bro

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See also: bro. and -bro

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Clipping of brother.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bro (plural bros)

  1. (slang) brother (a male sibling)
  2. (slang) brother (a male comrade or friend; one who shares one’s ideals)
  3. (slang) brother (usually used to address a male)
  4. (slang) fratboy (or someone that espouses the fraternity bro culture)

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Breton[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *broɣ, from Proto-Celtic *mrogis.

Noun[edit]

bro f (plural broioù)

  1. country (-side)

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Danish bro, from Old East Norse brō, from Proto-Germanic *brūwō (bridge; brow), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰruh- (beam, bridge).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /broː/, [b̥ʁoːˀ]

Noun[edit]

bro c (singular definite broen, plural indefinite broer)

  1. bridge

Inflection[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål: bro

References[edit]


Gallo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

bro m (plural bros)

  1. thorn

Kalasha[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit बृहत् (bṛhat, lofty, high, tall), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰérǵʰonts. Cognate with Persian بلند(boland), English borough.

Noun[edit]

bro

  1. mountain top, peak
  2. succession of peaks which make up a ridge

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

bro m (plural bros)

  1. (Jersey) pitcher

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb
Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Danish bro, from Old Danish bro, from Old East Norse brō, from Proto-Germanic *brōwō (bridge; brow), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰruh- (beam; bridge).

Noun[edit]

bro f or m (definite singular broa or broen, indefinite plural broer, definite plural broene)

  1. bridge

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English blow.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bro

  1. To blow, to produce air currents.
  2. To breathe.

Noun[edit]

bro

  1. breath

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old East Norse brō, from Proto-Germanic *brōwō (bridge; brow), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰruh- (beam, bridge).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

bro c

  1. bridge (a construction that spans a divide)
    Stan mellan broarna
    The town between the bridges (Stockholm old town)
    Släpp ingen djävul över bron, håll ut en stund ännu!
    Let no devil across the bridge, hold out yet a while!
  2. road bank (a road reenforced with stone or timber, in particular across wetlands)
  3. quay
    Synonyms: brygga, skeppsbro
  4. porch
    Jag får min motion när jag går ifrån bron och till vår garageuppfart.
    I get my exercise when I walk from the porch to our driveway.
    Synonym: förstubro

Declension[edit]

Declension of bro 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bro bron broar broarna
Genitive bros brons broars broarnas

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh bro, from Proto-Brythonic *broɣ, from Proto-Celtic *mrogis. Cognate with Old Irish mruig.

Noun[edit]

bro f (plural bröydd or brofydd)

  1. region, country, land, neighbourhood, native haunt
  2. border, limit, boundary, march
  3. vale, lowland, champaign

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bro fro mro unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “bro”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies