Battleground 3: Waterloo

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Battleground 3: Waterloo
Battleground 3 - Waterloo Coverart.png
Cover art
Developer(s)TalonSoft
Publisher(s)TalonSoft
SeriesBattleground
Platform(s)Windows
Release
  • NA: May 23, 1996
[1]
Genre(s)Computer wargame
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer

Battleground 3: Waterloo is a 1996 computer wargame developed and published by TalonSoft. It is the third entry in the Battleground series.

Gameplay[edit]

The game features the Battle of Waterloo which was the final defeat for Napoleon Bonaparte and his French Empire.

Reception[edit]

Terry Coleman of Computer Gaming World reported in August 1996 that "BG: Waterloo had, according to Empire (the distributor for Talonsoft in the US), the highest 'buy-in' at retail chains of any historical wargame they've released this year."[6]

A Next Generation critic said Battleground 3: Waterloo "is as good as PC war games get, featuring everything players could want in a turn-based bloodbath: historical accuracy, pleasing graphics, an easy-to-use interface, and strategic subtleties." He remarked that while the game only covers one battle, it has considerable breadth due to its many options, including the ability to play either a historically accurate campaign or a number of "what if" scenarios. He scored it four out of five stars.[3]

The four Battleground games of 1996—Bulge-Ardennes, Shiloh, Antietam and Waterloo—collectively won Computer Games Strategy Plus's wargame of the year award for that year.[7] Waterloo was a finalist for Computer Gaming World's 1996 "Wargame of the Year" award,[8] which ultimately went to Battleground 4: Shiloh.[9] Waterloo was a runner-up for Computer Game Entertainment's 1996 "Best War Game" prize, which ultimately went to Tigers on the Prowl 2. The magazine's editors called both games "top-notch".[10]

In 1996, Computer Gaming World named Waterloo the 115th best game ever. The editors wrote, "The grand age of warfare comes to life with colorful uniforms, delightful landscapes, and above-average opponent AI in this recent release."[11] The magazine's wargame columnist Terry Coleman named it his pick for the 10th-best computer wargame released by late 1996.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 1998-02-07. Retrieved 2019-06-04.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ Trotter, William R. (August 1996). "Battleground: Waterloo". PC Gamer US. Archived from the original on March 11, 2000. Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Battleground Waterloo". Next Generation. No. 22. Imagine Media. October 1996. p. 176.
  4. ^ Udell, Scott (June 13, 1996). "Battleground: Waterloo". Computer Games Strategy Plus. Archived from the original on April 28, 2005. Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  5. ^ Miller, Andrew. "Battleground 3: Waterloo". PC Games. Archived from the original on May 25, 1997. Retrieved June 4, 2019.
  6. ^ Coleman, Terry (August 1996). "No Joystick Required". Computer Gaming World (145): 179, 180.
  7. ^ Staff (March 25, 1997). "Computer Games Strategy Plus announces 1996 Awards". Computer Games Strategy Plus. Archived from the original on June 14, 1997. Retrieved November 2, 2010.
  8. ^ Staff (April 1997). "Best of the Bunch; Finalists Named for CGW Premier Awards". Computer Gaming World (153): 28, 32.
  9. ^ Staff (May 1997). "The Computer Gaming World 1997 Premier Awards". Computer Gaming World (154): 68–70, 72, 74, 76, 78, 80.
  10. ^ Staff (July 1997). "The Computer Game Entertainment Awards 1996". Computer Game Entertainment (1): 54–58.
  11. ^ Staff (November 1996). "150 Best (and 50 Worst) Games of All Time". Computer Gaming World (148): 63–65, 68, 72, 74, 76, 78, 80, 84, 88, 90, 94, 98.
  12. ^ Coleman, Terry (November 1996). "Command Decisions". Computer Gaming World (148): 277, 280.

External links[edit]