1b 4 1 2 1 Solak 2b 3 0 0 0 Peters rf 4 0 0 0 Hernandez 3b 1 0 0 0 Taveras cf 3 0 0 0 Trevino c 3 1 3 1 Totals 30 2 6 2 Baltimore AB R H BI McKenna cf 4 0 2 0 Mountcastle 1b 3 0 0 0 Hays lf 4 0 1 0 Santander rf 4 0 0 0 Mancini dh 2 1 1 0 Valaika ss-2b 3 1 1 1 Jones 2b 2 0 0 0 Mullins ph 1 0 0 0 Gutierrez 3b 3 1 2 2 Ciuffo c 3 0 1 0 Totals 29 3 8 3 Texas 000 000 011 Baltimore 000 000 30x

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 1 0 5 BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 — —

SO 0 1 2 1 0 3 0 1 0 8 SO 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 6 2 3

Avg. .258 .272 .242 .264 .236 .203 .244 .160 .229 Avg. .194 .260 .257 .241 .253 .202 .167 .300 .218 .333 6 0 8 0

LOB — Texas 6, Baltimore 4. 2B — Lowe (24), McKenna (6), Ciuffo (1), Valaika (7), Hays (25). HR — Trevino (4), off Kriske; Lowe (17), off Tate; Gutierrez (2), off Lyles. RBIs — Trevino (28), Lowe (71), Valaika (22), Gutierrez 2 (19). SB — Hernandez (11). CS — Hernandez (2).

Inherited runners-scored — Howard 3-0. WP — Kuhl. T — 2:33. Att. — 28,135.

Indians 6, White Sox 0 Chicago AB R H BI BB Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 Robert cf 4 0 0 0 0 Abreu 1b 4 0 1 0 0 Grandal c 3 0 0 0 1 Jiménez lf 3 0 1 0 0 Moncada 3b 3 0 1 0 0 García rf 3 0 0 0 0 Vaughn dh 2 0 0 0 1 Hernandez 2b 3 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 0 3 0 2 Cleveland AB R H BI BB Straw cf 4 2 2 0 0 Rosario ss 4 1 2 0 0 Ramírez 3b 4 2 2 3 0 Reyes dh 4 0 1 1 0 Bradley 1b 3 0 0 1 0 Ramirez lf 3 0 0 0 0 Zimmer rf 3 0 0 0 0 Hedges c 3 0 0 0 0 Giménez 2b 3 1 1 1 0 Totals 31 6 8 6 0 Chicago 000 000 000 — Cleveland 201 003 00x —

SO 2 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 8 SO 1 0 2 1 2 0 3 0 1 10 0 6

Avg. .303 .349 .265 .233 .246 .263 .263 .238 .228 Avg. .267 .281 .268 .256 .217 .264 .223 .174 .208 3 1 8 1

E — Moncada (14), Ramírez (15). LOB — Chicago 4, Cleveland 2. 2B — Moncada (30), Jiménez (10), Straw (25). HR — Ramírez (36), off Lynn; Giménez (5), off Lynn. RBIs — Ramírez 3 (99), Giménez (14), Reyes (81), Bradley (39). SB — Ramírez (26). SF — Bradley. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lynn, L, 10-6 6 7 6 6 0 6 2.72 Ruiz 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.09 Burr 1 1 0 0 0 3 2.60 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Morgan, W, 4-7 6 1 0 0 1 6 5.27 Hentges 2 1 0 0 1 2 6.55 Shaw 1 1 0 0 0 0 3.53

T — 2:40. Att. — 24,082.

Reds 7, Nationals 6 Washington AB R H BI Thomas cf 5 1 2 1 Escobar ss 5 1 1 0 Soto rf 3 1 1 0 Bell 1b 5 1 2 1 García 2b 5 0 2 1 Ruiz c 4 2 1 1 Mercer 3b 4 0 1 0 Stevenson lf 3 0 1 2 Fedde p 3 0 0 0 Hernandez ph 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 6 11 6 Cincinnati AB R H BI India 2b 5 2 2 0 Schrock lf 4 0 0 1 Castellanos rf 3 2 2 3 Stephenson 1b 3 1 1 0 Farmer ss 3 1 2 1 Suárez 3b 3 0 2 2 Barnhart c 4 0 0 0 Friedl cf 4 1 2 0 Gutierrez p 1 0 0 0 DeShields ph 0 0 0 0 Cabrera ph 0 0 0 0 Aquino ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 31 7 11 7 Washington 103 100 100 Cincinnati 021 020 101

BB 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 5 BB 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 5 — —

SO Avg. 1 .245 2 .285 0 .324 1 .258 1 .240 0 .284 2 .262 0 .220 1 .000 0 .274 8 SO Avg. 0 .268 1 .300 0 .310 0 .278 1 .263 1 .188 0 .252 0 .429 1 .091 0 .226 0 .228 1 .187 5 6 11 1 7 11 0

One out when winning run scored. E — Soto (6). LOB — Washington 10, Cincinnati 7. 2B — García (16), Farmer 2 (22), Suárez (19), India (31). HR — Thomas (7), off Santillan; Ruiz (3), off Hoffman; Castellanos (31), off Murphy. RBIs — García (19), Bell (88), Stevenson 2 (21), Thomas (25), Ruiz (14), Suárez 2 (75), Castellanos 3 (91), Schrock (12), Farmer (59). CS — DeShields (1). SF — Castellanos, Schrock.

Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lyles, L, 9-13 62/3 7 3 3 1 4 5.31 1 Santana /3 0 0 0 0 1 3.96 B.Martin 1 1 0 0 0 1 3.15 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Ellis 3 2 0 0 1 2 2.15 Diplán 2 2 0 0 2 2 4.21 Krehbiel 12/3 0 0 0 1 2 0.00 Kriske, W, 2-1 1 1 1 1 0 1 14.00 Tate, S, 3-5 11/3 1 1 1 1 1 4.59

Washington IP Fedde 42/3 1 Thompson /3 1 /3 Baldonado 2 Romero /3 Machado, BS, 0-3 1 Murphy, L, 0-2 11/3 Cincinnati IP H Gutierrez 22/3 5 2 Santillan /3 2 2 Wilson /3 2 Pérez 1 0 Sims 1 1 Hoffman 1 1 Lorenzen 1 0 Givens, W, 4-3 1 0

H R ER BB SO 7 5 5 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 2 R ER BB SO 4 4 4 3 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

ERA 5.26 3.04 7.45 0.00 3.82 6.19 ERA 4.74 2.85 3.14 6.65 4.47 4.59 3.62 3.06

Inherited runners-scored — Kriske 1-0. HBP — Lyles (Mountcastle). T — 2:54. Att. — 10,645.

Inherited runners-scored — Thompson 2-0, Romero 3-0, Santillan 3-2. T — 3:41. Att. — 18,293.


BASEBALL

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SATURDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East W L Pct Atlanta 82 72 .532 Philadelphia 81 74 .523 New York 73 81 .474 Miami 64 90 .416 Washington 64 91 .413 Central W L Pct z-Milwaukee 93 62 .600 St. Louis 86 69 .555 Cincinnati 80 75 .516 Chicago 67 88 .432 Pittsburgh 57 97 .370 West W L Pct z-San Fran 101 54 .652 z-Los Angeles 99 56 .639 San Diego 78 77 .503 Colorado 71 83 .461 Arizona 50105 .323

GB — 1½ 9 18 18½ GB — 7 13 26 35½ GB — 2 23 29½ 51

WC L10 Str Home — 6-4 W-2 37-37 5 8-2 W-5 47-33 12½ 1-9 L-4 44-33 21½ 3-7 L-4 40-38 22 4-6 L-2 35-43 WC L10 Str Home — 4-6 W-2 44-36 —10-0W-1542-33 6 5-5 W-2 42-37 19 1-9 L-5 39-41 28½ 4-6 L-3 34-41 WC L10 Str Home — 6-4 W-2 49-26 — 7-3 L-1 52-23 8 3-7 L-2 45-35 14½ 5-5 L-3 46-31 36 3-7 W-1 30-47

Away 45-35 34-41 29-48 24-52 29-48 Away 49-26 44-36 38-38 28-47 23-56 Away 52-28 47-33 33-42 25-52 20-58

z-clinched playoff berth

Friday’s results St. Louis 8, Chi. Cubs 5 (7), 1st Tampa Bay 8, Miami 0 San Diego 6, Atlanta 5 (7), 1st St. Louis 12, Chi. Cubs 4 (7), 2nd Philadelphia 8, Pittsburgh 6 Milwaukee 5, N.Y. Mets 1 San Francisco 7, Colorado 2 Cincinnati 8, Washington 7 (11) L.A. Dodgers 4, Arizona 2 Atlanta 4, San Diego 0, 2nd

Saturday’s results St. Louis 8, Chicago Cubs 5 Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 0 Tampa Bay 7, Miami 3 Milwaukee 2, N.Y. Mets 1 Cincinnati 7, Washington 6 Arizona 7, L.A. Dodgers 2 Atlanta 10, San Diego 8 (10) San Francisco 7, Colorado 2

Sunday’s games Pittsburgh (Kranick 1-3) at Philadelphia (TBD), 12:05 p.m. Miami (Luzardo 5-8) at Tampa Bay (Baz 1-0), 12:10 p.m. Washington (Rogers 2-0) at Cincinnati (Mahle 12-6), 12:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Carrasco 1-3) at Milwaukee (Peralta 9-5), 1:10 p.m. St. Louis (Woodford 3-3) at Chicago Cubs (Thompson 3-3), 1:20 p.m. San Francisco (Gausman 14-6) at Colorado (Senzatela 4-9), 2:10 p.m. Atlanta (TBD) at San Diego (Musgrove 11-9), 3:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Urías 18-3) at Arizona (Mejía 0-2), 3:10 p.m.

W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away 96 59 .619 — — 6-4 W-3 51-29 45-30 88 67 .568 8 — 7-3 L-2 49-31 39-36 88 67 .568 8 — 7-3 W-5 45-33 43-34 86 69 .555 10 2 5-5 W-1 43-31 43-38 50105 .323 46 38 4-6 W-1 25-52 25-53 W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away 87 68 .561 — — 4-6 L-1 49-27 38-41 76 78 .494 10½ 11½ 5-5 W-1 39-40 37-38 75 79 .487 11½ 12½ 7-3 W-1 42-37 33-42 70 84 .455 16½ 17½ 4-6 L-1 36-39 34-45 69 86 .445 18 19 6-4 L-1 36-41 33-45 W L Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away 91 64 .587 — — 6-4 L-3 47-28 44-36 85 70 .548 6 3 7-3 L-1 42-33 43-37 84 71 .542 7 4 6-4 W-2 42-38 42-33 74 81 .477 17 14 3-7 W-1 40-41 34-40 56 99 .361 35 32 2-8 L-1 33-42 23-57

x-clinched division; z-clinched playoff berth

Friday’s results Chicago White Sox 1, Cleveland 0 Tampa Bay 8, Miami 0 Kansas City 3, Detroit 1 Texas 8, Baltimore 5 N.Y. Yankees 8, Boston 3 Minnesota 3, Toronto 1 Seattle 6, L.A. Angels 5 Oakland 14, Houston 2

Saturday’s results Oakland 2, Houston 1 N.Y. Yankees 5, Boston 3 Tampa Bay 7, Miami 3 Detroit 5, Kansas City 1 Baltimore 3, Texas 2 Cleveland 6, Chicago White Sox 0 Toronto 6, Minnesota 1 L.A. Angels 14, Seattle 1

Sunday’s games Kansas City (Bubic 5-6) at Detroit (Peralta 4-3), 11:10 a.m. Texas (Dunning 5-9) at Baltimore (Means 6-7), 12:05 p.m. Chi. White Sox (Giolito 10-9) at Cleveland (McKenzie 5-7), 12:10 p.m. Miami (Luzardo 5-8) at Tampa Bay (Baz 1-0), 12:10 p.m. Toronto (Manoah 7-2) at Minnesota (Jax 3-4), 1:10 p.m. Houston (Odorizzi 6-7) at Oakland (Blackburn 1-3), 3:07 p.m. Seattle (Gonzales 9-5) at L.A. Angels (Ohtani 9-2), 3:07 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Montgomery 6-6) at Boston (Rodríguez 11-8), 6:08 p.m.

ANAHEIM, Calif. — Los Angeles Angels star Mike Trout is officially shut down for the season. The three-time AL MVP suffered a calf strain on May 17 and hasn’t returned to the lineup since. The original prognosis was six to eight weeks of rehabilitation, but the injury was worse than originally thought. Trout hit .333 with eight home runs, 18 RBIs and a 1.090 OPS in 36 games. BRIEFLY YANKEES: Infielder DJ LeMahieu was out of the lineup Saturday with a “hip/groin” issue. ANGELS: Shohei Ohtani walked four times in Friday’s loss to the Mariners, becoming the first player since Barry Bonds in 2003 to draw at least three walks in three consecutive games. He’s drawn a total of 11 walks — four intentional — in those games. — Wire reports

Angels 14, Mariners 1

H BI BB SO Avg. 3 0 0 0 .305 0 0 0 4 .228 1 0 0 1 .222 0 0 1 0 .257 1 1 0 1 .265 0 0 1 2 .252 0 0 0 0 .253 0 0 0 1 .205 0 0 0 2 .233 1 0 0 0 .105 0 0 0 0 .244 6 1 2 11 R H BI BB SO Avg. 0 1 0 1 1 .274 1 0 0 1 1 .287 1 0 0 1 3 .266 0 1 0 0 0 .245 0 2 2 0 0 .249 0 0 0 2 1 .248 0 0 0 0 1 .243 0 0 0 0 0 .193 0 0 0 0 1 .154 0 0 0 1 0 .210 2 4 2 6 8

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Crawford ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .267 France 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .291 Bauers 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .212 Seager 3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .215 a-Moore ph-3b-ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .180 Haniger rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .251 Kelenic cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .169 Toro 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .243 Torrens dh-3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Fraley lf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .204 Raleigh c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .188 Totals 31 1 6 1 1 4 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Marsh cf 4 4 2 1 1 2 .262 Ohtani dh 3 3 2 3 2 1 .257 Gosselin lf 3 2 2 4 1 0 .269 b-Wong ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Mayfield 3b 4 1 1 1 1 0 .214 Stassi c 3 1 0 0 2 0 .248 Walsh 1b 5 1 4 4 0 0 .272 Lagares rf 5 0 1 0 0 3 .232 Rengifo ss 4 2 2 1 1 1 .199 Fletcher 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .265 Totals 37 14 14 14 8 8 Seattle 001 000 000 — 1 6 0 Los Angeles 218 030 00x — 14 14 1

New York 000 100 000 — 1 6 0 Milwaukee 002 000 00x — 2 4 0

E — Rengifo (9). LOB — Seattle 4, Los Angeles 8. 2B — Raleigh (12), Walsh (31). 3B — Ohtani 2 (7). HR — Rengifo (6), off Anderson. RBIs — Crawford (51), Ohtani 3 (98), Gosselin 4 (47), Rengifo (16), Walsh 4 (90), Marsh (16), Mayfield (36).

LOB — New York 6, Milwaukee 7. 2B — Conforto (19). RBIs — Báez (85), Escobar 2 (85). CS — Nimmo (4). New York IP H R Hill, L, 0-4 5 2 2 Loup 1 1 0 May 1 1 0 Lugo 1 0 0 Milwaukee IP H Burnes, W, 11-4 7 5 Boxberger, H, 23 1 1 Hader, S, 34-35 1 0

ER BB SO 2 4 6 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 R ER BB SO 1 1 1 9 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1

HBP — Hill (Escobar). WP — Burnes. T — 3:16. Att. — 35,388.

ERA 3.86 0.98 3.62 3.43 ERA 2.29 3.41 1.29

Seattle Anderson, L, 2-2 Ramirez Sheffield Swanson Doolittle Andriese Los Angeles IP Barria 2 Diaz, W, 1-0 7

IP 2 1 1 1 1 2 H 3 3

H 9 2 1 1 0 1 R 0 1

R ER BB 9 9 1 2 2 1 3 3 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ER BB 0 0 1 1

T — 3:07. Att. — 30,221.

SO 0 2 0 1 2 3 SO 0 4

BOSTON — Giancarlo Stanton hit a go-ahead grand slam over the Green Monster in the eighth inning and the New York Yankees beat Boston 5-3 on Saturday to tie the Red Sox for the top spot in the AL wild-card race. The Yankees, who began the day with a two-game lead over Toronto and Seattle for the second wild card, now have a chance to nudge in front of their longtime rivals in Sunday night’s series finale at Fenway Park. Stanton connected off reliever Darwinzon HernanAP PHOTO dez with two outs to give the Yankees designated hitter Giancarlo Stanton watches his Yankees a 5-2 lead. eighth-inning grand slam Saturday in Boston. RAYS 7, MARLINS 3: Tampa in San Bay clinched its second Harper homered and Phil- RBI, and Atlanta won 1 straight AL East title, with adelphia kept the pressure Diego to keep its 1 /2-game Mike Zunino hitting a go- on NL East-leading Atlanta lead in the NL East. ahead homer and Brandon with a home victory over BREWERS 2, METS 1: Corbin Lowe later adding a pair of Pittsburgh. Burnes burnished his NL RBI doubles to beat Miami INDIANS 6, WHITE SOX 0: Cy Young Award credenin St. Petersburg, Fla. Eli Morgan allowed one hit in tials with a seven-inning, ATHLETICS 2, ASTROS 1: six innings and José Ramirez nine-strikeout performance Oakland got a walk-off win drove in three runs, power- to lead host Milwaukee past over Houston on Starling ing Cleveland to a home vic- New York. Marte’s RBI double in the tory over Chicago. BLUE JAYS 6, TWINS 1: Teninth inning. BRAVES 10, PADRES 8 (10): oscar Hernández, Marcus

games back in the AL wildcard race. DIAMONDBACKS 7, DODGERS 2: Ketel Marte and Carson Kelly homered early off Clayton Kershaw, Zac Gallen pitched one-run ball for six innings and Arizona beat Los Angeles in Phoenix. GIANTS 7, ROCKIES 2: Brandon Belt went deep twice and San Francisco set a franchise record for homers in a season with 236 in its road victory over Colorado. ANGELS 14, MARINERS 1: Shohei Ohtani hit a pair of RBI triples and walked twice — giving him 13 in four games — as Los Angeles routed visiting Seattle. REDS 7, NATIONALS 6: Nick Castellanos’ ninth-inning homer gave Cincinnati its second straight walk-off victory over Washington. TIGERS 5, ROYALS 1: Miguel Cabrera drove in four runs in Detroit’s home victory over Kansas City.

BOX SCORES Giants 7, Rockies 2

Braves 10, Padres 8

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. La Stella 2b 5 0 1 0 0 2 .246 Belt 1b 5 2 3 4 0 0 .270 Posey c 5 0 0 0 0 0 .301 Wade Jr. rf-lf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .260 Crawford ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .303 Flores 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .259 Dickerson lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .234 Duggar cf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .262 Solano ph 0 1 0 0 0 0 .277 Bryant ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Yastrzemski ph-rf 1 0 1 2 0 0 .225 Totals 38 7 11 7 1 7 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tapia lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .275 Rodgers ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .287 Blackmon rf 5 1 3 0 0 1 .273 Cron 1b 5 0 0 1 0 1 .274 McMahon 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .255 Díaz c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .239 Hilliard cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .217 Welker 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .167 Gray p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .109 Daza ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .284 Totals 38 2 11 2 1 6 San Francisco 100 030 030 — 7 11 0 Colorado 200 000 000 — 2 11 0

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Soler rf 5 2 3 4 1 0 .263 Freeman 1b 5 0 1 0 1 2 .299 Albies 2b 5 1 2 2 0 2 .259 Riley 3b 6 1 3 2 0 2 .304 Duvall cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Rosario lf 5 0 2 1 0 1 .292 d’Arnaud c 4 2 0 0 1 1 .225 Swanson ss 4 2 1 0 1 2 .246 Ynoa p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .226 Pederson ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .235 Adrianza ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Arcia ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .181 Totals 43 10 13 10 5 13 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 5 2 3 1 0 0 .307 Tatis Jr. ss 4 0 0 0 1 3 .285 Profar lf 2 1 0 0 0 1 .230 Pham ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Machado 3b 5 1 1 4 0 1 .279 Hosmer 1b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .268 Myers rf 5 1 1 0 0 4 .255 Grisham cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .240 Caratini c 4 0 1 1 0 0 .217 Velasquez p 1 0 0 1 0 0 .087 Marisnick ph-lf 2 1 1 0 0 0 .216 Totals 39 8 10 8 1 10 Atlanta 002 014 001 2 — 10 13 0 San Diego 120 041 000 0 — 8 10 1

Toronto AB R H BI Springer cf 4 1 1 2 Semien 2b 5 1 2 1 Guerrero Jr. 1b 4 0 0 0 Bichette ss 4 0 1 0 Hernández dh 4 2 2 1 Dickerson lf 2 0 1 0 Valera ph 1 0 0 0 Espinal 3b 4 1 1 0 Kirk c 3 0 1 0 1-Jansen pr-c 1 1 1 1 Grichuk rf 4 0 1 0 Totals 36 6 11 5 Minnesota AB R H BI Buxton cf 3 0 0 0 Polanco 2b-ss 4 1 1 0 Donaldson 3b 2 0 1 0 Garver dh 3 0 0 1 Rooker rf 2 0 0 0 Sanó 1b 2 0 0 0 Gordon lf 4 0 0 0 Jeffers c 2 0 0 0 Arraez ph-2b 2 0 0 0 Simmons ss 2 0 1 0 Kepler ph 1 0 0 0 Astudillo c 1 0 0 0 Totals 28 1 3 1 Toronto 020 001 210 Minnesota 100 000 000

E — Tatis Jr. (22). LOB — Atlanta 10, San Diego 5. 2B — Pederson (19), Soler (11), Grisham 2 (25), Frazier (34). HR — Soler (12), off Crismatt; Frazier (5), off Ynoa; Hosmer (12), off Ynoa; Machado (27), off Ynoa. RBIs — Albies 2 (103), Riley 2 (100), Pederson (59), Soler 4 (29), Rosario (13), Frazier (42), Hosmer (65), Velasquez (3), Machado 4 (100), Caratini (37).

E — Rooker (1), Donaldson (13). LOB — Toronto 6, Minnesota 8. 2B — Grichuk (25), Donaldson (25). HR — Hernández (31), off Gant; Semien (43), off Farrell; Springer (18), off Barraclough. RBIs — Hernández (111), Semien (99), Springer 2 (39), Jansen (20), Garver (32). SB — Polanco (11), Buxton (7), Dickerson (3). SF — Garver.

2B — McMahon (29), Díaz (18). HR — Belt 2 (29), off Gray. RBIs — Belt 4 (59), Duggar (35), Yastrzemski 2 (67), Cron (87), McMahon (77). SB — Yastrzemski (4). San Francisco IP DeSclafani 4 2 /3 Álvarez 1 /3 Littell, H, 7 García, H, 10 1 Rogers, H, 29 1 Watson, W, 4-1 1 Leone 1 Colorado IP Gray, L, 8-12 42/3 Gilbreath 11/3 Bard 1 1 /3 Sheffield 2 Kinley /3 Fernández 1

H 5 1 0 1 1 0 3 H 5 1 1 3 1 0

R ER BB SO ERA 2 2 1 3 3.26 0 0 0 0 2.48 0 0 0 1 2.91 0 0 0 0 2.69 0 0 0 0 2.10 0 0 0 1 2.70 0 0 0 1 1.62 R ER BB SO ERA 4 4 0 5 4.28 0 0 0 1 3.66 0 0 0 0 5.02 3 3 1 0 3.51 0 0 0 1 4.54 0 0 0 0 9.53

Yankees 5, Red Sox 3

Trout gives up on returning in ’21

New York AB R Nimmo cf 4 0 Lindor ss 4 0 Conforto rf 4 1 Alonso 1b 3 0 Báez 2b 4 0 Villar 3b 3 0 McNeil lf 3 0 Peraza ph 1 0 McCann c 3 0 Hill p 2 0 Smith ph 1 0 Totals 32 1 Milwaukee AB Wong 2b 3 Adames ss 3 García rf 3 Yelich lf 4 Escobar 1b 3 Urías 3b 2 Taylor cf 3 Piña c 3 Burnes p 2 Vogelbach ph 0 Totals 26

ASSOCIATED PRESS

T — 3:36. Att. — 45,063.

AROUND THE MAJORS

Brewers 2, Mets 1

Stanton’s grand slam sinks Red Sox

ORIOLES 3, RANGERS 2: Kelvin Gutierrez homered to PHILLIES 3, PIRATES 0: Jorge Soler hit a go-ahead Semien and George Springer cap a three-run seventh inRanger Suarez pitched a double with one out in the homered as Toronto won ning as host Baltimore beat four-hit shutout, Bryce 10th inning for his fourth in Minnesota to stay two Texas.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East x-Tampa Bay Boston New York Toronto Baltimore Central x-Chicago Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Minnesota West Houston Seattle Oakland Los Angeles Texas

M 4 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

ERA 4.66 4.26 6.83 3.18 6.00 5.32 ERA 4.61 3.12

New York AB R H BI Gardner cf 3 1 1 0 Judge rf 3 1 0 0 Rizzo 1b 3 1 0 0 Stanton dh 3 1 2 4 Gallo lf 3 0 0 0 Torres 2b 4 0 0 0 Sánchez c 4 0 0 0 Odor 3b 3 0 0 0 Wade ss 1 0 0 0 Urshela ss-3b 3 1 1 0 Totals 30 5 4 4 Boston AB R H BI Hernández cf 5 0 0 0 Renfroe rf 4 0 1 0 Devers 3b 3 0 1 0 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 Martinez dh 4 0 0 0 Schwarber lf 4 1 1 0 Dalbec 1b 4 1 1 1 Plawecki c 2 1 2 1 Iglesias 2b 4 0 1 0 Totals 34 3 7 2 New York 000 001 040 Boston 001 010 001

BB 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 — —

SO 0 0 0 1 3 2 3 1 1 1 12 SO 2 2 1 1 2 0 2 0 1 11 5 3

Avg. .224 .285 .253 .275 .203 .259 .208 .203 .268 .263 Avg. .251 .262 .275 .299 .285 .297 .246 .289 .000 4 0 7 0

LOB — New York 3, Boston 7. 2B — Gardner (15). HR — Stanton (33), off Hernandez; Plawecki (3), off Cortes Jr.; Dalbec (24), off Chapman. RBIs — Stanton 4 (91), Plawecki (15), Dalbec (77). SB — Gardner (4). New York Cortes Jr. King Luetge Severino, W, 1-0 Chapman, S, 29-33 Boston Pivetta Robles, H, 17 Houck, L, 1-5, H, 1 Hernandez, BS, 0-4 Brasier

IP H 41/3 4 11/3 2 1 /3 0 2 0 1 1 IP H 51/3 3 2 /3 0 12/3 0 1 /3 1 1 0

R 2 0 0 0 1 R 1 0 2 2 0

ER 2 0 0 0 1 ER 1 0 2 2 0

BB 0 0 0 1 0 BB 0 0 4 0 0

SO 4 2 0 4 1 SO 7 0 3 1 1

ERA 2.85 3.20 2.73 0.00 3.54 ERA 4.52 4.76 3.77 3.40 2.57

Inherited runners-scored — King 2-1, Luetge 1-0, Robles 2-1, Hernandez 2-2. T — 3:33. Att. — 36,103.

Athletics 2, Astros 1 Houston AB R H BI Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 Bregman 3b 4 0 0 0 Alvarez dh 4 0 0 0 Correa ss 3 0 0 0 Tucker rf 4 1 1 1 Gonzalez 1b 3 0 1 0 Meyers lf 3 0 0 0 Siri cf 2 0 0 0 Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 3 1 Oakland AB R H BI Harrison 2b 5 0 1 1 Marte cf 5 0 1 1 Olson 1b 2 0 0 0 Pinder rf 3 0 1 0 Kemp ph-lf 1 0 0 0 Canha lf-rf 3 0 1 0 Chapman 3b 3 0 0 0 Davis dh 2 0 1 0 Bolt pr-dh 0 1 0 0 Brown ph-dh 1 0 0 0 Murphy c 3 0 0 0 Andrus ss 3 1 2 0 Totals 31 2 7 2 Houston 000 000 100 Oakland 000 000 101

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 BB 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 6 — —

SO 0 0 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 9 SO 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 7 1 2

Avg. .278 .281 .278 .278 .293 .202 .252 .289 .173 Avg. .272 .324 .273 .237 .261 .231 .215 .209 .096 .208 .215 .243 3 7

0 0

One out when winning run scored. LOB — Houston 4, Oakland 11. 2B — Altuve (30), Marte (16). HR — Tucker (28), off Manaea. RBIs — Tucker (88), Harrison (21), Marte (28). Houston IP H Valdez 62/3 3 Graveman, BS 11/3 2 1 /3 2 Pressly, L, 5-3 Oakland IP H R Manaea 7 3 1 Trivino 1 0 0 Chafin, W, 2-1 1 0 0

R 1 0 1 ER 1 0 0

ER BB SO ERA 1 4 3 2.98 0 2 3 1.67 1 0 1 2.32 BB SO ERA 1 8 3.94 0 0 3.21 0 1 1.32

Inherited runners-scored — Graveman 2-1. HBP — Manaea (Siri), Valdez (Andrus). T — 2:49. Att. — 13,037.

Blue Jays 6, Twins 1

Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO ERA Ynoa 42/3 7 7 7 0 6 3.98 1 Minter /3 0 0 0 0 0 3.86 Martin 1 2 1 1 0 1 4.24 Jackson 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.97 Matzek 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.70 Rodríguez, W, 5-4 1 1 0 0 1 0 2.76 Smith, S, 34-40 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.66 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO ERA Velasquez 3 3 2 2 2 3 6.22 Weathers 2 2 1 0 0 3 5.01 1 Crismatt, BS, 0-1 /3 4 4 4 1 1 3.45 Lamet 12/3 1 0 0 0 3 3.86 Pagán, H, 17 1 0 0 0 0 0 4.35 Melancon, BS, 38-44 1 2 1 0 0 1 2.26 Hudson, L, 5-3 1 1 2 1 2 2 3.26

T — 4:07. Att. — 39,026.

Rays 7, Marlins 3 Miami Rojas ss Panik 2b Chisholm Jr. 2b-ss De La Cruz cf Sánchez rf Brinson lf L.Díaz 1b Fortes dh Alvarez 3b León c-3b Totals Tampa Bay AB Lowe 2b 5 Choi 1b 5 Arozarena lf 3 Meadows dh 3 Cruz ph-dh 1 Wendle ss 4 Y.Díaz 3b 4 Kiermaier cf 4 Phillips rf 3 Zunino c 4 Totals 36 Miami 001 Tampa Bay 000

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 1 1 1 0 0 .267 1 0 0 0 0 0 .150 5 1 2 0 0 1 .248 4 0 3 1 1 0 .322 5 1 3 0 0 0 .255 5 0 1 0 0 2 .230 4 0 1 0 0 0 .215 2 0 2 0 2 0 .533 4 0 0 1 0 2 .150 4 0 0 0 0 1 .184 38 3 13 3 3 6 R H BI BB SO Avg. 0 4 2 0 0 .239 0 0 0 0 1 .228 0 0 0 1 1 .272 1 1 0 0 0 .233 0 0 0 0 0 .270 1 2 1 0 0 .274 1 2 1 0 0 .259 1 1 0 0 2 .255 1 0 1 0 2 .203 2 2 2 0 1 .216 7 12 7 1 7 001 100 — 3 13 2 121 12x — 7 12 0

2B — Chisholm Jr. (19), Lowe 3 (29), Wendle (30), Kiermaier (19). 3B — Meadows (3). HR — Rojas (9), off McClanahan; Zunino (32), off Alcantara. RBIs — Rojas (46), Alvarez (4), De La Cruz (19), Wendle (54), Zunino 2 (61), Y.Díaz (61), Lowe 2 (88), Phillips (43). Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Alcantara, L, 9-14 6 9 5 3 0 6 3.09 Bleier 1 0 0 0 1 1 3.15 Bender 1 3 2 2 0 0 2.79 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO ERA McClanahan, W, 10-6 5 6 1 1 1 3 3.44 McHugh, H, 6 11/3 5 2 2 0 1 1.60 Feyereisen, H, 6 12/3 0 0 0 1 2 2.36 Fairbanks 1 2 0 0 1 0 3.70

T — 2:59. Att. — 23,783.

Orioles 3, Rangers 2 Texas AB R H BI Calhoun lf 4 0 1 0 Kiner-Falefa ss 4 0 0 0 García dh 4 0 0 0 Lowe 1b 4 1 2 1 Solak 2b 3 0 0 0 Peters rf 4 0 0 0 Hernandez 3b 1 0 0 0 Taveras cf 3 0 0 0 Trevino c 3 1 3 1 Totals 30 2 6 2 Baltimore AB R H BI McKenna cf 4 0 2 0 Mountcastle 1b 3 0 0 0 Hays lf 4 0 1 0 Santander rf 4 0 0 0 Mancini dh 2 1 1 0 Valaika ss-2b 3 1 1 1 Jones 2b 2 0 0 0 Mullins ph 1 0 0 0 Gutierrez 3b 3 1 2 2 Ciuffo c 3 0 1 0 Totals 29 3 8 3 Texas 000 000 011 Baltimore 000 000 30x

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 1 0 5 BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 — —

SO 0 1 2 1 0 3 0 1 0 8 SO 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 6 2 3

Avg. .258 .272 .242 .264 .236 .203 .244 .160 .229 Avg. .194 .260 .257 .241 .253 .202 .167 .300 .218 .333 6 0 8 0

2B — Lowe (24), McKenna (6), Ciuffo (1), Valaika (7), Hays (25). HR — Trevino (4), off Kriske; Lowe (17), off Tate; Gutierrez (2), off Lyles. RBIs — Trevino (28), Lowe (71), Valaika (22), Gutierrez 2 (19).

BB 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 BB 1 0 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 — —

Phillies 3, Pirates 0

SO Avg. 1 .234 1 .271 1 .317 2 .289 1 .302 1 .282 1 .256 0 .290 0 .247 0 .217 2 .246 10 SO Avg. 1 .290 0 .271 0 .248 2 .258 1 .203 0 .218 1 .257 2 .199 0 .283 0 .224 0 .211 0 .239 7 6 11 0 1 3 2

Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Ray, W, 13-6 6 3 1 1 4 6 2.68 Cimber 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.36 Mayza 1 0 0 0 2 1 3.16 Richards 1 0 0 0 0 0 3.14 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gant, L, 1-4 3 3 2 1 2 1 4.55 Moran 2 0 0 0 0 4 8.53 Farrell 1 3 1 1 0 1 3.47 Barraclough 1 2 2 2 1 2 6.10 Coulombe 2 3 1 1 0 2 3.78

T — 3:18. Att. — 27,183.

Tigers 5, Royals 1 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .277 Lopez ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .303 Perez c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .272 Benintendi lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .274 C.Santana 1b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .210 Mondesi dh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .260 Dozier rf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .215 Alberto 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .269 Isbel ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Olivares cf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .238 Totals 30 1 7 1 3 4 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Baddoo lf-cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .258 Schoop 1b 3 2 2 0 1 0 .277 Grossman rf-lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .237 Cabrera dh 4 1 3 4 0 0 .261 Candelario 3b 4 0 2 1 0 2 .276 H.Castro ss 2 0 1 0 0 0 .282 Goodrum ph-ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .213 Paredes 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Garneau c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .226 Reyes cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Cameron rf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .195 Totals 32 5 11 5 3 6 Kansas City 000 010 000 — 1 7 0 Detroit 000 003 02x — 5 11 0

2B — Dozier (27), Lopez (20), H.Castro (11), Cabrera (15), Candelario (42), Schoop (29). 3B — Dozier (5). RBIs — Dozier (50), Cabrera 4 (75), Candelario (66). SB — Lopez (21). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Heasley 51/3 3 0 0 2 3 3.86 Tapia, L, 4-1, BS, 0-3 1/3 4 3 3 0 0 2.61 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 3.53 Brentz G.Holland 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.16 E.Santana 0 3 2 2 1 0 4.99 Coleman 1 1 0 0 0 2 0.00 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Skubal 4 1 0 0 0 1 4.13 Hutchison, W, 3-1 22/3 3 1 0 2 0 1.50 Funkhouser, H, 9 1 2 0 0 1 1 3.17 Fulmer, S, 12-16 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 3.06

T — 3:00. Att. — 16,424.

D-backs 7, Dodgers 2 Los Angeles Betts rf Seager ss T.Turner 2b Muncy 1b W.Smith c J.Turner 3b Taylor lf-cf Lux cf Pujols ph Kershaw p Beaty lf Totals Arizona Marte 2b Ramos lf Varsho rf Walker 1b C.Kelly c Rojas 3b Vargas ss McCarthy cf Gallen p Calhoun ph Peralta ph Totals Los Angeles Arizona

AB R H 3 0 0 3 0 1 4 2 2 4 0 0 4 0 0 4 0 1 3 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 31 2 5 AB R H 5 2 3 4 0 0 4 0 2 3 1 0 4 1 1 3 1 0 4 0 0 2 2 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 33 7 9 000 001 110 110

BI BB 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 BI BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 2 0 6 4 001 — 12x —

SO 1 0 1 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 SO 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 2 7

Avg. .271 .289 .321 .250 .264 .276 .257 .243 .257 .222 .256 Avg. .329 .206 .247 .235 .232 .264 .169 .204 .172 .245 .258 5 2 9 0

2B — Varsho (16). HR — T.Turner (23), off Gallen; T.Turner (24), off C.Smith; Marte (13), off Kershaw; C.Kelly (13), off Kershaw. RBIs — T.Turner 2 (65), Marte (47), C.Kelly (43), Varsho (36), Calhoun (16), Peralta 2 (60).

Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lyles, L, 9-13 62/3 7 3 3 1 4 5.31 1 Santana /3 0 0 0 0 1 3.96 B.Martin 1 1 0 0 0 1 3.15 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Ellis 3 2 0 0 1 2 2.15 Diplán 2 2 0 0 2 2 4.21 Krehbiel 12/3 0 0 0 1 2 0.00 Kriske, W, 2-1 1 1 1 1 0 1 14.00 Tate, S, 3-5 11/3 1 1 1 1 1 4.59

Los Angeles IP H R ER BB Kershaw, L, 10-8 41/3 6 4 3 1 Graterol 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 /3 2 1 1 1 Price 1 /3 0 0 0 0 Bickford Phillips 1 1 2 2 2 Arizona IP H R ER BB Gallen, W, 3-10 6 3 1 1 2 Mantiply, H, 10 1 1 0 0 0 Ramirez 1 0 0 0 0 C.Smith 1 1 1 1 0

T — 2:54. Att. — 10,645.

T — 3:07. Att. — 28,026.

SO 3 0 0 0 0 SO 8 0 0 0

ERA 3.38 3.34 3.89 2.94 4.91 ERA 4.37 3.35 2.73 5.00

Pittsburgh Hayes 3b Newman ss Reynolds cf Tsutsugo 1b Alford lf Difo 2b Tucker rf Davis c Crowe p Gamel ph Moran ph Totals Philadelphia Vierling cf-lf Segura 2b Harper rf Realmuto c B.Miller 1b McCutchen lf Gregorius ss Torreyes 3b Suárez p Totals Pittsburgh Philadelphia

AB R H BI BB SO 4 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 28 0 4 0 0 7 AB R H BI BB SO 3 1 2 1 1 1 4 1 1 0 0 0 3 1 1 1 1 0 4 0 2 0 0 1 4 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 28 3 8 3 6 3 000 000 000 — 0 002 010 00x — 3

Avg. .256 .223 .295 .224 .219 .267 .207 .667 .063 .256 .263 Avg. .357 .295 .313 .270 .231 .222 .212 .247 .200 4 0 8 0

LOB — Pittsburgh 1, Philadelphia 8. HR — Vierling (1), off Crowe; Harper (34), off Crowe. RBIs — Vierling (4), Harper (82), B.Miller (48). S — Suárez. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO ERA Crowe, L, 4-8 42/3 8 3 3 4 2 5.77 1 Howard /3 0 0 0 0 0 5.62 Kuhl 1 0 0 0 2 0 4.94 Banda 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.55 De Los Santos 1 0 0 0 0 0 6.68 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Suárez, W, 7-5 9 4 0 0 0 7 1.45

Inherited runners-scored — Howard 3-0. WP — Kuhl. T — 2:33. Att. — 28,135.

Indians 6, White Sox 0 Chicago AB R H BI BB Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 Robert cf 4 0 0 0 0 Abreu 1b 4 0 1 0 0 Grandal c 3 0 0 0 1 Jiménez lf 3 0 1 0 0 Moncada 3b 3 0 1 0 0 García rf 3 0 0 0 0 Vaughn dh 2 0 0 0 1 Hernandez 2b 3 0 0 0 0 Totals 29 0 3 0 2 Cleveland AB R H BI BB Straw cf 4 2 2 0 0 Rosario ss 4 1 2 0 0 Ramírez 3b 4 2 2 3 0 Reyes dh 4 0 1 1 0 Bradley 1b 3 0 0 1 0 Ramirez lf 3 0 0 0 0 Zimmer rf 3 0 0 0 0 Hedges c 3 0 0 0 0 Giménez 2b 3 1 1 1 0 Totals 31 6 8 6 0 Chicago 000 000 000 — Cleveland 201 003 00x —

SO 2 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 8 SO 1 0 2 1 2 0 3 0 1 10 0 6

Avg. .303 .349 .265 .233 .246 .263 .263 .238 .228 Avg. .267 .281 .268 .256 .217 .264 .223 .174 .208 3 1 8 1

E — Moncada (14), Ramírez (15). LOB — Chicago 4, Cleveland 2. 2B — Moncada (30), Jiménez (10), Straw (25). HR — Ramírez (36), off Lynn; Giménez (5), off Lynn. RBIs — Ramírez 3 (99), Giménez (14), Reyes (81), Bradley (39). SB — Ramírez (26). SF — Bradley. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lynn, L, 10-6 6 7 6 6 0 6 2.72 Ruiz 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.09 Burr 1 1 0 0 0 3 2.60 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Morgan, W, 4-7 6 1 0 0 1 6 5.27 Hentges 2 1 0 0 1 2 6.55 Shaw 1 1 0 0 0 0 3.53

T — 2:40. Att. — 24,082.

Reds 7, Nationals 6 Washington AB R H BI Thomas cf 5 1 2 1 Escobar ss 5 1 1 0 Soto rf 3 1 1 0 Bell 1b 5 1 2 1 García 2b 5 0 2 1 Ruiz c 4 2 1 1 Mercer 3b 4 0 1 0 Stevenson lf 3 0 1 2 Fedde p 3 0 0 0 Hernandez ph 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 6 11 6 Cincinnati AB R H BI India 2b 5 2 2 0 Schrock lf 4 0 0 1 Castellanos rf 3 2 2 3 Stephenson 1b 3 1 1 0 Farmer ss 3 1 2 1 Suárez 3b 3 0 2 2 Barnhart c 4 0 0 0 Friedl cf 4 1 2 0 Gutierrez p 1 0 0 0 DeShields ph 0 0 0 0 Cabrera ph 0 0 0 0 Aquino ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 31 7 11 7 Washington 103 100 100 Cincinnati 021 020 101

BB 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 5 BB 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 5 — —

SO Avg. 1 .245 2 .285 0 .324 1 .258 1 .240 0 .284 2 .262 0 .220 1 .000 0 .274 8 SO Avg. 0 .268 1 .300 0 .310 0 .278 1 .263 1 .188 0 .252 0 .429 1 .091 0 .226 0 .228 1 .187 5 6 11 1 7 11 0

One out when winning run scored. E — Soto (6). LOB — Washington 10, Cincinnati 7. 2B — García (16), Farmer 2 (22), Suárez (19), India (31). HR — Thomas (7), off Santillan; Ruiz (3), off Hoffman; Castellanos (31), off Murphy. RBIs — García (19), Bell (88), Stevenson 2 (21), Thomas (25), Ruiz (14), Suárez 2 (75), Castellanos 3 (91), Schrock (12), Farmer (59). CS — DeShields (1). SF — Castellanos, Schrock. Washington IP Fedde 42/3 1 Thompson /3 1 Baldonado /3 2 /3 Romero Machado, BS, 0-3 1 Murphy, L, 0-2 11/3 Cincinnati IP H Gutierrez 22/3 5 2 /3 2 Santillan 2 Wilson /3 2 Pérez 1 0 Sims 1 1 Hoffman 1 1 Lorenzen 1 0 Givens, W, 4-3 1 0

H R ER BB SO 7 5 5 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 2 R ER BB SO 4 4 4 3 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

ERA 5.26 3.04 7.45 0.00 3.82 6.19 ERA 4.74 2.85 3.14 6.65 4.47 4.59 3.62 3.06

Inherited runners-scored — Thompson 2-0, Romero 3-0, Santillan 3-2. T — 3:41. Att. — 18,293.


AUTO RACING

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

STARTING GRID

THIS WEEK’S CUP RACE

YOUR GUIDE TO THE WEEK ON THE NASCAR CIRCUIT South Point 400 Distance: 400.5 miles, 267 laps Where: Las Vegas Motor Speedway When: 6 p.m. Sunday TV: NBCSN Radio: Motor Racing Network Last year’s winner: Kurt Busch Worth mentioning: The first playoff race in the Round oF 12.

STANDINGS

NASCAR Cup Series Driver

Wins T10s Laps ledPoints

1. Kyle Larson

6

21

1905 3059

2. Martin Truex Jr.

4

16

780 3029

3. Denny Hamlin

1

20

1229 3024

4. Ryan Blaney

3

16

372 3024

5. Kyle Busch

2

17

286 3022

6. Chase Elliott

2

17

524 3021

7. Alex Bowman

3

14

151 3015

8. William Byron

1

17

276 3014

9. Joey Logano

1

15

409 3013

10. Brad Keselowski

1

12

312 3008

11. Christopher Bell

1

11

88 3005

12. Kevin Harvick

0

19

200 3002

Harvick, Bell last two drivers to survive to next round

13. Aric Almirola

1

3

51 2075

14. Tyler Reddick

0

13

26 2075

ALEX ANDREJEV

15. Kurt Busch

1

10

192 2071

16. Michael McDowell

1

5

26 2028

17. Austin Dillon

0

7

15

761

18. Matt DiBenedetto

0

8

62

629

19. Ross Chastain

0

8

62

624

20. Chris Buescher

0

5

85

598

21. Ricky Stenhouse Jr.

0

2

25

574

22. Bubba Wallace

0

2

57

561

23. Chase Briscoe

0

3

18

529

24. Erik Jones

0

4

9

503

25. Daniel Suarez

0

3

Xfinity Series

Trucks Series

UP NEXT Alsco Uniforms 302: Las Vegas, 6:30 p.m. Saturday (NBCSN)

UP NEXT Victoria’s Voice 200: Las Vegas, 8 p.m. Late Friday

STANDINGS Pos. Driver

Points

STANDINGS 1. J. Nemechek

1. A. Cindric

2044

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Martin Truex Jr. leads Denny Hamlin and Joey Logano through a turn during last week’s NASCAR Cup Series race at Bristol Motor Speedway in Bristol, Tenn.

THEN THERE WERE 12 The Charlotte Observer

F

our of the 16 NASCAR playoff drivers saw their championship hopes dashed last week, and the drama of Bristol made the final drivers for the field of 12 in question all the way through the checkered flag. Here’s where the playoffs stand.

Moving on Kyle Larson (3,059 points): He was a constant leader at Bristol, winning the second stage and finishing first to close the race. Larson already was locked into the next round based on points. He earned his sixth win of the 2021 season. Martin Truex Jr. (3,029): He already was set to advance to the next round after his victory at Richmond, but his run wasn’t nearly as dominant at Bristol. Truex started on the pole but lost his lead position early, then finished out of the top 10 in the second stage and finished seventh at the flag. Denny Hamlin (3,024): He locked his spot in the Round of 12 with a win at Darlington and had another strong run at Bristol despite a ninth-place finish. He won the first stage and finished second in Stage 2, but he cut a tire after contact with Larson racing for the lead with around 100 laps to go. Ryan Blaney (3,024): He controlled the race in part of the final stage, battling with Bristol veteran Kevin Harvick for the top spot. He locked in his place in the Round of 12 before the third stage based on points and closed the first round of the playoffs in fourth. Kyle Busch (3,022): A flat tire forced him to pit under green flag conditions with around 40 laps to go. The stop was quick, but he went from racing into the top five to two laps down after the stop. He finished in 21st but comfortably advanced. Chase Elliott (3,021): He had a relatively quiet night mid-race, but he led laps in the opening stage and in the final 100 laps. Elliott pit with a flat tire after light side contact with Harvick racing for the lead. He advanced to the next round based on points after Anthony Alfredo exited the race in the final round. Alex Bowman (3,015): He entered the final stage nine points above the cutoff and was told he was racing his Hendrick Mot-

Kyle Larson does a burnout after winning last week’s NASCAR Cup Series race at Bristol Motor Speedway in Bristol, Tenn. orsports teammate William Byron for the transfer spot. Both Bowman and Byron raced in the top 10 in the final stage, and he clinched a spot in the next round after entering the race below the cutoff. William Byron (3,014): He entered the final stage down nine points to the cutoff and raced up to fifth with around 75 laps remaining. He finished in third to sneak by as the final transfer spot in the Round of 12. Joey Logano (3,013): He advanced on points before the race ended despite finishing out of the top 10 in each stage. Logano had a long pit stop early, then finished 12th in Stage 2 and ended the night in 11th. Brad Keselowski (3,008): He had a solid night, recovering from a 13th-place finish at Richmond, with an sixth-place finish. He moved on based on points. Christopher Bell (3,005): He advanced to the next round on points after posting a third-place finish at Richmond. He pit under green late in the race with bad damage to his car body and finished in 29th. Kevin Harvick (3,002): He shot to the lead off a restart in the final stage but quickly dropped to second behind Ryan Blaney. Harvick then gained back his P1 spot in the final 100 laps and finished in second behind Larson. He secured his place in the next round on points after

the second stage, and he was at the front of the pack in the final stage for multiple late-race restarts. He also had some strong words for Elliott after the race.

Missed the cut Tyler Reddick: He needed a stronger run to advance to the next round. He ran in the bottom 20 for much of the Bristol race, and although he was able to unlap himself in the final stage, it wasn’t enough given the strong Hendrick runs. Aric Almirola: He bounced back from a leaking oil line early in the race as he sat close to the cutoff before Bristol. Almirola was +16 entering the final stage after overcoming the early drama, but he fell to running in 17th and just +1 in the last 80 laps with Hendrick Motorsports cars in the top 10. He finished in 18th and won’t continue in the postseason. Kurt Busch: He said he was hoping for a “nice, smooth night” at Bristol as he entered tied with Bowman in points at the cut line, but Busch’s night wasn’t nearly as smooth as he needed. He struggled with the balance of his car and raced a lap down for much of the final stage, finishing in 19th. Michael McDowell: He needed a win to advance but raced at least one lap down for most of the race. This is the end of the postseason push for the Daytona 500 winner.

2. A.Allmendinger 2044 3. J.Allgaier

2020

4. N. Gragson

2017

5. Justin Haley

2015

6. Daniel Hemric 2014 7. Jeb Burton

2009

8. H.Burton

2008

9. Myatt Snider

2005

10. B. Jones

2003

11. Riley Herbst

2001

12. J. Clements

2000

74 500

3050

2. Sheldon Creed 3026 3. Ben Rhodes

3019

4. Zane Smith

3009

5. C. Smith

3006

6. Matt Crafton

3004

7. C.Hocevar

3002

8. S.Friesen

3001

9. Todd Gilliland 2100 10. Austin Hill

2094

11. G. Enfinger

501

12. Johnny Sauter 408

526

13. Derek Kraus

402

14. M. Annett

524

14. Tyler Ankrum

385

15. B. Brown

504

15. A. Self

381

16. Ryan Sieg

502

16. Ryan Truex

322

17. Josh Berry

450

17. Hailie Deegan

303

18. Alex Labbe

409

18. Tanner Gray

261

19. Josh Williams

409

19. Chase Purdy

237

20. T. Joe Martins 404

20. P. Kligerman

222

13. Ty Gibbs

Bristol dustup adds intrigue to playoffs ZACH DEAN

The Daytona Beach News-Journal

Bristol Motor Speedway delivered again. “I love this place,” said Kyle Larson, who won last week’s thriller in Tennessee. “This is by far my favorite track. This is why. You guys are amazing, loud. We feel the energy while we’re out there racing. Thanks, everyone, for spending your hard-earned money to come watch us putting on a show.” Folks got their money’s worth ... and then some. Chase Elliott vs. Kevin Harvick. What a show, no matter whose side you’re on.

Elliott was leading Harvick with the laps winding down when he got bottled up with lap traffic, allowing Harvick to made it three wide and eventually pinching Elliott’s right-side tires against the wall. Elliott’s Goodyears popped, he lost three laps on pit road, then returned to the track right behind Harvick. Elliott naturally didn’t make the cleanest of passes, then made it difficult for Harvick to get back around him the rest of the way. “We’re racing for the frickin’ win at Bristol,” Harvick said. “We’re three-

wide in the middle and he throws a temper-tantrum, like I was just trying to get the lead and race him hard.” All right, Elliott’s turn. “It’s something he does all the time. He runs into your left side constantly at other tracks,” Elliott said. “He did it to me at Darlington a few weeks ago because he was tired of racing with me. At some point, you’ve got to draw the line. I don’t care who he is or how long he’s been doing it.” Where does this go from here? For starters, this isn’t over. It wasn’t over in the pits when the two nearly

threw punches. It wasn’t over 15 minutes later when they went into Elliott’s hauler. And it won’t be over when they get to Vegas. “I told him I wanted to rip his freaking head off,” Harvick said after the race. “It’s all Chase’s way or it’s no way, and if he doesn’t get his way, then he throws a fit.” Both drivers easily advanced to the Round of 12, but Elliott will start the round with a decent cushion (+8) because of playoff points. Harvick heads to Vegas 12 points below the cut line. Circle that elimination race on the Charlotte

MARK HUMPHREY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kevin Harvick waves to fans before last week’s NASCAR Cup Series race at Bristol Motor Speedway in Bristol, Tenn. roval. Elliott obviously is feelings. Seems like as good really good there, and road a spot as any to drop the racing usually leads to hurt gloves.


CARDINALS

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

Cardinals 8, Cubs 5

NOTEBOOK

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Edman 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Goldschmidt 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .294 O’Neill lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .279 Arenado 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .256 Molina c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .254 Bader cf 4 3 4 2 0 0 .270 Nootbaar rf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .222 DeJong ss 3 1 1 3 0 1 .200 Lester p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .170 Kim p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .115 b-Carlson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .261 McFarland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 —c-Carpenter ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .173 García p 0 0 0 0 0 0 —Totals 35 8 9 7 1 8 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Contreras c 5 1 2 2 0 0 .231 Schwindel 1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .356 I.Happ rf 4 1 2 3 1 1 .227 Wisdom lf-3b 3 0 0 0 2 2 .231 Duffy 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .276 Wick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 —Nance p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bote 2b 3 1 2 0 1 1 .200 T.Thompson cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .118 Alcántara ss 4 2 2 0 0 2 .206 Sampson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Romine ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .196 Heuer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 —Effross p 0 0 0 0 0 0 —Ortega lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Totals 33 5 11 5 5 8 St. Louis 010 100 303 — 8 9 1 Chicago 002 200 001 — 5 11 0 a-singled for Sampson in the 6th. b-struck out for Kim in the 7th. c-struck out for McFarland in the 9th. E — Arenado (11). LOB — St. Louis 2, Chicago 8. 2B — Arenado (34), Bader (21), Duffy (10), Contreras (17). 3B — Bote (2). HR — Bader (14), off Sampson; O’Neill (32), off Sampson; DeJong (19), off Nance; I.Happ (24), off García. RBIs — Bader 2 (48), O’Neill (76), Nootbaar (14), DeJong 3 (45), Contreras 2 (53), I.Happ 3 (62). SB — Bader 2 (8). SF — DeJong. S — Sampson 2. DP — St. Louis 4 (DeJong, Edman, Goldschmidt; Arenado, Edman, Goldschmidt; DeJong, Edman, Goldschmidt; Molina, Goldschmidt, Arenado, Bader, Molina, Edman, Arenado, DeJong); Chicago 1 (Wisdom, Bote, Schwindel). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lester 5 8 4 3 3 6 4.62 Kim, W, 7-7 1 1 0 0 0 0 3.53 McFarland, H, 13 2 1 0 0 2 1 2.55 García 1 1 1 1 0 1 2.93 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Sampson 6 3 2 2 0 4 2.87 Heuer, L, 3-2, BS, 1-4 0 4 3 3 0 0 2.70 Effross 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.65 Wick 1 0 0 0 1 1 4.50 Nance 1 2 3 3 0 2 7.07 Inherited runners-scored — Effross 2-1. WP — Sampson, Nance. T — 3:18. Att. — 32,918.

Nootbaar focuses on small things

How they scored CARDINALS SECOND

Nolan Arenado pops out to second base to David Bote. Yadier Molina flies out to right field to Ian Happ. Harrison Bader homers to right field. Lars Nootbaar flies out to left field to Patrick Wisdom. 1 run, 1 hit, 0 errors, 0 left on. Cardinals 1, Cubs 0. CUBS THIRD

Sergio Alcantara singles to left field. Adrian Sampson out on a sacrifice bunt to shallow infield, Paul Goldschmidt to Tommy Edman. Sergio Alcantara to second. Willson Contreras doubles to deep left center field. Sergio Alcantara scores. Frank Schwindel strikes out on a foul tip. Ian Happ singles to center field, advances to 2nd. Willson Contreras scores. Patrick Wisdom walks. Matt Duffy grounds out to shortstop, Paul DeJong to Paul Goldschmidt. 2 runs, 3 hits, 0 errors, 2 left on. Cubs 2, Cardinals 1.

CARDINALS FOURTH Paul Goldschmidt flies out to left field to Patrick Wisdom. Tyler O’Neill homers to left field. Nolan Arenado flies out to center field to Trayce Thompson. Yadier Molina grounds out to shallow left field, Sergio Alcantara to Frank Schwindel. 1 run, 1 hit, 0 errors, 0 left on. Cardinals 2, Cubs 2. CUBS FOURTH

David Bote singles to left field. Trayce Thompson called out on strikes. Sergio Alcantara singles to shallow infield. David Bote to second. Adrian Sampson reaches on a sacrifice bunt to shallow infield. Sergio Alcantara to second. David Bote to third. Fielding error by Nolan Arenado. Willson Contreras singles to shallow center field. Adrian Sampson to second. Sergio Alcantara to third. David Bote scores. Frank Schwindel flies out to shallow center field to Tommy Edman. Ian Happ walks. Willson Contreras to second. Adrian Sampson to third. Sergio Alcantara scores. Patrick Wisdom grounds out to second base, Tommy Edman to Paul Goldschmidt. 2 runs, 3 hits, 1 error, 3 left on. Cubs 4, Cardinals 2. CARDINALS SEVENTH

Nolan Arenado doubles to deep left field. Yadier Molina singles to shallow center field. Nolan Arenado to third. Harrison Bader singles to shallow left field. Yadier Molina to second. Nolan Arenado scores. Lars Nootbaar singles to left center field. Harrison Bader to third. Yadier Molina scores. Paul DeJong out on a sacrifice fly to deep center field to Trayce Thompson. Harrison Bader scores. Dylan Carlson pinch-hitting for Kwang Hyun Kim. Dylan Carlson strikes out swinging. Tommy Edman grounds out to second base, Sergio Alcantara to Frank Schwindel. 3 runs, 4 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. Cardinals 5, Cubs 4. CARDINALS NINTH

Yadier Molina flies out to deep right field to Ian Happ. Harrison Bader doubles to center field. Lars Nootbaar reaches on third strike. Harrison Bader scores. Paul DeJong homers to center field. Lars Nootbaar scores. Matt Carpenter pinch-hitting for T.J. McFarland. Matt Carpenter called out on strikes. Tommy Edman grounds out to first base, Frank Schwindel to Tommy Nance. 3 runs, 2 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. Cardinals 8, Cubs 4. CUBS NINTH

Willson Contreras grounds out to shortstop, Paul DeJong to Paul Goldschmidt. Frank Schwindel grounds out to shallow infield, Luis Garcia to Paul Goldschmidt. Ian Happ homers to center field. Patrick Wisdom called out on strikes. 1 run, 1 hit, 0 errors, 0 left on. Cardinals 8, Cubs 5.

Transaction mambo: Hudson added, J. Miller IL’d

BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHICAGO — As Cardinals rookie Lars Nootbaar began listing all the reasons he’s found ways to contribute significant moments despite a limited role and limited success at the plate, one of them walked by. “What did he say?” coach Willie McGee asked. “This guy helps me a ton,” Nootbaar repeated, motioning to McGee. “Sheesh,” the former MVP grinned, stepping out of the dugout and away from such praise. “Best seat in the house. I sit here and watch him do his thing.” Throughout the Cardinals’ record 15game winning streak, Nootbaar’s thing has been coming off the bench or sliding into a spot start and doing something small that, in reflection, looms large. Despite a zero-for-21 streak going into Friday night’s game, Nootbaar had been productive beyond what his average implied. He worked a walk in Milwaukee and stole a base that set up the winning run. He drew another pinch-hit walk in the Cardinals’ rally to overtake a five-run deficit this past week. He had the catch in New York that robbed a home run from Pete Alonso, effectively ending the Mets’ playoff aspirations. And on Saturday, Nootbaar delivered the game-tying RBI with a single in the seventh in the Cardinals’ 8-5 victory over the Cubs. “When you’re on a streak like this, it’s easy to stay locked in,” Nootbaar said. “In those situations, in any situation, you want to be ready and sharp when my number gets called.” Throughout his climb to the majors, Nootbaar, like all prospects, has been an everyday player, counted on to produce at the plate and his advancement determined mostly by what he does with his swing. A lesson many young players learn and Nootbaar has excelled at is recalibrating how to measure production. There are more ways to help a team win a game than with a hit, and when Nootbaar wasn’t getting one he still was contributing. He said that view of the game started in spring training during detailed meetings about how 90 extra feet on the bases could change a game and here’s what to look for to take it. And from the dugout, that “best seat in the house,” he watched Paul Goldschmidt and others prove it. “You have a guy like ‘Goldy’ and it’s not just the hits,” Nootbaar said. “He base-runs extremely well. He’s super smart on the basepaths. He plays great defense. It seems like he never makes a mental mistake. So for me watching him every single day, it’s like,

In a series of overnight roster moves, the Cardinals cleared the way for Dakota Hudson to remain on the active roster while sending rookie Jake Woodford on quite a journey and never having him leave the team or change his assigned Sunday start. Hudson made his return a year after undergoing Tommy John surgery with 3 2/3 strong innings Friday night, but he was on the roster as the Cardinals’ 29th man for the doubleheader. That meant the CardiPAUL BEATY, AP PHOTO nals had to clear a spot for him on the 28Outfielders Lars Nootbaar, right, and man roster. They did so late Friday by opHarrison Bader celebrate their win Saturday. tioning Woodford to Class AAA Memphis. That was a placeholder move. Early SatAVERAGES urday morning, once they could, the CarBatting AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E dinals placed reliever Justin Miller (elbow) Goldschmidt .294 585 99 172 34 2 30 97 64 131 12 2 O’Neill .279 458 84 128 24 1 32 76 38 163 13 9 on the injured list so that Woodford could Sosa .274 281 39 77 8 4 6 27 16 61 4 10 return without spending the minimum 10 J. Rondon .271 70 12 19 3 0 2 7 7 15 2 1 days in the minors. Bader .270 344 41 93 21 1 14 48 27 78 8 3 Timing was the reason Hudson didn’t Edman .263 620 88 163 41 3 10 54 37 94 28 7 Carlson .261 522 75 136 30 4 15 59 53 146 2 4 swap with Miller. Arenado .256 577 79 148 34 3 33 103 47 91 2 11 Miller finished Friday’s night game, so Molina .254 433 45 110 19 0 11 66 24 76 3 3 Nootbaar .222 99 14 22 3 1 5 14 12 26 2 2 the earliest the righthander could go on DeJong .200 335 44 67 8 1 19 45 34 99 4 8 the IL was Saturday. The Cardinals said Knizner .186 145 16 27 7 0 1 9 17 35 0 3 he’s had difficulty recovering after appearCarpenter .173 196 18 34 11 1 3 21 32 76 2 4 Team .244 5138 681 1254 254 21 187 656 456 1288 84 93 ances. He was on the IL recently because of a sore elbow. Pitching W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO Miller will be eligible to return to the McFarland 4 1 2.55 34 0 0 35.1 30 10 10 2 8 18 Whitley 0 0 2.86 22 0 0 22.0 13 8 7 1 11 19 roster if the Cardinals reach the postseaGarcia 1 0 2.93 31 0 1 30.2 24 10 10 1 6 30 son, allowing the team an expedited way Wainwright 16 7 3.05 31 31 0 200.1 161 70 68 20 48 170 to activate Hudson with reducing depth. Gallegos 5 5 3.14 70 0 13 77.1 48 28 27 6 18 93 Reyes 10 8 3.28 68 0 29 71.1 44 32 26 9 52 93 Flaherty 9 2 3.30 15 15 0 76.1 56 35 28 12 25 82 Kim 7 7 3.53 26 21 1 104.2 96 46 41 12 38 80 Cabrera 3 5 3.59 68 0 0 67.2 52 29 27 3 32 76 Woodford 3 3 3.92 24 6 0 57.1 54 27 25 7 22 45 Happ 4 2 3.97 10 10 0 47.2 43 21 21 8 17 38 Lester 4 1 4.13 11 11 0 61.0 62 30 28 10 22 36 Mikolas 2 2 4.15 8 8 0 39.0 36 21 18 5 10 24 Hudson 1 0 4.91 1 0 0 3.2 4 2 2 0 0 2 A. Miller 0 0 4.91 37 0 0 33.0 40 18 18 4 14 34 Team 86 69 4.02 155 155 48 1356.0 1176 649 606 145 583 1165

wow, there’s not just one particular way you can help out this team. He does it in so many different ways. Every single category. A guy like me, I’m young, and I’m looking up at him and watching every single day, and saying OK, that’s a way I can help this. There’s another way. There’s another.” A year ago, during the lockdown, Nootbaar got a job working the dawn shift at a manufacturer of fighter jets. He called it “muscle work.” Then he’d really hit the weights, work out, and prepare for spring. It was there, during major-league camp, that coaches recognized Nootbaar’s ability to “evaluate and stay pretty even keel and just go play,” Cardinals manager Mike Shildt said. “Sees the game. Tries to be productive in every way.”

Hicks joins Memphis, starts With an assignment to the Arizona Fall League coming in a few weeks, Jordan Hicks, the Cardinals’ fireball closer, made a sudden appearance with Class AAA Memphis on Saturday night as the Redbirds’ starter. Hicks has been going through his rehab and simulated games at the Cardinals’ complex in Jupiter, Fla., but made the drive up to Jacksonville, Fla., to join the Redbirds for his first official rehab appearance. Hicks threw 18 pitches and faced three batters. He allowed a single and two walks. All three batters eventually scored after Hicks had turned the inning over to a teammate.

Sosa on the mend Shortstop Edmundo Sosa’s right hand remained tender and sore Saturday, but the Cardinals remained encouraged that the fastball that struck him Friday did not cause a fracture. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals From D1

“Everyone is stepping up,” pitcher Adam Wainwright said. “New heroes every day.” A team that began the month inviting questions about an uncertain future is finishing an unforgettable month with unmatched history. The Cardinals won their club record 15th consecutive game by rallying to overpower and overwhelm the Cubs 8-5 at Wrigley Field. The winning streak is the longest by a Cardinals team in 130 seasons of membership in the National League. It is the longest winning streak by any big-league club in September in nearly 90 years, and it breaks the previous club record for the Cardinals set in 1935 as that charismatic era run out of fuel. So long Gas House Gang. Hello Mash House Gang. The Cardinals (86-69) socked three homers Saturday and 11 already in two days at Wrigley. Harrison Bader began the Cardinals’ scoring and his four-hit game with a solo homer. Tyler O’Neill hit his third of the weekend to begin the comeback victory. And Paul DeJong punctuated the history-making afternoon for the boys in victory blue with a two-run homer in the ninth. They are two wins from clinching a wild-card playoff berth. This win showcased so much of what the Cardinals have done well to rise from the bleary background of the postseason picture to being front and center and playing their most vibrant baseball of the season. Sublime defense. Timely relief. Power. Clever baserunning. Confidence. “It’s the complete elation of knowing every time we come to the field that we’re going to win,” McFarland said. “It’s that confidence. It’s almost that motivation. Every time we come to the field we’re expecting to win. We’re rising to the occasion.” Almost poetically, he delivered the pitch that proved it by getting the whole team involved. Trailing 5-4 after misplacing a two-run lead, Cubs infielder David Bote tripled to lead off the eighth inning. McFarland walked the next batter, and three batters into the eighth he had one out, runners at the corners, and the tying run 90 feet from home. He knew the pitch catcher Yadier Molina would call. It’s why McFarland has risen in the Cardinals’ bullpen to such spots: his sinker. Before he threw it, second baseman Tommy Edman mentioned to first baseman Paul Goldschmidt that Bote was breaking from third on contact. The play was there at home. McFarland delivered, Rafael Ortega swung, and the grounder was there for Goldschmidt to glove. He threw the ball to Molina and Bote was stuck between a former Rockie and a hard place. Molina threw to Arenado at third, and he tagged Bote for the first out. The other two Cubs had drifted from their bases, caught in limbo because they didn’t commit. Arenado did. He ran from third toward first to put a second run-

PAUL BEATY, AP PHOTO

Harrison Bader celebrates after scoring on a wild pitch while Cubs reliever Tommy Nance attempts to apply the tag in the ninth inning Saturday. down in motion. “I’m glad the focus was on everyone else on the field because I’m pretty sure I’m spinning around in circles on the field,” McFarland said. “And then a Harrison Bader sighting in the rundown,” manager Mike Shildt said. All three Cardinals outfielders collected near second to take their turn. Arenado threw to Edman who fired over to Molina by third base. Second would have been uncovered, except center fielder Bader was there. Molina threw to Bader, Bader chased the runner back to shortstop Paul DeJong. “I don’t have that little flick touch,” Bader said of the throw he had to make on the run. “I’m a one-speed thrower with my arm. I know my place is not on the dirt. It’s in the grass.” DeJong gloved Bader’s throw and applied the tag for the second out. That goes as a 3-2-5-4-2-8-6 double play. From pitch to out, only the corner outfielders didn’t touch the ball. “We practice rundowns a lot in spring training and talk about everyone’s roles,” Goldschmidt explained in a text message. “You can practice every scenario but all nine guys definitely knew where they were supposed to go and reacted to the play. That can easily get overlooked but coaches and players didn’t let that happen.” With their one-run lead preserved by the best defense in the majors, the Cardinals launched toward history in the ninth. Bader “put on a one-man show,” Shildt said. The Cardinals’ center fielder doubled to open the inning by sliding around the tag at second. He scored his third run of the game. During the winning streak, Bader is 23 for 56 (.411) with 12 extra-base hits. His homer for a 1-0 lead in the second inning was his fifth of September. With the Cardinals trailing 4-2 entering the seventh, Bader’s RBI single brought home Arenado after his leadoff double. Rookie Lars Nootbaar tied

the game with an RBI single, and Bader scored on DeJong’s sacrifice fly for the lead that double play protected. The addition of runs in the ninth gave a bullpen thinned by Friday’s doubleheader welcome insurance, and the state of that bullpen was on starter Jon Lester’s mind in the fourth inning as a trainer and Shildt met him on the mound. Forever beloved on the north side for his role with the 2016 World Series champs and that Cubs core, Lester visited Wrigley for the second time this season as an opponent but the first as an archrival. A Boston great, Lester never wore pinstripes at Fenway, but here he was in feathers on the mound at the Friendly Confines. He allowed four runs (three earned) and something in how his velocity sagged or pitches drifted concerned the Cardinals enough to consider lifting him with Bote at the plate and a 3-2 count in the fourth. Lester refused. “I don’t think Shildt really liked — I didn’t say anything bad — but I wasn’t coming out of that game,” Lester said. “I knew the position that I was putting (a reliever) in wasn’t a great position — 3-2 count. I knew what was going on. I needed to figure out a way to get that out.” Said Shildt: “He was very adamant he was OK.” The fallout from Lester being left on the mound will be clear in the coming days. The result was exactly as he promised — a strikeout to give reliever Kwang Hyun Kim an ensuing clean inning. Kim (7-7) pitched a scoreless inning and bought time for the Cardinals do the only things they’ve done for two weeks now — win. They keep stacking wins, together. “We have bigger things to focus on,” Bader said. “We have more games to win. We’re going to take this energy as deep as we can. … My perspective is — what time is the game tomorrow?” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

CRAIG HUDSON PHOTOS, FOR THE WASHINGTON POST

DC Vault’s late-night competition called Moon Vault, featuring LED lighting, is seen in August.

Vault From D1

training equipment make it possible for individuals of varying abilities to work out simultaneously. While Luthy and DC Vault staff train both the University of Maryland and Catholic University teams, other athletes can get runs in, too. “I think it’s the number one location for training in the country. Well, there’s the Olympic training center, but it’s right after,” says the University of Maryland’s Gwendolyn Zeckowski, 21, as she warms up alongside fellow collegiate athletes who nod in agreement. Luthy — who has trained multiple national record holders — is impressed by this current college crew, and especially Zeckowski, who’s back to training after an incredible recovery from a series of strokes in February 2020 plus brain surgery. He thinks that several of them could qualify for the 2024 Olympic trials. He has even higher hopes for another group of DC Vaulters. “PG music!” Luthy yells to his college students, who’ve been blasting their playlists through the speakers. It’s time for FlyKids, a class for ages 6 to 10, which may be the first program designed exclusively for such young vaulters. “I had to have little kid poles custom made to get the smallest poles in the world,” says Luthy, who — like most pole vaulters — didn’t try the sport until high school.

In his decades of coaching at the collegiate level, both at Eastern Michigan University and here in the Washington region since 2008, Luthy has found that because of this common late start, athletes often aren’t able to achieve their full potential. He points to the extreme counterexample of multiple world record holder Armand “Mondo” Duplantis, who took home the gold for Sweden in Tokyo. The son of an all-American pole vaulter, Duplantis was practicing in his own backyard by the time he was in preschool. So Luthy is experimenting with a gymnastics-like approach to pole vault for kids, aiming to spark some long-term interest that could eventually translate into athletic scholarships and championships. As the pint-size pole vaulters swing their legs and stretch their hamstrings, their parents hang out in the grass on the other side of the chain-link fence. Anita Iacaruso was grateful to find any regular outdoor physical activity for her 8-yearold, Ashley, during the pandemic. Over the past five months, it’s become pretty much all Ashley wants to do. “We put a pull-up bar in our dining room, because that’s normal,” Anita jokes. It is, in fact, normal among Ashley’s FlyKids friends, particularly 8-year-old Asha Iyer, who practices her pull-ups on her bunk bed. When the pair recently got together at Asha’s house for a play-

date, they reconfigured a set of outdoor furniture and cushions into a makeshift pole vault setup. Asha started with DC Vault two years ago, and her intense focus earned her the nickname “Little Beast,” which is emblazoned on one of the four pole vault shirts in constant rotation in her wardrobe. She didn’t want to go on a family vacation this summer because it meant missing a week of practice, explains her mom, Anne. “So [Luthy] gave her a stick to practice some moves. She’s been taking it to bed with her,” she says. Asha’s goal? “Shoot my legs up and keep my head straight,” she says. “I want to set a world record.” In August, she soared to a new personal record of 5 feet 7 inches at Moon Vault, DC Vault’s late-night competition featuring LED lights lining the runway and athletes covered in glowing body paint. ■■■ A key part of DC Vault’s outreach strategy is putting on a show, explains assistant coach Chad Ackerman. This year’s first event was the inaugural DMV Pole Vault Championships, giving students across the region a chance to face off. Up next was the National Street Vault in July, held in the middle of Eastern Market to maximize visibility. Still to come in October is the Halloween Vault, with costumed athletes and an appearance by Sergio, a 15foot skeleton. (From December through February,

Rosalie Rosenberg attempts to clear the bar during Moon Vault.

DC Vault switches to indoor training locations.) Having fun with the sport while creating more chances to compete gives vaulters a reason to stick with it, even after college. “I always used to say, ‘You can play pickup basketball or go swim laps. You can’t do pickup pole vault.’ But now I can,” says Jen Garrott, 33, who used to compete for William & Mary. She’s one of several “older” athletes who have found their way to DC Vault. “We’re a little rusty. But there’s a lot of muscle memory,” says 24-year-old Maddie Van Aken, who competed for the University of Lynchburg and is working her way up to improving on her college personal record. There’s also no reason adults who’ve never pole vaulted before can’t start, says Luthy, who sees the potential appeal to CrossFit types and anyone interested in strength and sprinting. DC Vault occasionally hosts “adult experience” sessions, which offer a crash course — with only safe landings, naturally. Flinging oneself up as high as possible is an inherently risky activity, but Luthy says the thick mats everywhere prevent a lot of issues. The most common problem is twisted ankles. “They decide to land on their feet instead of their back,” groans Luthy, who repeatedly tells his athletes not to do anything that stupid. What he doesn’t need to remind them of is why they

show up. Marley Oare, 17, drives two hours each way from Fauquier County most days of the week with no complaints. “You feel like you’re flying, and there’s no better feeling,” she says. For Whitney Snyder, a junior at

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CARDINALS

D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

Frederickson From D1

He pulled a Neo in the ninth, turning what would have been a single for most into a double, then swiping third base and then scoring on a wild pitch that required him to flutter his feet mid-slide to avoid being tagged. Manager Mike Shildt compared it to The Matrix. Whoa. And as if all of this was not enough for Bader in his two-RBI, three-run day, he then hopped onto a postgame Zoom session and said the line that so accurately captures the mentality his team has leaned into during the first 15-game winning streak in a long and proud Cardinals history that leaves little room for new accomplishments. “There’s no reason we can’t make it 16 tomorrow,” said Bader, whose 23 hits lead all Cardinals during The Streak. Betting against it, like throwing a strike to Paul Goldschmidt, would be unwise. Especially with another game coming Sunday in Chicago, where the Cardinals have plugged into some serious power. But whether The Streak ends there or here or carries all the way through the end of the regular season, which would tie Cleveland’s 2017 club (22 wins) for the longest American or National League winning streak that was not interrupted by a tie, nothing can take away from the 2021 Cardinals the history they made Saturday on the North Side. A snapshot is in order. Here’s what it shows. Cardinals hitters have gone, well, bananas. An often-suspect lineup that has slowly trended in the right direction since a near-crippling June swoon

PAUL BEATY, AP PHOTO

Harrison Bader celebrates his solo homer in the second inning Saturday with Paul DeJong. has reached another level now. The Cardinals have averaged seven runs per game during The Streak, outscoring the opposition 105-49. Shildt’s lineup is averaging .294 with a .341 on-base percentage and a .541 slugging percentage. That’s an on-base plus slugging percentage of .882, which is the best team OPS in all of baseball during this two-week tour of force. The Cardinals have clobbered 29 home runs in The Streak’s 510 at-bats, averaging 1.9 per game. They’ve blasted 15 in their last five. Some context: The Cardinals had 19 homers in all of June’s 858 at-bats. Goldschmidt is averaging .386 with a .463 onbase percentage and an .825 slugging percentage during

The Streak. Bader is averaging .411 with a .441 onbase percentage and a .732 slug. Tyler O’Neill is slashing .305/.354/.695. Nolan Arenado’s right behind them at .296/.361/.593. Even once-benched shortstop Paul DeJong, reinserted in place of the injured Edmundo Sosa, has found something, homering in each of the last two games. Cardinals pitchers have figured out their roles and locked in. Starters and relievers, including multiple ones who arrived in what became trajectory shifting in-season additions, have combined to hold opponents to a 3.05 ERA in 133 innings during The Streak. Two shutouts have been secured. Five quality starts have been provided.

Nine of 10 save opportunities have been successfully converted, with just one win (the fourth) taking two tries. Nineteen holds have been notched. The staff’s walk rate, often a massive problem, has been slashed to an average of 2.98 walks per nine innings. Opponents have been held to an OPS of .643, which during The Streak trails only the celebrated staffs of the Dodgers (.587) and the Brewers (.618). Cardinals fielders are feasting. Few defenses could help support a run like this while pitchers are averaging an NL-low 7.1 strikeouts per nine innings at the same time. But balls in play do not expose this defense. It feasts on balls in play. The Cardinals are making routine plays. They

Hochman From D1

enters his final week of calling games on KMOX. He is leaving us, but he is leaving us with memories of moments and moments that became memories. Still, our daily lives won’t be the same. He was the connecter to the present, while he simultaneously connected with the past. His cadence is part of the cadence of our days. His great guffaw — heh-hehheh — is the comfort food of laughs. His colloquialism is quintessentially local. Fly balls, verbally baptized as babies, no longer will “get up.” “Mike is a tremendous person who holds a special place in my heart,” said another local legend, the great Olympian Jackie JoynerKersee. “Fifty years is an unbelievable amount time to give to any craft. His undeniable talent is a credit to his love for the game and the Cardinals family. He’s going to be missed.” “Two down, sax jammed. Lavelle at the belt … Brummer’s stealing home — he is saa-aafe! And the Cardinals win. Brummer stole home! The dugout comes out and they congratulate him. You wouldn’t believe it! Glenn Brummer!”

– August 22, 1982

I wanted to talk about Shannon with someone who knew him, sure, but also grew up on him. So, I met up at Sportsman’s Park in Ladue with Tom Ackerman, the sports director at KMOX (1120 AM). Of course, we each had a cold frosty Budweiser. “Nobody has sold more Budweisers, more hotel rooms, more Cardinals tickets than Mike,” Ackerman said. “He has been an ambassador of St. Louis for a long, long, long time. … His knowledge of the game, the way he talks about the game, is so infectious. Everyone just sort of latched on to it. And he became this voice, like, you couldn’t do without. I’m 46, so my entire life, when I’ve turned on the radio, Mike Shannon was on.” Like so many of us do, Ackerman loves the little things that make up the fabric of the broadcasts. The station break for the fine folks in Paducah, Kentucky, or Little Rock, Arkansas, or some map dot in Cardinals Nation; the playful banter between pitches; the references to longtime producer Jim Jackson; the casual name-drops of Hall

are making hard plays look routine. They are making impossible plays, and doing so quite often. They have turned 17 double plays in the 15 games. They lead the NL in outs acquired both on the ground and in the air during The Streak. They have committed more than one error in just one of the 15 wins, and just one total over the last seven. Cardinals opponents are averaging a microscopic .248 on balls in play during The Streak. These opponents aren’t hitting into bad luck. They’re hitting into baseball’s best defense. Cardinals baserunners are taking every inch of unprotected dirt. They’re not just being aggressive. They’re operating with remarkable preci-

sion. They’ve swiped 11 bases during The Streak. Guess how many times they’ve been caught stealing? None. And that number doesn’t count all of the times hitters have turned a single into a double, or gone first-to-third to take advantage of an opponent’s hesitation. The Cardinals always have been good baserunners under Shildt, but now it has reached a higher place. So, there’s your picture. The Cardinals won’t be stopping to frame it. “We’re moving on,” Shildt said Saturday after The Streak made Cardinals history, sounding a lot like his locked-in center fielder. “We want to add to it.”

of have done, Berkman did a Mike Shannon impersonation. “He’s really sort of a throwback,” Berkman then said. Indeed, a throwback. A throwback to a whole half-

century of Cardinal baseball. But for one last week, John Rooney will throw it to the voice of the Cardinals, Mike Shannon.

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Mike Shannon takes part in a ceremony honoring the 50th anniversary of the Cardinals’ 1967 World Series victory in 2017. of Famers who Shannon calls contemporaries. “And I love the exchange, right before first pitch,” Ackerman said. “John Rooney will talk it up, talk it up, however he frames it, and then he says: ‘And with the first pitch, the voice of the Cardinals, Mike Shannon.’ I … love that. I just love it. … “It’s very, very comforting to hear Mike Shannon call a game. I remember the first game we played on KMOX after the pandemic started. We started replaying games from the 2011 season. I was listening to it at home and I started tearing up, just hearing Shannon calling a 2011 game, because I missed it so much I wondered what was going on in the world, would we have baseball again and broadcast on the air is just such a familiar feeling.” “Swing and a long one, there it is baby, the Cardinals take the lead as Albert Pujols comes through! And the Redbirds lead this baby, 5 to 4! … What did I tell you folks? David Eckstein, the man. This could be a crushing blow — a crushing blow — to the Houston club. Albert Pujols — you talk about most valuable player, how is that? Woooo!”

– October 17, 2005

The artist Dan Zettwoch first came to St. Louis in 1995 to attend Washington University. “I was always a big Cardinals fan,” the Louisville native said, “but the thing that turned me into a super fan was going to art school and listening to all the games on radio in the Delmar Loop. Working all those nights in the studio, I’d listen to KMOX.” Zettwoch became a successful freelance illustrator and cartoonist. He created a classic piece about Game 6 of the 2011 World Series.

At one point, he was commissioned by the Missouri History Museum to do 35 wall-sized murals for the exhibit called “A Walk In 1875 St. Louis.” And he once painted an homage to that voice from the art-studio radio. It’s a smiling Shannon behind a microphone, and he’s surrounded by his own words — dozens of “Shannonisms.” “That piece was born out of all those years listening to him,” Zettwoch said. “That’s actually what I like about baseball. I’m not in it for the dignified, classy. I’m here for the weird folk stories and the humor and the kind of oddball side of it.” Dubbed “The Moon Man,” Shannon, now 82, is both down-to-earth and out there. He’s got an authenticity that speaks to this city. He’s good for at least one laugh-out-louder per game (and sometimes he’ll heh-heh-heh right along with you). He’s got his standards. He’ll say something like, “Ol’ Abner’s done it again,” in reference to Abner Doubleday, inaccurately credited with inventing baseball — though, to be fair, “Ol’ Alexander” is clunky. And he’s got his classics, such as, “I wish you folks back in St. Louis could see this moon!” (To his credit, he later pointed out in an interview with stweekly that it could’ve been too foggy back home to see the moon).

boy from St. Louis would listen to the boy from St. Louis who became a Cardinals World Series hero. “Mute the TV and turn on Shannon! That’s what people did,” David Freese said. “He’s just been around forever. We’d see him all the time, after games he’d come down, hang out. He was just a big part of this team in the city.” Shannon hit key homers in the 1964 and 1967 World Series, and later captured World Series moments with his calls. Shannon the broadcaster is a ballplayer first. He gets the ballplayer. Understands the game. For however quirky Shannon can be, he’s quite the baseball intellectual. In this city, we all have become smarter baseball thinkers by listening to Thomas Michael Shannon. “He has a great understanding of what’s important in the game — he really gets to the heart of the matter,” said Lance Berkman, who starred on the 2011 Cardinals. “His voice, the quality of his voice — there was no doubt about who is broadcasting the game. And it’s kind of synonymous with St. Louis. “And I think back to even old Busch Stadium, coming to St. Louis as an opposing player, and they would obviously always have the broadcast on in the visiting clubhouse. There was no bathroom next to the dugout, so you had to go all the “Swing and a long one into right, get up baby, get up, get up! It’s at the wall, way back up into the clubit is — off the wall! One run in! Here house, and you’d walk in comes Berkman! Over to third goes there and Shannon’s calling Freese — we’re tied, 7 to 7! … Listen to the action. I just remember this crowd, they have gone bananas!” being in that old clubhouse — October 27, 2011 and hearing that kind of Before he became a Cardi- gruff voice.” nals World Series hero, the And then, like so many

Call to sign up. It’s just too much fun to miss out on!

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BASKETBALL

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D7

JOHN LOCHER, AP PHOTO

Kahleah Copper passes during practice for the WNBA All-Star team in July.

WNBA From D1

All but a couple teams welcomed the men back with open arms. Inseason practices are a challenge already, strictly from a numbers perspective, and that’s before taking injuries and other factors in account. “It is [significant],” Minnesota Lynx assistant coach and Hall of Famer Katie Smith said. “Part of it is wear and tear. Practice has to be a little bit shorter because [the players are] going all the time. They don’t have as much rest and reps. People are banged up. It’s much better that they don’t have to be in there. You can do your normal drills rather than having just eight or nine people in practice and not being able to play five-on-five or rely on older folks like myself to try to jump in and do something. It’s not giving them what they need.

“So the guys, practice players, are huge for our rosters and our teams to really prep and get what we need out of the season and make it through.” The Washington Mystics may be the biggest example of the value of having practice players available in 2021. Elena Delle Donne missed all but three games, Alysha Clark and Emma Meesseman missed the entire season and Tina Charles, Natasha Cloud, Myisha Hines-Allen and Erica McCall all missed significant stretches of the season. The team faced the Connecticut Sun with just six available players on June 29 and played several games with just eight players — and that was just games. The Mystics went most of the season not being able to play any five-on-five during practices and having to try to clean up mistakes in makeshift workouts. The value goes beyond simply having warm bodies to simulate a legitimate basketball game. The

men bring a physicality to practice that goes beyond what other women present. The Mystics, for example, practice shooting behind the NBA three-point line. Practicing against men is a similar concept with a goal to make game day easier. “They’re always faster, stronger, the way they jump higher, handeye coordination, all of that,” said Tina Charles, the league’s leading scorer in 2021. “It keeps you more engaged, especially when you’re playing defense on them, when they’re [playing] defense on you. “When you’re going against [teammates], you don’t want to beat one another up because I need you tomorrow to play ‘X’ amount of minutes.” Mystics guard Sydney Wiese added, “It forces us to have good habits or else it’s glaring and they make you pay for mistakes very easily.” The WNBA may have permitted teams to use practice players, but

everyone didn’t take advantage. The pandemic is still raging and the more contagious delta variant caused new cases and deaths to spike since July. The Los Angeles Sparks and Dallas Wings both made the decision to not use the men due to safety concerns. The two organizations decided the risk wasn’t worth it. Dallas Coach Vickie Johnson said they tried to focus on chemistry and individual development. “In discussions with our players and respecting how they felt about it, just kind of refrained from it at the moment,” Sparks Coach Derek Fisher said. “We’ve tried our best to help our team get better without pushing them too far in terms of workload. “We tried to manage it as best we could. It makes a difference for those teams that have chosen to do that. It does have a positive impact and hopefully something we can get back to in 2022.”

Johnson added, “It’s just too many people to monitor. It’s hard enough to monitor 12 players, and so now we have to monitor eight or 10 guys with their family and whatever. So we just didn’t really want to take the chance.” The absence of male practice players had a legitimate impact on the day-to-day operation of WNBA teams and the quality of play on game day. Many work behind the scenes doing additional duties, mopping sweat off the floor and anything else that needs to be done at the time. The men in Washington helped work with Delle Donne as she neared her return from a pair of back surgeries. The relationship is symbiotic to the ultimate benefit of the product on the floor. “They’re good guys, too,” Lynx guard Kayla McBride said. “They’re always staying around rebounding for us. Just solid guys. So we’re thankful to have them.”

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BLUES

09.26.2021 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D7

Neal, Saad spark Blues in exhibition opener Blues trade Sanford BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Two seasoned NHL veterans, who have combined for 478 career regular-season goals, did most of the scoring Saturday in the Blues’ exhibition opener against Minnesota at Enterprise Center. And Ivan Barbashev accounted for the go-ahead goal in what became a 6-2 Blues triumph. Brandon Saad, who has 184 career goals, gave the Blues a 1-0 lead with a netfront rebound of a Vladimir Tarasenko shot with four minutes left in the first period. James Neal, with 294 goals on his career resumé, scored from the tightest of angles to make it 2-0 with just 2:22 gone in the second. Neal whipped a shot from the corner — goal line extended — that surprised Wild goalie Kaapo Kahkonen. Neal added another goal early in the third and then got a hat trick with an empty-netter in the final minute. Other than their goalscoring prowess over the years, the situations for Saad and Neal couldn’t be more different this season. Saad signed a five-year,

Blues From D1

“When we came here in 2008, as a manager I was hoping to get my kids through high school,” Armstrong said. “I actually got ’em through college now. “It’s nice to be here. When I look back on my career, starting in Minnesota, then we transferred to Dallas, I’d been to two organizations (before St. Louis). I’m not big on change in that fashion, so being here for another five years is exciting.” Armstrong credited the players and coaches for making his longevity possible. “The hard work that they do is really what sets this

man scoring again. That made it a 2-2 game at the 4:27 mark. But the Blues responded with two goals in 18 seconds to take a 4-2 lead. First came a score from Ivan Barbashev to break the tie, and then Neal struck again with a snipe from the left circle off a Tyler Bozak feed. Both goals came with Andrew Hammond in goal for the Wild. Following Neal’s emptyROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM netter, another tryout player, Michael Frolik, Brandon Saad maneuvers in the first period of Saturday’s scored with Hammond exhibition against the Wild at Enterprise Center. back in goal to make it 6-2. $22.5 million contract with the Blues via free agency this season. He will be a big part of the team’s plans this season. To wit, coach Craig Berube took a line of Saad-Robert ThomasTarasenko out for a test drive against Minnesota. Neal, on the other hand, is fighting to stay in the league at age 34. He went unsigned in free agency and is with the Blues on a professional tryout contract. He played on a line with Tyler Bozak and rookie Jake Neighbours on Saturday. Ville Husso, who ended his 2020-21 season with

a 31-save shutout victory against Minnesota on May 12, got the start in goal and remains tough to score on for the Wild. Playing only the first period, he stopped all 10 shots he faced, including a few quality saves. Charlie Lindgren took over in net for the final two periods, yielding a secondperiod goal to Adam Beckman that trickled through at the 10:13 mark of the period. In the third period, mere seconds after stopping William Bitten on a breakaway, Lindgren couldn’t stem the tide on a threeman breakaway with Beck-

organization apart,” he said. “What they’ve been able to do over the last decade of making us one of the top teams in the NHL, allowing us to continue to push to stay in that echelon over the next five years and beyond, is exceptional.” Reminiscent of another Armey — former St. Louis Rams GM Charley Armey during the “Greatest Show on Turf” days — Armstrong takes an aggressive approach. He’s not afraid to take risks or think outside of the box. Such an approach doesn’t always work, and not every Armstrong move has worked. But his batting average is pretty good. It’s debatable whether the Cup window remains open for the Blues at the

present moment. But under Armstrong’s guidance they have stayed competitive — and done so without topof-the-round draft picks for several years. He rarely sits still. He always seems to have something going, whether it’s adding a consultant (Ken Hitchcock) or hiring a former player as a scout (Troy Brouwer). On Saturday, the day of his extension, he traded Zach Sanford to Ottawa for St. Louisan Logan Brown and a conditional fourth-round draft pick. “There’s really no cookie cutter way to do this,” Armstrong said. “You have to try and be creative. Sometimes you have to make unpopular decisions. You have to be able to sell that to the group on why we’re doing it.

Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis 6, Minnesota 2 Minnesota 0 1 1 — 2 St. Louis 1 1 4 — 6 First Period—1, St. Louis, Saad 1 (Thomas, Tarasenko), 16:00. Penalties—Barbashev, STL (Slashing), 16:18. Second Period—2, St. Louis, Neal 1 (Santini), 2:22. 3, Minnesota, Beckman 1 (Bitten), 10:13. Penalties—Benn, MIN (Holding), 3:36. Third Period—4, Minnesota, Beckman 2 (Bitten), 4:27. 5, St. Louis, Barbashev 1, 5:02. 6, St. Louis, Neal 2 (Bozak, Bortuzzo), 5:20. 7, St. Louis, Neal 3, 19:07 (en). 8, St. Louis, Frolik 1 (Kostin, Barbashev), 19:33. Penalties—None. Shots on Goal—Minnesota 10-11-10—31. St. Louis 5-6-19—30. Power-play opportunities—Minnesota 0 of 1; St. Louis 0 of 1. Goalies—Minnesota, Hammond 0-1-0 (21 shots-18 saves), Minnesota, Kahkonen 0-0-0 (8-6). St. Louis, Husso 0-0-0 (10-10), St. Louis, Lindgren 1-0-0 (21-19). A—15,293 (19,150). T—2:26. Referees—Justin Kea, Brian Pochmara. Linesmen—Kilian McNamara, Mark Shewchyk.

“Quite honestly I think our players for the most part understand the method behind the madness. They just want to make sure we’re trying to do our best every day to give them the best opportunity to win a Stanley Cup. That’s why they play. Obviously the economics are great, but they all want to be part of winning organizations. If we have to go outside the box to do that, we’re willing to do that.” And in that sense, Armstrong and Stillman are kindred spirits. “If I was terribly risk averse, I wouldn’t have gotten into this thing in 2012,” Stillman said, smiling. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

for St. Louisan Brown BY TOM TIMMERMANN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Logan Brown had just made the 16-hour drive from St. Louis to Ottawa to report for the Senators’ training camp and now, a week later, he’s turning around to come back, having Brown hardly settled in there. “I never even unpacked out of (my truck),” he said. “I literally brought a couple backpacks up to the room. I guess that was a good call by me.” The Blues acquired Brown, a center, from Ottawa on Saturday for forward Zach Sanford, who had an enigmatic four seasons with the Blues, in a deal general manager Doug Armstrong said was made “out of necessity, not out of desire.” The Blues also will get a fourth-round draft pick in 2022 from Ottawa if Brown, the son of former Blues defenseman Jeff Brown, does not appear in 30 games this season. “(My family) are all going nuts,” Brown said as he got ready to make the drive home. “My mom and sister are losing their minds. My dad’s just really excited for me. It’s home for me. So it’s pretty special.” The Blues needed to make some move at some point to get under the salary cap. “When we made a qualifying offer (for $2 million to Sanford), we didn’t know what was going to happen (on other fronts),” Armstrong said. “At the end of the day, you added it up and the cap was 81 (million) and we were 83. It’s as much (about) being cap compliant.” The trade was simplified by the Blues being very familiar with Brown. Before leaving for Ottawa, he was skating with the Blues at Centene. “I know all those guys,” Brown said. “I’ve been skating with them for a couple

summers, so it’ll be an easy transition.” Brown was part of the five-player St. Louis firstround draft class of 2016 and the 11th player taken overall. He has the least NHL playing time of the quintet, just 30 games total and just one game last season. He played in 13 games with their AHL team in Belleville, Ontario. “Logan’s obviously a big man, he’s 6-6,” Armstrong said. “He can play center and left wing, he was taken 11th overall so he’s got a pedigree. Everyone evolves and matures at a different time and he needed a fresh start.” Whether that start for him comes in St. Louis or in the AHL in Springfield remains to be seen. Sanford’s fresh start will come in Ottawa. His time in St. Louis has been tough. After the Blues acquired him from Washington for Kevin Shattenkirk, the Capitals promptly won the Stanley Cup. In 2017, in his first camp with the Blues, he was checked into the boards by Dmitrij Jaskin on the first day of camp and hurt his shoulder, requiring surgery and missing the entire season. During camp in 2018, his father, Michael, only 54, died. The enduring memory of Sanford in St. Louis might be his practice session fight in 2019 with teammate Robert Bortuzzo, leaving him to say in April that it was “more me getting my (rear end) kicked. It was an event that coincided with the team turning around their season and winning the Stanley Cup. While Sanford developed into a solid defensive player, his offense was inconsistent and he played anywhere from the top line to the fourth line. He scored 16 goals in 2019-20, four in a game against Vegas. He scored 10 in the abbreviated 2021 season. He also scored the Blues’ final goal in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Final, with Boston. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

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D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

SCREEN PLAY YOUR TV GUIDE TO THE WEEK IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL TUBE RATINGS:

More buzz than a Justin Fields start. Hold off on “Ted Lasso.”

Still worthy of your full attention. DVR for a lazy day.

Main attraction No. 12 Notre Dame vs. No. 18 Wisconsin, 11 a.m., Fox: Wisconsin stumbled out of the gate against Penn State and Notre Dame hasn’t delivered the wow factor yet. Ahead of both is an opportunity to build some steam at Chicago’s Soldier Field. Wisconsin will look to slow down Notre Dame’s passing attack, which is led by former Badgers QB Jack Coan. Rating:

M 1 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

GAMES ON TV Saturday’s games 11 a.m. Georgia at Vanderbilt 11 a.m. Villanova at Penn State 11 a.m. Ohio at Northwestern 11 a.m. Notre Dame vs. Wisconsin 11 a.m. LSU at Mississippi State 11 a.m. Missouri at Boston College 11 a.m. Richmond at Virginia Tech 11 a.m. SMU at TCU 11 a.m. Texas Tech at Texas 11 a.m. Miami (Ohio) at Army 11 a.m. Boise State at Utah State 11 a.m. Bowling Green at Minnesota 1:30 p.m. Washington State at Utah 2:30 p.m. Colorado State at Iowa 2:30 p.m. Texas A&M vs. Arkansas 2:30 p.m. Clemson at NC State 2:30 p.m. Iowa State at Baylor 2:30 p.m. Rutgers at Michigan 2:30 p.m. UT-San Antonio at Memphis 2:30 p.m. Louisville at Florida State 2:30 p.m. Illinois at Purdue 2:30 p.m. Wyoming at Connecticut 2:30 p.m. Kent State at Maryland 3 p.m. Georgia State at Auburn 3 p.m. Kansas at Duke 5 p.m. UCLA at Stanford 6 p.m. Tennessee at Florida 6 p.m. Kentucky at South Carolina 6 p.m. Navy at Houston 6 p.m. Nebraska at Michigan State 6:30 p.m. Southern Miss at Alabama 6:30 p.m. West Virginia at Oklahoma 6:30 p.m. Akron at Ohio State 6:30 p.m. North Carolina at Georgia Tech 7 p.m. Florida Atlantic at Air Force 7 p.m. Indiana at Western Kentucky 8:30 p.m. California at Washington 9:15 p.m. South Florida at BYU 9:30 p.m. Arizona at Oregon

SEC BTN BTN alt. Fox ESPN ESPN2 ACC FS1 ABC CBSSN CBS ESPNU PAC12 FS1 CBS ESPN Fox ABC ESPNU ESPN2 BTN CBSSN BTN alternate SEC ACC PAC12 ESPN ESPN2 ESPNU FS1 SEC ABC BTN ACC FS2 CBSSN PAC12 ESPN2 ESPN

AROUND THE SEC CONF

ALL

THIS WEEK

Georgia

EAST

1-0

3-0

at Vanderbilt, 11 a.m.

Kentucky

1-0

3-0

at South Carolina, 6 p.m.

Florida

0-1

2-1

Tennessee, 6 p.m.

Missouri

0-1

2-1

at Boston College, 11 a.m.

South Carolina

0-1

2-1

Kentucky, 6 p.m.

Tennessee

0-0

2-1

at Florida, 6 p.m.

Vanderbilt

0-0

1-2

Georgia, 11 a.m.

WEST

Notre Dame quarterback Jack Coan throws a pass against Purdue during their game last week in South Bend, Ind. MICHAEL CONROY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

CONF

ALL

THIS WEEK

Alabama

1-0

3-0

S. Mississippi, 6:33 p.m.

Arkansas

0-0

3-0

vs. Texas A&M, 2:30 p.m.

Mississippi

0-0

3-0

Bye

Texas A&M

0-0

3-0

vs. Arkansas, 2:30 p.m.

Auburn

0-0

2-1

Georgia St., 3 p.m.

LSU

0-0

2-1

at Mississippi St., 11 a..m.

Mississippi State

0-0

2-1

LSU, 11 a.m.

AROUND THE BIG TEN EAST

CONF

ALL

THIS WEEK

Maryland

1-0

3-0

Kent St., 2:30 p.m.

Michigan State

1-0

3-0

Nebraska, 6 p.m.

Penn State

1-0

3-0

Villanova, 11 a.m.

Ohio State

1-0

2-1

Akron, 6:30 p.m.

Michigan

0-0

3-0

Rutgers, 2:30 p.m.

Rutgers

0-0

3-0

at MIchigan, 2:30 p.m.

Indiana

0-1

1-2

at W. Kentucky, 7 p.m.

WEST

CONF

ALL

THIS WEEK

Iowa

1-0

3-0

Colorado State, 2:30 p.m.

Illinois

1-0

1-3

at Purdue, 2:30 p.m.

Minnesota

0-1

2-1

Bowling Green, 11 a.m.

Kicking off your Saturday

SETTING THE SCENE

Purdue

0-0

2-1

Illinois, 2:30 p.m.

(It’s game day! Grab the coffee and boneless wings.)

S. Florida coach prepares for days of noise, chaos

Nebraska

0-1

2-2

at Michigan State, 6 p.m.

Wisconsin

0-1

1-1

vs. Notre Dame, 11 a.m.

Northwestern

0-1

1-2

Ohio, 11 a.m.

Texas Tech at Texas, 11 a.m., ABC: It’s Air Raiders vs. the Running Horns. Texas got its ground game going to the tune of 427 yards against Rice, but the Red Raiders will provide a stiff test. They rank second in the Big 12 in rushing yards allowed at 54.3 per contest. Rating: LSU at Mississippi State, 11 a.m., ESPN: The Bulldogs gashed LSU for 623 yards of total offense in Death Valley the last time these two met. Yes, LSU’s defense has something to prove. Mississippi State quarterback Will Rogers is averaging an FBSbest 41 completions per game. Rating: Commercial check-ins: No. 2 Georgia at Vanderbilt, 11 a.m., SEC; Bowling Green at Minnesota, 11 a.m., ESPNU; Missouri at Boston College, 11 a.m., ESPN2; Boise State at Utah State, 11 a.m., CBS

Saturday afternoon delight (A little warmup for a big night.) No. 7 Texas A&M vs. No. 16 Arkansas, 2:30 p.m., CBS: The Aggies have won 11 straight games dating to last season, but they’re on a backup quarterback and will see a Hogs team that likes to control the game on the ground. Arkansas is looking for its first 4-0 start since 2003. Rating: No. 9 Clemson at NC State, 2:30 p.m., ESPN: This could be a sneaky good game. Clemson has looked out of sorts on offense while the Wolfpack has a veteran defense, though the unit is dealing with some injuries. Watch for a potential upset here. Rating: No. 14 Iowa State at Baylor, 2:30 p.m., Fox: The Cyclones have held four consecutive opponents under 100 yards rushing for the first time since 1944 and lead the nation in total defense at 194 yards per game. Baylor already has rushed for 964 yards and 11 TDs in three games. Rating: Commercial check-ins: Rutgers at No. 19 Michigan, 2:30 p.m., ABC

Saturday prime time (The stadium lights — and your TV — should shine bright.) Nebraska at No. 20 Michigan State, 6 p.m., FS1: It’s another opportunity for Scott Frost and the Huskers to knock off a ranked foe. Nebraska hasn’t defeated a ranked opponent on the road since 2012, when it won 17-14 at Penn State. Michigan State is 3-0 for the first time in six years. Rating: Tennessee at Florida, 6 p.m., ESPN: Can Florida avoid a hangover against an 18½-point underdog after nearly knocking off top-ranked Alabama? The Gators have dominated this series, winning 15 of the past 16 meetings. Rating: West Virginia at No. 4 Oklahoma, 6:30 p.m., ABC: Some talking heads will tell you that Oklahoma hasn’t looked impressive in the early going. The Sooners now get a chance to tweak the narrative on national TV. The Sooners have dominated the previous three meetings, averaging 56.7 points and 624.7 yards in that stretch. Rating: Commercial check-ins: Indiana at Western Kentucky, 7 p.m., CBSSN; South Florida at No. 15 BYU, 9:15 p.m., ESPN2; Arizona at No. 3 Oregon, 9:30 p.m., ESPN

Peeking ahead

Next week’s big games No. 13 Mississippi at No. 1 Alabama No. 19 Michigan at No. 18 Wisconsin No. 16 Arkansas at No. 2 Georgia No. 8 Cincinnati at No. 12 Notre Dame

South Florida coach Jeff Scott soon will be entering a venue filled with a screaming crowd just brimming with endless energy. Part of his young daughter’s birthday bash. At Chuck E. Cheese. Hours before that moment, a little dress rehearsal for chaos and noise — LaVell Edwards Stadium as the Bulls make a rare trip out West to face No. 15 BYU on Saturday night. “This is a business trip. It’s not a vacation,” said Scott, whose program will be making its second-ever trip to the state of Utah. The Bulls lost to the Utah Utes in 2001. “Yes, it’s something you’ll remember for a long time. But we need to to be able to keep our focus.” To prepare for BYU’s boisterous crowd, the Bulls (1-2) have turned up the noise at practice. The Bulls also are going out a day early to acclimatize and plan to pay a visit to the stadium, just so they’re a little more familiar with the surroundings. It’s back home immediately after the game, where the team hopes to arrive by about 9:30 a.m. Florida time. A few hours of sleep for Scott then it’s off to his daughter’s birthday celebration. An action-packed two-day stretch for sure. A potentially program-defining game under the second-year South Florida coach, too. “That’s why we talked a lot about grit, mental toughness and adversity and all these things,” said Scott, who arrived at South Florida from Clemson and went 1-8 last season. “We need all this we can get. You don’t get better by having it easy.” The stadium isn’t the easiest of places to visit. The Cougars (30) have won 12 straight at LaVell Edwards Stadium, which is the fifth-longest streak in school history. — Associated Press

AROUND THE BIG 12 TEAM

CONF

ALL

THIS WEEK

Baylor

1-0

3-0

Iowa State, 2:30 p.m.

Kansas State

0-0

3-0

at Oklahoma St., 6 p.m.

Oklahoma

0-0

3-0

West Virginia, 6:30 p.m.

Oklahoma State

0-0

3-0

Kansas State, 6 p.m.

TCU

0-0

2-0

SMU, 11 a.m.

Texas Tech

0-0

3-0

at Texas, 11 a.m. at Baylor, 2:30 p.m.

Iowa State

0-0

2-1

Texas

0-0

2-1

Texas Tech, 11 a.m.

West Virginia

0-0

2-1

at Oklahoma, 6:30 p.m.

Kansas

0-1

1-2

at Duke, 3 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS TOP 25 1. Alabama (3-0) 2. Georgia (3-0) 3. Oregon (3-0) 4. Oklahoma (3-0) 5. Iowa (3-0)

Southern Mississippi, 6:30 p.m. at Vanderbilt, 11 a.m. Arizona, 9:30 p.m. West Virginia, 6:30 p.m. Colorado State, 2:30 p.m.

6. Penn State (3-0)

Villanova, 11 a.m.

7. Texas A&M (3-0)

No. 16 Arkansas, 2:30 p.m.

8. Cincinnati (3-0) 9. Clemson (2-1) 10. Ohio State (2-1) 11. Florida (2-1) 12. Notre Dame (3-0) 13. Mississippi (3-0) 14. Iowa State (2-1)

Bye at NC State, 2:30 p.m. Akron, 6:30 p.m. Tennessee, 6 p.m. No. 18 Wisconsin, 11 a.m. Bye at Baylor, 2:30 p.m.

15. BYU (3-0)

South Florida, 9:15 p.m.

16. Arkansas (3-0)

at Texas A&M, 2:30 p.m.

17. Coastal Carolina (3-0)

Massachusetts, noon

18. Wisconsin (1-1)

No. 12 Notre Dame, 10 a.m.

19. Michigan (3-0)

Rutgers, 2:30 p.m.

20. MIchigan State (3-0) 21. North Carolina (2-1) 22. Fresno State (3-1) 23. Auburn (2-1) 24. UCLA (2-1) 25. Kansas State (3-0)

Nebraska, 6 p.m. Georgia Tech, 9:15 p.m. vs. UNLV, late Fri. Georgia St., 3 p.m. at Stanford, 5 p.m. at Oklahoma State, 6 p.m.


D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

M 2 • SUnDAy • 09.26.2021

MIZZOU NOTEBOOK

SEC ROUNDUP

Early missed chance proves costly

No. 16 Arkansas ends long skid to No. 7 A&M

BY DAVE MATTER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHESTNUT HILL, Mass. — For everything that went wrong for Missouri late in the Tigers’ loss Saturday at Boston College, early missed opportunities had coach Eli Drinkwitz still steamed hours after the 41-34 overtime defeat. The Tigers’ day couldn’t have started any better. Just four minutes into the action at Alumni Stadium, they had thrown a touchdown pass and forced a turnover on BC’s first play from scrimmage. Connor Bazelak connected with Barrett Banister on a 9-yard play-action pass in the end zone to open the scoring. Then, against a Missouri defense that’s been ravaged by the run this season, Boston College opted for a deep pass on first down — and might have gotten too cute for its own good. Safety Shawn Robinson made a juggling interception to extinguish BC’s opening drive on its first play. A two-score lead was there for the taking. But Mizzou only sputtered, coming up with a threeand-out series. “It was an opportunity to really establish our will in the game, to go up 14-0,” Drinkwitz said. “We didn’t take advantage of the opportunity. We punted and they went down and scored. It gave them some momentum. It’s something we’ve got to continually improve. … This is a work in progress. This whole thing is a work in progress.” Down only a touchdown, Boston College stayed true to its identity on offense and began to chip away at Mizzou’s proven weakness. The second time he touched the ball, running back Patrick Garwo dashed through three flailing defenders on a 67yard jaunt to the end zone for BC’s game-tying score, part of a four-play 98-yard touchdown drive. Relying heavily on their

MARY SCHWALM, AP PHOTO

Boston College running back Alec Sinkfield is upended by Missouri linebacker Blaze Alldredge in the first half Saturday in Chestnut Hill, Mass. running game, the Eagles ripped off more scoring drives of 75, 75, 50 and 60 yards, maintaining possession for more than five minutes on five of their nine series in regulation. BC finished the day with five runs of 10 yards or more but did most of its work methodically, getting every yard it needed in any situation. The Eagles converted 10 of 16 thirds downs and two of two fourth downs and only lost yardage on four of 76 plays from scrimmage. Missed tackles were a problem on some runs, but more than anything, the Tigers struggled to shed blocks in the trenches. “Against a team that runs the ball like this, you get a lot of zone (blocking),” Missouri linebacker Blaze Alldredge said. “They really don’t even try and be super physical on blocking you. They just kind of try to get in your way. On those long drives if you fall asleep a little bit and maybe they haven’t been cutting it back when they ran the same play two or three times in a row, all of a sudden, you just let the guard cut you off and he cuts it back and he hits a big one.”

No timeout? Boston College reached Mizzou territory in the final seconds of the first half, but after a sack on third and long, Drinkwitz decided against calling a timeout as BC faced fourth and 17. Instead, MU let the Eagles nearly run out the clock to kick a game-tying 49yard field goal with five seconds left. His counterpart was surprised by the strategy. “Truthfully, I thought he would have called timeout,” BC coach Jeff Hafley said “Remember at the end of the half, there was 40 seconds left? I waited and we kicked a field goal so they wouldn’t have any time. I thought he was going to use a timeout there, because then he would have had about 34, 35 seconds left at the end of the half with that explosive offense. You saw what they did with 20 seconds (at the end of regulation), right?”

5-yard pass to Barrett Banister, the Tigers had just enough time for Mevis to attempt a field goal to send the game into overtime. Against Arkansas last year, a similar last-minute drive set up his game-winning 32-yarder. He’d need more leg this time on the 56-yard attempt. “We thought if we got to the 40 we could kick it,” Drinkwitz said. “Man, that was a really big-time drive for us to get a chance to make that kick.” Mevis just cleared the crossbar for the longest field goal of his career but took little satisfaction considering the final outcome. “I’m trying to make kicks, score points,” he said. “I’d probably say (it was a) career long but that doesn’t matter. … I just wanted to give my team an opportunity to go win the game. That’s all I was focused on.”

Extra points

Missouri played without starting right guard Case Cook for the second straight game as he recovers from an undisclosed injury. The team captain snapped a streak of 22 straight starts when he missed last week’s game against Southeast Missouri. Connor Wood started in his place. • Saturday’s game was MU’s first overtime contest since a twoOT loss to South Carolina in 2013. • Running back Tyler Badie finished with 72 rushing yards on 18 carries and added five catches for 34 yards. • Keke Chism led Mizzou with seven catches for 67 yards. • Redshirt freshman wideout Mookie Cooper played sparingly and caught only one pass for 3 yards. • Alldredge and safety Martez Manuel led Mizzou with 11 tackles Mevis delivers The circumstances were dif- each and combined for MU’s only ferent from last year’s comeback sack. win over Arkansas, but Har- Dave Matter rison Mevis delivered just the @dave_Matter on Twitter same Saturday. Thanks to a quick dmatter@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ARLINGTON, Texas — KJ Jefferson threw for 202 yards and two touchdowns before getting banged up to start the second half and No. 16 Arkansas held on for a 20-10 win over seventh-ranked Texas A&M on Saturday, the first in the series for the Razorbacks in their 10 seasons as Southeastern Conference foes. Texas A&M (3-1, 0-1 SEC) also had its overall 11-game winning streak snapped. Jefferson came up limping and favoring his left leg after getting tackled out of bounds to start the second half, and left a few plays later. But he did return to the game late, and was on the field to take the final kneel-down in the SEC opener to cap Arkansas’ first 4-0 start since 2003. The Aggies hadn’t allowed a passing touchdown this season until Jefferson’s 85yard score to Treylon Burks, who pushed by a defender and match the catch near the 40. Burks appeared to stumble, but stayed upright and sprinted down the right sideline for 10-0 lead late in the first quarter. Arkansas leads 42-33-1 overall in the series that dates back to 1903 and includes their time as longtime Southwest Conference rivals. But Texas A&M had won all nine meetings since joining the SEC in 2012, which was 20 years after the Razorbacks debuted in the league. Jefferson threw another TD early in the second quarter when AJ Green caught a pass in the left flat, shed one defender, did a stutter step around another one and then got a boost when linebacker Aaron Hansford basically pushed him past yet another defender inside the 25 on way to a 48-yard touchdown. Jefferson finished 7 of 15 for 212 yards with plenty of big plays. Trelon Smith added 82 yards rushing as the Razorbacks piled up 443 total yards The Aggies cut the gap to 17-10 midway through the third quarter when Isaiah Spiller took a handoff up the middle, found an open gap and outran four defensive backs to the end zone for a 17-10 lead. That was most of Spillar’s 95 yards.

LSU 28, Mississippi State 25

MARY SCHWALM, AP PHOTO

Missouri wide receiver JJ Hester is wrapped up by Boston College defensive back Mike Palmer after making a catch in the second half.

Missouri From D1

an appropriate crescendo for a game that went a