Wikipedia:Wiki Ed/University of California, Berkeley/PLP - Berkeley Interdisciplinary Research Group on Privacy - Coleman Lab (Fall 2020)

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Course name
PLP - Berkeley Interdisciplinary Research Group on Privacy - Coleman Lab
Institution
University of California, Berkeley
Instructor
Naniette Coleman
Wikipedia Expert
Ian (Wiki Ed)
Subject
privacy
Course dates
2020-09-19 00:00:00 UTC – 2020-12-19 23:59:59 UTC
Approximate number of student editors
50


The Privacy Literacy Project (PLP) is a recurrent project hosted by the Interdisciplinary Research Group on Privacy (IRGP). IRGP was founded at UC Berkeley during the summer of 2016. The semester long, discovery-oriented, research (and professional) skills training program focuses on the review, discussion, translation, and dissemination of privacy, surveillance, and cybersecurity knowledge to the public.

Student Assigned Reviewing
Jameswang323 Identity replacement technology Biological data, Electronic Commerce Modeling Language, Evercookie, Disinformation attack, Mutual authentication, Smudge attack, Hancock programming language, Security breach notification laws
GlossomathisRabbit
Eddyd101 Artificial intelligence in hiring Internet vigilantism, Contact scraping, Hard Privacy Technologies, Soft Privacy Technologies, All or nothing disclosure of secrets, Indiscriminate monitoring, Hyper-surveillance, Man on the side attack, Information assurance
Quackdon Man-on-the-side attack Reliability verification, Information assurance, Web browsing history, Artificial intelligence in hiring, Contact scraping, Internet vigilantism, Hard Privacy Technologies, Soft Privacy Technologies, All or nothing disclosure of secrets, Hyper-surveillance
BerkeleyScrub User behavior analytics
IntheHeartofTexas Indiscriminate monitoring All or nothing disclosure of secrets, Hyper-surveillance, Man-on-the-side attack, Reliability verification, Information assurance, Web browsing history, Artificial intelligence in hiring, Contact scraping, Internet vigilantism, Hard Privacy Technologies
Exploredragon Evercookie Disinformation attack, Smudge attack, Mutual authentication, Security breach notification laws, Hancock programming language, Shadow profile, Network eavesdropping, Identity-based security, Biological data
Madssnake Mutual authentication Hancock programming language, Security breach notification laws, Shadow profile, Network eavesdropping, Identity-based security, Pretexting, Biological data, Identity replacement technology, Disinformation attack, Smudge attack
Bobalily Network eavesdropping Pretexting, Identity-based security, Identity replacement technology, Biological data, Electronic Commerce Modeling Language, Evercookie, Disinformation attack, Smudge attack, Hancock programming language, Shadow profile
Hello Kitty Kermit Police hacking
Tinayyt Reliability verification Information assurance, Web browsing history, Contact scraping, Artificial intelligence in hiring, Internet vigilantism, Hard Privacy Technologies
Niangao Hard Privacy Technologies Soft Privacy Technologies, All or nothing disclosure of secrets, Hyper-surveillance, Man-on-the-side attack, Reliability verification, Web browsing history, Information assurance, Contact scraping, Internet vigilantism
Plusoneplusone Electronic Commerce Modeling Language Evercookie, Disinformation attack, Smudge attack, Mutual authentication, Hancock programming language, Security breach notification laws, Network eavesdropping, Shadow profile, Identity replacement technology, Biological data
Showtime oski Hancock programming language Network eavesdropping, Shadow profile, Pretexting, Identity-based security, Biological data, Identity replacement technology, Evercookie, Electronic Commerce Modeling Language, Disinformation attack, Smudge attack, Mutual authentication, Security breach notification laws
BunnyShampoo Soft Privacy Technologies Indiscriminate monitoring, All or nothing disclosure of secrets, Man-on-the-side attack, Hyper-surveillance, Information assurance, Reliability verification, Artificial intelligence in hiring, Web browsing history, Hard Privacy Technologies, Internet vigilantism
Hiiisparks Smudge attack Security breach notification laws, Mutual authentication, Shadow profile, Hancock programming language, Identity-based security, Network eavesdropping, Pretexting, Identity replacement technology, Evercookie, Disinformation attack
SpongebobSquarepants25 Identity-based security Identity replacement technology, Pretexting, Biological data, Electronic Commerce Modeling Language, Evercookie, Disinformation attack, Smudge attack, Mutual authentication, Shadow profile, Network eavesdropping
Lolabaylo Disinformation attack Smudge attack, Mutual authentication, Hancock programming language, Security breach notification laws, Shadow profile, Network eavesdropping, Identity-based security, Pretexting, Evercookie, Electronic Commerce Modeling Language
MaryJane404 Internet vigilantism Soft Privacy Technologies, Hard Privacy Technologies, Indiscriminate monitoring, All or nothing disclosure of secrets, Hyper surveillance, Man on the side attack, Reliability verification, Information assurance, Artificial intelligence in hiring, Contact scraping
HanMiKC Pretexting, Pretexting (security) Identity replacement technology, Biological data, Evercookie, Electronic Commerce Modeling Language, Disinformation attack, Smudge attack, Mutual authentication, Security breach notification laws, Network eavesdropping, Identity-based security
Imakespaghetti29 All or nothing disclosure of secrets Hyper-surveillance, Man-on-the-side attack, Reliability verification, Information assurance, Artificial intelligence in hiring, Web browsing history, Contact scraping, Internet vigilantism
Nicholas100000 Security breach notification laws Hancock programming language, Shadow profile, Network eavesdropping, Identity-based security, Identity replacement technology, Pretexting, Biological data, Electronic Commerce Modeling Language, Smudge attack, Mutual authentication
Panacotta101 Web browsing history Artificial intelligence in hiring, Contact scraping, Internet vigilantism, Hard Privacy Technologies, Soft Privacy Technologies, Indiscriminate monitoring, All or nothing disclosure of secrets, Hyper-surveillance, Reliability verification, Information assurance
Sauceboss12 Information assurance Web browsing history, Artificial intelligence in hiring, All or nothing disclosure of secrets, Hyper-surveillance, Soft Privacy Technologies, Hard Privacy Technologies, Internet vigilantism, Indiscriminate monitoring
Nankingaszz Shadow profile Network eavesdropping, Identity-based security
Moonstar0619 Contact scraping Internet vigilantism, Hard Privacy Technologies, Soft Privacy Technologies, Indiscriminate monitoring, All or nothing disclosure of secrets, Hyper-surveillance, Man-on-the-side attack, Reliability verification, Web browsing history, Artificial intelligence in hiring
Lilmeowmeow3161 Biological data, Man on the side attack, Information assurance Electronic Commerce Modeling Language, Evercookie
Sfwarriors99 Hyper-surveillance Man-on-the-side attack, Reliability verification, Information assurance, Web browsing history, Contact scraping, Artificial intelligence in hiring

Timeline

Week 2

Course meetings
Monday, 21 September 2020   |   Tuesday, 22 September 2020   |   Wednesday, 23 September 2020   |   Thursday, 24 September 2020   |   Friday, 25 September 2020
In class - Introduction to the Privacy Literacy / Wikipedia Project

Welcome to Privacy Literacy / Wikipedia project's course timeline. This page will guide you through this Wikipedia project for our lab. 


This page breaks down writing a Wikipedia article into a series of steps, or milestones. These steps include online training to help you get started on Wikipedia


Our course has also been assigned a Wikipedia Content Expert. Check your "user talk page" for notes from them. You can also reach them through the "Get Help" button on this page.

To help you plan your time the Executive Director of the Lab and Leadership team have assigned a "difficulty level" to each week of work.  These levels are based on the work of prior lab members.  The goal is to help you determine, in advance, how much effort will be required.  A Difficulty Level of 1 = easy effort; Difficulty Level 2 =  easy to moderate effort; Level 3 = moderate effort; Level 4 = moderate to intense effort; and Level 5 = intense effort. Check in ahead of time if you have questions and please make sure to plan accordingly.

 

**Please, please, please, please DO NOT SKIP AHEAD. This course is designed to build upon content learned and practiced the prior week.  It is important to understand each week’s work thoroughly before moving onto next week’s steps.  This course site is also dynamic (meaning it changes). If you jump ahead you may start work that is ultimately moved to another week or not assigned.  Concentrate the work well that has been assigned to you during the current week**

 

 To get started, please review the following handouts: 


Assignment - Get Started on Wikipedia
  • Create an account and join this course page, using the enrollment link your instructor sent you. Please use your real name on the account but DO NOT not use your real name for your username. While this is not a requirement (not using your real name as your username) it will protect your privacy (which is something we care a lot about).
  • Because of Wikipedia's technical restraints, you may receive a message that you cannot create an account. To resolve this, please try again off campus or the next day. If you have ANY difficulty setting up your account (ex. block) please let us know immediately.
  • If you will be using Wikipedia from outside the United States and need to use a VPN please see our lab intranet page for a document on VPN use and/or search for Wikipedia's FAQ on editing while using a VPN. Looking ahead, if you encounter an IP block please reach out to our Wikipedia expert. 

 ***When you finish the trainings, practice by introducing yourself (use your username) to a classmate on that classmate's "user talk page."***

***You are going to keep hearing the terms "user talk page," "sandbox," and "article talk page," this semester. Let's make sure you understand what they all mean.  Please write up the definitions of each in a word document and attach it to your memo this week. Make sure you also save a copy for yourself so you can reference it when you get confused.***

***In order to have your work checked for the duration of this course, you need to be logged into Wikipedia and the portal.***

Milestones

Please review the Berkeley library research guide for our lab and the library skills videos created for our lab by American Cultures Librarian Corliss Lee. Both are hyperlinked on our lab intranet page.

This week, everyone should have attended bootcamp and set up a Wikipedia account.


Assignment - Start Thinking About Privacy+ Topic Ideas

Start brainstorming interesting Privacy+ topics. Remember, this is the topic you will be working on for the semester and starting a brand-new Wikipedia page on. Include ten (10) potential Privacy+ topics in your memo this week. Not sure what to include? Bring a list of ideas and come talk to me in office hours on Friday.

Week 3

Course meetings
Monday, 28 September 2020   |   Tuesday, 29 September 2020   |   Wednesday, 30 September 2020   |   Thursday, 1 October 2020   |   Friday, 2 October 2020
Assignment - Evaluate Two Privacy Articles on Wikipedia
For your assignment, you should complete the following exercise for TWO articles.

 

====== Your first article will be the Wikipedia article about information privacy. For your second article, you may select an article of your choice on the topic of privacy, surveillance, or cyber security.

Read your two articles and use them to complete this exercise: ======

Exercise

Evaluate an article

  • In your sandbox, write up your answers to these questions for the two articles you reviewed. If you don't remember what your sandbox is and how to get there, take a look at the definitions you wrote up during week 1 or review your earlier trainings.

  • Optional (feel like showing off): Choose at least 1 question from the above list that is relevant to one of the articles you're evaluating. Leave your evaluation on the article's "Talk page." Be sure to sign your feedback with four tildes — Locnamehn (talk) 23:01, 18 December 2020 (UTC). 

**Please, please, please, please DO NOT SKIP AHEAD. This course is designed to build upon content learned and practiced the prior week.  It is important to understand each week’s work thoroughly before moving onto next week’s steps.  This course site is also dynamic (meaning it changes). If you jump ahead you may start work that is ultimately moved to another week or not assigned.  Concentrate the work well that has been assigned to you during the current week**

 

 

In class - Weekly "Virtual" Lab Discussion
What's a Content Gap?

 Now that you're thinking about what makes a "good" Wikipedia article, consider these additional questions. Send your answers out on your PLP your project team email list by 11:59pm PST on Saturday.


  • Wikipedians often talk about "content gaps." What do you think a content gap is, and what are some possible ways to identify them?
  • What are some reasons a content gap might arise? What are some ways to remedy them?
  • Does it matter who writes Wikipedia?
  • What does it mean to be "unbiased" on Wikipedia? How is that different, or similar, to your own definition of "bias"?
Assignment - Narrow Down Your 10 Topics To 5 And Complete Privacy+ Selection Exercise

·       Ahead of lab please narrow down your 10 Privacy+ topics to 5.  Once you are done send them out on your project team email list and add them to your personal Privacy+ document on the lab intranet page.

      Next take a look at the Privacy+ Topic Selection exercise. Please do the exercise yourself. Don’t worry if you are not sure if your topics are OK. The exercise will help you to flesh out your ideas and help us learn more about what you are interested in.  Once you have completed the exercise completely - do ALL of the sections in the exercise - in your personal document we will work on selecting a topic for you. Please completed the exercise by Saturday at 11:59pm so we have time to do our work. Topics will be announced in our weekly email.

Assignment - Annotation Exercise

Your first "IRGP Annotation" will be assigned this week.  Check your email!

Week 4

Course meetings
Monday, 5 October 2020   |   Tuesday, 6 October 2020   |   Wednesday, 7 October 2020   |   Thursday, 8 October 2020   |   Friday, 9 October 2020
Assignment - Add To An Article On Privacy
      • Familiarize yourself with editing Wikipedia by adding a citation to an article. Use the training here and the exercise below to complete this assignment.***

 

Exercise

Add a citation



  • Please add a couple sentences to a privacy related Wikipedia article and cite the source you found that information in, or you can use the Citation Hunt Tool (search for “privacy” if you use this) to find statements that need citations.
  • This task will require you perform a bit of research.  Reach out to me or to members of our larger team if you need help.  Remember you have Berkeley Librarian Corliss Lee who is happy to help you!  You can also write to your project team email list if you need a little help. Wikipedia also has a ton of resources to help you. Click the "Get Help" button and use them.

***In order to have your work checked for the duration of this course, you need to be logged into Wikipedia and the portal.***

 

**Please, please, please, please DO NOT SKIP AHEAD. This course is designed to build upon content learned and practiced the prior week.  It is important to understand each week’s work thoroughly before moving onto next week’s steps.  This course site is also dynamic (meaning it changes). If you jump ahead you may start work that is ultimately moved to another week or not assigned.  Concentrate the work well that has been assigned to you during the current week**

 

Assignment - IF ASSIGNED A TOPIC
Start Planning / Start Annotating

If you have not done so already it's time to submit your privacy+ topic selection exercises to the lab leadership, get approval.

 

If you DO NOT HAVE AN APPROVED TOPIC at this point, it is probably because you were asked to add more information to your privacy+ exercise because it did not have enough detail.  If you have not received a privacy+ topic article yet, plan to discuss your topic with the Executive Director of the lab and get the topic approved.  Things are just starting to pick up (this is a level 3 week) and you do NOT want to fall behind.

 

If you HAVE AN APPROVED TOPIC assign your Privacy+ topic article to yourself in the article tab above.  Please locate the section titled “My Articles” under the “Home” tab of the portal. There should be a section titled “Assign myself an article.” Click here in order to assign your topic and given article to yourself.and then assign your Privacy+ topic article to yourself in the article tab above.  Please locate the section titled “My Articles” under the “Home” tab of the portal. There should be a section titled “Assign myself an article.” Click here in order to assign your topic and given article to yourself.


If you already have a topic assigned by the Executive Director of the Lab it is time to find a few / few more peer-reviewed articles (remember you need a minimum of 20 articles that are at least 15 pages long each - without tables, graphs, citations, etc - in your final annotated bibliography on your topic in ASA format, and start preparing your annotated bibliography if you have not already done so.  If your article is too short you will end up having to do extra ones.  We check article length during the semester and will let you know if this happens but it is better to just follow firections and make good decisions so you don't have extra work to do.  Remember, if you need help formatting your bibliography in ASA style, try out Citation Machine.

Remember you can reach out to Berkeley Librarian Corliss Lee or the larger research team for help on finding articles and you have a host of resources on how to do annotations that have been given to you.  You have also already done an annotation on an article alongside members of the Lab.  You can also send your questions out on your project team email list.


***Based on our work so far this term, find your APPROVED privacy+ topic article  in the portal (assigned by the Executive Director of the lab), select it and assign it to yourself on the Students tab above if you have not already done so.***

Finalize your topic / Find your sources (only if assigned a topic by Executive Director)

***In your sandbox, write a few sentences about what you plan to contribute to the selected article or why you are creating this new article.***

  • ** Think back to when you did an article critique. What else can you add? Post some of your ideas in your sandbox.
    • Perhaps you might make an outline of your future article (or contribution) and also put that in your sandbox.
    • If you don't remember what your sandbox is and how to get there, take a look at the definitions you wrote up during week 1 or review your earlier trainings.
      • Start/Continue compiling a list of relevant, reliable, peer reviewed, journal articles. ***
  • ** *** Compile a list of at least 20 peer reviewed journal articles that are at least 15 pages long each (without tables, graphs, citations, etc) on your topic in ASA format, and upload it to your shared document on the lab website.  If your articles are too short you will have to find new ones or do new annotations so be thoughtful.

      • Please also post that bibliography to the talk page of the article you'll be working on if you are working on an existing page. Make sure to check in on the "Talk page" if you are updating an article to see if anyone has advice on your bibliography.”

***Begin/Continue preparing article annotations***

  • ** Complete 5 annotations this week and send your completed annotations out on your project team email list (in the body of your email). Please also add them to your shared document on the Lab website.

Week 5

Course meetings
Monday, 12 October 2020   |   Tuesday, 13 October 2020   |   Wednesday, 14 October 2020   |   Thursday, 15 October 2020   |   Friday, 16 October 2020
Assignment - IF ASSIGNED A TOPIC
Start Planning / Start Annotating

If you have not done so already it's time to submit your privacy+ topic selection exercises to the lab leadership, get approval.

 

If you DO NOT HAVE AN APPROVED TOPIC at this point, it is probably because you were asked to add more information to your privacy+ exercise because it did not have enough detail.  If you have not received a privacy+ topic article yet, plan to discuss your topic with the Executive Director of the lab and get the topic approved.  Things are just starting to pick up (this is a level 3 week) and you do NOT want to fall behind.

 

If you HAVE AN APPROVED TOPIC assign your Privacy+ topic article to yourself in the article tab above.  Please locate the section titled “My Articles” under the “Home” tab of the portal. There should be a section titled “Assign myself an article.” Click here in order to assign your topic and given article to yourself.and then assign your Privacy+ topic article to yourself in the article tab above.  Please locate the section titled “My Articles” under the “Home” tab of the portal. There should be a section titled “Assign myself an article.” Click here in order to assign your topic and given article to yourself.


If you already have a topic assigned by the Executive Director of the Lab it is time to find a few / few more peer-reviewed articles (remember you need a minimum of 20 articles that are at least 15 pages long each - without tables, graphs, citations, etc - in your final annotated bibliography on your topic in ASA format, and start preparing your annotated bibliography if you have not already done so.  If your article is too short you will end up having to do extra ones.  We check article length during the semester and will let you know if this happens but it is better to just follow firections and make good decisions so you don't have extra work to do.  Remember, if you need help formatting your bibliography in ASA style, try out Citation Machine.

Remember you can reach out to Berkeley Librarian Corliss Lee or the larger research team for help on finding articles and you have a host of resources on how to do annotations that have been given to you.  You have also already done an annotation on an article alongside members of the Lab.  You can also send your questions out on your project team email list.


***Based on our work so far this term, find your APPROVED privacy+ topic article  in the portal (assigned by the Executive Director of the lab), select it and assign it to yourself on the Students tab above if you have not already done so.***

Finalize your topic / Find your sources (only if assigned a topic by Executive Director)

***In your sandbox, write a few sentences about what you plan to contribute to the selected article or why you are creating this new article.***

  • ** Think back to when you did an article critique. What else can you add? Post some of your ideas in your sandbox.
    • Perhaps you might make an outline of your future article (or contribution) and also put that in your sandbox.
    • If you don't remember what your sandbox is and how to get there, take a look at the definitions you wrote up during week 1 or review your earlier trainings.
      • Start/Continue compiling a list of relevant, reliable, peer reviewed, journal articles. ***
  • ** Compile a list of at least 20 peer reviewed journal articles that are at least 15 pages long each (without tables, graphs, citations, etc) on your topic in ASA format, and upload it to your shared document on the lab website.  If your articles are too short you will have to find new ones or do new annotations so be thoughtful.

    • Please also post that bibliography to the talk page of the article you'll be working on if you are working on an existing page. Make sure to check in on the "Talk page" if you are updating an article to see if anyone has advice on your bibliography.”

***Begin/Continue preparing article annotations***

  • ** Complete 5 annotations this week and send your completed annotations out on your project team email list (in the body of your email). Please also add them to your shared document on the Lab website.
Assignment - Weekly "Virtual" Lab Discussion
Thinking About Sources and Plagiarism
  • Blog posts and press releases are considered poor sources of reliable information. Why?
  • What are some reasons you might not want to use a company's website as the main source of information about that company?
  • What is the difference between a copyright violation and plagiarism?
  • What are some good techniques to avoid close paraphrasing and plagiarism?

Week 6

Course meetings
Monday, 19 October 2020   |   Tuesday, 20 October 2020   |   Wednesday, 21 October 2020   |   Thursday, 22 October 2020   |   Friday, 23 October 2020
Assignment - Annotate Sources / Outline Your Article / Draft Your Article

You've submitted your 5 areas of interest/possible topics, got one approved by the Lab Executive Director, compiled a list of atlleast 20 peer reviewed articles of atleast 15 pages each, created an ASA formatted bibliography, and you have completed 5 annotations (possibly more). If not, it is time to get moving on annotations. 

***You will need to complete an additional 5-10 annotations by Saturday so you can receive feedback. Please send your updated bibliography with new annotations out on your project team email list (and the ones you did last week...make sure you make the updates suggested by the team) in your individual shared document.  It is also now time to start outlining your article (and writing) your article.***


*** Creating a new article?***

  •  Write an outline of that topic in the form of a standard Wikipedia article "lead section." Write it in your sandbox
    •  A "lead" section is not a traditional introduction. It should summarize, very briefly, what the rest of the article will say in detail. The first paragraph should include important, broad facts about the subject. A good example is Ada Lovelace. See Editing Wikipedia page 9 for more ideas.  If you get stuck write to the group on your project team email list with questions, look at other Wikipedia pages, use the "Get Help" button and as usual plan to send questions out on your project team email list.
    • Also make an outline of additional sections you might include in your article and what might be in them.  You made a list of interesting related Wikipedia articles and topics with their links as a lab during the lab exercise where we chose your topic, consider reviewing that too.  You will need to link your page to others.  Start thinking about that and make a new list.  You will need that list for Saturday also.  
    • If you don't remember what your sandbox is and how to get there, take a look at the definitions you wrote up during week 1 or review your earlier trainings.
      •   Improving an existing article?  ***

  •  Identify what's missing from the current form of the article. Think back to the skills you learned while critiquing an article. Look at the example of a well done articles (above).
  • If you get stuck write to the group on your project team email list with questions, look at other Wikipedia pages, use the "Get Help" button and as usual plan to bring questions to lab.
  • Make notes for improvement in your sandbox
  • Also make an outline of additional sections you might include in your article and what might be in them. You made a list of interesting related Wikipedia articles and topics with their links as a lab during the lab exercise where we chose your topic, consider reviewing that too.  You will need to link your page to others.  Start thinking about that and make a new list.  You will need that list for Saturday also.  


Keep reading (and annotating) your sources as you begin to write the body of the article.  Remember the magic number is 20 annotations on 20 peer reviewed articles of at least 15 pages (without citations, tables, graphs, etc).


Resources: Editing Wikipedia pages 7–9

Add 5 / Edit 5

Starting this week till the end of lab, you will be searching for unique privacy articles within your language’s Wikipedia.

 

'***Add five 'unique privacy, surveillance, or cybersecurity pages to the Privacy+ pages list for this semester on the lab web page with a link and your name in brackets next to it. Edit every page you add to the list.  Possible Options:  Add two sentences.  Add a citation.  Fix punctuation.  Clarify a sentence or two.***

 

'***In order to have your work checked for the duration of this course, you need to be logged into Wikipedia and the portal.***'


Don't forget to leave notes so other Wikipedians know what you edited

Milestones

Everyone has begun writing their article drafts. 

Week 7

Course meetings
Monday, 26 October 2020   |   Tuesday, 27 October 2020   |   Wednesday, 28 October 2020   |   Thursday, 29 October 2020   |   Friday, 30 October 2020
Assignment - Expand your Draft
  • Keep working on transforming your article into a complete first draft. Make sure your draft is ready for peer-editing by noon Thursday weekly. Everyone will both get and give a friendly peer edit(s) weekly going forward.  
  • If you'd like a Content Expert to review your draft, now is the time! Click the "Get Help" button in your sandbox to request notes. I strongly encourage you to do this.
  • If you don't remember what your sandbox is and how to get there, take a look at the definitions you wrote up during week 1 or review your earlier trainings.
Assignment - Continue Working on Your Annotations

***You will need to complete an additional 5-10 annotations by Saturday so you can receive feedback. Please send your updated bibliography with new annotations out on your project team email list as well and update them (and the ones you did last week) in our shared document. ***

Assignment - Peer Edit & Copy Edit (ASAP so everyone can respond to feedback in memo)

Guiding framework

  • Review "Peer Editing" guiding framework training.
  • Make sure your article is ready to be peer edited by Thursday at noon.
  • Beginning on Thursday at noon select the two classmates’ articles that you were assigned in this weeks email, assign them to yourself, and then peer edit and copy edit their articles. If you are not clear on what this means, Google both terms and also send a note to your project team email list.
  • Please put your peer edit in your labmate's "USER TALK PAGE." If you don't remember what your USER TALK PAGE is and how to get there, take a look at the definitions you wrote up during week 1 or review your earlier trainings.
  • As you review, make spelling, grammar, and other adjustments. Pay attention to the tone of the article. Is it encyclopedic? 
Assignment - Add 5 / Edit 5

'***Add five 'unique privacy, surveillance, or cybersecurity pages to the Privacy+ pages list for this semester on the lab web page with a link and your name in brackets next to it. Edit every page you add to the list.  Possible Options:  Add two sentences.  Add a citation.  Fix punctuation.  Clarify a sentence or two.***

 

'***In order to have your work checked for the duration of this course, you need to be logged into Wikipedia and the portal.***'


Don't forget to leave notes so other Wikipedians know what you edited

Milestones

Every student has finished reviewing their assigned articles.  Every article has been reviewed at least twice. 

Assignment - Respond to Your Peer Edits (Please complete and include in your memo)

You have some feedback from other students in your "User Talk page" (and possibly other Wikipedians). It's time to work with that feedback to improve your article!


  • Read Editing Wikipedia pages 12 and 14.
  •  Return to your draft or article and think about the suggestions. Decide which ones to start implementing. Reach out to your instructor or your Content Expert if you have any questions. 
  • ***Include a copy of your article draft, peer feedback, and what you have done in response to peer feedback in your weekly memo.***  
Assignment - Weekly "Virtual" Lab Discussion
Thinking About Wikipedia
  • What do you think of Wikipedia's definition of "neutrality"?
  • What are the impacts and limits of Wikipedia as a source of information?
  • On Wikipedia, all material must be attributable to reliable, published sources. What kinds of sources does this exclude? Can you think of any problems that might create?
  • If Wikipedia was written 100 years ago, how might its content (and contributors) be different? What about 100 years from now?

Week 8

Course meetings
Monday, 2 November 2020   |   Tuesday, 3 November 2020   |   Wednesday, 4 November 2020   |   Thursday, 5 November 2020   |   Friday, 6 November 2020
Assignment - Finish Up Your Annotations

***You will need to complete the last few of your 20 annotations by Saturday so you can receive feedback. Please send your updated bibliography with new annotations out on your project team email list as well and update them (and the ones you did last week) in our shared document.*** 

Assignment - Add 5 / Edit 5

'***Add five 'unique privacy, surveillance, or cybersecurity pages to the Privacy+ pages list for this semester on the lab web page with a link and your name in brackets next to it. Edit every page you add to the list.  Possible Options:  Add two sentences.  Add a citation.  Fix punctuation.  Clarify a sentence or two.***

 

'***In order to have your work checked for the duration of this course, you need to be logged into Wikipedia and the portal.***'


Don't forget to leave notes so other Wikipedians know what you edited

Assignment - Peer Edit and Copy Edit Assigned Page(s)

***Peer edit your classmates' drafts. Leave suggestions in their user talk page.*** 


  • Make sure your article is ready to be peer edited by Thursday at noon.
  • Beginning on Thursday at noon peer edit for the people you were assigned this week.


  • As you review, make spelling, grammar, and other adjustments. Pay attention to the tone of the article. Is it encyclopedic?
  • Other editors may be reviewing your work also, so look for their comments! Be sure to acknowledge feedback from other Wikipedians. 
  • If you don't remember what your user talk page is and how to get there, take a look at the definitions you wrote up during week 1 or review your earlier trainings.
Assignment - Respond to Your Peer Edit

***Include a copy of your article draft, peer feedback, and what you have done in response to peer feedback in your weekly memo.***  

Week 9

Course meetings
Monday, 9 November 2020   |   Tuesday, 10 November 2020   |   Wednesday, 11 November 2020   |   Thursday, 12 November 2020   |   Friday, 13 November 2020
Assignment - Continue Improving your Article

Exercise

Add links to your article

Now's the time to revisit your text and refine your work. You may do more research and find missing information; rewrite the lead section to represent all major points; reorganize the text to communicate the information better; or add images and other media.

Assignment - Polish your Work

Continue to expand and improve your work, and format your article to match Wikipedia's tone and standards. Remember to contact your Content Expert at any time if you need further help!

Assignment - Prepare For IRGP Virtual Undergraduate Symposium Presentation
  • Prepare for 10 minute presentation about your Wikipedia editing experience.
  • Review videos of previous presentations (if available) and start to think about what you want to do.
Assignment - Add 5 / Edit 5

'***Add five 'unique privacy, surveillance, or cybersecurity pages to the Privacy+ pages list for this semester on the lab web page with a link and your name in brackets next to it. Edit every page you add to the list.  Possible Options:  Add two sentences.  Add a citation.  Fix punctuation.  Clarify a sentence or two.***

 

'***In order to have your work checked for the duration of this course, you need to be logged into Wikipedia and the portal.***'


Don't forget to leave notes so other Wikipedians know what you edited

Assignment - Peer Edit and Copy Edit Assigned Page(s)

***Peer edit your classmate's drafts. Leave suggestions in their user talk page.*** 


  • Make sure your article is ready to be peer edited by Thursday at noon.
  • Beginning on Thursday at noon peer edit for the people you were assigned this week.
  • As you review, make spelling, grammar, and other adjustments. Pay attention to the tone of the article. Is it encyclopedic?
  • Other editors may be reviewing your work also, so look for their comments! Be sure to acknowledge feedback from other Wikipedians. 
  • If you don't remember what your user talk page is and how to get there, take a look at the definitions you wrote up during week 1 or review your earlier trainings.
Assignment - Respond to Your Peer Edit

***Include a copy of your article draft, peer feedback, and what you have done in response to peer feedback in your weekly memo.***   

Assignment - Blog Writing Workshop

Watch the Blog Writing workshop this week to learn about blog writing in general and your assignment in particular!

Milestones

Do some deep breathing exercises.  Do a few extra reps at the gym.  Phone a friend. Have some chocolate.  Power pose.  Meditate.  Do whatever you need to do to prepare yourself.  Your article needs to be uploaded to the mainspace by the end of next week.  Remember you can continue to edit it.  You just need to get it up there!  Remember how this all started....Be Bold!

Week 10

Course meetings
Monday, 16 November 2020   |   Tuesday, 17 November 2020   |   Wednesday, 18 November 2020   |   Thursday, 19 November 2020   |   Friday, 20 November 2020
Assignment - Improve your Article and Prepare for your Presentation

Do additional research and writing to make further improvements to your article, based on suggestions and your own critique.


  •  Read Editing Wikipedia page 12 to see how to create links from your article to others, and from other articles to your own. Try to link to 3–5 articles, and link to your article from 2–3 other articles. 
  • Consider adding an image to your article. Wikipedia has strict rules about what media can be added, so make sure to take the 'Contributing Images and Media Files' training before you upload an image.

'Polish your work'

Continue to expand and improve your work, and format your article to match Wikipedia's tone and standards. Remember to contact your Content Expert at any time if you need further help!

Prepare for presentation at IRGP's Virtual Undergraduate Research Symposium
Prepare for 10 minute presentation about your Wikipedia editing experience.

Review videos of previous presentations (if available) and start to think about what you want to do.

Assignment - Begin Moving Your Work to the Wikipedia Mainspace

***Once you have both revised and edited your citations for your translated article, it's time to start moving your article to Wikipedia proper - the "mainspace."***

Use the training above as a tool for moving your completed article to the mainspace.

***You will need to complete the last few of your 20 annotations by Saturday so you can receive feedback. Please send your updated bibliography with new annotations out on the project email list as well and update them (and the ones you did last week) in our shared document.***


Send an email to your project team email list once you have started to upload your work into the mainspace for your assigned language.

 

Resource: Editing Wikipedia, page 13

 
Assignment - Add 5 / Edit 5

'***Add five 'unique privacy, surveillance, or cybersecurity pages to the Privacy+ pages list for this semester on the lab web page with a link and your name in brackets next to it. Edit every page you add to the list.  Possible Options:  Add two sentences.  Add a citation.  Fix punctuation.  Clarify a sentence or two.***

 

'***In order to have your work checked for the duration of this course, you need to be logged into Wikipedia and the portal.***'


Don't forget to leave notes so other Wikipedians know what you edited

Assignment - Final Article Development

It's the final few weeks to develop your article.


  • Read Editing Wikipedia page 15 to review a final check-list before completing your assignment.
  • Don't forget that you can ask for help from your Content Expert at any time!
Assignment - Peer Edit and Copy Edit Assigned Page(s)

***Peer edit your classmate's drafts. Leave suggestions in their user talk page.*** 


  • Make sure your article is ready to be peer edited by Thursday at noon.
  • Beginning on Thursday at noon peer edit for the people you were assigned this week.


  • As you review, make spelling, grammar, and other adjustments. Pay attention to the tone of the article. Is it encyclopedic?
  • Other editors may be reviewing your work also, so look for their comments! Be sure to acknowledge feedback from other Wikipedians. 
  • If you don't remember what your user talk page is and how to get there, take a look at the definitions you wrote up during week 1 or review your earlier trainings.
Assignment - Respond to Your Edit

***Include a copy of your article draft, peer feedback, and what you have done in response to peer feedback in your weekly memo.*** 

Assignment - Begin Thinking About Your Blog Post

This is the opportunity to challenge yourself and express your expertise of knowledge on your topic subjectively. This original piece will take the form a professionally written academic blog of 500 to 1000 words with an attached bibliography of at least 5 academic sources. These can be pulled from your bibliography on your Wikipedia page. 

Brainstorm 5 blog topics this week and add them and a few sentences about what you might write for each to your personal blog document. Think back to the zoom video that we saw in lab last week. What audience are you trying to reach?

Week 11

Course meetings
Monday, 30 November 2020   |   Tuesday, 1 December 2020   |   Wednesday, 2 December 2020   |   Thursday, 3 December 2020   |   Friday, 4 December 2020
In class - Submit Your Final Annotations

Make sure all of the recommended edits have been completed. Once they have, submit your annotations. 

Assignment - Improve your Article and Prepare for your Presentation



Do additional research and writing to make further improvements to your article, based on suggestions and your own critique.


  • Read Editing Wikipedia page 12 to see how to create links from your article to others, and from other articles to your own. Try to link to 3–5 articles, and link to your article from 2–3 other articles. 
  • Consider adding an image to your article. Wikipedia has strict rules about what media can be added, so make sure to take the 'Contributing Images and Media Files' training before you upload an image.

Polish your work

Continue to expand and improve your work, and format your article to match Wikipedia's tone and standards. Remember to contact your Content Expert at any time if you need further help!

Prepare for presentation
Prepare for 10 minute presentation about your Wikipedia editing experience.


Assignment - Add 5 / Edit 5

'***Add five 'unique privacy, surveillance, or cybersecurity pages to the Privacy+ pages list for this semester on the lab web page with a link and your name in brackets next to it. Edit every page you add to the list.  Possible Options:  Add two sentences.  Add a citation.  Fix punctuation.  Clarify a sentence or two.***

 

'***In order to have your work checked for the duration of this course, you need to be logged into Wikipedia and the portal.***'


Don't forget to leave notes so other Wikipedians know what you edited

Assignment - Peer Edit and Copy Edit Assigned Page(s)

***Peer edit your classmate's drafts. Leave suggestions in their user talk page.*** 


  • Make sure your article is ready to be peer edited by Thursday at noon.
  • Beginning on Thursday at noon peer edit for the people you were assigned this week.


  • As you review, make spelling, grammar, and other adjustments. Pay attention to the tone of the article. Is it encyclopedic?
  • Other editors may be reviewing your work also, so look for their comments! Be sure to acknowledge feedback from other Wikipedian
Assignment - Respond to Your Peer Edit

***Include a copy of your article draft, peer feedback, and what you have done in response to peer feedback in your weekly memo.*** 

Assignment - Draft Blog Post is Due on Friday / Edits of Blog(s) Assigned Due Saturday

Add your draft blog post to your personal blog doc on the lab webpage. Review and offer comment suggestions to the blog of the person(s) you were assigned.

Assignment - Finalize Your Article Work in the Mainspace

It may seem scary but that does not mean it isn't time!  It's time to finalize your article in the mainspace.  

 

Send an email to your project team email list once you have finished finalizing your work in the mainspace.

Week 12

Course meetings
Monday, 7 December 2020   |   Tuesday, 8 December 2020   |   Wednesday, 9 December 2020   |   Thursday, 10 December 2020   |   Friday, 11 December 2020
In class - Final Draft Of Blog Due on Saturday

Submit your draft blog post by Saturday and include it in your memo.  Make sure you have considered any edits suggested and updated your blog ahead of final submission.

Assignment - Article Edits are Complete/ Article Posted / Prepare to Present

Everyone should have finished all of the work they'll do on Wikipedia, and be ready to present what they have done.

Assignment - Add 5 / Edit 5

'***Add five 'unique privacy, surveillance, or cybersecurity pages to the Privacy+ pages list for this semester on the lab web page with a link and your name in brackets next to it. Edit every page you add to the list.  Possible Options:  Add two sentences.  Add a citation.  Fix punctuation.  Clarify a sentence or two.***

'***In order to have your work checked for the duration of this course, you need to be logged into Wikipedia and the portal.***'

Don't forget to leave notes so other Wikipedians know what you edited

Milestones

Submit your 10 minute presentation about your Wikipedia editing experience.

Week 13

Course meetings
Monday, 14 December 2020   |   Tuesday, 15 December 2020   |   Wednesday, 16 December 2020   |   Thursday, 17 December 2020   |   Friday, 18 December 2020
Milestones