The Color of Money by Walter Tevis
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The Color of Money

3.85  ·  Rating details ·  579 ratings  ·  46 reviews
"Tevis in unequaled when it comes to creating and sustaining the tension of a high stakes game. Even readers who have never lifted a cue will be captivated." -- Publishers Weekly

Twenty years after he conquered the underground pool circuit as The Hustler, "Fast" Eddie Felson is playing exhibition matches with former rival Minnesota Fats in shopping malls for prizes like ca
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Paperback, 300 pages
Published May 1st 2003 by Da Capo Press (first published 1984)
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Average rating 3.85  · 
Rating details
 ·  579 ratings  ·  46 reviews


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Sam Quixote
Like The Hustler, I never saw the movie of The Color of Money but I knew it was directed by Martin Scorsese and starred Tom Cruise along with Paul Newman, reprising his role as “Fast” Eddie Felson. So I looked it up on IMDB after reading this book thinking Cruise’s character was Babes Cooley, the cocky young upstart who’s Eddie’s nemesis in this book and… nope! He plays someone called “Vincent Lauria”, a character who’s not in the book at all, while Babes, and other key characters like Fats Minn ...more
Lee
Apr 01, 2015 rated it it was amazing
I was aware that this book followed The Hustler, but since I was holding it in my hand at the Attic , used book store, I thought I would read it first anyway. I had seen the movies based on both books and The Color... Seemed kind of off-base, not really about Fast Eddy, more about Tom Cruise. I was right, the book really tells Eddy's story twenty years after the tale told in The Hustler, which I am now reading and loving. Tevis' prose is spare and exact. His description of the pool games are vis ...more
Aaron
Mar 30, 2011 rated it it was amazing
I read a Gene Wolfe quote in which he stated that his intentions were to create works that needed to be revisited multiple times to fully understand, that this was necessary for all great fiction. Each of the Tevis novels I have read contain some of the simplest and clearest prose I have ever come across. Even while describing intricate actions on the pool table (or the chess board in "Queens Gambit") there is no obfuscation. All is understood.

Not to crap on Wolfe (I do mightily enjoy some of hi
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Jeffrey Powanda
Nov 26, 2020 rated it really liked it
Shelves: pool
“Fast” Eddie Felson, the protagonist of Tevis's first novel The Hustler, returns in Tevis's last novel, The Color of Money.

Eddie is 50 and broke. He's coming off a divorce, the sale of his pool hall, and uncertainty about his future. He needs sixty thousand dollars to buy his pool hall back, so he desperately seeks out Minnesota Fats, who is retired in Florida and hasn't played pool in six years. Eddie convinces Fats to join him on the road to perform a series of exhibition games for a small ca
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Rachel
If I were to summarize this book in one word it would be ‘blah’ because I’m not sure if ‘snooze-fest’ counts as one word or two.

I gave it two stars instead of one only because the narrative of pool play, both straight pool and nine ball, were descriptive and interesting. This book had no relation to the movie starring Paul Newman and Tom Cruise. The plot really was nonexistent. And, in case you are a fan of the movie, there was no pool hustling done by the Tom Cruise character with him parading
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Nial
Sep 25, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction
I really enjoyed this sequel!!!
Kirk Johnson
Jan 04, 2021 rated it really liked it
The Man Who Fell to Earth and The Hustler, previous Tevis works, both started out as solid novels and ended in stunning fashion. The Color of Money, while satisfying, merely stays solid throughout, and a certain Tevis formula is becoming apparent, though one is never quite sure which facet of the formula will shine through.
Carson
Dec 10, 2010 rated it really liked it
It is always interesting to read a book that has since become a movie. That said, "The Color of Money" has always been one of my all-time favorite films. Paul Newman as Fast Eddie Felson in what was (deservingly but incredibly) his only Best Actor Oscar win and Tom Cruise dancing to "Werewolves of London" makes for great entertainment.

The reason I read - especially these days - is for inspiration, for motivation and to feel kinship with the characters.

Fast Eddie, now 50 years old and 20+ years a
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Sara
Jul 13, 2012 rated it it was ok
I was curious to read this book after reading "The Hustler". I wanted to know what happened to Fast Eddie after he walked out of that pool hall. I was a bit disappointed. It was nice to see Minnesota Fats again and it was interesting watching Eddie get back into pool after all those years. I felt that book didn't have enough of a plot to keep my interest, though, as it was rather low key. That certain something that The Hustler had was missing from this book - maybe the rawness, the desperation, ...more
Chrisl
Dec 20, 2018 rated it really liked it
Shelves: sports, fiction, lila, 1980s
Enjoyed the book. No desire to see movies featuring Tom ...
Played enough pool in USAF and college to comprehend most.
Appreciate Tevis characters and range
Brian
Jul 04, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Excellent ! I was put off by the atrocious movie version, but because of the author penning the tremendous 'Man who fell to earth' and 'Hustler', gave it a shot. Can't praise it highly enough. There were some typos though. Strange. But well worth reading :-O
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Christopher Nelson
Jun 25, 2012 rated it really liked it
Strong, clear prose. Would've given 5 stars, but I'm trying to give fewer of those. ...more
Elliott
May 22, 2012 rated it it was ok
A flaccid follow-up to the aggressive, sexually-charged punch of "The Hustler." ...more
Realini
Dec 29, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: delightful
The Color of Money based on novel by Walter Tevis, directed by Martin Scorsese, with Paul Newman, Tom Cruise, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio
Resilience, talent, money and values

Paul Newman has won the Academy Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role for his performance in this excellent motion picture
He was not only a mesmerizing actor, but a wonderful man, as we learn from a classic about the movie industry:

- Adventures in the Screen Trade by William Goldman, winner of two Oscars for his scripts: But
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Herb
Mar 26, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Within a year he'd be dead.

He taught writing at Ohio University for a while, drank and smoked and didn't write a word for fifteen years. He'd been a phenom, publishing The Hustler when he was 31 and working for the Kentucky Highway Department, The Man Who Fell to Earth four years after that, but got comfortable and lazy and forgot what he was for.

He tore himself away from academic life, put himself into a New York apartment, and wrote Mockingbird in 1980, The Queen's Gambit in 1983, and this bo
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Vel Veeter
Apr 09, 2020 rated it it was amazing
The last of the crop of Walter Tevis books I have direct access to in audiobook form. This is a sequel to the first novel The Hustler and the book that the sequel to that film is based on. I don’t recall a lot of the Martin Scorsese movie and maybe it’s good, but the changes that he made as filmmaker are so incredibly boring compared to how very very good this book is. It far surpasses the first book, really gets at the heart of mortality and aging, and tells a much more compelling story than ei ...more
Richard Block
Nov 10, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Green

Walter Tevis's sequel to the Hustler is not it's equal, but it is still very good. If you saw the movie, forget that - there is no Tom Cruise, just Paul Newman. Fast Eddie Felson is the hero of both books, and this fast paced tale focuses on what happens to Fast Eddie 20 years after Hustler.

Felson seems to have wasted his life, married, owned a pool hall, got divorced and now wants to get back into the game. He invites Minnesota Fats to a nostalgia tour, but that doesn't work. He then meet
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Tom Hill
Dec 03, 2020 rated it liked it
Not as good as The Hustler, and it has little in common with the film version of The Color of Money. But it's an interesting and mostly entertaining read depicting Fast Eddie's life in the 1980s. It doesn't have the same edge or focus on obsession as The Hustler, but it depicts Eddie as a better, if more aimless person. So I found that intriguing: the way Tevis shows us how Eddie has mellowed twenty years after the first novel. He treats the people (specifically the woman) in his life better, an ...more
Paul
May 02, 2019 rated it really liked it
If you've seen the movie, be ready for something totally different when you read this book! In my case seeing the movie was such a long time ago and perhaps on a very sleepy evening so I only realized the altered movie storyline until I was well underway. I'll have watch the movie again as well.

Playing pool is a great way to challenge yourself mentally and I'm very happy Walter Tevis wrote two great books about the game. Pool is a small sport so I consider myself lucky for this. Especially becau
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David Sterritt
“The Color of Money” is Walter Tevis’s sequel to his first novel, “The Hustler,” which appeared 25 years earlier, and for me the follow-up is less tight, less punchy, and less engrossing than its predecessor. Like the protagonist, the book has an oddly uncritical attitude toward filthy lucre, and the descriptions of pool games get draggy and repetitious after a while, a pitfall Tevis avoided in the first novel. Much of the sequel is mildly interesting and enjoyable, but “The Hustler” is still th ...more
Cathy
Dec 22, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I saw The Queen's Gambit advertised on Netflix and stumbled on a 99p Deal of the Day Kindle copy of The Colour of Money while looking for TheQ'sG.
I haven't seen the film and can't actually believe I've just read a book about shooting pool, a topic in which I have no interest whatsoever.
It really is a remarkable book dominated by strong writing of the central characters. The author's insights into relationships and effect of choices on the way lives develop makes for compulsive reading.
One of the
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Lloyd Culpepper
Nov 15, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Walter Travis st His Best

I read The Hustler and The Color of Money every year or so and never cease to enjoy the mind of a Genius.
I have added The Queens Gambit to the list this year and will enjoy it in rotation as well.
Tevis knows the human condition better than most.
Enjoy this world as often as you dare.
Chandra
Nov 26, 2020 rated it really liked it
Thanks to Enoch Pratt Free Library who said “If you liked The Queen’s Gambit on Netflix, read this book.” They were right! I really liked it. Never saw the movie but maybe now I will. I liked the writing style too.
Chris
Jan 02, 2021 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
This book was good, but not at all what I was expecting. The film adaptation, which I have always loved and is the reason I picked up the book, doesn't even really attempt to follow the book. Amazingly, they're both good on their own. ...more
Nottyboy
Oct 22, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Enjoyed The Hustler, and this one even more.

I felt as if the writer's craft matured along with Fast Eddie. I can feel this will be one novel I'll read multiple times.
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Parthib
Sep 07, 2019 rated it it was amazing
An worthy sequel to "The Hustler." ...more
Ranette
Oct 23, 2020 rated it liked it
A washed-up pool player finds new talent in a young man. As he teaches him, he regains strength and is able to continue his own career.
Jon
Nov 19, 2020 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Great novel about competition, obsession, and ageing. Would recommend.
Rianna
Dec 10, 2020 rated it really liked it
A little slow to get into but if def picked up 👌
Justin
Dec 28, 2020 added it
Interestingly (or maybe not)... has almost nothing in common with the movie.
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Walter Stone Tevis was an American novelist and short story writer. Three of his six novels were adapted into major films: The Hustler, The Color of Money and The Man Who Fell to Earth. The Queen's Gambit has also been adapted in 2020 into a 7-episode mini-series. His books have been translated into at least 18 languages. ...more

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“«La mezza età non esiste, Fast Eddie. È un’invenzione dei giornali e della tv, come l’alitosi. Serve per tenere la gente al suo posto».” 0 likes
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