October 4, 2019 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD— E1243 EXTENSIONS OF REMARKS
EXTENSIONS OF REMARKS
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October 4, 2019 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks E1243
HONORING THE LIFE OF ILLINOIS
STATE POLICE TROOPER GER-
ALD ELLIS
HON. DARIN LaHOOD
OF ILLINOIS
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. LAHOOD. Madam Speaker, I would like
to honor Illinois State Police Trooper Gerald
‘‘Jerry’’ Ellis, who passed away Saturday,
March 30, 2019, while on duty.
Gerald Ellis was born and raised in
Colchester, Illinois, and in 2002, graduated
from Colchester Highschool. It was clear early
on that Ellis was destined for a career in pub-
lic service. As a child, he was a member of
the Macomb Police Department Explorers
post. Ellis also bravely served in Iraq as a sol-
dier in the United States Army. Ellis continued
his schooling at Western Illinois University.
While pursuing his education, he was selected
to participate in the Illinois State Police intern-
ship program. This led to Ellis eventually de-
ciding to become a full-time member of the
force.
Trooper Ellis had always been committed to
his work and his community. He had a tend-
ency to put others before himself. In school,
Ellis was known as a hard worker, great stu-
dent, and to be the one to reach across social
lines and bring different groups of people to-
gether. Ellis was injured by a distracted motor-
ist earlier in his career while attempting to pre-
vent a man from jumping from an overpass.
In honor of the sacrifice that Trooper Ellis
made, it is my privilege to commemorate his
life and service today. My thoughts and pray-
ers go out to his wife, Stacy, and their two
daughters, who have lost a loving husband
and father. We are all blessed to have those
like State Trooper Gerald Ellis serving and
protecting us.
f
HONORING PAULETTE LYNCH
HON. JIMMY PANETTA
OF CALIFORNIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. PANETTA. Madam Speaker, I rise today
to recognize Paulette Lynch for her 30 years
of leadership to Monterey County’s creative
sector and to congratulate her on her retire-
ment after 15 years as executive director of
the Arts Council for Monterey County. The
20th District of California appreciates Paulette
Lynch’s dedication to the community and the
great progress she has made over the past
three decades.
Paulette Lynch spearheaded First Night
Monterey in 1992 and successfully led the or-
ganization for ten years before becoming Ex-
ecutive Director of the Arts Council for Mon-
terey County in 2004. She also reshaped the
Arts Council’s mission, creating a greater eq-
uity in funding for the arts throughout the
county, developing award-winning programs,
and providing unifying leadership in the cre-
ative sector on the central coast of California.
Further, Paulette restored county funding, di-
versified the Arts Council revenues, and cre-
ated the annual Champion of the Arts Gala,
an event which honors seven arts nonprofit or-
ganizations and individuals who have made
profound and lasting contributions throughout
Monterey County.
Paulette Lynch has been guided by the
phrase ‘‘the Arts are the Answer,’’ and dem-
onstrated the transformational benefits of arts
in the classroom, community, the juvenile jus-
tice systems, and health systems. 35 school
districts and 20,000 students, as well as nu-
merous communities, benefited from her dedi-
cation. Paulette was previously recognized for
her work to improve the quality of life within
California’s 20th District. She has won several
awards and honors throughout her tenure, in-
cluding the 2008 Monterey County Weekly
Editor’s Pick for Community Leadership Best
pf Monterey County, the 2009 City of Seaside
25th Anniversary Award for Lifetime Support
of Youth in the Arts, the 2013 Monterey Coun-
ty Commission on the Status of Women Out-
standing Woman of Monterey County, the
2013 Monterey County Weekly Top 25 Game-
Changing Leaders of Monterey County, and
the 2015 National Association of Counties
Award for Innovation program Art as Healing
Intervention for incarcerated youth at the Mon-
terey County Probation Department Youth
Center.
Madam Speaker, I ask that my colleagues
join me in congratulating and thanking Pau-
lette Lynch for her 30 years of service and
leadership to Monterey County. Her tireless
commitment to improving the lives of everyone
in California’s 20th District through the arts will
not be forgotten, and her legacy in the com-
munity will certainly be long lasting. On behalf
of Central Coast residents, I thank Ms. Lynch
for her contribution to our community and
wishing her a long and healthy retirement.
f
CELEBRATING THE CENTENNIAL
ANNIVERSARY OF THE COMMU-
NITY FOUNDATION OF GREATER
BUFFALO
HON. BRIAN HIGGINS
OF NEW YORK
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. HIGGINS of New York. Madam Speak-
er, I rise today to acknowledge with gratitude
and admiration the Centennial Anniversary of
the Community Foundation of Greater Buffalo,
which since its establishment in 1919 has en-
hanced and encouraged long-term philan-
thropy in Western New York. Throughout the
decades, visionary leadership, dedicated staff
and giving donors have built on this Founda-
tion’s century of commitment to connecting
people, ideas and resources to improve lives
throughout our region. For 100 years, the
Community Foundation’s proven record of ac-
countability, sustainability and transparency
has made the most of the generosity of indi-
viduals, families, foundations and organiza-
tions who entrust charitable assets to the
Foundation’s care. Currently, the stated goals
of the Community Foundation of Greater Buf-
falo are to improve educational achievement
and workforce readiness for low-income resi-
dents, increase racial equity, protect and re-
store significant environmental resources and
promote equitable access, and strengthen the
region as a center for architecture, arts and
culture.
This stalwart organization for local philan-
thropy proposes, plans, implements and sup-
ports many impactful collaborative initiatives.
These include Say Yes Buffalo, working to re-
move barriers preventing Buffalo students
from achieving academic success and Read to
Succeed, helping children reach their highest
potential and awards over two million dollars
in annual scholarships to students in the area.
Insistent on results-oriented outcomes that im-
proves the health outcomes for families and
neighborhoods remains a primary focus of this
Foundation’s award winning Green and
Healthy Homes Initiative and the Wipe Out
Lead program.
Racial equity is one of the primary commu-
nity goals of the Community Foundation be-
lieving that we must ensure all members of
our region can fulfill their highest potential.
Through active support of the Greater Buffalo
Racial Equity Roundtable which includes more
than 210 partners working together in different
capacities to advance racial and ethnic equity
and accelerate shared regional prosperity.
Preserving and protecting the heritage of the
Michigan Street Baptist Church, Buffalo’s old-
est African American church remains the life
work of the Buffalo Freedom Station Coalition.
Capacity building provided by the Community
Foundation has helped enhance the efforts of
this all-volunteer group dedicated to com-
memorating and deepening the understanding
of the historical role Buffalo residents played
in the civil rights and abolitionist movements.
Twenty percent of the world’s freshwater
runs through our region and the Community
Foundation of Greater Buffalo is playing a crit-
ical role in preserving and restoring Western
New York’s environmental resources. Con-
vened by the Community Foundation, the
Western New York Environmental Alliance, is
now an independent, member-run coalition of
more than 80 organizations working to protect
and steward our natural assets. Our proximity
to two Great Lakes and a series of rivers,
creeks and streams is highly valued by the
Community Foundation as they team with
other similar foundations to form the Great
Lakes One Water Partnership to advance a
new era of water management to benefit peo-
ple and businesses in the Great Lakes Basin.
Cleaner water, remediated land and greener
public parks help to foster stronger communal
bonds and as such, it is imperative that it is
truly accessible to all in our community, region
and beyond our borders.
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E1244 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks October 4, 2019
The Community Foundation of Greater Buf-
falo proudly extols and celebrates the rich his-
tory of architecture, arts and culture that
makes Western New York home to the work
and legacy of such legends as Louise Be-
thune, Joseph Dart, Frank Lloyd Wright, H.H.
Richardson, Frederick Law Olmsted and Louis
Sullivan. Recognizing the value of preserva-
tion, performance and visitor experiences de-
livered with authenticity and creative energy,
the Community Foundation continues to invest
in organizations that strengthen these sectors.
Their understanding of the significant eco-
nomic impact of such inspirational and unique
treasures has led to more than doubling their
investment in just the last five years. Arts and
culture are alive, thriving and attracting inter-
national recognition and adding to our quality
of life thanks to such sustained support.
It is in making that connection between the
past and present that the Community Founda-
tion of Greater Buffalo has chosen the
Kleinhans Music Hall as the venue for ‘‘The
Centennials’’ celebration on Tuesday, Sep-
tember 24. Edward and Mary Seaton
Kleinhans left a gift in 1934 directing the
Foundation to build ‘‘a suitable music hall for
the people of Buffalo.’’ The Foundation en-
sured their vision was realized and now, 80
years later, their gift continues to provide a
home for the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra,
world-class performances and personal mile-
stones. Looking to the future, this celebration
will award one million dollars in honor of 12
local change makers who have made a dif-
ference in the lives of Western New Yorkers
through a community-wide nomination proc-
ess. As stated by the Foundation’s current
President and CEO Clotilde Perez-Bode
Dedecker, ‘‘The Centennials will celebrate ev-
erything we stand for as an organiztion—fo-
cused forward.’’
Again, I wish to acknowledge, congratulate
and praise the Community Foundation of
Greater Buffalo on their Hundred Years of ex-
traordinary generosity, impressive accomplish-
ments and collaborative engagement that has
improved lives and continues to drive positive
change throughout Western New York. Their
celebration is well-deserved, and we stand
ready to work with them as the next century
of opportunity and growth begins for The
Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo.
f
HONORING SPECIALIST FOURTH
CLASS JOHN WESLEY DAHR
HON. SCOTT PERRY
OF PENNSYLVANIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. PERRY. Madam Speaker, I rise today
on behalf of the Tenth District of Pennsylvania
and a grateful Nation to honor the memory
and exceptional service and sacrifice of Spe-
cialist Fourth Class John Wesley Dahr of
Dillsburg, Pennsylvania. Specialist Dahr
earned the Distinguished Service Cross for his
unhesitating and selfless bravery in combat
during the Vietnam War, and made the ulti-
mate sacrifice for the cause of his fellow Sol-
diers, and for our Nation.
On 8 January 1967, Specialist Dahr was
participating in search and destroy missions
near Cu Chi with elements of the 25th Infantry
Division, when his company was pinned down
by Viet Cong and received heavy incoming
fire. Specialist Dahr willingly subjected himself
to enemy fire and waded through waist-deep
water to aid a wounded comrade. After car-
rying the wounded Soldier 100 meters to safe-
ty, he repeated his heroic actions, rescuing
two more Soldiers before returning to the cen-
ter of the battlefield to combat the enemy.
As he fired upon the Viet Cong, he saw yet
another wounded Soldier and ran to his aid.
Despite extreme risk to his own life, he stood
up in the open to hold the injured warrior
above water while he sought help to get them
both to safety. Specialist Dahr was mortally
wounded during his attempt to rescue a fourth
Soldier.
Specialist Dahr’s actions set the standard by
which all others should be judged. Our Coun-
try owes him a debt of eternal gratitude for his
extraordinary actions in the line of duty and in
the face of terror. Specialist Dahr’s tireless,
selfless and heroic actions are a credit to him-
self, his Family, the United States Army and
the United States of America.
f
PERSONAL EXPLANATION
HON. JAMES E. CLYBURN
OF SOUTH CAROLINA HON. WILLIAM R. KEATING
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. CLYBURN. Madam Speaker, I was un-
able to cast my votes on the following dates,
September 24, 25, and 27, due to a family
emergency. Had I been present, I would have
voted: ‘‘yea’’ Roll Call No. 541; ‘‘yea’’ Roll Call
No. 542; ‘‘yea’’ Roll Call No. 543; ‘‘yea’’ Roll
Call No. 544; ‘‘nay’’ Roll Call No. 545; ‘‘yea’’
Roll Call No. 546; ‘‘yea’’ Roll Call No. 547;
‘‘yea’’ Roll Call No. 548; ‘‘yea’’ Roll Call No.
553; ‘‘yea’’ Roll Call No. 554; and ‘‘yea’’ Roll
Call No. 555.
f
HONORING THE 25TH ANNIVER-
SARY OF THE ORANGE COUNTY
CONSERVATION CORPS
HON. J. LUIS CORREA
OF CALIFORNIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. CORREA. Madam Speaker, I rise today
to honor the achievements of the Orange
County Conservation Corps (OCCC), now
celebrating their 25th anniversary. Founded in
1993, the OCCC provides at-risk and dis-
advantaged youth a chance to learn valuable
skills while giving back to their community.
The OCCC is considered a ‘‘Second Chance
at Success,’’ ultimately ensuring a positive life
for our youth.
The OCCC provides youth with a pathway
to earning a high-school diploma, via an on-
site charter school. By embracing a culture of
teamwork and cooperation, the OCCC instills
a strong work ethic in our youth, providing ex-
perience and job skills that will make them val-
uable members of our workforce.
Since 1993, OCCC has served more than
8,000 young adults, recycled 9,000 tons of re-
cyclable materials, and planted over 120,000
trees. Preserving our environment empowers
our youth, allowing them to help others and
positively affect our community. These stu-
dents can develop their educational, profes-
sional, and personal skills.
OCCC has provided corpsmembers with
more than $1.5 million in financial assistance.
Over 3,000 high school diplomas and job
training certificates have been provided to
corpsmembers to seek higher education.
OCCC’s Corps-to-Career Specialist assists
students in transitioning from the corps to their
future goals by introducing them to local col-
leges, trade schools, and ROP programs.
Corpsmembers learn resume writing, inter-
viewing skills, and a professional demeanor
that will prepare them for a bright future.
Today, we celebrate not only 25 years of
success for OCCC, but we honor its future. A
future that continues to uphold the values of
hard-work, teamwork, and service. It is for
these reasons that I ask my colleagues to join
me in honoring and recognizing the Orange
County Conservation Corps for their commit-
ment to our youth and our communities.
f
IN RECOGNITION OF THE RETIRE-
MENT OF FIREFIGHTER STE-
PHEN ALMEIDA
OF MASSACHUSETTS
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. KEATING. Madam Speaker, I rise today
in recognition of the retirement of Mr. Stephen
Almeida, a 41-year veteran of the Fairhaven
Fire Department.
Stephen began his career in 1978 as a call-
firefighter and was later appointed as a full-
time firefighter for the town of Fairhaven,
where he would serve for the next 32 years as
a full-time firefighter. Once a full-time fire-
fighter, Stephen rose quickly in his career. He
was elected to the Fire Union’s Executive
Board, and in a few short years would assume
the role of Union President of the Fairhaven
Firefighters Association, a position he would
hold for the next twenty years.
During Stephen’s tenure, the town trans-
ferred the ambulance service from within the
Police Department over to the Fire Depart-
ment. As Union President, Stephen worked
closely with the town and Fire Chief to ensure
this undertaking went smoothly. Embracing a
proactive approach to fire safety, Stephen was
also heavily involved in Fairhaven’s fire pre-
vention program. Going above and beyond his
duties to permit and inspect, Stephen also vol-
unteered as the town’s Santa Claus, arriving
not in a red sleigh but rather a red fire truck.
Stephen attributes much of his passion and
success to his mentor, Lt. Earl Faunce, who
instilled in Stephen the values and traditions of
the Fire Department.
Stephen has been married to his wife
Cheryl for 37 years. They have 3 children and
4 grandchildren, and I wish them many years
of happiness and more time spent with their
family.
Madam Speaker, I am proud to honor Ste-
phen Almeida and his commitment to ensuring
the safety of his community. I ask that my col-
leagues join me in recognizing his hard work
and dedication as he celebrates his retire-
ment.
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October 4, 2019 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks E1245
HONORING BLACK FINE ART
MONTH
HON. ROBIN L. KELLY
OF ILLINOIS
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Ms. KELLY of Illinois. Madam Speaker, I
rise to include in the R
ECORD the following
Proclamation:
Whereas, Black artists inspire the citizens of
Chicago with the power of their imaginations
and create works that heal, uplift, and trans-
form our community; and
Whereas, Black artists create works in all
art forms that reflect a wide range of experi-
ences and perspectives; and
Whereas, the appreciation of the full diver-
sity and complexity of Black lives is crucial for
the common good of our local, national, and
international communities; and
Whereas, Black artists play a leading role in
shaping public attitudes about diversity and
provide valuable role models for future gen-
erations; and
Whereas, Black artists create work that
touches our deepest emotions and builds
bridges among people of all ages, abilities,
races, religions, and sexual preferences; and
Whereas, Pigment International,
TM the
Black art collective, in collaboration with The
DuSable Museum of African American History,
a Smithsonian Affiliate, and in partnership with
the bold gallerists, esteemed art purveyors,
talented curators, and prominent arts organi-
zations across Chicago, across the country
and globally, has organized a new inter-
national holiday called Black Fine Art Month,
which is celebrated annually during October.
Whereas, the citizens of Chicago are joining
with artists and art supporters around the
world to celebrate the Black fine art aesthetic
and its global impact during this inaugural
Black Fine Art Month proclaimed this October
3, 2019; now, therefore be it
Resolved that I, ROBIN L. KELLY, serving as
a Member of the House of Representatives,
do hereby proclaim October as ‘‘Black Fine Art
Month,’’ in the Second Congressional District
of Illinois.
f
IN RECOGNITION OF DR. EVA
FELDMAN
HON. DEBBIE DINGELL
OF MICHIGAN
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mrs. DINGELL. Madam Speaker, I rise
today to recognize Dr. Eva Feldman for re-
ceiving the 2019 Distinguished Achievement
Award from the Michigan Medicine Alumni So-
ciety. Her esteemed work in neurology is wor-
thy of commendation and makes her an excel-
lent recipient of this great honor.
Dr. Eva Feldman received her Ph.D. and
M.D. in neuroscience at the University of
Michigan Medical School in 1979 and 1983,
respectively. After performing her residency in
neurology at The Johns Hopkins Hospital—be-
coming the first neurologist to receive The
Johns Hopkins Award for Medical Teaching
and Excellence—she returned home to the
University of Michigan to complete a Neuro-
muscular fellowship in 1988. She has been
part of the University of Michigan faculty ever
since and continues to devote her career to
understanding neurological disorders and de-
veloping new and innovative treatments.
Under her supervision, nine scientists have re-
ceived their Ph.D. degrees, and over 100
postdoctoral fellows and neurologists have
been trained to treat neurological diseases.
Today, Dr. Feldman serves as the Director
of the University of Michigan ALS Center of
Excellence and runs the Program for Neu-
rology Research & Discovery, her own 30–sci-
entist laboratory. In addition, she is the prin-
ciple investigator of the first two FDA-ap-
proved human trials of intraspinal stem cell im-
plantation therapy for ALS. Furthermore, Dr.
Feldman formerly directed the A. Alfred
Taubman Medical Research Institute until
2017.
Dr. Feldman is renowned for her neuro-
logical expertise. Throughout her tenure, Dr.
Feldman has published over 420 original peer-
reviewed articles, four books, and 70 book
chapters, and has received continuous funding
from the National Institutes of Health for more
than 30 years. She is the Past President of
the Peripheral Nerve Society and served as
President of the American Neurological Asso-
ciation from 2011 to 2013. In addition to being
an elected member of the Association of
American Physicians and National Academy of
Medicine, Dr. Feldman has earned a vast list
of awards and recognitions including the 2016
Castle Connolly National Clinician of the Year
Award and the 2017 Endocrine Society Gerald
D. Aurbach Award for Outstanding
Translational Research, to name only a few.
Most recently, Dr. Feldman was honored with
the 2019 PNS Alan J. Gebhart Prize for Excel-
lence in Peripheral Nerve Research.
Madam Speaker, I ask my colleagues to join
me today in honoring Dr. Eva Feldman for her
extraordinary work in neurology. We are grate-
ful for her lifetime of impactful work and wish
her many years of continued success. The
2019 Distinguished Achievement Award is well
deserved.
f
IN RECOGNITION OF THE FOR-
TIETH ANNIVERSARY OF HAR-
VESTERS
HON. EMANUEL CLEAVER
OF MISSOURI
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. CLEAVER. Madam Speaker, I proudly
rise today to celebrate the Fortieth Anniver-
sary of Harvesters and recognize its countless
contributions to Missouri’s Fifth Congressional
District, the Kansas City region, and beyond.
As part of a national network of hunger relief
organizations, Harvesters is a cornerstone of
many communities in the 5th District, and I am
truly honored to have such an impactful, admi-
rable organization based in the district I rep-
resent.
Harvesters began in Kansas City in 1979
when faith organizations, social service agen-
cies, and businesses partnered to tackle the
increasing issue of hunger in the greater Kan-
sas City area. Harvesters is a food bank that
acts as a liaison between more than 760
agencies in Missouri and Kansas to coordinate
with emergency food pantries, homeless shel-
ters, children’s homes, schools, and others to
end food insecurity. During its first year of op-
eration, Harvesters administered 155,000
pounds of food within five counties. The non-
profit has only increased in size and reach in
the years since.
In 2018, Harvesters distributed 52,572,724
pounds of food throughout twenty-six counties
in Missouri and Kansas. As operations ex-
panded and flourished, the United States De-
partment of Agriculture extended a partnership
to Harvesters, offering the organization the op-
portunity to distribute federal commodities to
qualifying agencies. In 2011, Harvesters was
nationally recognized as the Food Bank of the
Year by Feeding America, the largest domes-
tic hunger relief organization in the United
States.
Harvesters operates community-wide pro-
grams for children, families, and seniors out of
its Topeka and Kansas City facilities. The
BackSnack program works with schools to
provide over 8,000 nutritious snacks and
meals each week to children in the greater
Kansas City area. The nonprofit has imple-
mented mobile food pantries throughout Mis-
souri’s Fifth Congressional District for families
that may not otherwise have access to a gro-
cery store. Harvesters also works with the fed-
eral government on the Commodity Supple-
mental Food Program, which delivers boxes of
nutritious food to seniors each month. Har-
vesters is inclusive of all, tailoring each of its
programs to the diverse community it serves.
Harvesters set itself apart as an advocate
and champion of human dignity in our commu-
nities. Throughout its twenty-six county service
area, one in eight people are food insecure.
The organization recognizes that many individ-
uals and families need food assistance at
times, and they strive to provide support with
benevolence and compassion. Harvesters staff
and volunteers are truly an inspiration to us
all.
Madam Speaker, please join with me in
celebrating Harvesters’ Fortieth Anniversary.
Through magnanimous leadership and dedi-
cated service, Harvesters has touched the
lives of thousands of residents in Missouri’s
Fifth Congressional District and beyond. We
stand today to celebrate Harvesters’ indelible
mark on our country and thank them for their
enduring work to end hunger in our commu-
nities.
f
RECOGNITION OF THE 150TH ANNI-
VERSARY OF THE WEST
HARPETH PRIMITIVE BAPTIST
CHURCH
HON. MARK E. GREEN
OF TENNESSEE
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. GREEN of Tennessee. Madam Speak-
er, I rise today to recognize the 150th Anniver-
sary of the West Harpeth Primitive Baptist
Church.
The West Harpeth Primitive Baptist Church
was founded circa 1869 under the leadership
of Elder Peter Starnes. The first congregants
were former slaves upon whose strong Chris-
tian faith the church was founded.
The land was purchased in 1881 and the
initial facility was constructed on the property.
The land, located near Old West Harpeth
Road, is the same site on which their building
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E1246 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks October 4, 2019
stands today. The facility was rebuilt in 1948
and around that time, a separate building was
constructed, consisting of a dining room and
two restrooms accessed from the outside.
The church was remodeled in 1968 under
the pastorate of Elder Walter E. Rodgers.
Later in 1986, under the pastorate of Elder
Hewitt C. Sawyers, the building was expanded
to include a baptistry and indoor restrooms. In
1998, a major renovation was done which in-
cluded the construction of a new sanctuary,
offices, and classrooms. Throughout the
church’s 150 years, there have been only six
pastors.
The church is hosting the 150th Church An-
niversary Celebration on October 27, 2019 at
3 p.m., where they will dedicate a historical
marker.
Madam Speaker, I would like to congratu-
late West Harpeth Primitive Baptist Church
and their congregants on the historic occasion
of their 150th Anniversary, and I know there
will be many more years in kingdom building
for Christ and service to their community.
f
RECOGNIZING THE EZIBU MUNTU
AFRICAN DANCE COMPANY AND
THE ‘‘REMEMBER THEM’’ AFRI-
CAN HOLOCAUST COMMEMORA-
TION
HON. A. DONALD McEACHIN
OF VIRGINIA that the outstanding character and strong
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. MCEACHIN. Madam Speaker, I rise to
recognize the Ezibu Muntu African Dance
Company and all of the attendees of the ‘‘Re-
member Them’’ convocation on October 1,
2019, which commemorated the 400-year an-
niversary of the African Holocaust. The Ezibu
Muntu African Dance Company has helped in-
crease awareness about the transatlantic
slave trade, and I am grateful for their efforts
in organizing this important commemoration.
The 400-year African Holocaust commemo-
ration is an opportunity to mourn and reflect
on the enduring impacts of the transatlantic
slave trade, and to celebrate all that our com-
munity has overcome and achieved since
1619. We must always remember those who
were affected by this horrific and painful chap-
ter of history, and learn from our shared past.
As we reflect, let us honor the resilience of our
community, and reinvigorate our commitment
to justice. Together, I know we can create an
equitable and fair future for all generations.
Madam Speaker, please join me in express-
ing my gratitude to the Ezibu Muntu African
Dance Company and all of the attendees of
the ‘‘Remember Them’’ convocation for their
work to better our community. As we look to-
ward our next chapter, let us never forget
where we have come from, nor the experi-
ences of those who came before us. I wish
them the best for a successful and healing
event.
RECOGNIZING DYSAUTONOMIA
AWARENESS MONTH
HON. BRIAN HIGGINS
OF NEW YORK
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. HIGGINS of New York. Madam Speak-
er, I rise today to recognize the millions that
fight each day against Dysautonomia, a group
of debilitating medical conditions that result in
a malfunction of the autonomic nervous sys-
tem. This system is responsible for ‘‘auto-
matic’’ bodily functions such as respiration,
heart rate, blood pressure, digestion, tempera-
ture control and more; the things that many of
us have the luxury of taking for granted.
Dysautonomia impacts more than 70 million
people around the world including Diabetic Au-
tonomic Neuropathy, Vasovagal Syncope,
Pure Autonomic Failure, and Postural Ortho-
static Tachycardia Syndrome. This devastating
diagnosis significantly impacts the lives of
people of any age, gender, race or back-
ground across the United States and Western
New York.
As is, dysautonomia can be extremely inca-
pacitating, but an often-unseen symptom of
this disability is the social isolation that accom-
panies it. The financial stress on the families
of those impacted by this disease warrant our
acknowledgement and recognition. Increased
awareness about dysautonomia will help pa-
tients get treated sooner, save lives and foster
support for individuals and families coping with
this diagnosis. I am proud to once again affirm
moral fiber of those in the Western New York
Community continue to provide the much-
needed support for the victims suffering from
dysautonomia. Looking ahead, it will be crucial
for the community to remain steadfast as they
rally around these victims in their ongoing
hard fought battle against this disease.
Dysautonomia awareness is a critical com-
ponent in the early detection of the disease
because most patients take years to be prop-
erly diagnosed. Dysautonomia International, a
non-profit organization that advocates on be-
half of patients living with dysautonomia, en-
courages communities to deepen their under-
standing of this challenging condition; espe-
cially during Dysautonomia Awareness Month
each October. The tireless efforts of the
Dysautonomia community for research and ac-
cessible services will be recognized on Satur-
day, October 5 in my Congressional District;
the color turquoise will bathe Niagara Falls
and Buffalo City Hall in solidarity of care and
concern.
Dysautonomia International continues to
raise awareness and funds for this debilitating
disease in hopes that one day successful
treatments and a cure will be found. Their ef-
forts should be recognized across our nation
throughout and beyond the month of October.
Madam Speaker, I recognize Dysautonomia
International and Dysautonomia Awareness
Month. I ask that my colleagues join me in
recognizing the contributions of the profes-
sional medical community, patients and family
members who are working to educate our citi-
zenry about dysautonomia throughout Western
New York. They are deserving of greater un-
derstanding, recognition and respect.
HONORING THE CITY OF FORT
BRAGG
HON. JARED HUFFMAN
OF CALIFORNIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. HUFFMAN. Madam Speaker, I rise
today to recognize the City of Fort Bragg, Cali-
fornia on the 130th anniversary of its incorpo-
ration. One of only four cities in Mendocino
County, it is the largest coastal city on Califor-
nia’s North Coast between San Francisco and
Eureka.
Prior to its incorporation as a city on August
5, 1889, the area now known as Fort Bragg
was inhabited by Native Americans of the
Pomo tribes for more than 10,000 years. It
was first encountered by a Bureau of Indian
Affairs exploration party in 1855, which led to
the establishment of the Mendocino Indian
Reservation and Fort Bragg military post in
1857. The military post and reservation were
abandoned by 1865, after the majority of the
indigenous population was forced to relocate
to the Round Valley Reservation in inland
Mendocino County.
Fort Bragg’s first Mayor, C.R. Johnson, was
president of the Fort Bragg Redwood Com-
pany. Much of the City’s infrastructure was
laid out and developed by the timber industry,
particularly the Union Lumber Company which
formed through the consolidation of smaller
companies and established Fort Bragg as a
company town. Additionally, Noyo Harbor was
a thriving commercial fishing port as well as
the only source of outside goods until the Cali-
fornia Western Railroad was developed in
1905, creating reliable rail transportation be-
tween Fort Bragg and San Francisco.
Today, Fort Bragg has transitioned from tim-
ber extraction and commercial fishing to an
economy oriented toward tourism and serv-
ices. With a population of approximately
8,000, it is the largest city on the North Coast
and serves as a retail and service hub for
more than 20,000 residents as well as hun-
dreds of thousands of visitors who come each
year to experience the scenic coastline and
temperate climate. Fort Bragg is governed by
a City Council comprised of 5 members and
has a thriving and diverse population that is
dedicated to making the City a warm, inviting,
and family-friendly place to live and work.
Madam Speaker, the City of Fort Bragg con-
tinues to be a special place with a thriving
local economy and inviting atmosphere. De-
spite the challenges inherent in transitioning
into a tourism-focused economy, the City has
succeeded in carrying on the values and tradi-
tions that epitomize this unique coastal com-
munity. Please join me in congratulating the
City of Fort Bragg on the occasion of its 130th
anniversary, and in wishing it and its residents
many more years of vibrance and prosperity.
f
HONORING THE TOWN OF LEWIS
ON THE DEDICATION OF THEIR
NEW VETERANS PARK
HON. ELISE M. STEFANIK
OF NEW YORK
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Friday, October 4, 2019
Ms. STEFANIK. Madam Speaker, I rise
today to honor the Town of Lewis, the Vet-
erans Park Committee, American Legion Post
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October 4, 2019 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks E1247
1319 and the many volunteers who coordi-
nated to make this new veteran’s park a re-
ality.
The park was proposed in 2014 and since
then, many groups have come together to
help accomplish this project. The American
Legion Post 1319 helped compile the list of
veterans from Lewis that participated in each
war that the United States has been involved
in since the Revolution. Those names were
then etched into brass plaques that will be the
focal point of the park. The entire community
came together to assist with the construction,
fundraising and planning, with local busi-
nesses also contributing to the effort.
This is a perfect example of the community
spirit that makes the North Country so special.
On behalf of New York’s 21st Congressional
District, I want to thank all those who contrib-
uted to this amazing effort to honor our vet-
erans. I look forward to this park being a place
where future generations can come and reflect
on the service and sacrifice that has kept our
nation safe.
f
GREAT PLAINS HONOR FLIGHT 2019
HON. KEN BUCK
OF COLORADO
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. BUCK. Madam Speaker, in honor of
America’s heroic veterans, the Honor Flight
Network conducts annual trips to Washington,
D.C. This is the first ever High Plains Honor
Flight, following the conclusion of the Northern
Colorado Honor Flight which had taken more
than 3,000 of our nation’s heroes to visit and
reflect at their war memorials over the past
decade. On September 15, 2019, High Plains
Honor Flight Northern held an Honor Flight
that gave many of our courageous veterans
this extraordinary opportunity. I am pleased to
recognize the September I5, 2019 Honor
Flight honoring World War II, Korean War, and
Vietnam War veterans of Colorado.
Madam Speaker, those who participated in
this flight are as follows:
World War II: Charles Assmus, Clarence
Carlson, John Dutton, Gordon Norton, Willis
Sibley.
Korean War: Michael Abramovich, George
Edinger, James Forrest, Alan Gates, Charles
Hall, Jason Laguna, Richard Lindemann, Rich-
ard McCown, James McWilliams, Gerald
Mitchell, Erlis Morse, John Oliver, Bernard
Pisciola, Donald Price, Earle Ridgeway, Rich-
ard Stoltzfus, Wayne Tobey, Johnny West,
Benjamin Zimmerman.
Korean War & Vietnam War: Robert
Davison, Gerald McDuffee, Jed Pancoast.
Vietnam War: Ronald Adams, Ronald
Albers, Leon Bartholomay, Richard Belt, Hal
Bennett, Kenneth Blum, Clyde Bullard, Jr.,
Kenneth Butcher, Jan Carlson, Allan Cazer,
Terry Chandler, Spencer Chapin, Daniel
Crego, James Crowell, James Davies, Robert
Delva, William Dowling, Gerald Ecker, Carl
England, Thomas Evans, Ricky Farrier,
Markton Gadbury, Roy George, Don Gooding,
Jack Hall, Calvin Hamilton, Robert Jacobson,
Charles Jett, Larry Johnson, Daniel Katze,
James Keeler, Gene Keys, Daniel King, Ray-
mond Kirchner, Jr., Damian Kisner, Richard
Knight, Terrence Kullbom, Dale Langholf, Noel
LaRose II, Harvey Lawson, Richard Lawson,
Robert Loner, Jerald Lucas, Antonio Luna,
Thomas Mason, Tony Mathias, Bobby Mat-
thews, Charles McConnell, Timothy McGinnis,
Allen Meyer, Blythe Miley, Richard Miller,
Thomas Mitchell, Robert Montgomery, James
Morgan, Richard Morris, Paul Niebel, Larry
Odegard, Carol Jean Padilla, Theron Parlin,
David Patterson, Mark Patterson, Robert Pen-
nington, Randall Peonio, Arturo Perez, Floyd
Peterson, Christopher Petroff, Linda Pickett,
Gary Pitt, Donald Posselt, Richard
Ranabargar, John Rasmussen, Robert Righi,
Gary Schuler, Curtis Shaffer, John Shaffner,
Lee Sherbenou, Donald Simmons, Jerry Skel-
ton, Richard Smith, Richard Smith Jr., Jimmy
Spence, Donald Spotanski, Roger Stocker,
Thomas Tedesco, Virgil Treadway, Ted Tur-
ner, Thomas Wartella, Arthur Weidner, Mark
Williamson, Garry Wilson, William Woolman,
Darell Zimbelman.
It is my distinct pleasure as the U.S. Rep-
resentative of the 4th District of Colorado to
recognize the honor, courage, and sacrifice of
these heroes, along with all members of
America’s Armed Forces. I thank them for
their dedication and service to this nation.
f
PAM FEELY
HON. ED PERLMUTTER
OF COLORADO
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. PERLMUTTER. Madam Speaker, I rise
today to recognize and applaud Pam Feely for
receiving the 2019 Board Member of the Year
Award from the West Metro Fire Protection
District.
Pam has served on the Board of Directors
of the West Metro Fire Protection District for
10 years. During her tenure, she has provided
strong leadership through a number of signifi-
cant changes, including a transition in Fire
Chiefs.
During the District’s merger with the Wheat
Ridge Fire Protection District in 2016, Pam
served as the lead negotiator and initiated the
idea of including former Wheat Ridge Board
members on the Board for West Metro. Pam
was key to ensuring a smooth transition and
successful merger of the two districts for the
benefit of the local community. In addition,
Pam was instrumental in her foresight of the
impact of the Gallagher Amendment on the fi-
nancial sustainability of the District. She
worked to identify a solution to a major chal-
lenge facing the District and, in 2018, helped
lead the District’s efforts in a successful cam-
paign to stabilize the District’s budget.
From understanding the importance of the
District and its board members within the com-
munity to working to ensure all District staff
feels appreciated and valued, Pam’s excellent
leadership and ongoing dedication is invalu-
able to the District and the community it
serves. I extend my deepest thanks and ap-
preciation to Pam Feely for her service to the
West Metro Fire Protection District and to our
local community. Congratulations on this well-
deserved recognition.
HONORING SERGEANT FIRST
CLASS ELIS A. BARRETO ORTIZ
HON. GEORGE HOLDING
OF NORTH CAROLINA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. HOLDING. Madam Speaker, I rise to
commemorate the life of Sergeant 1st Class
Elis A. Barreto Ortiz, who was killed in the line
of duty earlier this month.
Sergeant Barreto Ortiz grew up in Morovis,
Puerto Rico. Following in the footsteps of his
father, he joined the Army in 2010 and was
assigned to the 259th Transportation Battalion.
In 2013, Sergeant Barreto Ortiz was deployed
to Afghanistan for a nine-month stint. Four
years later, he graduated from the U.S. Army
Airborne School and was assigned to the
82nd Brigade Support Battalion of the 82 Air-
borne Division based out of Fort Bragg, North
Carolina.
This past June, Sergeant Barreto Ortiz left
for his third deployment to Kabul, Afghanistan.
His mission was to support and operate along-
side a contingent of special operations forces.
On Thursday, September 5th, Sergeant
Barreto Ortiz was killed in action when his ve-
hicle was hit by a suicide car bomber. Ser-
geant Barreto Ortiz was 34 years old and is
survived by his wife, two sons, and a daugh-
ter.
He is described by those who knew him as
a kind and compassionate leader who was
proud to serve his country.
During his distinguished and decorated ca-
reer Sergeant Barreto Ortiz was awarded the
Bronze Star, the Meritorious Service Medal,
the Army Commendation Medal with two Oak
Leaf Clusters, the Army Achievement Medal
with two Oak Leaf Clusters, the Army Good
Conduct Medal with two Oak Leaf Clusters,
the Combat Action Badge, the Basic Para-
chutist Badge, the Army Driver and Mechanic
Badge.
Sergeant Barreto Ortiz’s death is a painful
reminder of the enormous sacrifices our serv-
ice members and their families make to pro-
tect the freedoms we all enjoy.
While Sergeant Barreto Ortiz will be dearly
missed, he will not be forgotten. May he rest
in peace, with the humble thanks of a grateful
Nation.
f
HONORING HIGH PERFORMING
BLUE RIBBON SCHOOLS IN CALI-
FORNIA’S 39TH DISTRICT
HON. GILBERT RAY CISNEROS, Jr.
OF CALIFORNIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. CISNEROS. Madam Speaker, it is with
great pride that I rise to congratulate two
schools in California’s 39th Congressional Dis-
trict. Acacia Elementary School and Robert C.
Fisler Elementary School have been recog-
nized as Exemplary High Performing Schools
by the Department of Education’s Blue Ribbon
Schools program. This honor is a direct reflec-
tion of the culture of academic excellence built
from the combined efforts of students, faculty,
parents, volunteers, and local communities.
Acacia Elementary School of Orange Coun-
ty’s Fullerton School District owes its distinc-
tion to a myriad of innovative teaching and
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E1248 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks October 4, 2019
learning practices. Of these practices, ‘‘Bal-
anced Literacy’’ has been utilized since 2012
and combines reading, writing, listening, and
speaking strategies. Complementing this ap-
proach are programs such as STEM & Robot-
ics Lab dedicated to the mastery of 21st cen-
tury applications. The foundation of Acacia’s
academic principles lies in presenting real
world problems and project-based learning op-
portunities to students. For students still estab-
lishing their first academic identities, it is vital
that the materials they are presented with ac-
curately reflect the intricacies of their own en-
vironment. Combining this hands-on pathway
with personalized strategies has lent a tremen-
dous hand in instilling confidence, agency, and
understanding within Acacia’s student body.
Robert C. Fisler Elementary School, also of
Orange County’s Fullerton School District,
owes its distinction to an academic framework
that is supported by a vision of student em-
powerment. As the school with the largest
population of Gifted and Talented Education
(GATE) students in the district, Fisler School
has maintained an excellent reputation in es-
tablishing a wide array of unique educational
opportunities. Students at Fisler are encour-
aged to take risks and experiment in order to
develop both academically and emotionally.
By reflecting on failures and regulating thought
processes, these young individuals learn flexi-
bility, persistence, and empathy. Fisler School
favors a comprehensive instructional model
that includes programs for computer science,
video production, performing arts, and more.
Through these programs, students are encour-
aged to engage in and explore high school,
post-secondary, and future career options for
a well-rounded, personalized academic experi-
ence.
While learning is a continuous process in
our children’s daily lives, it is during school
that they find tools and resources necessary
to root knowledge for future use. Therefore, it
is imperative that the school environment is
conducive to growth and development. Acacia
Elementary School and Robert C. Fisler Ele-
mentary School have established holistic aca-
demic philosophies that cater to this belief.
They know that it is not just academic rigor or
prestige, but rather a safe, collaborative envi-
ronment that cultivates curiosity and deter-
mination crucial for student success. I am
proud to know that my district is home to
places of instruction that embody such an idea
and I am more than honored to be rep-
resenting them.
Madam Speaker, I ask that you and my dis-
tinguished colleagues join me in congratulating
the teachers, parents, staff, volunteers, and—
most importantly—the students of Acacia Ele-
mentary School and Robert C. Fisler Elemen-
tary School. They are well-deserving of this
recognition and I am eager to welcome the
next generation of leaders that will emerge
from these two schools.
f
IN RECOGNITION OF THE GROUND-
BREAKING OF KLA’S ANN ARBOR
CAMPUS
HON. DEBBIE DINGELL
OF MICHIGAN
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mrs. DINGELL. Madam Speaker, I rise
today to recognize KLA Corporation and cele-
brate the groundbreaking of its new campus in
Ann Arbor.
KLA Corporation (KLA) is a leader in proc-
ess control and yield management systems for
the semiconductor industry and other related
nanoelectronics industries. KLA develops
equipment and services that facilitate innova-
tion and tackle the world’s toughest technical
challenges. With 18 global locations and over
10,000 employees worldwide, KLA’s vision
hinges on collaboration, as working side by
side diversifies perspectives and leads to
maximized discovery and solutions. In addi-
tion, KLA invests significantly in research and
development, continually striving to find new
ways to drive progress and transform the in-
dustry.
The opening of KLA’s second headquarters
in Ann Arbor exemplifies the corporation’s
continued commitment to innovation, research,
and technological advancement. The new
R&D center will be home to 600 engineers,
scientists, and professionals from our commu-
nity and will spur future partnerships with insti-
tutions throughout Southeast Michigan, espe-
cially within our automotive industry. Further-
more, KLA’s new campus will strengthen the
corporation’s relationship with the University of
Michigan and enhance opportunities for tech-
nical collaborations with students in the Col-
lege of Engineering. As a leader in the
sciences, I am excited to welcome KLA into
our driven Ann Arbor community.
Madam Speaker, I ask my colleagues to join
me in celebrating the opening of KLA’s new
headquarters in Ann Arbor. I look forward to
its positive impact on our Southeast Michigan
community and wish the corporation continued
success in the years ahead.
f
HONORING CONSOLIDATED TRIBAL
HEALTH, INC.
HON. JARED HUFFMAN
OF CALIFORNIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. HUFFMAN. Madam Speaker, I rise
today in recognition of Consolidated Tribal
Health Project, Inc. on the 35th anniversary of
their founding. Formed in 1984 through a Title
V compact with the Indian Health Service,
Consolidated Tribal Health has served the
health needs of the American Indian and Alas-
ka Native populations in Mendocino County for
three and a half decades.
Consolidated Tribal Health purchased its
current location in 1998 in Redwood Valley
after many years renting office space in near-
by Ukiah, and then constructed an additional
clinic building and Wellness Center in order to
better serve its expanded population. Today,
the clinic serves over 3,000 patients, a major-
ity of whom are American Indian and Alaska
Native people.
Consolidated Tribal Health Project is a
501(c)3 nonprofit ambulatory community
health clinic governed by a consortium of eight
federally recognized tribes, including the
Cahto Tribe of the Laytonville Rancheria, Coy-
ote Valley Band of Pomo Indians of California,
Guidiville Rancheria of California, Hopland
Band of Pomo Indians, Pinoleville Pomo Na-
tion, Potter Valley Tribe, Redwood Valley or
Little River Band of Pomo Indians of the Red-
wood Valley Rancheria California, and Sher-
wood Valley Rancheria of Pomo Indians of
California. The organization is committed to
providing excellent medical, dental, and be-
havioral health care to the people it serves,
and counts among its many accolades the
2018 National Dental GPRA Award for Best
Overall Performance.
Madam Speaker, Consolidated Tribal Health
Project has for the past 35 years been a tire-
less advocate for tribal healthcare in
Mendocino County, meeting the needs of in-
digenous Americans by honoring traditional
Native American values and maintaining the
physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, and so-
cial wellbeing of the community it serves.
Therefore, please join me in recognizing this
vital organization and wishing them success
for many more years to come.
f
RECOGNIZING DR. HECTOR NAVA
FOR SAVING THE LIVES OF SOL-
DIERS ON THE BATTLEFIELD
AND THOSE DIAGNOSED WITH
CANCER IN OUR COMMUNITY
HON. BRIAN HIGGINS
OF NEW YORK
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. HIGGINS of New York. Madam Speak-
er, I rise today to recognize the incredible ca-
reer and military service of Dr. Hector Nava.
His story is like that of the millions of immi-
grants who came to America with a desire to
seek a better future for themselves, and in
doing so, making our nation a better place.
Upon earning his medical degree in 1967 in
Mexico, Dr. Nava immigrated to the United
States for training. Dr. Nava took an atypical
route into the field of healthcare when he vol-
unteered his medical expertise to the United
States Army. He spent a year as a General
Medical Officer in El Paso, Texas and from
there he dedicated another year of his career
as a Captain Battalion Surgeon in the 23rd
Medical Battalion in Vietnam. For this com-
mendable work saving the lives of American
soldiers in combat, Dr. Nava earned the
Bronze Star.
After leaving Vietnam, Dr. Nava continued
to save the lives of others. He ventured to
Western New York and spent four more years
as a General Medical Officer at General Hos-
pital in Niagara Falls while simultaneously pur-
suing his residency at Buffalo General Hos-
pital. Once his residency was completed, he
was employed by Roswell Park Cancer Insti-
tute as a Cancer Research Surgeon and
Endoscopist, where he would spend the rest
ofhis career.
While working at Roswell Park, Dr. Nava se-
cured seven federal research grants, and con-
ducted lectures around the world, from Egypt
to Batavia. In academia, it is argued that the
quality one’s of research is reflected in how
frequently it has been published and used by
other researchers. Dr. Nava’s research has
been published in over one-hundred journals,
has been used in seven different books, and
has been referenced hundreds of times by
other researchers in the field.
Throughout his career he has received
many awards including the Research Surgeon
Award, the Hispanic American Hall of Fame—
Field of Medicine, ranked in the top 100 of
WNY’s top doctors by Buffalo Spree Maga-
zine, a Surgical Oncology Fellows Apple
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October 4, 2019 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks E1249
Teaching Award, and a Lifetime Achievement
Award from the American College of Sur-
geons. Dr. Nava also invented a treatment for
Barrett’s Esophagus, a condition that can lead
to cancer of the esophagus.
Madam Speaker, I recognize Dr. Hector
Nava. From teaching undergraduate and grad-
uate courses at local universities on surgical
oncology and gastroenterology, to working and
partnering with other WNY hospitals, and par-
ticipating in local service events like the Mexi-
can Musical Performance, Dr. Nava has made
his mark on our community.
f
CELEBRATING POLK COUNTY’S
175TH ANNIVERSARY
HON. BRUCE WESTERMAN
OF ARKANSAS
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. WESTERMAN. Madam Speaker, I rise
today to recognize the 175th anniversary of
Polk County, Arkansas. This county, set right
on the border of Arkansas and Oklahoma, is
named after former President James Polk and
is currently home to more than 20,000 people.
Almost half of Polk County lies in the
Ouachita National Forest, and as a forester by
trade, I’ve seen how important this forest is to
our state’s ecosystem and wildlife habitats. I’m
grateful to the land managers that live in Polk
County and steward our resources well.
In addition to the beautiful landscapes and
fertile valleys, Polk County is home to many
incredible people that I am privileged to know.
I’m honored to recognize Polk County and its
history today, and I hope this legacy is passed
down for generations to come.
f
RECOGNIZING BANNER ELEMEN-
TARY SCHOOL FOR RECEIVING
THE NATIONAL BLUE RIBBON
SCHOOLS AWARD
HON. DARIN LaHOOD
OF ILLINOIS
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. LAHOOD. Madam Speaker, I would like
to recognize Banner Elementary School, in
Dunlap, Illinois, as a recipient of the 2019 Na-
tional Blue Ribbon Schools Award. This rec-
ognition is a testament to the hard work both
the faculty and students have put into making
their school one of the safest and healthiest
learning environments in the country.
The National Blue Ribbon Schools Program
was started by the United States Department
of Education to serve as a way to highlight
schools across the country that meet a high
standard for educational excellence. The De-
partment of Education chooses the winning
schools each year based on their overall aca-
demic excellence or their progress in closing
achievement gaps among student subgroups.
At Banner Elementary School, the level of
hard work and dedication the staff, administra-
tion, and students all exhibit is unparalleled.
Again, Congratulations to Banner Elementary
School on receiving the National Blue Ribbon
Schools Award. I am proud to represent this
shining example of educational excellence.
MARY (MO) LUKENS
HON. ED PERLMUTTER
OF COLORADO
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. PERLMUTTER. Madam Speaker, I rise
today to posthumously recognize and honor
Mary (Mo) Lukens, a great Coloradan and
wife, mother and grandmother.
Mo was a lifelong resident of Colorado and
a proud resident of Golden. For over 20 years
she dedicated her time to the Golden commu-
nity serving many different organizations in-
cluding the Golden Rotary Club, Applewood,
Denver, Golden and West Jefferson County
Chambers of Commerce and others. Addition-
ally, she ran a successful business, Mo’s
Family Portraits, which helped capture many
wonderful memories for families in Jefferson
County and across Colorado.
Mo was also very involved with the Cancer
Action Network and served as the 7th Con-
gressional District Ambassador. She was a
tireless advocate for cancer research and
funding. For the last decade, she chaired and
co-chaired the Relay for Life for the American
Cancer Society to honor those battling cancer,
including her own struggle as well as that of
her mother and grandmother.
I was privileged to know Mo for many years,
and her vibrance and good work in our com-
munity will never be forgotten. Her passion for
her community, her good nature and sense of
humor was a true delight. On behalf of the
people of Jefferson County and Colorado, I
honor Mary (Mo) Lukens for a life well-lived
and extend my deepest appreciation for her
contribution to our community.
f
RECOGNIZING JOHN J. DAY, JR.
AND HIS NOMINATION FOR THE
FRENCH LEGION OF HONOR
HON. TROY BALDERSON
OF OHIO
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. BALDERSON. Madam Speaker, I rise
today to recognize the life and achievements
of John J. Day, Jr., in honor of his nomination
and confirmation of France’s highest distinc-
tion of military and civil merits, the French Le-
gion of Honor.
In October of 1942, during the height of
World War II, John answered his nation’s call
and joined the United States Army as a mem-
ber of the 90th Infantry Division, a regiment
that later earned the title of ‘‘Tough Hombres.’’
Deployed to Europe two years later, the
Tough Hombres arrived on English soil on
Easter Sunday, 1944. Soon after their arrival,
John, along with his regiment, boarded a ship
for Normandy. At the young age of 21, John
courageously defended his country two days
after D-Day in the Battle of the Seves River.
Taken off the front line on July 22, 1944, John
completed his assignment at a Postal Unit in
Avon, France. John was finally discharged
from the Army in November 1945, six months
after World War II ended.
John returned to civilian life and to his work
with the Pennsylvania Central Railroad system
in New York. Following his retirement, John
and his late wife, Mary Ann, enjoyed traveling
across the country, visiting children and grand-
children. John currently resides in Galena,
Ohio, where he is an active member of the
Westerville Chapter of the VFW.
A decorated veteran, John has been award-
ed numerous awards such as the World War
II Victory Medal, the American Campaign
Medal, and the Combat Infantry Badge, just to
name a few. The French Legion of Honor
adds to the extensive list of awards and rec-
ognitions John received throughout his distin-
guished career, though it does not scratch the
surface of the number of reasons we owe a
debt of gratitude to John for his service to our
country.
Consul General of France will officially
present John with his medal on October 8 in
Westerville, Ohio. I am confident that John’s
impact will be an enduring one, and that this
ceremony will be cherished by his family and
friends. I thank John for his service, and I am
proud to join in recognizing John J. Day, Jr.,
as he receives this distinguished and well-de-
served honor.
f
DICK SCHWEERS
HON. FRANCIS ROONEY
OF FLORIDA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. ROONEY of Florida. Madam Speaker, I
rise today to honor Richard ‘‘Dick’’ Schweers
of Estero. Dick is a staple of the Estero Com-
munity and has served on the Board of Com-
missioners of the Estero Fire Rescue Depart-
ment since 1997 and is the current Chairman.
In 1997, the Board of Commissioners was fac-
ing many challenges. It was down to only two
members and needed a third member to form
a quorum to conduct business. In addition,
Estero Fire Rescue was deeply in debt and
struggling to remain solvent. While it took
some convincing at the time by then Governor
Lawton Chiles, Dick eventually agreed to be
appointed as a fire commissioner to restruc-
ture the department. With Dick’s hard work,
leadership, and guidance, Estero Fire Rescue
was completely turned around.
Today, Estero Fire Rescue has four build-
ings, state of the art equipment, and a large
crew of firefighters and paramedics. It is now
one of the premier fire districts in our area.
After 22 years with the Estero Fire Rescue
Department, volunteering to help raise thou-
sands of dollars for the Harry Chapin Food
Bank, serving on the Estero Council of Com-
munity Leaders and the Estero Historical Soci-
ety, and being an active member in the Notre
Dame Club of Southwest Florida, Dick is retir-
ing.
I thank Dick for his decades of service to
our community and our citizens, and hope he
enjoys a well-earned retirement.
f
IN RECOGNITION OF HENRY S.
BARBOSA
HON. J. LUIS CORREA
OF CALIFORNIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. CORREA. Madam Speaker, I rise to
honor Henry S. Barbosa for his outstanding
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E1250 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks October 4, 2019
and impactful work in the community. Mr.
Barbosa has invested tremendous time, talent,
and passion to his community and OCCC has
honored Mr. Barbosa with their prestigious
Legacy Award. Mr. Barbosa serves as a long-
time board chair for the Orange County Con-
servation Corps (OCCC), which provides a
safety net and career pathway for at-risk
adults residing in Orange County by offering
both career and workforce development pro-
grams.
Mr. Barbosa began his young professional
career by earning his Bachelor of Arts in Polit-
ical Science from the University of California
Los Angeles and his Juris Doctor from UCLA
School of Law in 1973. He then began his
legal career as the Deputy District Attorney for
the City of Los Angeles. His passion for public
service is known by the community and for 27
years, Mr. Barbosa practiced private law pri-
marily representing local cities as a city attor-
ney. He also served as Special Counsel for
public agencies like the LA Unified School Dis-
trict.
Most recently, Mr. Barbosa served as As-
sistant General Counsel to the Metropolitan
Water District of Southern California and with-
in two years of serving as Vice-Chairman of
the Board, Mr. Barbosa was also Chairman of
the Engineering, Operations and Real Prop-
erty Committee, as well as many others. Mr.
Barbosa was very effective and influential
while serving on the negotiations team that set
key terms for the historic Quantifications Set-
tlement Agreement, resulting in the first major
agricultural to urban water transfer within the
Law of the Colorado River.
Mr. Barbosa’s areas of expertise include
land use and zoning, public works and con-
demnation, environmental law, water re-
sources, civil rights, including election law, po-
litical campaigns, and CATV. Notably, his ex-
pertise in land use and environmental law was
recognized by former Speaker of the California
State Assembly, Willie Brown, who appointed
Mr. Barbosa to the Solid Waste Advisory
Committee that developed statewide regula-
tions for landfills management.
Furthermore, Mr. Barbosa has been instru-
mental as lead counsel in several published
appellate decisions including Salazar v. City of
Montebello 1987, an election law challenge to
the candidacy of a homeless person in a mu-
nicipal election.
Mr. Barbosa’s receipt of the ‘‘Legacy
Award’’ from OCCC is a true testament of his
dedication and service to his community. I ask
my colleagues to join me in congratulating Mr.
Barbosa on his lifelong accomplishments.
f
THANKING KEVIN MILLER
HON. RUSS FULCHER
OF IDAHO
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. FULCHER. Madam Speaker, today, I
rise to honor Kevin Miller of Star, Idaho. Kevin
is a dear friend, beloved colleague, humble in-
spiration, and profound joy to the multitudes of
people that know him. Kevin is quiet about the
work he has done to enhance our commu-
nities, improving the lives of countless Ida-
hoans. You may not know it, but Kevin spends
two weeks a year living in a trailer, broad-
casting his radio show at Walmart to raise
money for a local homeless shelter. He may
not tell you, but Kevin has been visiting public
and private schools for years to help draw at-
tention to their events and fundraisers. Kevin
might not mention it, but his faith in action to
promote the life of the unborn has been felt in
the hearts of those affected by abortion. Quiet-
ly, off the air, Kevin is the local hero that we
celebrate today. Kevin fights for the average
Joe and highlights the challenges and cham-
pions of our great state, our home, Idaho.
Kevin, your work means so much to the peo-
ple of Idaho. It is my pleasure to honor Kevin
Miller for the dedication, commitment, and love
he has for Idaho.
f
REMEMBERING JAMAL
KHASHOGGI, RESPECTED AND
HEROIC JOURNALIST, LOVING
FATHER, AND RELENTLESS PUR-
SUER OF TRUTH
HON. SHEILA JACKSON LEE
OF TEXAS
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Speaker, I rise
today to celebrate the life of Jamal Khashoggi,
an American national and resilient journalist
who was murdered by members of the Saudi
Arabian government on October 2, 2018.
The First Amendment of the United States
Constitution grants freedom of speech and
freedom of the press.
I would like to note that the press is the only
commercial enterprise enshrined in the Con-
stitution, giving Americans an independent
press.
This is something that is often taken for
granted, freedom of the press is not given to
citizens in many parts of the world.
Jamal Khashoggi was born on October 13,
1958, in Medina, Saudi Arabia.
Jamal Khashoggi attended Indiana State
University and received his BA in business ad-
ministration in 1983.
Jamal Khashoggi did not dream of becom-
ing a Saudi Arabian dissident, he did not want
to be forced into a self-imposed exile; how-
ever, it was what he had to do to continue to
live.
As a journalist, Jamal Khashoggi wanted to
report on the facts and truths, not to dismiss
the injustice that occurred, especially in his
home nation.
Jamal Khashoggi wrote for and edited
newspapers in Saudi Arabia and served as an
aide in Saudi embassies in Washington and
London.
After leaving Saudi Arabia, Jamal
Khashoggi published his first op-ed in the
Washington Post in September 2017, explain-
ing why he and others had gone into self-im-
posed exile out of fear of being arrested in
Saudi Arabia.
For the next year, Jamal Khashoggi contin-
ued writing articles criticizing Saudi Arabian in-
volvement in the war in Yemen, the imprison-
ment of women who campaigned for women’s
rights, and revealed the strict control of the
Saudi Arabian government on news and social
media.
On October 2, 2018, Jamal Khashoggi was
enticed into entering the Saudi consulate in
Istanbul for an appointment to obtain a docu-
ment he needed to marry his Turkish fiance´e.
Knowing Jamal Khashoggi was scheduled
to arrive at the consulate, 15 Saudi agents
who had flown in hours earlier met him, killed,
dismembered, and disposed of his body which
has yet to be found.
Journalists must be protected, the right to a
free press must be protected.
However, Trump and his allies have blocked
attempts in Congress to hold the Saudi Ara-
bian regime accountable for their actions.
The United States House of Representa-
tives passed H. Res. 2037 for which I voted,
condemning the Saudi Arabian government for
the murder and execution, but the current ad-
ministration continues to steer clear of assign-
ing blame and bringing the killers to justice.
The impotent reaction from our Administra-
tion signals to strongmen everywhere that they
can terrorize their people—and mock the
United States—with impunity.
The citizens of the world have not forgotten
what happened to Jamal Khashoggi, and they
will never forget.
Jamal Khashoggi was a loving father of four
to Salah, Abdullah, Noha, and Razan Jamal,
and a fiance´e to Hatice Cengiz, the woman
who waited outside of the consulate that fate-
ful day.
We will forever be deprived of the stories
Jamal Khashoggi would have written, and so
there will inevitably be a delay in learning
about the corruption he might have exposed,
heroism he might have praised, and insights
he might have offered.
America stands in support of American na-
tionals.
I encourage all journalists to be fearless and
persistent; democracy depends on it.
f
HONORING JENNIE ADSIT FOR HER
CAREER IN PUBLIC SERVICE ON
THE OCCASION OF HER RETIRE-
MENT FROM THE JEFFERSON
COUNTY BOARD OF LEGISLA-
TORS
HON. ELISE M. STEFANIK
OF NEW YORK
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Friday, October 4, 2019
Ms. STEFANIK. Madam Speaker, I rise
today to honor Jennie Adsit on the occasion of
her retirement from the Jefferson County
Board of Legislators.
Jennie was first elected to the County Board
of Supervisors in 1977. She has served on the
board of legislators since its inception in 1996
until 1999 and then from 2006 to the present.
During her tenure on the board, she has
served as the Chair of the Finance and Rules
Committee from 1996 through 1997 and
served on the committee a total of sixteen
years. Additionally, she served as the Chair of
the Health and Human Services Committee
between 2002 and 2003 and has served on
that committee since 2006. She has also been
a member of the Planning and Development
Committee and is currently a member of the
General Services Committee. In all of these
roles, Jennie has consistently worked to better
the lives of her fellow residents of Jefferson
County.
On behalf of New York’s 21st Congressional
District, I want to thank Jennie for her lifetime
of dedicated public service. She has made a
lasting positive impact on Jefferson County
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October 4, 2019 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks E1251
and the North Country as a whole. I wish her
well on this next chapter in her life.
f
CELEBRATING MR. JOHN T.
STEINMETZ
HON. STEVE STIVERS
OF OHIO The gentlelady from American Samoa, Mrs.
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. STIVERS. Madam Speaker, I rise today
on behalf of the people of Ohio’s 15th Con-
gressional District to celebrate Mr. John T.
Steinmetz as he receives the French Legion of
Honor.
Mr. Steinmetz, a native of Lancaster, Ohio,
has continuously demonstrated his commit-
ment to our nation’s values and cemented his
standing as a true American hero and a pillar
of our community. Since Mr. Steinmetz began
active duty service on February 4, 1944, he
has been a part of our nation’s proud tradition
of military service. His dedication and commit-
ment to protecting and serving our nation and
our allies is unparalleled.
Mr. John T. Steinmetz has made a signifi-
cant impact in the lives of those around him.
Although it is nearly impossible to quantify his
impact, Americans have an excellent example
of service, sacrifice, and patriotism. From his
service on the USS
SC–515, to his participa-
tion in the Southern France Landing in August
of 1944 at Baie de Bougnon and his ascen-
sion to Seaman First Class, he, rightfully,
earned the American Campaign Medal, the
European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign
Medal, and the World War II Victory Medal.
I can say, without a doubt, that truly all of
Ohio, our nation, and our world is a better and
freer place because of his service and leader-
ship.
I wish to congratulate Mr. John T. Steinmetz
on this tremendous honor and convey my
most sincere appreciation for his dedication to
service.
f
AMBER ALERT NATIONWIDE ACT
HON. GREGORIO KILILI CAMACHO
SABLAN
OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS Nashville-based industrial contracting firm
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. SABLAN. Madam Speaker, today, I in-
troduce the AMBER Alert Nationwide Act, so
that all families and first responders in our
country have access to this critical tool to save
children who are victims of abduction and ex-
ploitation.
Since its creation in 1996, the AMBER Alert
system has saved the lives of nearly a thou-
sand children through its network of instant
alerts sent through radio, television and text
messages. However, the system is not avail-
able nationwide. Funding Congress initially au-
thorized under the PROTECT Act to expand
the reach of AMBER Alerts was only available
to states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto
Rico. This has left families and first respond-
ers in tribal communities as well as the North-
ern Mariana Islands, American Samoa and
Guam to search for missing children without
the help of this life-saving technology. Last
year, Congress recognized the need to include
Indian tribes in the system by passing the
Ashlynne Mike AMBER Alert in Indian Country
Act. The AMBER Alert Nationwide Act in-
cludes all U.S. territories so our first respond-
ers can access the federal resources their
counterparts receive to make the necessary
infrastructure upgrades to help keep our chil-
dren safe.
Radewagen, is an original cosponsor of the
bill. And the National Center for Missing and
Exploited Children has endorsed the legisla-
tion. I urge my colleagues to support this bi-
partisan bill to help reunite all our nation’s
missing children with their families no matter
where they live.
f
HONORING THE 50TH ANNIVER-
SARY OF THE CITY OF BRENT-
WOOD, TENNESSEE
HON. MARK E. GREEN
OF TENNESSEE
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. GREEN of Tennessee. Madam Speak-
er, I rise today to recognize the fiftieth anniver-
sary of the City of Brentwood, Tennessee.
Brentwood was incorporated in Williamson
County on April 15, 1969. Since then, spurred
by the development of Maryland Farms into a
business park in the 1970s and 1980s, Brent-
wood’s population expanded from less than
4,000 residents to over 40,000 today.
A prosperous suburb in the Nashville area,
Brentwood has maintained its character as a
low-density residential community even as it
has been one of the fastest-growing cities in
the state, with ninety percent of the city’s acre-
age zoned for residential use.
Its thriving business environment, high qual-
ity of life, top-rated schools, scenic beauty,
and Tennessee way of life have given Brent-
wood a well-deserved reputation as one of the
best places in the nation to live, work, and
raise a family.
Brentwood is home to many of Tennessee’s
finest citizens, and I am honored to represent
them in the United States Congress. I ask my
colleagues in the United States House of Rep-
resentatives to join me in congratulating the
City of Brentwood on this momentous occa-
sion.
f
IN RECOGNITION OF THE OPENING
OF THE BEAUTIFUL LUXE
SCHOOL OF COSMETOLOGY
HON. DEBBIE DINGELL
OF MICHIGAN
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mrs. DINGELL. Madam Speaker, I rise
today to recognize the opening of the Beautiful
Luxe School of Cosmetology, the first black-
owned beauty school in Ann Arbor.
In 2010, Aisha Gatlin established Beautiful
Luxe Hair Company, an Ypsilanti-based luxury
hair extension boutique and salon. Seeing a
need for more salon options for textured hair
care, Gatlin endeavored to create a salon that
would provide a high-quality and luxury experi-
ence to all people regardless of hair type. As
such, she put her vision into action and be-
came CEO of Beautiful Luxe Hair Company, a
salon that caters to all phases of hair and spe-
cializes in hair extensions and natural hair.
Like its name, the salon strives to help people
feel their most beautiful.
The opening of the Beautiful Luxe School of
Cosmetology further enhances the vision of
the Beautiful Luxe Hair Company and exempli-
fies Aisha Gatlin’s continued commitment and
passion for natural hair care. Through Gatlin’s
efforts, cosmetology students in our commu-
nity will be given the skills necessary to launch
successful careers in cosmetology with the
confidence to serve all hair types. The Beau-
tiful Luxe School of Cosmetology will train stu-
dents to master techniques in cutting, coloring,
and styling different phases of textured hair,
as well other services like skin treatments and
nail care. In addition to opening the beauty
school, Gatlin has generously offered $2,500
in scholarships to help students embark on
their careers in cosmetology, truly benefiting
our Ann Arbor community.
Madam Speaker, I ask my colleagues to join
me in honoring Aisha Gatlin and celebrate the
opening of the Beautiful Luxe School of Cos-
metology in Ann Arbor. I am grateful for
Gatlin’s meaningful efforts to facilitate greater
inclusivity in the haircare industry, and her
impactful work is worthy of commendation.
f
HONORING THE 60TH BIRTHDAY OF
WILLIAM MORGAN
HON. MARK E. GREEN
OF TENNESSEE
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. GREEN of Tennessee. Madam Speak-
er, I rise today to recognize and honor William
Morgan of Nashville, Tennessee on the occa-
sion of his 60th birthday.
William Morgan was born on June 22, 1959
in Nashville. He graduated from Montgomery
Bell Academy in 1977 and from Vanderbilt
University in 1981. William went on to earn his
MBA from Vanderbilt, where he was the
Founders Medalist. In 1986, he joined the
John Bouchard & Sons Company, where he
has served as president since 2001.
In addition to his leadership of John Bou-
chard & Sons, Mr. Morgan works tirelessly to
better his community and country. He has
served as chairman of the Family Action
Council of Tennessee, and he is a member of
the Nashville Rotary Club. He has been a
longtime supporter of many ministries both in
Nashville and nationwide, including the Hope
Clinic for Women, Need Link Nashville, and
the TN Governmental Prayer Alliance.
William is married to Lisa Morgan, and they
are the proud parents of three children, Carver
(Lauren), Sumner (Brian), and Wallace, and
they are the proud grandparents of Clara. In
every area of his life, he seeks to honor God
and serve his community—and he has done
so faithfully for these 60 years.
Madam Speaker, I ask that my colleagues
in the United States House of Representatives
join me in congratulating this great American
and thanking him for his service to our nation.
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E1252 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks October 4, 2019
CONGRATULATING HENRY S.
BARBOSA ON RECEIVING THE
ORANGE COUNTY CONSERVATION
CORPS LEGACY AWARD
HON. KATIE PORTER
OF CALIFORNIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Ms. PORTER. Madam Speaker, I am hon-
ored to recognize Mr. Henry S. Barbosa as
the recipient of the Legacy Award, which will
be presented during the 25th Anniversary
Celebration of Orange County Conservation
Corps (OCCC).
Mr. Barbosa has served for seven years on
the Board of OCCC, which is a voluntary work
and learn program that provides an oppor-
tunity for at-risk and disadvantaged youths,
age 18 to 25. Corpsmembers have a chance
to earn a living while learning valuable em-
ployment skills through job training and attend-
ing an on-site charter school.
Mr. Barbosa’s long and distinguished record
of service to his community stretches well be-
yond his time with OCCC. His legal career
began as a Deputy District Attorney for Los
Angeles County and continued over 27 years
in private practice, primarily representing cities
and other public agencies throughout Cali-
fornia. Mr. Barbosa also acted as Assistant
General Counsel to the Metropolitan Water
District of Southern California.
In recognition of his community leadership,
Mr. Barbosa was designated as a member of
the Los Angeles Board of Police Commis-
sion’s Blue Ribbon Panel to analyze the
causes of and response to the Rampart area
police corruption scandal. He was an elected
public official for 10 years, serving as the
President and a Director of the Three Valleys
Municipal Water District representing Rowland
Heights and as a member of the Board for the
Metropolitan Water District of Southern Cali-
fornia. Mr. Barbosa was appointed to the Solid
Waste Advisory Committee that developed
statewide regulations for landfills manage-
ment.
Mr. Barbosa continues to advocate for inclu-
sion in our communities. He has served for 10
years as Vice-Chair of the National Hispanic
Media Coalition, a nation-wide advocacy group
for greater access by minorities in film and
broadcast media.
I thank Mr. Barbosa for his leadership and
commitment to service and congratulate him
on this well-deserved award.
f
HONORING SANTA ANA POLICE DE-
PARTMENT CHAPLAIN RUPERT
VEGA
HON. J. LUIS CORREA
OF CALIFORNIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. CORREA. Madam Speaker, I rise today
to honor Santa Ana Police Department Chap-
lain Rupert Vega, a true hero of our commu-
nity.
Chaplain Rupert Vega was born and raised
in Santa Ana. He, along with his family of six,
lived in the Artesia Pilar neighborhood, near El
Salvador Park. He received his education from
the Santa Ana Unified School District. Chap-
lain Vega, with his wife, raised their two chil-
dren in Santa Ana, where he continues to live
to this very day. His children, now adults, also
reside in Santa Ana.
At age 57, Chaplain Vega retired from his
25-year career in the medical field, but retire-
ment has done nothing to slow him down. He
has been a licensed ordained chaplain and
minister for many years and has worked as a
Santa Ana Police Department Chaplain for the
last five years, volunteering well over 5,000
hours to date.
Chaplain Vega was recruited as a Police
Chaplain, by his friends, Ed and Maria Mar-
tinez—two long time employees of the Santa
Ana Police Department.
As a Police Chaplain, Rupert has volun-
teered his time to the community of Santa Ana
and the members of the Santa Ana Police De-
partment. However, Chaplain Vega is so much
more than a chaplain—to our community, he
is a vision of hope in times of tragedy, to the
members of the Santa Ana Police Department,
he is a big brother, a guiding light, and even
a shoulder to cry on when times get tough.
With much humility, Chaplain Vega would
say that he has been blessed beyond meas-
ure to have been commissioned by the Lord to
work as a Police Chaplain, but it is really the
community and the members of Santa Ana
Police Department that are blessed to have
him as their chaplain and as a part of our
community.
f
RECOGNIZING INTERNATIONAL
PLASMA AWARENESS WEEK
HON. DORIS O. MATSUI
OF CALIFORNIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Friday, October 4, 2019
Ms. MATSUI. Madam Speaker, today, as
every other day throughout the year, patients
suffer from rare diseases that need cures,
cures that are sometimes elusive. But patients
that need plasma protein therapies have hope;
and on October 7 to 11, 2019, across the
United States and throughout the world, pa-
tients, plasma donors, and plasma collection
centers will join together to observe Inter-
national Plasma Awareness Week (IPAW).
There will be events to raise global aware-
ness of the crucial need for plasma to create
life-saving therapies, recognize that plasma
donors contribute greatly in saving and im-
proving lives, and increase understanding of
the many rare diseases and plasma protein
therapies that help to treat them. Plasma-de-
rived therapies and recombinant blood clotting
factors, collectively known as plasma protein
therapies, are unique, biologic medicines that
are either infused or injected to treat a variety
of rare, life-threatening, chronic, and genetic
diseases including bleeding disorders, heredi-
tary angioedema, immune deficiencies, pul-
monary disorders, neurological disorders,
shock and trauma, liver cirrhosis, and infec-
tious diseases such as tetanus, hepatitis, and
rabies.
Plasma-derived therapies save and improve
lives of individuals throughout the world, in-
cluding in emergency and surgical medicine.
Plasma protein therapies have significantly im-
proved the quality of life, markedly improved
patient outcomes, and extended the life ex-
pectancy of individuals with rare, chronic dis-
eases and conditions. Healthy, committed do-
nors provide the plasma essential to manufac-
ture these lifesaving therapies; and there are
now more than 780 plasma collection centers
in the U.S. that have demonstrated their com-
mitment to plasma donor and patient safety
and quality by earning International Quality
Plasma Program (IQPP) certification.
Madam Speaker, I ask that my colleagues
in the House of Representatives join me and
rise in commemoration of International Plasma
Awareness Week, honoring those committed
donors and collection centers who make and
collect needed and lifesaving contributions.
f
REMEMBERING SANDEEP
DHALIWAL, HOUSTON, TEXAN
AND HERO
HON. SHEILA JACKSON LEE
OF TEXAS
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Speaker, I rise
to pay tribute to a hero, a Deputy with the
Harris County Sheriff’s Department, Deputy
Sandeep Dhaliwal.
Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal was a Houston
resident and public servant who died while in
the line of duty on September 27, 2019, in
Houston, Texas, at the age of 42.
Sandeep Dhaliwal was a trailblazer for the
Sheriff’s Department of which he served in for
a decade.
Sandeep Dhaliwal was the first member of
the Sikh community to become a Harris Coun-
ty Sheriff’s deputy.
In the Sikh religion, men and women do not
cut their hair; they cover their head with tur-
bans.
Out of piety, the men refrain from shaving
their beards.
Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal garnered national
attention in 2015, after the sheriff’s office al-
lowed him to wear his traditional articles of
faith, including a turban and a beard, while on
patrol.
Sandeep educated us as a city and county
and taught us all about the humility and beau-
ty of the Sikh faith.
Through his example and grace, Sandeep
Dhaliwal taught of the virtues and symbolic
power of the turban and stood as a bulwark
against the nasty racism that has been visited
on Sikhs.
Even more notable, the Harris County Sher-
iff’s Office was the largest in the country to
have a full-time Sikh American officer with his
articles of faith intact due to a religious accom-
modation exception to their dress code policy.
On the afternoon of September 27, 2019,
Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal pulled over a silver
Nissan Altima for a routine traffic stop on
Willancy Court near Cypress.
After speaking with the driver, Deputy
Sandeep Dhaliwal turned to walk back to his
patrol car, the driver got out of the vehicle and
ran at the Deputy shooting him twice from be-
hind in the head.
The shooter, then returned to his car, driv-
ing away.
Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal died after being
airlifted to a hospital.
The assailant had a violent past and was
convicted of two felonies in 2002 for an epi-
sode in which he shot a man and then barri-
caded himself in his home with his 4-year-old
son, with an intent to use him as a shield.
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October 4, 2019 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks E1253
The assailant was sentenced to 20 years in
jail but served only 12 years before getting out
on parole in 2014.
In January of 2017, a warrant was issued
for parole violations of assault and possession
of a prohibited weapon, the warrant was still
active Friday when Sandeep Dhaliwal pulled
him over.
Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal was a hero to
many through his actions, organizing a tractor-
trailer of supplies to be delivered from Cali-
fornia after Hurricane Harvey, and had trav-
eled to Puerto Rico to help a colleague with
hurricane relief efforts there.
Prior to serving as a law enforcement offi-
cer, Sandeep Dhaliwal owned a successful
trucking business.
Sandeep believed that the Harris County
Sheriff’s Office needed someone to build
bridges with the Sikh community, so he sold
his business and took a lower paying job.
Sandeep Dhaliwal represented the commu-
nity’s diversity and inclusiveness well, as a
practicing Sikh he embodied the articles of
faith, equality, service, and justice while serv-
ing in his position.
I attended the candlelight vigil held in his
honor the day after his tragic death.
The vigil was not just a moment to remem-
ber the bravery of Deputy Sandeep Dhaliwal,
it was also a moment for our community to re-
member the impact he had on our civic life
and the decency he had for his fellow man.
This is because the site of the vigil was
named after another fallen officer, Deputy
Darren Goforth, based, in part, on Deputy
Sandeep Dhaliwal’s advocacy.
The impact made by Deputy Sandeep
Dhaliwal, during his short time with us, has
been profound, and it compelled me to come
to offer condolences to the Sikh National Cen-
ter, the Gurudwara where Sandeep Dhaliwal’s
family worships and where I was honored to
recognize him for his kindness, strength, serv-
ice, and involvement in the community.
It was important for Deputy Sandeep
Dhaliwal’s family to know that America mourns
with the Dhaliwal Family.
America is a place of justice and she will
not rest until justice comes to the Sikhs of
America.
Sandeep Dhaliwal was more than a public
servant, he was an outstanding member of the
community, a hero to many, a loving husband,
and a father to three.
Sandeep Dhaliwal will forever be in the
hearts and memory of so many he touched.
My heart breaks for his family and loved
ones. I offer my deepest condolences as they
mourn his loss.
f
HONORING THE 40TH ANNIVER-
SARY OF GATEWAY DOMESTIC
VIOLENCE SERVICES
HON. JASON CROW
OF COLORADO
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. CROW. Madam Speaker, in honor of
October being National Domestic Violence
Awareness Month, I rise today to recognize
Gateway Domestic Violence Services.
In addition, I would like to take this oppor-
tunity to congratulate Gateway Domestic Vio-
lence Services on its 40th Anniversary. Since
1979, Gateway has steadfastly provided serv-
ices to over 400,000 adults and children who
are experiencing family violence throughout
the City of Aurora and Arapahoe County.
Gateway has assisted these individuals
through their 24/7 Crisis Line, Emergency
Shelter, Extended-Stay Shelter, Nonresidential
Counseling Program and Court Advocacy Pro-
gram. These services have resulted in allow-
ing individuals and families to live a life free
from violence in their homes.
The scourge of domestic violence is wide-
spread and affects people of all ages, races,
religions, and socio-economic backgrounds. It
is estimated that 50 percent of all families in
the United States are impacted by intimate
partner violence. A woman is assaulted or
beaten every 9 seconds and approximately 4
victims are killed each day by an intimate part-
ner. The trauma suffered by children who wit-
ness domestic violence can result in their in-
ability to form healthy relationships.
Today, it is my honor to commemorate
Gateway’s 40th anniversary. The work they do
in our community is necessary and impres-
sive. In 2018 alone, they answered just under
8,000 crisis calls, served 789 individuals be-
tween their two shelters, counseled 229 adults
and children, walked through the court proc-
ess with 2,925 victims, and presented on the
issues of family violence 102 times to groups
throughout the community.
Gateway diligently strives to ensure that
every victim that reaches out for help is treat-
ed with dignity, respect and given the tools to
help break the cycle of violence they are ex-
periencing. Furthermore, their work helps en-
sure victims are not blamed for the violence
they experience and will not have to continue
to live in fear of abuse in their own home.
I am confident that Gateway Domestic Vio-
lence Services will continue to provide quality
services to victims throughout the community,
as they have done for the past 40 years.
f
SECURE AND FAIR ENFORCEMENT
BANKING ACT OF 2019
SPEECH OF
HON. ED PERLMUTTER
OF COLORADO
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Wednesday, September 25, 2019
Mr. PERLMUTTER. Madam Speaker, I sub-
mit the following letters of endorsement for
H.R. 1595, the SAFE Banking Act.
THE SCOTTSMIRACLE-GRO COMPANY,
February 12, 2019.
Re Challenges and Solutions: Access to
Banking Services for Cannabis-Related
Businesses Hearing.
Hon. G
REGORY W. MEEKS,
Chair, Subcommittee on Consumer Protections &
Financial Institutions, House Committee on
Financial Services, Washington, DC.
DEAR CHAIRMAN MEEKS: I am writing re-
garding the upcoming hearing of the Sub-
committee on Consumer Protection and Fi-
nancial Institutions titled ‘‘Challenges and
Solutions: Access to Banking Services for
Cannabis-Related Businesses.’’
The ScottsMiracle-Gro Company is the
quintessential American business. Estab-
lished in 1868 in Marysville, Ohio, the
ScottsMiracle-Gro name is synonymous with
America’s love for lawns and gardens. We are
also a leader in the evolution and emergence
of indoor and greenhouse gardening through
our subsidiary, The Hawthorne Gardening
Company.
With approximately 6,000 associates at
more than 65 U.S. locations in 26 states,
ScottsMiracle-Gro has small and large man-
ufacturing plants that create products for
American consumers. The vast majority of
our business is based on a wide range of prod-
ucts for lawn and garden care. However, we
are also the country’s largest manufacturer
of hydroponic growing systems, nutrients,
lights, filters and components for indoor
growing. These products can be used to nur-
ture a wide variety of plants, including can-
nabis. Our hydroponic division is expected to
generate revenue this year of approximately
$600 million, or about 20 percent of company-
wide revenue.
While ScottsMiracle-Gro does not directly
participate in the U.S. cannabis industry,
this rapidly growing and critical business
unit is nonetheless impacted by the existing
conflict between federal and state laws. Our
concern is particularly acute when it comes
to our relationships with our banking part-
ners. We know that state-law-authorized
cannabis cultivators are among those who
use our products to grow their crop. How-
ever, we are unable to sell equipment to
them directly because of the current banking
rules. In order to satisfy our banks’ compli-
ance requirements and maintain our banking
relationships, we are required to use a costly
two-step distribution process to serve these
end customers.
We share these experiences to help the
committee understand the vast implications
and challenges to the current system. While
the committee may hear from many can-
nabis companies, we also want to highlight
the inefficiencies ScottsMiracle-Gro faces as
a provider to this industry.
We applaud the Committee for taking the
time to learn more about the challenges of
this current arrangement and encourage you
to examine the many different aspects of
this banking issue during your evaluation of
the topic, including the needs of ancillary
companies like ScottsMiracle-Gro. We also
thank Congressmen Perlmutter, Heck, Stiv-
ers, and Davidson for their leadership on this
important issue through their work on the
SAFE Banking Act arid look forward to ad-
ditional discussion on this measure as a
means to address concerns raised in this let-
ter.
As an American company with over 150
years of business experience, we have many
unique insights about this emerging industry
and would be happy to share those perspec-
tives as the Committee continues to learn
more and develops solutions to address this
issue.
Thank you for your attention to this mat-
ter.
J
IM KING.
S
EPTEMBER 23, 2019.
Hon. E
D PERLMUTTER,
Washington, DC.
DEAR REP. PERLMUTTER: In June of last
year, at the 86th annual meeting of the U.S.
Conference of Mayors in Boston, we formed a
first-of-its-kind local government coalition
of mayors to establish a national framework
to prepare governments for the implementa-
tion of legalized marijuana. Our coalition is
writing to you today to encourage congres-
sional support for passage of the SAFE
Banking Act. As mayors of many American
cities leading the implementation of safe and
successfully regulated cannabis markets, we
believe it is long overdue for marijuana busi-
nesses to have the same access to banking
and financial services as all other legitimate
U.S. businesses. Passage of this Act would
add important protections against an illegal
market and bad actors, as well as allow for
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E1254 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks October 4, 2019
full transparency and regulation of trans-
actions and provide an economic boost for
the United States.
More than $100 million dollars in mari-
juana tax revenue is projected in our cities
from marijuana sales in 2019. Opening finan-
cial services to the cannabis industry could
reduce the opportunity and motive for crime
in what is currently a cash-based industry. It
would also improve the ability of the federal
government to audit tax receipts and allow
for the legalized markets to reduce unneces-
sary financial expenses for the cannabis in-
dustry, potentially leading to additional pay
for the many employees working in this in-
dustry. Additionally, billions of dollars in
deposits nationwide would strengthen the
country’s financial sector.
The vast majority of cannabis businesses
comply with the rules and regulations, and
the industry has made meaningful contribu-
tions to supporting strong and safe markets
across the United States. Marijuana busi-
nesses have consistently supported youth
prevention efforts and have also played an
important role in educating the public on
the rules for marijuana consumption. They
are a valid contributor to our local econo-
mies, and they have overcome many obsta-
cles to earn their place among our country’s
legitimate businesses.
Voters across the United States have cho-
sen to end marijuana prohibition. It’s long
overdue that Congress respects the will of
our voters in legalized cannabis markets and
allow banking services for this legitimate in-
dustry.
Legalized marijuana has generated billions
of dollars in economic activity nationwide.
Allowing banking services is a national eco-
nomic stimulus that does not cost taxpayers
and would be a bipartisan victory for cham-
pions of states’ rights and the Tenth Amend-
ment.
Respectfully,
Mayors Coalition to Push for Marijuana
Reform—Michael B. Hancock, Mayor of
Denver, CO; Eric Garcetti, Mayor of
Los Angeles, CA; Libby Schaaf, Mayor
of Oakland, CA; Heidi Williams, Mayor
of Thornton, CO; Ted Wheeler, Mayor
of Portland, OR.
A
MERICAN FINANCIAL
S
ERVICES ASSOCIATION,
Washington, DC, September 25, 2019.
Hon. NANCY PELOSI,
Speaker of the House, House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
Hon. KEVIN MCCARTHY,
Minority Leader, House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
DEAR SPEAKER PELOSI AND MINORITY LEAD-
ER MCCARTHY: The American Financial Serv-
ices Association (AFSA) writes to express its
strong support for H.R. 1595, the Secure and
Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Banking Act,
which is scheduled for consideration before
the House of Representatives on September
25.
H.R. 1595, sponsored by Representatives Ed
Perlmutter (D–CO), Denny Heck (D–WA),
Steve Stivers (R–OH) and Warren Davidson
(R–OH), along with more than 200 bipartisan
House members, includes an important pro-
vision ending Operation Choke Point. Spe-
cifically, it prohibits a federal banking agen-
cy from ordering a bank to terminate a
banking relationship with a legal business
unless there is a valid reason and that reason
is not based solely on reputational risk.
The ostensible intent of Choke Point pro-
gram was to prevent criminal fraud. How-
ever, in actuality, federal officials pressured
banks to close accounts of businesses oper-
ating within state and federal law without
legal recourse or due process solely because
the officials were ideologically opposed to
the businesses’ existence. Under Operation
Choke Point, businesses that were operating
legally suddenly found banks terminating
their accounts, in some cases accounts that
the business had had for years, without ex-
planation. While the program was targeted
at gun dealers and payday lenders, other
businesses, such as installment lenders, were
also impacted. No legal business should be
targeted solely based on the political bias of
a particular administration.
Even though Operation Choke Point has
officially ended, its effects remain. Financial
services companies that follow state and fed-
eral laws are still having their accounts
closed with very little explanation. Further-
more, companies that had their accounts
closed may still be having trouble finding
new banking relationships. Legitimate bank
customers, like traditional installment lend-
ers, which have provided safe and affordable
small-dollar credit to consumers in their
communities for over a century, deserve fair
access and fair treatment by federal banking
agencies.
We are pleased that Congress is acting in
the interest of small businesses, who in turn,
serve a large number of American con-
sumers. Limiting the availability of lawful
goods and services to consumers in an at-
tempt to punish politically disfavored busi-
nesses harms consumers and sets a bad
precedent. Government initiatives must be
carried out on solid legal ground to be cred-
ible.
They should not be based on political bias
and not undermine faith in government
agencies and the rule of law.
We urge members of the House of Rep-
resentatives to support H.R. 1595.
Sincerely,
B
ILL HIMPLER,
President & CEO,
American Financial Services Association.
SEPTEMBER 20, 2019.
Hon. N
ANCY PELOSI,
Speaker, House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
Hon. KEVIN MCCARTHY,
Minority Leader, House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
DEAR SPEAKER PELOSI AND MINORITY LEAD-
ER MCCARTHY: As a national, diverse, multi-
sector collection of broad stakeholders, that
are impacted by the burgeoning legal can-
nabis industry throughout the United States,
we write to ask that you bring the SAFE
Banking Act (H.R. 1595) before the House
floor for a vote. Our organizations support
taking an initial step that allows proceeds
from the legal cannabis industry into the
banking system for purposes of public safety
and to protect law-abiding financial institu-
tions and ancillary businesses that have been
put in an untenable position.
With 33 states and several territories per-
mitting cannabis use, a growing chorus of
Americans and legal businesses now face an
increasing number of risks resulting from a
patchwork legal system with no federal
banking protections. Because of this, U.S. in-
dustry and, especially, financial institu-
tions—which provide the infrastructure for
safe marketplaces to grow—must assume
civil and in some instances, criminal liabil-
ity in order to service state-licensed can-
nabis businesses and ancillary companies.
As a result, the distribution, sale, posses-
sion, research, transaction, housing, employ-
ment, and broader landscape of cannabis is
becoming increasingly problematic. This
only creates more legal and security con-
cerns that impact the operations and safety
of businesses and consumers. More notably,
the lack of available safe harbor for cannabis
will continue to challenge the full adoption
and deployment of the legal hemp and CBD
products market in the U.S. due to the inex-
tricable link between hemp and cannabis.
To help resolve this, we urge Congress to
vote on and pass the SAFE Banking Act or
similar measures, which are meant to create
a safe harbor for depository institutions that
provide a financial product or service to a
covered business in a state which has imple-
mented laws and regulations permitting the
use of cannabis. A safe harbor would not only
enable law enforcement and states to effec-
tively monitor and regulate cannabis trans-
actions and businesses, but it would bring
billions of dollars and tax revenue out of duf-
fel bags and safes and into the regulated
banking sector.
We understand that creating a true federal
regulatory framework for cannabis is a
multi-step process. However, we strongly be-
lieve that the SAFE Banking Act is a crit-
ical first step to ensure that legal cannabis
marketplaces are safe, legal, and trans-
parent.
Thank you for your thoughtful, bipartisan
leadership. We look forward to working with
you on this increasingly important issue.
Sincerely,
American Bankers Association.
Americans for Prosperity.
Council of Insurance Agents and Brokers.
Electronic Transactions Association.
National Association of Mutual Insurance
Companies.
National Association of Professional Em-
ployer Associations.
National Association of REALTORS.
Wholesale & Specialty Insurance Associa-
tion.
f
HONORING HIGHLY DECORATED
HISPANIC AMERICAN VETERAN
SFC JOHN ‘‘DOC’’ ANTHONY
ACEVEDO, U.S. ARMY (RET.)
HON. BRIAN HIGGINS
OF NEW YORK
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. HIGGINS of New York. Madam Speak-
er, I rise to recognize SFC John ‘‘Doc’’ An-
thony Acevedo, U.S. Army (Ret.), a highly
decorated Hispanic American Veteran from
Buffalo, NY. John Anthony Acevedo was born
to Mary and Jorge Acevedo in 1969 and grew
up on Swan Street in downtown Buffalo. His
father was from Hormigueros, Puerto Rico,
and his mother was a Buffalo native who grew
up in Buffalo.
John attended grammar school at St.
Columba Catholic School, then Buffalo Public
School No. 6 Academic Challenge Center, and
Emerson Vocational High School in Buffalo.
Following graduation, he worked as a security
guard at the Larkin building. On March 7,
1989 John Acevedo made the decision to en-
list into the Army as a medic. The basis for
this decision was two-fold. He had a remark-
able gift for putting others at ease, which he
discovered during his time as an altar boy at
St. Columba Catholic School. He felt that this
would make him a great medic. Secondly, he
was inspired by his family’s rich history of mili-
tary service. John’s uncles Rafael Rodriguez
and Augustine Olivencia served in the highly
decorated 65th Infantry Regiment
‘‘Borinqueneers’’. Rafael served in the Korean
War and Augustine served during World War
II. As an effort to give recognition to these
trailblazers the recognition they deserve I co-
sponsored a bill in 2016 to award the Con-
gressional Gold Medal to the ‘‘Borinqueneers’’.
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October 4, 2019 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks E1255
John’s other uncle Joseph Pieracci also
served in the Army during the Korean War.
John’s grandfather, Anthony Grasso, also
served as a medic in WWII. John’s cousin Wil-
mer Olivencia received a Purple Heart, which
I had the honor of presenting him with in 2015
at the Grease Pole festival, for wounds sus-
tained while serving in the U.S. Army during
the Vietnam War, a war in which John’s uncle,
Tony Grasso, also served with the 1st Cal-
vary. John’s cousin Louis Rodriguez, Rafael’s
son, served in Vietnam and is currently retired
from the U.S. Army and is now living outside
of Fort Bragg, North Carolina. John’s nephew
Michael Kerr is currently a member of the Re-
serves after serving in the U.S. Air force.
After joining the Army, John was assigned
as a medic with the 299th Engineer Battalion
upon completion of his basic training at Fort
Knox Kentucky and his medical training in Fort
Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas. John
Acevedo rose through the ranks and eventu-
ally became a Sergeant First Class and
earned the nickname ‘‘Doc’’ because he
oversaw 120 other medics. Sergeant First
Class John Acevedo served nearly 5
1
2
years
overseas in a combat zone. He served 5 tours
of duty in Egypt, Afghanistan, South Korea,
Saudi Arabia, and Iraq.
During his lengthy military career, John
served in the same Task Force as Medal of
Honor recipient David Bellavia, while in the
2nd Brigade Combat, 2nd Infantry Division.
They were part of the Fall of Fallujah, a critical
turning point in the war in Iraq. He also was
selected by Command Sergeant Major of the
10th Mountain Division to be an escort for
former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld
and his Commander picked him to escort Oli-
ver North. John also escorted several enter-
tainers such as those from World Wrestling
Entertainment owned by Vincent McMahon.
Today we recognize John Acevedo for his
26 years of military service earning him a total
of 28 medals and ribbons including the Bronze
Star, Meritorious Service Medal (2nd Award),
Joint Service Commendation Medal (2nd
Award), and the prestigious Combat Medical
Badge. His highest award, the Bronze Star
Medal, was for actions he took as a medic in
Iraqi Freedom. While he was assigned as the
Brigade Sergeants NCO they came under fire.
When he heard a blast in the distance, he
grabbed his gear and medic bag and ran to-
ward the explosion. He simultaneously
searched for casualties and participated in the
counter attack. In doing so, he put his own life
in jeopardy to prevent further casualties, while
saving as many of his fellow soldiers as pos-
sible who were injured while fighting off the
enemy. These awards embody the Staff Ser-
geant’s unparalleled talent, unwavering cour-
age, and insurmountable willpower in advanc-
ing American interests in places of violent con-
flict.
After serving our country for over 26 years,
Sergeant First Class John Acevedo officially
retired from the Army on March 31, 2015.
John’s father once told him that when he was
on the battlefield, he is an American, but he
should never forget his roots as a Hispanic
American. John returned to his family and
friends in Buffalo and went on to further serve
his community, this time much closer to home.
He is currently employed on a nursing team at
the VA Hospital in Buffalo. He is also very ac-
tive with veteran organizations throughout our
community. He is an Alumni of the Wounded
Warrior Project. He is also a member of the
Ft. Drum Retiree Council and a life member of
the Association of the United States Army.
John Anthony Acevedo has 4 children John
Jr., Jorge, Deborah and Ana Maria and two
grandchildren Arayna and Lyric. Several of
John’s family members are currently serving,
continuing his family’s proud legacy of military
service. John’s daughter Deborah is joining
the US Air Force and his nephew Michael Kerr
served in the Air Force and is currently in the
Reserves. John’s cousin Pedro Pabon cur-
rently serves in the Army Reserves.
Today we recognize John Acevedo, as a
true patriot who dedicated his life to serving
our country, serving our community. John is a
great example of the dedication that Hispanic
Americans have for their country and their
community.
f
PERSONAL EXPLANATION
HON. JARED HUFFMAN
OF CALIFORNIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. HUFFMAN. Madam Speaker, I regret
that I had a conflict that caused me to miss
the following vote. I would have voted ‘‘aye’’
on roll call vote 555.
f
CONGRATULATING AND WEL-
COMING AMERICA’S NEWEST
CITIZENS
HON. PETER J. VISCLOSKY
OF INDIANA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. VISCLOSKY. Madam Speaker, it is with
great pleasure and sincerity that I take this
time to congratulate thirty individuals who will
take their oaths of citizenship on October 4,
2019. This memorable occasion will be held at
the United States Courthouse and Federal
Building in Hammond, Indiana.
America is a country founded by immi-
grants. From its beginning, settlers have come
from countries around the world to the United
States in search of better lives for their fami-
lies. Oath ceremonies are a shining example
of what is so great about the United States of
America—that people from all over the world
can come together and unite as members of
a free, democratic nation. These individuals
realize that nowhere else in the world offers a
better opportunity for success than here in
America.
On October. 4, 2019, the following people,
representing many nations throughout the
world, will take their oaths of citizenship in
Hammond, Indiana: Shania Shamar Perry,
Johan Jacques Taljaard, Cirilo Favela, Claude
Mihai Butnaru, Qays Jinan Matti Karo,
Gabriela Hernandez, Steven Esat Karagoz,
Armando Wu, Ravindra Babu Bhogadula,
Maria Mhango, Argelia Cristina Fagre-Rivas,
Ljube Shurdoski, Indiana Jankowski, Fernando
Hernandez, Juan Nieto, Irma Ruiz, Jessica
Tirado Ochoa, Sirak Kifle Negash, Sarah
Hughes, Urmil Raj Kashyap, Guoyun Liu,
Mihaela Roxana Layman, Ana G. Dunnett,
Santiago Loera, Sonia Menchaca, Julieta
Grino Pingol, Lucy Wambui Kiruki, Margaret
Matilda Brewster, Idalia Patricia Ramirez, and
Mehulkumar Soni.
Although each individual has sought to be-
come a citizen of the United States for his or
her own reasons, be it for education, occupa-
tion, or to offer their loved ones better lives,
each is inspired by the fact that the United
States of America is, as Abraham Lincoln de-
scribed it, a country ‘‘. . . of the people, by
the people, and for the people.’’ They realize
that the United States is truly a free nation. By
seeking American citizenship, they have made
the decision that they want to live in a place
where, as guaranteed. by the First Amend-
ment of the Constitution, they can practice reli-
gion as they choose, speak their minds with-
out fear of punishment, and assemble in
peaceful protest should they choose to do so.
Madam Speaker, I respectfully ask you and
my other distinguished colleagues to join me
in congratulating these individuals who will be-
come citizens of the United States of America
on October 4, 2019. They, too, will be Amer-
ican citizens, guaranteed the inalienable rights
to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
We, as a free and democratic nation, con-
gratulate them and welcome them.
f
DEDICATING FAIRFIELD-
VACAVILLE HANNIGAN TRAIN
STATION
HON. JOHN GARAMENDI
OF CALIFORNIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. GARAMENDI. Madam Speaker, we rise
today to celebrate the naming of the Fairfield-
Vacaville train station after our dear friend, As-
semblyman Tom Hannigan.
Tom was elected to the Assembly in 1978
to represent his home town of Fairfield. Rec-
ognizing the importance of connecting our
state capitol with the economic engine of the
San Francisco Bay Area, Hannigan authored
and passed legislation that created a plan for
the development of an intercity commuter train
system to connect the cities. In just four years,
Hannigan was able to turn this plan into reality
with the establishment of the Capitol Corridor
train service that we know today.
Today more than 1.7 million passengers use
the Capitol Corridor annually to commute
along the 168-mile long route, which connects
an entire region between San Jose and Au-
burn. Publicly managed by Amtrak, the train
route maintains some of the highest ridership
rates in our country.
Commissioned in 2008 by the city of Fair-
field, the Fairfield-Vacaville Hannigan Train
Station opened to its first passengers in No-
vember 2017. Over the past two years, the
station has established itself as a model of the
Capitol Corridor’s community-oriented trans-
portation system, with more than 3,600 pas-
sengers who originate their trips from the sta-
tion every month.
By the time of his passing in 2018, Tom
Hannigan had faithfully served his country in
the United States Marine Corps and his com-
munity at the city, county, and state govern-
ment levels for more than a quarter of a cen-
tury. The dedication of the Fairfield-Vacaville
Hannigan Train Station is a fitting memori-
alization of the legacy he has left behind for
his hometown and all of those who continue to
benefit from the Capitol Corridor train service.
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E1256 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks October 4, 2019
RECOGNIZING JOHNNIE RUTH
HUBER BOYD
HON. J. LUIS CORREA
OF CALIFORNIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. CORREA. Madam Speaker, I rise today
to honor Mrs. Johnnie Ruth Huber Boyd. My
constituent, Mrs. Boyd recently visited Wash-
ington, DC, as an Honor Flight Network partic-
ipant to visit the memorials dedicated to honor
the service and sacrifices of other American
veterans like her.
Johnnie, as she is known to her family and
friends, was born September 28, 1924, in
Brownfield, Texas, where cotton farming is still
the backbone of the region. From an early
age, Johnnie worked on her family’s farm and
attended school when she wasn’t needed in
the fields.
At 14 years old, Johnnie moved hundreds of
miles from home to serve as a caretaker for
a family in Lueders, Texas. There, she at-
tended and graduated high school. Thanks to
her tenacity and determination, Ms. Boyd
earned a scholarship to Texas State College
for Women but was unable to submit her ap-
plication in person because she could not af-
ford bus fare.
At 17 years old, while America was em-
broiled in World War II, Johnnie answered the
nation’s call to service by lying about her age
to enlist in the U.S. Navy WAVES or ‘‘Women
Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service.’’
These women held the same status as naval
reservists. Johnnie was among 350,000
women who joined the Armed Services during
WWII, serving at home and abroad.
Upon enlisting in the U.S. Navy, she was
stationed at Hunter’s College in New York
where she received her initial Navy training.
After training, she was transferred to a base in
San Francisco and lived in Berkeley. She took
the ferry into San Francisco each day to board
the ship, on which she served as Store Keep-
er 1st class alongside the paymaster and
other soldiers. During this time, she also con-
tinued her education.
She served from 1941 to 1945, and later
married Raymond Huber, a Master Sargent in
the United States Marine Corps. She went on
to attend Santa Ana College and received her
Associate’s Degree in Business Finance in
1978.
Johnnie, now 94 years old, currently resides
in the City of Orange, where she continues
her service to our great country as an active
community member. She is the proud mother
of 8, grandmother of 17, and great grand-
mother of 10.
Please join me in saluting this WWII veteran
who continues to contribute her wisdom, te-
nacity, and life-long American work ethic to-
ward making America the greatest country in
the world.
f
REMEMBERING THE LIFE OF
WALTER E. GOOD
HON. TIM RYAN
OF OHIO
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. RYAN. Madam Speaker, I rise today to
honor the life of Walter E. Good of Boardman,
Ohio, who passed away on Thursday, Sep-
tember 26, 2019, at the age of 80.
Walter will always be remembered as a car-
ing, loyal and faithful man that stood by the
principles of duty, honor and country. He was
born October 9, 1938, in Youngstown, the son
of Walter P. and Marguerite (Clark) Good and
was a lifelong area resident.
Walter was proud to have grown up on the
east side, where he graduated from East High
School. He then continued his education at
Youngstown State University, where he
earned his two bachelor’s degrees in Mathe-
matics and Engineering, and his master’s de-
gree in Business Administration. With his love
for education, Walter taught part-time at
Youngstown State University.
He was a proud United States Army vet-
eran, who served during the Vietnam Era. For
his service to our country, Walter received the
Good Conduct Medal, the Marksman Badge
and received an Honorable Discharge on June
6, 1963. Walter celebrated his career as an in-
dustrial engineer in the steel industry, ulti-
mately retiring from the United States Postal
Service.
He was a member of the Basilica of Our
Lady of Mount Carmel, its Vestibule Club, and
was a lector for Sunday mass. He also be-
longed to the Penguin Club, the Theta Chi
Fraternity and the Smoky Hollow Golden
Eagle Club. Upon his retirement, Walter took
great pride in maintaining the Smoky Hollow
Memorial.
Walter had many passions in his life. He en-
joyed reading history books and tailgating prior
to the YSU football games. He had a true pas-
sion for sporting events, especially for Ursuline
High School and Youngstown State University.
Walter was so proud of his family, especially
his grandchildren, and always put them at the
center of his life.
Walter leaves behind his high school sweet-
heart and wife of over 57 years, the former
Dolores Lariccia, whom he married June 9,
1962; two children, Walter Michael (Tracy)
Good of Boardman and Nannette (Terry) Ja-
cobs of Youngstown; five grandchildren, whom
he adored, Christine, Michael and Riley Good,
and Caila and Alexis Jacobs; and a sister, Sr.
Brigid (Jeraldine Good) of the Poor Clares
Monastery, Rockford, Illinois. All of whom will
continue Walter’s legacy of kindness, gen-
erosity, and unconditional love.
I am honored to be a long-time friend of Mr.
Good’s son, Walt, who undoubtably inherited
his passion for our community from his father.
Our Valley certainly owes both father and son
a great debt for their service to the commu-
nity. My condolences go out to anyone whose
life was touched by Walter.
f
COLLIER-LEE HONOR FLIGHT
HON. FRANCIS ROONEY
OF FLORIDA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. ROONEY of Florida. Madam Speaker, I
rise today to honor the Collier-Lee Honor
Flight for their above and beyond service to
the veterans of our district. Every year, Collier-
Lee Honor Flight works to take hundreds of
veterans from Southwest Florida to our na-
tion’s capital to visit the memorials that honor
their bravery and sacrifice in service to our
country. These moments are cherished by
those who served, and many of our veterans
would never have the opportunity to see them
without the help of the honor flight.
This past weekend, when one veteran, Paul
Jordan, needed to remain in D.C. due to med-
ical reasons and missed the hero’s welcome
home ceremony event at our airport, Collier-
Lee Honor Flight took it upon themselves to
organize a second patriotic ceremony for
Paul—leaving no man behind. Collier-Lee
Honor Flight members, members of our com-
munity, airport staff, and fellow veterans, all
came together to give him an unforgettable
welcome home.
This above and beyond spirit shines through
in all the efforts of Collier-Lee Honor Flight.
Thank you to Collier-Lee Honor Flight and all
who make these trips possible, those who wel-
come home our veterans, and most impor-
tantly to the veterans who served our country
so bravely.
f
SECURE AND FAIR ENFORCEMENT
BANKING ACT OF 2019
SPEECH OF
HON. ED PERLMUTTER
OF COLORADO
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Wednesday, September 25, 2019
Mr. PERLMUTTER. Madam Speaker, while
the SAFE Banking Act focuses on harmo-
nizing federal and state banking laws regard-
ing serving legitimate cannabis businesses
and their service providers, there are still sev-
eral issues where the federal government
could provide more clarity. The Department of
Treasury and its regulatory agencies should
issue guidance on behalf of all federally li-
censed businesses engaging in, or consid-
ering engaging in, the legal cannabis trade, or
Hemp and CBD trade, with respect to their en-
gagement in a legal business.
f
HONORING THE SERVICE OF
LARRY SLY
HON. MARK DeSAULNIER
OF CALIFORNIA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Friday, October 4, 2019
Mr. DESAULNIER. Madam Speaker, I rise
today to recognize the service of long-time
community activist and leader, Larry Sly.
Larry Sly graduated from UC Berkeley and
quickly became an advocate and leader in
Contra Costa County. Starting his career with
the Food Bank as a truck driver, Larry became
a prominent volunteer for the Food Bank of
Contra Costa and Solano Counties and in
1976 was elevated to Executive Director. Dur-
ing his decades of leadership, the Food Bank
grew exponentially, distributing 36,000 pounds
of food in his first year to over 20 million
pounds of food in 2018.
A food security advocate, Larry has been
actively involved in organizations such as the
Concord Rotary Club and has served on the
Board of Directors for the California Associa-
tion of Food Banks. Larry has served on state
advisory committees on hunger and food se-
curity and has helped many California cities
develop successful food banks.
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October 4, 2019 CONGRESSIONAL RECORD—Extensions of Remarks E1257
He has also used his advocacy and exper-
tise to solve hunger issues on the national
stage. Larry was a member of Feeding Amer-
ica and served as Vice Chair of the Board of
Directors and as an elected member of the
National Council (NAC). He has received nu-
merous awards across the country for his
commitment to providing accessible food and
resources for those in need.
Larry Sly is a champion of supporting fami-
lies in his community and nationwide. Please
join me in congratulating Larry for his dedi-
cated service, and in wishing him great luck
and joy in retirement.
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Created Date20191005085648Z