10 Most Popular Spanish Spirits And Liqueurs - TasteAtlas
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What to drink in Spain? 10 Most Popular Spanish Spirits and Liqueurs

Last update: Thu Jan 14 2021
10 Most Popular Spanish Spirits and Liqueurs
10

Honey Liqueur

Ronmiel de Canarias

CANARY ISLANDS, Spain
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Ronmiel de Canarias
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Ronmiel de Canarias is a traditional liqueur made with honey and rum. As the name suggests, it hails from the Canary Islands, where it was initially mixed in homes and bars, while the commercial production started in the 1950s. Ronmiel is a clear liqueur with a color that ranges from golden yellow to mahogany.


It is a sweet drink with honey and caramel-like aroma and flavor, while the alcohol content varies between 20% and 30%. Traditionally, it is enjoyed neat, preferably as a digestif.

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09

Spirit

Chinchón

CHINCHÓN, Spain
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Chinchón is an anise-based spirit hailing from a namesake city located in the Community of Madrid. The drink is distilled from a macerate of green anise seeds that are steeped in neutral alcohol and water. Depending on its sweetness, Chinchón comes in three different varieties: special dry, dry, and sweet.


Dry versions are mainly enjoyed as a drink, while the sweet Chinchón is often incorporated into desserts. Like other types of anise-based beverages, this Spanish version is also traditionally mixed with water to produce a cloudy drink that is best enjoyed as a digestif. 
08

Coffee Liqueur

Café licor

ALCOI, Spain
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This coffee liqueur hails from Alcoy, though it is popular throughout Alicante and in Valencia. It is made by roasting coffee beans and then macerating them in a distillate. Typical alcohol content varies from 15 to 25% ABV. Unlike other types of coffee liqueurs, this version is not sweet or syrupy.


The legend says it was developed from the tradition of adding a splash of aguardiente, rum, or brandy to coffee. The combination became popular among the citizens of Alcoy, and many decided to produce and bottle the drink. This dark liquor has typical coffee aromas and flavors and is best served neat, preferably well-chilled.

07
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Hierbas ibicenas are liqueurs for Ibiza made with various herbs that are macerated in an anise-based spirit. This liqueur has a long tradition on the island, and though it is produced on an industrial scale, many locals use their traditional family recipes and forage local Mediterranean plants to make homemade versions of the drink.


A bottle of this liqueur can include dozen different aromatics. Standard options include chamomile, laurel, rosemary, thyme, lavender, fennel, mint, oregano, sage, lemon verbena, wormwood, and even orange and lemon zest. The drink is aromatic and herbaceous and is best enjoyed as a digestif.

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06

Herbal Liqueur

Anís

SPAIN and  2 more regions
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Anisette, anisetta, or simply anis is a term that encompasses various anise-based liqueurs. These types of liqueurs don’t have a single origin, but they are mostly associated with Mediterranean countries, such as Italy, Spain, France, Greece, and Turkey.


The drink is mostly distilled from a base that is flavored with anise plant, sometimes together with other botanicals. The distillate is then usually sweetened or additional flavored. Most varieties range from 40 to 60% ABV. Anise liqueurs are usually enjoyed neat, mixed with water, or served over ice, but they can also be added to espresso (café corretto), or incorporated into cocktails and long drinks.

05

Herbal Liqueur

Palo de Mallorca

MALLORCA, Spain
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Palo de Mallorca is a dark-colored liqueur flavored with cinchona bark and gentian root. It is a dense and sweet liqueur with a bitter aftertaste and caramel and licorice aromas that can only be produced in Mallorca. Like similar types of herbal liqueurs, palo de Mallorca was initially used as a bitter health remedy.


In the 19th century, the original recipe was improved with the addition of sugar and alcohol. With these additions, it became more palatable and consequently more popular. Palo de Mallorca is mostly enjoyed as an aperitif, usually mixed with sparkling or soda water. 
04

Spirit

Brandy de Jerez

PROVINCE OF CÁDIZ, Spain
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Brandy de Jerez is a type of Spanish brandy that is made in the sherry triangle. It has to be aged using the traditional solera system, and the maturation has to take place in the barrels that were previously used for sherry production.


Airén is the most common grape variety used in the production of Jerez brandy. Despite some differences that are mainly dependent on the age and the barrel, brandy de Jerez usually varies from golden brown to mahogany. On the nose, it displays spicy, roasty, and woody notes. 
03

Fruit Liqueur

Pacharán

NAVARRE, Spain
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Pacharán is a sloe-flavored liqueur that is mostly associated with Navarre, but it is also enjoyed in other Spanish regions. The drink is made by macerating sloes (blackthorn) in an anise-flavored spirit. Sometimes, bay leaves, roasted coffee beans, herbs, or spices can be added to the mix.


The sloes are macerated for several months until the liqueur attains a distinctive mahogany hue. The resulting drink is sweet, pleasant, and potent—alcohol content typically falls between 25-30% ABV. Pacharán has a long history, dating back to the Middle Ages. 
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02

Fruit Liqueur

Licor 43

CARTAGENA, Spain
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Also known as Cuarenta y Tres, which translates as forty-three, this sweet liqueur was first produced in the 1940s by Diego Zamora and other members of the Zamora family who claim that their recipe was based on an ancient liqueur known as liqvor mirabilis (marvelous liquid).


Although the exact recipe is secret, the liqueur is made with precisely forty-three ingredients—hence the name. After it is aged and filtered, the final result is a smooth and dense golden-colored drink with aromas reminiscent of vanilla, citrus fruit, and spices. Licor 43 can be served well-chilled, preferably on the rocks and enjoyed as a digestif, but it is also commonly incorporated into cocktails and mixed drinks. 
01

Brandy

Orujo

SPAIN
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Orujo is an ancient Spanish pomace brandy that is enjoyed throughout the country, but it is usually associated with northern Spain—namely Galicia, León, and Asturias. In its basic form, orujo comes as a clear, strong spirit with an alcohol content that varies between 40-50%.


The drink is occasionally aged or infused with various ingredients such as herbs and fruits. It is usually served in shot glasses, locally known as chupito, and is best enjoyed as a digestif, which is meant to be slowly sipped. In the past, it was mostly home-produced, but in recent years many factory-produced orujo brandies appeared on the market. 
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Spanish Spirits and Liqueurs
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