Django (1966) - IMDb
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Django (1966)

Not Rated | | Action, Western | December 1966 (USA)
Trailer
1:18 | Trailer
A coffin-dragging gunslinger and a half-breed prostitute become embroiled in a bitter feud between a Klan of Southern racists and a band of Mexican Revolutionaries.

Director:

Sergio Corbucci

Writers:

Sergio Corbucci (story), Bruno Corbucci (story) | 5 more credits »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Franco Nero ... Django
José Bódalo ... Gen. Hugo Rodriguez (as José Bodalo)
Loredana Nusciak ... Maria
Ángel Álvarez ... Nathaniel the Bartender (as Angel Alvarez)
Gino Pernice ... Brother Jonathan (as Jimmy Douglas)
Simón Arriaga Simón Arriaga ... Miguel (as Simon Arriaga)
Giovanni Ivan Scratuglia Giovanni Ivan Scratuglia ... Klan Member (as Ivan Scratuglia)
Remo De Angelis ... Ricardo (as Erik Schippers)
Rafael Albaicín Rafael Albaicín ... Member of Hugo's Gang (as Raphael Albaicin)
José Canalejas ... Member of Hugo's Gang (as José Canalecas)
Eduardo Fajardo ... Major Jackson
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Storyline

Squelching across a God-forsaken ghost town near the US/Mexican border, always dragging a heavy coffin, blue-eyed Django, a drifting, mud-spattered, former Union soldier, saves runaway María from certain death. But, the wooden container with the mysterious content has already caught the attention of the racist ex-Confederate officer, Major Jackson, and his gang of white supremacists, and before long, things get nasty. Now, the guns have the final say, and as if that weren't enough, Jackson's sworn enemy, General Hugo Rodríguez, and his feared revolutionaries, enter the picture, wanting to have a piece of the action. Can Django, the taciturn stranger with the lighting-fast right hand, take on two armies of murderous henchmen, and live to tell the tale? Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A century ago on the low hills along the border between the southern states and turbulent Mexico, a mystery man appeared... a man with a sad, impenetrable face. Who was that man? What was his secret? See more »

Genres:

Action | Western

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The title "Django" is a reference to renowned jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt, who had a crippled hand. Viewers at the time would have been aware of this allusion. See more »

Goofs

After Django smacks Ricardo with the butt of his own rifle and throws it back to him, Ricardo angrily readies the rifle with the intention of shooting Django. Although a metallic clicking sound is heard, he is actually shown to be miming the action (presumably by mistake)--his hand is not within the lever. See more »

Quotes

Django: [pulls a blanket from Maria's bed] I'm taking a blanket.
Maria: Thank you.
Django: For what?
Maria: All that you've done for me.
Django: [starts to leave] I didn't do it for you.
Maria: Thank you, even if it wasn't for me.
Django: I don't know... if I should have save you.
Maria: It's not for me to say. But for the first time, I felt like I was a real woman. Someone to protect, and... and to be loved, Django.
Django: [drops the blanket and closes the door] I'm glad I made you feel like a real woman - very glad. I mean that.
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Alternate Versions

Restored version by Blue Underground includes restored scenes not found on previous releases. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Django the Bastard (1969) See more »

Soundtracks

Django (theme)
Lyrics by Franco Migliacci (as Migliacci) and Robert Mellin (uncredited)
Composed by Luis Bacalov (as Enriquez)
Conducted by Bruno Nicolai (uncredited)
Performed by Rocky Roberts
Published by General Music [it]
See more »

User Reviews

"DJANGOOOOO!"
11 September 2000 | by QKnownSee all my reviews

If you've already seen Leone's FISTFULL OF DOLLARS a million times like I have, then you might be a little dissapointed when watching this one, since it's basically the same thing. Only difference here is that there's a little bit of gore which can upset a few people. And the dubbing is pretty awful, It sounds like the same guy who voices over 3 other characters in the film.

I could go on about some other distractions, but I'm not here to pan this flick.As a matter of fact, I LIKE IT! You have to realize that this film was a stepping-stone for the action genre that has continued to this day. So give credit where credit is due!

Perhaps my favorite part of the film is the opener, Django himself, walking (What? No horse?) through a dark,cold,muddy world, dragging his good ol' mysterious coffin and being accompanied by the music of the title song (A catchy tune which sounds like a combination of Elvis and the Moody Blues).

What follows next is common in "Spaghetti-land", so If you love these films or have never seen any, be obliged to take a peek at this flick.


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Details

Country:

Italy | Spain

Language:

Italian

Release Date:

December 1966 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Jango See more »

Filming Locations:

Elios Film, Rome, Lazio, Italy See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$6,150, 23 December 2012

Gross USA:

$25,916

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$25,916
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (censored) | (censored)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor) (uncredited)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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