2015 Paris Attacks Suspect: Deaths Of 130 “nothing Personal”
Connect with us

News

2015 Paris attacks suspect: Deaths of 130 “nothing personal

Published

on

2015 Paris attacks suspect: Deaths of 130 “nothing personal”

PARIS — The key defendant in the 2015 Paris attacks trial said Wednesday that the Islamic State network which struck the city was attacking France, and that the deaths of 130 people was “nothing personal.”

Wearing all black and declining to remove his black mask, Salah Abdeslam was the last of the 14 defendants present in the custom-built courtroom to speak.

Nine Islamic State group gunmen and suicide bombers struck within minutes of one another at several locations around Paris on Nov. 13, 2015, beginning at the national soccer stadium and ending with a bloodbath inside the Bataclan concert hall. It was the deadliest violence to strike France since World War II and among the worst terror attacks to hit the West.

Abdeslam is the only survivor of that cell, most of whose members were French or Belgian. He fled the city after discarding his malfunctioning suicide vest. The two people he called upon to drive through the night from Brussels to Paris and pick him up are among the 20 men on trial. Six are being tried in absentia.

Advertisement google news
Click to comment

News

Man convicted of 2017 quadruple homicide in Glasgow Village

Published

on

Man convicted of 2017 quadruple homicide in Glasgow Village

ST. LOUIS COUNTY – A St. Louis County jury convicted 24-year-old Ja’Vonne Dupree of four counts of Murder 1st Degree and numerous other counts of felony charges just before midnight on Friday, October 8. The conviction came after four days of evidence and arguments and deliberating almost to midnight.

First-degree murder carries the mandatory penalty of life in prison without eligibility of parole.

These crimes were committed by Dupree on August 24, 2017 in Glasgow Village. The incident was investigated by the St. Louis County Police Department.

Dupree was arrested and charged in December of 2017.

The jury decided that the defendant shot and killed each of the victims, robbed the victims of electronics and clothing, picked up multiple shell casings, and fled the murder scene in one of the victims’ car with the stolen items.

The victims were 18-year-old Deandre Kelley, 56-year-old Patricia Steward, her 20-year-old son Joseph Corley and her 10-year-old adopted son Terrance DeHart.

Family members of the victims testified that Dupree was a homeless youth who was taken in by the family’s matriarch. This family member was a hip-hop producer who worked with Dupree as a rapper. The murders and other crimes were committed after being put out of the family home by one of the victims.

“The unimaginable suffering of an amazing and loving family does not end with these guilty verdicts, but at least they know that justice has been served and that they were intimately involved in the success of this investigation and prosecution,” said St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Wesley Bell. “This family, our dedicated trial team, meticulous police detectives and a fair and reasonable jury worked late into the night for a guilty verdict, in the second of two separate murder trials on Friday, that brought justice and hopefully closure to both families.”

Continue Reading

News

Justin Barron, 19, played role of Cale Makar in Avalanche’s final preseason game

Published

on

Justin Barron, 19, played role of Cale Makar in Avalanche’s final preseason game

Minus the top defensive pairing of Cale Makar and Devon Toews, the Avalanche on Saturday featured a big-league lineup plus a teenager.

It was the preseason finale at Ball Arena, where superstar center Nathan MacKinnon scored twice and rookie defenseman Justin Barron gave the club a final look with nothing at stake.

Barron, 19, will either make the Avs’ opening-night roster or be reassigned to the American Hockey League’s Colorado Eagles. The Avs are carrying 10 defensemen, and if Toews is placed on injured reserve, the club would have to make just one move on the blue line to get down to the maximum 23 players ahead of Wednesday’s opener against the visiting Chicago Blackhawks.

Toews is recovering from offseason shoulder surgery and is expected to miss at least the opener. Makar, who underwent an offseason medical procedure but practiced Friday for the first time in a regular jersey, was originally scheduled to make his preseason debut against the Dallas Stars on Saturday.

Perhaps he didn’t play so Barron, the Avs’ 2020 first-round draft pick, could play Makar’s role on the top pairing and lead the No. 1 power play. Barron partnered with Sam Girard at even strength and ran the top power play with MacKinnon, Mikko Rantanen, Gabe Landeskog and J.T. Compher. He also killed penalties in Colorado’s 4-2 victory to finish 2-4 in the preseason.

MacKinnon scored early in the first period and Rantanen struck on the power play midway through the second. Second-line winger Andre Burakovsky had the primary assist on both goals. MacKinnon scored his second early in the third off a great play/pass by Rantanen. Compher scored a 180-foot empty-net goal in the final minutes.

Goalie Jonas Johansson, who will begin the season as Darcy Kuemper’s backup, played the entire game and stopped 18 shots.

Continue Reading

News

Army general who commanded in Iraq dies of cancer at age 67

Published

on

Army general who commanded in Iraq dies of cancer at age 67

WASHINGTON — Raymond T. Odierno, a retired Army general who commanded American and coalition forces in Iraq at the height of the war and capped a 39-year career by serving as the Army’s chief of staff, has died, his family said Saturday. He was 67.

“The general died after a brave battle with cancer; his death was not related to COVID,” a family statement said. “There are no other details to share at this time. His family is grateful for the concern and asks for privacy.”

Odierno died Friday; the family declined to say where. It said funeral and interment information was not yet available.

President Joe Biden lauded Odierno as a “hero of great integrity and honor.” In a joint statement, the president and First Lady Jill Biden recalled that Odierno spoke at the funeral of their son Beau, who served under Odierno in Iraq and died of brain cancer in 2015.

“Ray was a giant in military circles — dedicated first and always to the service members he commanded and served alongside,” the Bidens said, adding that Odierno and his wife Linda were advocates for military children and families.

“We stand with the Odierno family and all our brave service members who were shaped and molded by General Odierno over his lifetime of service,” they said.

At 6-foot-5, Odierno was an imposing figure. He played football as a cadet at West Point and retained a lifelong interest in the sport. Army Secretary Christine Wormuth wrote on Twitter Saturday evening that Odierno embodied the values of West Point and of the Army itself.

“A leader who was larger than life, we will remember him always for his selfless service to our nation and to our soldiers in and out of uniform,” she wrote.

Odierno served three tours in Iraq. After his first, in 2003-04 as commander of the 4th Infantry Division, he was criticized by some for overly aggressive tactics that some believed fed an insurgency. At an early high water mark, in December 2003, his soldiers involved in the capture of Iraq’s deposed president, Saddam Hussein. That success gave hope to quashing an emerging insurgency, but in 2004 the insurgency gained greater momentum and led to the deadly rise of al-Qaida in Iraq.

Odierno returned to Iraq in 2008 and served for two years as served as commander of Multi-National Corps-Iraq. He then took over as the top overall U.S. and coalition commander in Baghdad, leaving in 2010 as combat was winding down. He was succeeded in that post by Gen. Lloyd Austin, who is now the secretary of defense.

A native of Rockaway, New Jersey, Odierno graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, in 1976 with a commission in field artillery. He served in a wide range of Army and Defense Department roles with multiple tours abroad, including in Iraq, Germany, Albania and Kuwait. As a three-star general he was assistant to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, a job that made him the main military adviser to the secretary of state.

When Odierno retired in 2015, he was succeeded as Army chief of staff by Gen. Mark Milley, the current Joint Chiefs chairman.

At a ceremony marking his retirement from the Army, then-Defense Secretary Ashton Carter described him as a commander whose tenacity and operational savvy gave civilian leaders great confidence.

“His commanding presence calmed the confused, and his courage and compassion helped carry the burden of loss and sacrifice,” Carter said.

Three months ago, North Carolina State University announced that Odierno had joined its board of trustees. In 1986 he earned a Master of Science degree in nuclear effects engineering from North Carolina State. He was president of Odierno Associates, a consulting firm in Pinehurst, North Carolina.

Continue Reading

News

Illinois woman arrested for first-degree murder of five-month-old

Published

on

Illinois woman arrested for first-degree murder of five-month-old

CANTON, Ill. (WMBD) — A Canton woman has been arrested and charged with first-degree murder of a five-month-old infant.

Joslynn M. Graham, 23, is now in custody.

The investigation is ongoing and no other information is available at this time.

There is no word if the child is related to Graham.

WMBD will bring you more as information becomes available.

Continue Reading

News

Keeler: Steve Addazio’s CSU Rams are everything Karl Dorrell’s CU Buffs aren’t right now: Confident. Efficient. Physical. And beasts in the run game.

Published

on

Keeler: Steve Addazio’s CSU Rams are everything Karl Dorrell’s CU Buffs aren’t right now: Confident. Efficient. Physical. And beasts in the run game.

FORT COLLINS — Can you imagine what would happen if CSU played CU in football right now?

Seriously. Line them up in Loveland. Estes Park. Budapest. Wherever. Doesn’t matter.

The Rams win by two touchdowns. Minimum.

“This is a team where you see everything (clicking) on all cylinders,” CSU defensive lineman Scott Patchan said after his Rams throttled San Jose State 32-14 on a sunny Homecoming Saturday at Canvas Stadium.

“We feed off that energy, obviously. Momentum is huge in college football.”

Amen, brother. And right now, after a horrid start, Team Daz is riding that momentum back to relevance. CSU has done an almost complete 180 from the motley crew that got de-pantsed by South Dakota State and shamed by (cough) Vanderbilt.

For the better part of the last three weeks, the Rams (2-3) have embodied (and grasped) everything that the Buffs (1-4) have not: Running the ball, swarming, tackling, running the ball, getting their defense off the field, running the ball, an efficient passing game that hits the occasional triple, a minimum of mental mistakes and RUNNING THE BALL.

“Play great defense, (an) ability to run the football, no turnovers, great in special teams, because that’s field-changing, score in the red zone. That’s our plan to win,” offered CSU coach Steve Addazio, who’s now won two of three, with a close loss at No. 3 Iowa sandwiched in between, since Sept. 18. “We just want to keep on this course right now.”

And here’s the refreshing part: Not only did CSU ramble for 217 yards on 53 carries against a Spartans defense that came in allowing just 141.3 on the ground per game. Not only did the Rams pound it when they wanted to pound it.

They managed all that minus three starters on offense: wideout Dante Wright, running back David Bailey and left guard Vincent Picozzi.

No Wright. No Bailey. No Picozzi. And no excuses.

“That’s who we’re supposed to be,” said quarterback Todd Centeio, who completed 19 of 23 throws on the day, which tied him with Moses Moreno (1996) for the fourth-most accurate passing performance (82.6%) in CSU football history. “We’re all Division I athletes for a reason.”

Like the man said, momentum is huge in college football. After dropping a gift from the football gods at Empower Field against Texas A&M, the Buffs got hammered at home by Minnesota and USC, and coach Karl Dorrell was pushing postgame cameras out of his face like Sean Penn.

Meanwhile, UNC beat Northern Arizona at home in overtime, 17-10, only for Ed McCaffrey’s Bears to get outscored 103-24 by Montana State and Eastern Washington over their next two tilts. McCaffrey’s son, offensive coordinator Max McCaffrey, was reprimanded after apparently hurling a piece of a clipboard into the crowd following the Montana State loss.

Almost everywhere you turn along the Front Range, college football has turned into Meltdown City.

Everywhere, that is, except in FoCo.

“One thing Coach Addazio always preaches is steadying the boat,” Centeio continued. “You have to be calm, cool and collected, no matter what’s going on … (if) the foundation is love and trust, we’ll be fine.”

We’ll grant you that the Spartans’ 3-2 record coming in was a softer 3-2 than most. San Jose State’s backup quarterback, Nick Nash, brings some of the same traits to the table as CU’s Brendon Lewis. And some of the same glaring issues — the forward pass, mainly — when stuck playing from behind. High winds at Canvas were swirling, turning any throw or punt sent higher than 10 feet up into an adventure.

All of which helped, to be sure. But if once is a fluke and twice is a worry, three times is a pattern.

Exhibit A: CSU’s rush defense. First two games: 71 opponent runs, 346 opponent yards, 4.9 per carry. Since: Three tilts, 91 opponent runs, 182 yards, 2.0 per carry.

Exhibit B: CSU’s third-down defense. First two games: 11 opponent conversions on 29 attempts (37.9%). Since: Three tilts, 12 conversions on 43 attempts (27.9%).

Exhibit C: CSU’s penalties. First two games: 16 flags for 165 yards in losses, or 83 lost per game. Since: Three tilts, 18 flags for 153 yards, or 51 lost per game.

“I think it all starts with playing great defense,” Adazzio said. “I heard some commentary that just blew my circuits about — I don’t know when it was, maybe it was (Alabama) coach (Nick) Saban? I don’t know why he said it, because he’s a defensive guy. You win championships with great defense. That’s not going out of style … and we’re playing really good defense right now.”

Bonus: Nobody pushed a television camera. That we know of.

Double bonus: No Rams coaches tossed a piece of clipboard into the stands. Also that we know of.

“We’re shooting,” Centeio said with a grin, “for the stars.”

Love and trust, baby. Love and trust.

Continue Reading

News

Scouts bring back Soap Box Derby in Longmont on Saturday, with plans to continue and expand

Published

on

Scouts bring back Soap Box Derby in Longmont on Saturday, with plans to continue and expand

After lowering themselves down into their long, narrow cars, kids either leaned forward, grabbing the reins to steer their car forward and down the hill, or sat back, ready to let the car do all the work.

When they were given the signal, some kids hastily rolled forward and sped off down the hill. Others had a bit more trouble getting going after the grade leveled out and were forced to use their arms to propel forward as they pushed off the asphalt.

About 30 kids competed in the Scouts BSA Soap Box Derby on Saturday in Longmont. The event was the first derby held in the Longmont area in about 20 years, said Adrienne Barrett, whose daughters Anni and Eiry, both 9, competed Saturday.

“Their favorite part was building the car,” Barrett said. “They built it from scratch. It’s been about a month that they have been working on it.”

Annie Barrett drags her vehicle up the hill during the Soap Box Derby down Mountain View Avenue on October 9, 2021. (Cliff Grassmick/Staff Photographer)

Barrett, of Mead, said they named their car Neon Moon and decorated it with stars.

The contestants were Cub Scouts and Scout members from Longmont’s Troop 64 and other area troops, said Scott Conlin, an assistant scoutmaster with the troop.

It was Conlin’s idea to bring the derby back to the area in effort to get kids outside and working together.

“There’s an official Soap Box Derby, which happens in Littleton or Colorado Springs, but there isn’t any of that in northern Colorado,” he said.

Awards were given to Cub Scouts (under age 11) and Scouts (ages 11-17) for fastest teams, fastest cars and drivers, and best-designed cars.

Neon Moon was the winner for all three of the Cub Scout categories with Eiry Barrett, with Pack 159 of Mead, taking first for fastest driver.

The fastest team in the Scouts category was The A Team, from Troop 78 of Boulder. The fastest overall driver was Joe Danforth, of Louisville, who is part of Troop 78. The best- designed car was Scrap, from Troop 377 in Boulder. The fastest single-run driver was Ian Tucker, also from Troop 377.

Although it was his first year organizing the event, Conlin could tell the kids were having fun and enjoying the day. That’s what it’s all about, he said.

It’s always tricky with a first-year event, but everyone here seems to be having a great time,” Conlin said. “The kids come back, and they are like ‘Yeah!’ That’s what makes it.”

Conlin plans to turn the derby into an annual event and will open it up to kids who are not in Scouts as well.

Ben Trendler, 14, waited for his car, The Collective Brain Cell, to be called Saturday afternoon. His two partners had raced in it ahead of him and won.

LONGMONT, CO - Oct. 9, 2021: ...
Nathan Anderson prepares to take off down the ramp for the first race of the day during the Soap Box Derby down Mountain View Avenue on October 9, 2021. (Cliff Grassmick/Staff Photographer)

It was his first time competing in a derby, and he was anxious to glide down the ramp, he said.

“It was just fun,” he said. “We got to work on (the car) together and figure out what we wanted to add to it.”

Jon Wynett, of Boulder, sat on the sidewalk and watched kids launch off the ramp Saturday. His son, Jeremy Wynett, 12, was a builder for the competition.

Wynett said it was his first time attending a Soap Box Derby. He added that Jeremy’s great-uncle had been a national Soap Box Derby champion in 1958.

Wynett said Jeremy enjoyed the event because it gave him the opportunity to work with friends and do something different.

“I think he just likes the teamwork of everyone getting together to build the car,” he said.

Continue Reading

News

Northern Colorado falls to Eastern Washington, 63-17; drops second straight

Published

on

Northern Colorado falls to Eastern Washington, 63-17; drops second straight

Eastern Washington and its nationally-ranked offense made things look easy, compared to one of the league’s worst, its rout of the University of Northern Colorado.

UNC (2-4, 1-2 Big Sky) lost its homecoming game to EWU (6-0, 3-0 Big Sky), 63-17, on Saturday in Greeley.

“I love our players, love our coaches,” UNC coach Ed McCaffrey said after the game. “We’re going to go watch that film and find out what we need to do to get better.”

The Bears got behind early after three quick touchdowns from the Eagles and its own lack of offensive production.

Junior kicker Ben Raybon broke the shutout for the Bears with a 49-yard field goal in the first quarter, but the team had dug itself a 40-point hole by the 2:54 mark in the second quarter.

Northern Colorado junior linebacker Jace Bobo grabbed an interception right before halftime that led to the Bears’ first touchdown and a little confidence.

“Turnovers are so big in football,” McCaffrey said. “I think it’s the number one determinant of who wins and loses, normally, and that was a big one for us. We were able to score after that turnover.”

Still, UNC had just 97 yards and five first downs going into the locker room. It ended the game with 13 first downs and 265 yards.

Despite what the score indicated, Northern Colorado’s defense tried to stop Eastern Washington. It in no way gave up against and even came up with a few big plays.

In addition to Bobo’s interception, he added a sack in the third for a 9-yard loss and a few quarterback scrambles. Graduate defensive back Komotay Koffie led all players with 11 total tackles.

The Bears logged 80 tackles, eight of which were for a loss of yardage, compared to Eastern Washington’s 73 tackles and five TFLs.

UNC held the Eastern Washington to 479 yards, which is certainly a lot, but lower than its 616 yard-per-game average.

“In every football game, you know, you’re never as good as you think you are when you win, and you’re never as bad as you think you are when you lose,” McCaffrey said.

Unfortunately, unless the defense can force pick sixes — which the Eagles had one of — it won’t win games when the offense can’t score points or halts momentum with careless penalties.

Graduate quarterback Dylan McCaffrey said he didn’t think the offense hesitated on plays, but that doesn’t mean it was a good performance, either.

“I thought we played pretty fast out there,” Dylan McCaffrey said. “Some stuff didn’t click that we’ll get back to the drawing board and work on, for sure. I’ve got to put us in better positions.”

Overall, it was a game that the Bears would probably like to forget, but it’s one they’ll need to use if they want to rebound in the final weeks of the season.

UNC will be on the road for the next two weeks before returning to Greeley at 1 p.m. on Oct. 30 against Sacramento State.

Continue Reading

News

SSM Health offers free drive-thru flu shots

Published

on

SSM Health offers free drive-thru flu shots

ST. LOUIS – The CDC recommends getting your annual seasonal flu vaccination. This is the best way to reduce chances of being diagnosed with influenza or spreading it to others.

It’s even more important this year with the Covid-19 virus’ continued spread in the community.

Masks are required for anyone over the age of 2. The Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital clinic will vaccinate anyone over the age of 6 months.

There are four different locations where you can get your shots:

  • St. Clare Hospital in Fenton from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
  • DePaul Hospital in St. Louis from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
  • St. Joseph Hospital in St. Charles from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.

To schedule an appointment, go online to the SSM Health MyChart platform or call at 314-955-9600.

Continue Reading

News

Colorado State rides Cayden Camper’s 6 FGs to win over San Jose State

Published

on

Colorado State rides Cayden Camper’s 6 FGs to win over San Jose State

FORT COLLINS — Cayden Camper kicked six field goals — three in each half — and Colorado State opened Mountain West Conference play with a 32-14 victory over San Jose State on Saturday.

Colorado State (2-3, 1-0) grabbed the lead on their opening drive when Jaylen Thomas scored on a 1-yard run to cap an eight-play, 75-yard drive. Camper made it 10-0 with 28 seconds left in the first quarter on a 28-yard field goal. Camper sandwiched short field goals around a Spartans’ TD — Nick Nash connected with Derrick Deese Jr. for the 18-yard score — and the Rams led 16-7 at halftime.

Todd Centeio hooked up with Ty McCullouch for a 60-yard scoring strike on the Rams’ first possession of the third quarter to push their lead to 23-7. Camper kicked a 53-yard field goal to make it 26-7 and connected from 38 and 24 yards out in the final quarter to cap the scoring.

Centeio completed 19 of 23 passes for 232 yards for Colorado State. A’Jon Vivens rushed for 114 yards on 31 carries.

Nash was 11-of-22 passing for 154 yards and two TDs with one interception for San Jose State (3-3, 1-1). The Spartans managed just 267 yards of offense, while yielding 449.

 

Continue Reading

News

Tower Grove South neighborhood hit with multiple car break-ins overnight

Published

on

Tower Grove South neighborhood hit with multiple car break-ins overnight

ST. LOUIS – The Tower Grove South community is cleaning up major damage after nearly 30 cars were broken into overnight. 

Around 1:30 a.m. on Hartford Street homeowners’ security cameras caught what appeared to be multiple men checking car doors. 

In another video, one can hear windows being shattered. 

“We’ve been having a real big problem, people breaking into cars and stealing things and our neighborhood should not have these type(s) of things because this is a very (well-kept) area,” one neighborhood resident said. 

It’s just ridiculous that there’s that little respect for people’s property,” resident Nathan McDermott said.

Another resident who chose to not be identified said her car was hit. A taped-up window is now what’s left, a sign of lingering frustration.

“It looks like they tried to hit the front window because there (are) cracks on it, but they smashed out the back window,” she said.

Residents said two more streets were hit as well, including Wyoming and Juniata.

“Only once has my truck been broken into, but this is the second time in a month now that things have been hit like this, so it’s becoming an issue,” McDermott said.  
 
Some say they have filed police reports. 

Continue Reading

Trending