domestication

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domestication

[də‚mes·tə′kā·shən]
(biology)
The adaptation of an animal or plant through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with and advantageous to humans.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The origins of the widespread domestication of animals was probably the end of the last ice-age around 15,000 years ago.
90 is an erroneous conflation of a passage in the "Late Egyptian Miscellanies" (about the ear of the pupil on his back) and the domestication of animals in the "Instructions of Ani."
One could say that domestication of animals means casting one's life with that of humans.
US archaeologists on the shores of the Caspian Sea have found a cave containing the first known agricultural tools and evidence of the earliest known domestication of animals dating back 8,000 years.
It is possible to consider the occurrence of "estrus behavior" as a characteristic that accompanies the process of domestication of animals with seasonal reproduction.
An environmental perspective on world history, Johnston notes, helps students establish connections between, for example, the domestication of animals and plants and agricultural pollution.
Domestication of animals began over 12,000 years ago and continues today (Jorgenson, 1997).
The domestication of animals (12,000 B.C.) meant that hungry humans no longer had to follow migrating herds; they could now decide where they would live.
Nor does this all seem to be solely a survival of the historic matriarchate through which all nations pass, - it appears to be more than this, - as if the great Black race in passing up the steps of human culture gave the world, not only the Iron Age, the cultivation of the soil, and the domestication of animals, but also, in peculiar emphasis, the mother-idea.
The achievements of even the most "primitive" cultures, say those of Neolithic man, embodied in the invention pottery, the weaving of cloth, agriculture, the domestication of animals, cannot have been primitive after all.