The Kid (1921) - Trivia - IMDb
Edit
The Kid (1921) Poster

(1921)

Trivia

This was Charles Chaplin's first feature length film he directed.
78 of 78 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Charles Chaplin and Jackie Coogan met for the last time in 1972, during Chaplin's brief return to America for an Honorary Academy Award.
76 of 76 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The production company tried to cheat Charles Chaplin by paying him for this six-reel film what they would ordinarily pay him for a two-reel film, which was about $500,000. Chaplin took the unassembled film out of state until the company agreed to the $1.5 million he was supposed to be paid, plus half the surplus profits on rentals, along with reversion of the film to him after five years on the rental market.
120 of 122 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The off-screen chemistry between Charles Chaplin and Jackie Coogan was just as strong as their onscreen relationship. Every Sunday, during the first few weeks of filming, Chaplin would take Jackie to amusement parks and pony rides and other activities. Some have seen Chaplin's relationship with Coogan as an attempt for Chaplin to reclaim his own unhappy childhood, while others have interpreted Chaplin's attention toward the boy as recasting Coogan into the child he had just lost.
76 of 77 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
For the scene in which the Kid is taken from the Tramp and nearly carted away to a workhouse, Charles Chaplin stated in his autobiography that the young Jackie Coogan was made to cry by his father, who told him that if he would not cry in the scene, he would be sent to an actual workhouse.
147 of 152 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
A dedicated perfectionist, Charles Chaplin took 5 1/2 months to shoot the film, a huge amount of time for a film production in 1921.
46 of 46 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The portrayal of poverty and the cruelty of welfare workers are reminiscent of Charles Chaplin's own childhood in London. This makes it the most autobiographical film he ever made.
66 of 67 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Jackie Coogan, who plays the adorable "Kid," grew up to be the extremely weird "Uncle Fester" on the beloved '60s sitcom The Addams Family (1964).
125 of 130 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The main theme from Charles Chaplin's score is based on a theme from Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's 6th Symphony.
75 of 77 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Charles Chaplin decided to make a film around Jackie Coogan after seeing him in a vaudeville performance with his father Jack Coogan Sr.. The elder Coogan essentially put his career on hold to coach little Jackie through filming. Chaplin, in turn, rewarded Jack Sr.'s role in coaching the boy, as well as assuaged his performer's ego, by paying him $125 a week, almost double the $75 a week Jackie was getting to costar. Jack Sr. also played several roles in the film, as a bum who picks the Tramp's pocket, as the Devil in the Heaven sequence, and as a party guest.
37 of 37 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The shooting ratio (the amount of material shot: what appears in the final film) is 53:1, far higher than any other Charles Chaplin film.
66 of 69 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In 1971 Charles Chaplin edited and reissued the film and composed a new musical score.
28 of 28 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Due to the fact that Jackie Coogan's mother and stepfather had spent all the youngster's money before he reached adulthood, the "Coogan Bill" was enacted to ensure that child actors' funds would never again be able to be squandered by their parents or guardians.
28 of 28 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Charles Chaplin, at considerable risk, borrowed $500,000 from an Italian bank to make the film.
34 of 35 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Lita Grey, who portrays an angel in the film, was Charles Chaplin's second wife, from 1924-27.
32 of 33 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry in December 2011, as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."
50 of 53 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Charles Chaplin suffered through a divorce from his first wife, Mildred Harris, while shooting this film.
72 of 78 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Production of this film ran so long that Charles Chaplin's film company contracting him, First National Pictures, complained. To placate the company, Chaplin invited executives and theater exhibitors to a grand tour of the studio to review the production and to meet the stars. The result was that the visitors were so charmed with what they experienced, especially with the players such as Jackie Coogan, that they agreed to be patient. Ultimately, that patience was proven worthwhile with the film becoming a major critical and commercial success.
20 of 20 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
When Jackie Coogan became an adult, he fell on harsh financial times. In desperation he reached out to Charles Chaplin, who without hesitation handed him $1,000.
20 of 20 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The failure of the original copyright holder to renew the film's copyright resulted in it falling into public domain, meaning that virtually anyone could duplicate and sell a VHS/DVD copy of the film. Therefore, many of the versions of this film available on the market are either severely (and usually badly) edited and/or of extremely poor quality, having been duped from second or third generation (or more) copies of the film.
55 of 59 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Charles Chaplin biographer Jeffrey Vance writes of the legacy of Chaplin's The Kid: "The Kid remains an important contribution to the art of film, not only because of Chaplin's innovative use of dramatic sequences within a feature-length comedy but also because of the revelations The Kid provides about its creator. Undoubtedly, when Chaplin penned the preface to The Kid, "A picture with a smile - and perhaps, a tear," he had his own artistic credo - and life - in mind." Mary Pickford said of the film: "The Kid is one of the finest examples of the screen language, depending upon its actions rather than upon subtitles."
18 of 18 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In December 2011, The Kid was chosen to be preserved in the Library of Congress' National Film Registry. The Registry said that the film is "an artful melding of touching drama, social commentary and inventive comedy" and praised Charles Chaplin's ability to "sustain his artistry beyond the length of his usual short subjects and could deftly elicit a variety of emotions from his audiences by skillfully blending slapstick and pathos."
9 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The working title was "The Waif".
13 of 14 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Several of the street scenes were filmed on Los Angeles's famed Olvera Street, almost 10 years before it was converted into a Mexican-themed tourist attraction.
14 of 17 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Included among the American Film Institute's 1998 list of the 400 movies nominated for the Top 100 Greatest American Movies.
11 of 13 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
As of March 2015, The Kid has earned a rare 100% perfect rating on film review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes, based on 30 critic reviews, and an 8.4 user rating on the Internet Movie Database, placing it at number 95 among the latter site's Top 250 Titles.
13 of 17 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In the scene where Charles Reisner's "Bully" is trying to beat up Charles Chaplin's "Tramp," it is obvious that the Bully's upper body has been heavily padded to make him look far bigger and more threatening than he really is, physically.
26 of 43 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This film is part of the Criterion Collection, spine #799.
9 of 13 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Chosen by filmmaker Wayne Wang as his all-time favorite film in an AFI poll.
11 of 26 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Hall of Fame basketball coach Pete Newell, who acted while growing up in Los Angeles, was considered by Charles Chaplin for a role.
7 of 17 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
11 seconds were cut from this in the UK in 1922.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Included among the American Film Institute's 2000 list of the 500 movies nominated for the Top 100 Funniest American Movies.
1 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In May 2017, it was announced that FilmNation Entertainment is remaking The Kid as an animated sci-fi movie. The untitled film will be directed by Christian Volckman and Rupert Wyatt and is said to be "inspired by the characters and themes in The Kid."
1 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page


Recently Viewed