2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Maryland

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2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Maryland

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →

All 8 Maryland seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 7 1
Seats won 7 1
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 1,912,740 1,028,150
Percentage 64.75% 34.8%
Swing Decrease 0.55% Increase 2.52%

2020 U.S. House elections in Maryland.svg

The 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Maryland was held on November 3, 2020, to elect the eight U.S. Representatives from the state of Maryland, one from each of the state's eight congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. On March 17, 2020, Governor Larry Hogan announced that the primary election would be postponed from April 28 to June 2 due to coronavirus concerns.[1] On March 26, the Maryland Board of Elections met to consider whether in-person voting should be used for June's primary, and recommended that voting in June be mail-in only.[2]

District 1[edit]

The 1st district encompasses the entire Eastern Shore of Maryland, including Salisbury, as well as parts of Baltimore, Harford and Carroll counties. The incumbent is Republican Andy Harris, who was reelected with 60.0% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Mia Mason, Veteran of the United States Navy, Army and District of Columbia National Guard, 2018 Green candidate for the U.S. Senate from Maryland[4][5][6]
  • Jennifer Pingley, registered nurse[7][6]
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Allison Galbraith, Democratic candidate for Maryland's 1st congressional district in 2018[8][6]
  • Erik Lane, technology consultant and businessman[6]

Endorsements[edit]

Jennifer Pingley
  • Wayne Gilchrest, former Congressman, Maryland District 1[9]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mia Mason 25,772 42.8
Democratic Allison Galbraith 22,386 37.2
Democratic Jennifer Pingley 12,040 20.0
Total votes 60,198 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Jorge Delgado, former congressional staffer, activist[4][6]
  • Andy Harris, incumbent U.S. Representative[6]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andy Harris (incumbent) 72,265 81.6
Republican Jorge Delgado 16,281 18.4
Total votes 88,546 100.0

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[11] Safe R July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[12] Safe R June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[13] Safe R July 2, 2020
Politico[14] Safe R April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[15] Safe R June 3, 2020
RCP[16] Safe R June 9, 2020
Niskanen[17] Safe R June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

Maryland's 1st congressional district, 2020[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andy Harris (incumbent) 250,901 63.4
Democratic Mia Mason 143,877 36.4
Write-in 746 0.2
Total votes 395,524 100.0
Republican hold

District 2[edit]

The 2nd district encompasses the suburbs of Baltimore, including Brooklyn Park, Towson, Nottingham, and Dundalk, and also includes a small part of eastern Baltimore. The incumbent is Democrat Dutch Ruppersberger, who was reelected with 66.0% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dutch Ruppersberger (incumbent) 82,167 73.3
Democratic Michael Feldman 20,222 18.0
Democratic Jake Pretot 9,780 8.7
Total votes 112,169 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Johnny Ray Salling 5,942 19.1
Republican Genevieve Morris 5,134 16.5
Republican Tim Fazenbaker 5,123 16.4
Republican Richard Impallaria 5,061 16.2
Republican Jim Simpson 4,764 15.3
Republican Scott M. Collier 3,564 11.4
Republican Blaine Taylor 1,562 5.0
Total votes 31,150 100.0

Independents[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[11] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[12] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[13] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[14] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[15] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[16] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[17] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

Maryland's 2nd congressional district, 2020[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dutch Ruppersberger (incumbent) 224,836 67.7
Republican Johnny Ray Salling 106,355 32.0
Write-in 835 0.3
Total votes 332,026 100.0
Democratic hold

District 3[edit]

The 3rd district runs along the I-95 corridor from Annapolis into parts of southern and southeastern Baltimore and the northern Baltimore suburbs of Parkville and Pikesville. It also stretches into the Washington, D.C. suburb of Olney. The incumbent is Democrat John Sarbanes, who was reelected with 69.1% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Sarbanes (incumbent) 110,457 82.5
Democratic Joseph C. Ardito 17,877 13.4
Democratic John M. Rea 5,571 4.2
Total votes 133,905 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Charles Anthony, retired Lt. Colonel of the U.S. Army[27]
  • Thomas E. "Pinkston" Harris, perennial candidate[27]
  • Reba A. Hawkins, community activist[27]
  • Joshua M. Morales, political candidate[27]
  • Rob Seyfferth, grocery store clerk[27]
Withdrawn[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Charles Anthony 12,040 41.7
Republican Reba A. Hawkins 6,535 22.6
Republican Thomas E. "Pinkston" Harris 4,623 16.0
Republican Rob Seyfferth 3,210 11.1
Republican Joshua M. Morales 2,487 8.6
Total votes 28,895 100.0

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[11] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[12] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[13] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[14] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[15] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[16] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[17] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

Maryland's 3rd congressional district, 2020[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Sarbanes (incumbent) 260,358 69.8
Republican Charles Anthony 112,117 30.0
Write-in 731 0.2
Total votes 373,206 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4[edit]

The 4th district encompasses parts of the Washington, D.C. suburbs in Prince George's County, including Landover, Laurel, and Suitland. It also extends into central Anne Arundel County, including Severna Park. The incumbent is Democrat Anthony G. Brown, who was reelected with 78.1% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Shelia Bryant
Organizations

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Anthony G. Brown (incumbent) 110,232 77.6
Democratic Shelia Bryant 26,735 18.8
Democratic Kim A. Shelton 5,044 3.6
Total votes 142,011 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Nnabu Eze, Republican candidate for US Senate in 2018, Green candidate for Maryland's 3rd congressional district in 2016[42][30]
  • Eric Loeb, anti-gerrymandering activist[30]
  • George E. McDermott, Republican candidate for Maryland's 4th congressional district in 2018, Democratic candidate for Maryland's 4th congressional district in 2012[43][30]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican George E. McDermott 11,131 56.4
Republican Nnabu Eze 4,512 22.9
Republican Eric Loeb 4,098 20.8
Total votes 19,741 100.0

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[11] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[12] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[13] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[14] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[15] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[16] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[17] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

Maryland's 4th congressional district, 2020[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Anthony Brown (incumbent) 282,119 79.6
Republican George McDermott 71,671 20.2
Write-in 739 0.2
Total votes 354,529 100.0
Democratic hold

District 5[edit]

The 5th district is based in southern Maryland, and encompasses Charles, St. Mary's, Calvert counties and a small portion of southern Anne Arundel County, as well as the Washington, D.C. suburbs of College Park, Bowie, and Upper Marlboro. The incumbent is Democrat Steny Hoyer, the current House Majority Leader, who was reelected with 70.3% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • William A. Devine III, 2018 Republican nominee for the 5th district[44][45]
  • Vanessa Marie Hoffman, businesswoman[45]
  • Steny Hoyer, incumbent U.S. Representative[45][46]
  • Briana Urbina, former special education teacher and civil rights attorney[45][47]
  • Mckayla Wilkes, activist[45][48]

Endorsements[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Steny Hoyer (incumbent) 96,664 64.4
Democratic Mckayla Wilkes 40,105 26.7
Democratic Vanessa Marie Hoffman 6,357 4.2
Democratic Briana Urbina 4,091 2.7
Democratic William Devine 2,851 1.9
Total votes 150,068 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Bryan DuVal Cubero, veteran[45]
  • Lee Havis, IMS executive director[45]
  • Kenneth Lee, firefighter[45]
  • Chris Palombi, former policeman[45]
  • Doug Sayers, veteran[45]
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Mark S. Leishear, former political candidate[45]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Chris Palombi 11,761 36.0
Republican Doug Sayers 9,727 29.8
Republican Kenneth Lee 5,008 15.3
Republican Lee Havis 3,593 11.0
Republican Bryan DuVal Cubero 2,585 7.9
Total votes 32,674 100.0

Independents[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[11] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[12] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[13] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[14] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[15] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[16] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[17] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

Maryland's 5th congressional district, 2020[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Steny Hoyer (incumbent) 274,210 68.8
Republican Chris Palombi 123,525 31.0
Write-in 1,104 0.3
Total votes 398,839 100.0
Democratic hold

District 6[edit]

The 6th district is based in western Maryland, and covers all of Garrett, Allegany, and Washington counties, and parts of Frederick County. It also extends south into the Washington, D.C. suburbs in Montgomery County, including Potomac and Germantown. The incumbent is Democrat David Trone, who was elected with 59.0% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Trone (incumbent) 65,655 72.4
Democratic Maxwell Bero 25,037 27.6
Total votes 90,692 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Neil Parrott 28,804 65.2
Republican Kevin T. Caldwell 11,258 25.5
Republican Chris P. Meyyur 4,113 9.3
Total votes 44,175 100.0

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[11] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[12] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[13] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[14] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[15] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[16] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[17] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

Maryland's 6th congressional district, 2020[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic David Trone (incumbent) 215,540 58.8
Republican Neil Parrott 143,599 39.2
Green George Gluck 6,893 1.9
Write-in 402 0.1
Total votes 366,434 100.0
Democratic hold

District 7[edit]

The 7th district is centered around the city of Baltimore, and includes Downtown Baltimore as well as northern and western Baltimore. It also extends into the western Baltimore suburbs of Woodlawn, Catonsville, Ellicott City, and Columbia, and rural northern Baltimore County. The incumbent was Democrat Elijah Cummings, who was reelected with 76.4% of the vote in 2018.[3] Cummings died in office on October 17, 2019.[60] Former congressman Kweisi Mfume won the special election on April 28, 2020, with 73.5% of the vote.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kweisi Mfume (incumbent) 113,061 74.3
Democratic Maya Rockeymoore Cummings 15,208 10.0
Democratic Jill P. Carter 13,237 8.7
Democratic Alicia D. Brown 1,841 1.2
Democratic Charles Stokes 1,356 0.9
Democratic T. Dan Baker 1,141 0.7
Democratic Jay Jalisi 1,056 0.7
Democratic Harry Spikes 1,040 0.7
Democratic Saafir Rabb 948 0.6
Democratic Mark Gosnell 765 0.5
Democratic Darryl Gonzalez 501 0.3
Democratic Jeff Woodard 368 0.2
Democratic Gary Schuman 344 0.2
Democratic Michael D. Howard, Jr. 327 0.2
Democratic Michael Davidson 298 0.2
Democratic Dan L. Hiegel 211 0.1
Democratic Charles U. Smith 189 0.1
Democratic Matko Lee Chullin 187 0.1
Democratic Adrian Petrus 170 0.1
Total votes 152,248 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Withdrawn[edit]
  • Christopher M. Anderson — withdrew candidacy on December 9, 2019[61]
  • Reba A. Hawkins, community activist — withdrew candidacy on January 24, 2020[61]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Kimberly Klacik 16,465 68.8
Republican Liz Matory 3,401 14.2
Republican William T. Newton 1,271 5.3
Republican Ray Bly 1,234 5.2
Republican Brian L. Brown 1,134 4.7
Republican M.J. Madwolf 442 1.8
Total votes 23,947 100.0

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[11] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[12] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[13] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[14] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[15] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[16] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[17] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

Maryland's 7th congressional district, 2020[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kweisi Mfume (incumbent) 237,084 71.6
Republican Kimberly Klacik 92,825 28.0
Write-in 1,089 0.3
Total votes 330,998 100.0
Democratic hold

District 8[edit]

The 8th district stretches from the northern Washington, D.C. suburbs north toward the Pennsylvania border. It is represented by Democrat Jamie Raskin, who was reelected with 68.2% of the vote in 2018.[3]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jamie Raskin (incumbent) 111,894 86.8
Democratic Marcia H. Morgan 10,236 7.9
Democratic Lih Young 4,874 3.8
Democratic Utam Paul 1,885 1.5
Total votes 128,889 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
  • Gregory Thomas Coll[81]
  • Bridgette L. Cooper,[81] opera singer and a former music educator, 2018 Republican candidate in the 8th district[82]
  • Nicholas Gladden, Businessman and contractor[81]
  • Patricia Rogers[81]
  • Shelly Skolnick[81]
  • Michael Yadeta, Businessman and engineer[81]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results[10]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Gregory Thomas Coll 13,070 41.8
Republican Bridgette L. Cooper 4,831 15.4
Republican Nicholas Gladden 4,019 12.8
Republican Patricia Rogers 3,868 12.4
Republican Shelly Skolnick 2,979 9.5
Republican Michael Yadeta 2,526 8.1
Total votes 31,293 100.0

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[11] Safe D July 2, 2020
Inside Elections[12] Safe D June 2, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[13] Safe D July 2, 2020
Politico[14] Safe D April 19, 2020
Daily Kos[15] Safe D June 3, 2020
RCP[16] Safe D June 9, 2020
Niskanen[17] Safe D June 7, 2020

Results[edit]

Maryland's 8th congressional district, 2020[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jamie Raskin (incumbent) 274,716 68.2
Republican Gregory Thomas Coll 127,157 31.6
Write-in 741 0.2
Total votes 402,614 100.0
Democratic hold

References[edit]

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External links[edit]

Official campaign websites for 1st district candidates
Official campaign websites for 2nd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 3rd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 4th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 5th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 6th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 7th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 8th district candidates