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New England

region, United States
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New England, region, northeastern United States, including the states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.

Waving American flag. Flag of the United States of America, United States flag, patriotic, patriotism, stars and stripes.
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The region was named by Capt. John Smith, who explored its shores in 1614 for some London merchants. New England was soon settled by English Puritans whose aversion to idleness and luxury served admirably the need of fledgling communities where the work to be done was so prodigious and the hands so few. During the 17th century the population’s high esteem for an educated clergy and enlightened leadership encouraged the development of public schools as well as such institutions of higher learning as Harvard (1636) and Yale (1701). Isolated from the mother country, New England colonies evolved representative governments, stressing town meetings, an expanded franchise, and civil liberties. The area was initially distinguished by the self-sufficient farm, but its abundant forests, streams, and harbours soon promoted the growth of a vigorous shipbuilding industry as well as of seaborne commerce across the Atlantic Ocean.

In the 18th century, New England became a hotbed of revolutionary agitation for independence from Great Britain, and its patriots played leading roles in establishing the new nation of the United States of America. In the early decades of the republic, the region strongly supported a national tariff and the policies of the Federalist Party. In the 19th century, New England was characterized culturally by its literary flowering and a deep evangelical dedication that frequently manifested itself in zeal for reform: temperance, abolition of slavery, improvements in prisons and insane asylums, and an end to child labour. The antislavery movement finally came to predominate, however, and New England stoutly supported the cause of the Union in the American Civil War (1861–65).

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As the American frontier pushed westward, migrants from New England transplanted their region’s patterns of culture and government to new frontiers in the Midwest. The Industrial Revolution successfully invaded New England in this period, and manufacturing came to dominate the economy. Such products as textiles, shoes, clocks, and hardware were distributed as far west as the Mississippi River by the itinerant Yankee peddler. Both before and after the American Civil War, a new labour force from Ireland and eastern Europe flooded New England’s urban centres, causing an ethnic revolution and forcing the traditional Protestant religions to share their authority with Roman Catholicism.

The 20th century witnessed many changes in New England. In the years following World War II, the region’s once-flourishing textile and leather-goods industries virtually deserted the region for locations farther south. This loss came to be offset by advances in the transport-equipment industry and such high-technology industries as electronics, however, and by the late 20th century New England’s continued prosperity seemed assured owing to the proliferation of high-technology and service-based economic enterprises in the region.

The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica This article was most recently revised and updated by Jeff Wallenfeldt, Manager, Geography and History.
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