2020 United States presidential election in Arkansas

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2020 United States presidential election in Arkansas

← 2016 November 3, 2020 2024 →
Turnout66.9% Increase
  Donald Trump official portrait (cropped).jpg Joe Biden presidential portrait (cropped).jpg
Nominee Donald Trump Joe Biden
Party Republican Democratic
Home state Florida Delaware
Running mate Mike Pence Kamala Harris
Electoral vote 6 0
Popular vote 760,647 423,932
Percentage 62.40% 34.78%

Arkansas Presidential Election Results 2020.svg
County results

President before election

Donald Trump
Republican

Elected President

Joe Biden
Democratic

The 2020 United States presidential election in Arkansas took place on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 United States presidential election in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia participated.[1] Arkansas voters chose six electors[2] to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote pitting incumbent Republican President Donald Trump and his running mate, incumbent Vice President Mike Pence, against Democratic challenger and former Vice President Joe Biden and his running mate, United States Senator Kamala Harris of California. Also on the ballot were the nominees for the Libertarian, Green, Constitution, American Solidarity, Life and Liberty, and Socialism and Liberation parties and Independent candidates. Write-in candidates are not allowed to participate in presidential elections.[3]

Prior to the election, all 14 news organizations making predictions considered this a state Trump would win, or otherwise a safe red state. In 2016, Trump won Arkansas by a 26.92% margin,[4] the largest margin for a candidate of either party since Jimmy Carter's 30.01% margin in 1976. In 2020, Trump won 62.40% of the vote to Biden's 34.78%, a 27.62% margin,[5] the seventh consecutive election in which Republicans improved on their margin in Arkansas, the longest in the nation of any state for either party.[6] This made Arkansas one of only seven states, along with the District of Columbia, in which Trump improved on his performance in 2016.[a] A socially conservative southern state fully within the Bible Belt, Arkansas has not voted for a Democratic presidential candidate since former Governor Bill Clinton carried it in 1996, and the last Democrat to even win over 40% of the vote was John Kerry in 2004.[6]

Trump won landslide margins across the state, including in many of the state's metropolitan areas and suburbs. Biden's strength was mostly isolated to Pulaski County, home to the state capital and largest city of Little Rock, and Jefferson County, home to Pine Bluff. He also won six rural, predominantly African-American counties on the eastern border along the Mississippi River. All but seven counties in the state swung heavily to the right, with the exceptions being three counties in the Little Rock metropolitan area (including Pulaski itself); Sebastian County, home to Fort Smith; and three counties in the northwest encompassing and surrounding the college town of Fayetteville where the University of Arkansas is located.[7] Notably, Biden lost Washington County, where Fayetteville is, by only 3.9 percentage points, the closest any Democrat has come to winning it since Clinton did so in 1996. Arkansas weighed in as 32.07 percentage points more Republican than the national average in 2020. Biden became the first Democrat to win the White House without carrying Woodruff County since the county's founding in 1862.[citation needed]

Analysis[edit]

Arkansas is a majority-White Southern state, completely covered in the Bible Belt and with slow population growth in comparison to the nation as a whole. As a result--although former Democratic president and state governor Bill Clinton hails from the state--no Democrat has won Arkansas since he did in 1996, with the Republican margin increasing in every consecutive presidential election since then. In addition, the state lost its competitive status in 2008, when the Democratic presidential nomination of Barack Obama over Hillary Clinton--as well as Arkansans' distaste for social liberalism--caused Arkansas to go red by almost 20 points, as opposed to only 9 in 2004.

Continuing on this trend, Trump carried the Natural State again by a margin of 27.62% - a .7% increase from 26.92% four years earlier in 2016 - during a year when the Democrats won nationally. Even as most of the nation swung slightly leftward, many counties in Arkansas still swung dramatically rightward. Trump improved his margin in the historically-Democratic Delta county of Woodruff from 8.9% four years ago to 27.7% this year.

Biden's main bases of support were in Pulaski County (Little Rock), Jefferson County (Pine Bluff), and most of the counties along the Mississippi River. Despite his statewide loss, Biden was able to decrease Trump's margin in Washington County--a northwest Arkansas county home to Fayetteville and in turn the University of Arkansas--from 9.9% to 3.9%.

Per exit polls by the Associated Press, Trump's strength in Arkansas came from 86% with Southern white, born again/evangelical Christians. 52% of voters opposed changing the Arkansas state flag to remove the star that symbolizes the Confederacy, and these voters backed Trump by 88%–10%.[8]

In other elections, incumbent Republican Tom Cotton defeated Libertarian Ricky Dale Harrington, Jr. in the Senatorial election by 33 points, outperforming Trump.

Primary elections[edit]

The primary elections were held on Super Tuesday, March 3, 2020.

Republican primary[edit]

Incumbent President Donald Trump, former Massachusetts Governor Bill Weld, and perennial candidate Rocky De La Fuente were the declared Republicans candidates. Tom Cotton, the current junior senator from Arkansas, declined to run in 2017.[9][10][11] As incumbent presidents rarely face prominent challenges in primaries, Trump won all 40 delegates and 97.13% of the vote.

The following candidates are on the ballot.[12]

2020 Arkansas Republican presidential primary[13]
Candidate Popular vote Delegates
Count Percentage
America Symbol.svg Donald Trump 238,980 97.13% 40
Bill Weld 5,216 2.12% 0
Rocky De La Fuente 1,848 0.75% 0
Total 246,044 100% 40

Democratic primary[edit]

Eighteen candidates were on the Democratic primary ballot, of whom nine had already withdrew, three withdrew during the early voting period, and six were active candidates. Former Vice President Joe Biden won the primary with 40.59% of the vote and 17 delegates; he carried all but one county. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont came in second place, with 22.44% of the vote and 9 delegates. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg won 16.72% of the vote and 5 delegates; no other candidates won over 15% of the vote or any delegates.[14] Biden's win was widely predicted in polling and forecasts,[15][16] similar to most other southern states; his best performance was along the eastern border along the Mississippi River and on the southern border, which have high concentrations of African American voters, who Biden consistently performed better among throughout the primary. He also won the Little Rock, Fort Smith, Jonesboro, and Pine Bluff metropolitan areas. Analogous with his performance in the 2016 primary, Sanders performed best in the northwest, traditionally the most Republican part of the state, holding Biden to less than 40 percent of the vote in many regions and winning Washington County, home to the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. Biden's strong performance in the state is a vestige of the prominence of moderate, white, Democratic politicians in and from the state throughout the late 20th century and 2000s which has largely faded amid increased political polarization and Republican gains among white, non-college-educated voters.[17] Aided by several other centrist candidates withdrawing from the race just before Super Tuesday[18] and a growing Democratic voter base in the suburbs,[19] Arkansas was a relatively noncompetitive state throughout the primary.

Popular vote share by county
  Biden—30–40%
  Biden—40–50%
  Biden—50–60%
  Biden—60–70%
  Sanders—30–40%
2020 Arkansas Democratic presidential primary[20]
Candidate Votes % Delegates[21]
Joe Biden 93,012 40.59 17
Bernie Sanders 51,413 22.44 9
Michael Bloomberg 38,312 16.72 5
Elizabeth Warren 22,971 10.03
Pete Buttigieg (withdrawn†) 7,649 3.34
Amy Klobuchar (withdrawn†) 7,009 3.06
Tom Steyer (withdrawn†) 2,053 0.90
Tulsi Gabbard 1,593 0.70
Kamala Harris (withdrawn) 715 0.31
Andrew Yang (withdrawn) 715 0.31
Michael Bennet (withdrawn) 574 0.25
Cory Booker (withdrawn) 572 0.25
Marianne Williamson (withdrawn) 501 0.22
Steve Bullock (withdrawn) 485 0.21
John Delaney (withdrawn) 443 0.19
Joe Sestak (withdrawn) 408 0.18
Mosie Boyd 393 0.17
Julian Castro (withdrawn) 304 0.13
Total 229,122 100% 31
†Candidate withdrew after early voting started.

General election[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[22] Safe R November 3, 2020
Inside Elections[23] Safe R November 3, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[24] Safe R November 3, 2020
Politico[25] Safe R November 3, 2020
RCP[26] Likely R November 3, 2020
Niskanen[27] Safe R November 3, 2020
CNN[28] Safe R November 3, 2020
The Economist[29] Safe R November 3, 2020
CBS News[30] Likely R November 3, 2020
270towin[31] Safe R November 3, 2020
ABC News[32] Safe R November 3, 2020
NPR[33] Likely R November 3, 2020
NBC News[34] Safe R November 3, 2020
538[35] Safe R November 3, 2020

Polling[edit]

Graphical summary[edit]

Aggregate polls[edit]

Source of poll
aggregation
Dates
administered
Dates
updated
Joe
Biden

Democratic
Donald
Trump

Republican
Other/
Undecided
[b]
Margin
270 to Win October 17–28, 2020 November 3, 2020 35.0% 60.3% 4.7% Trump +25.3
FiveThirtyEight until November 2, 2020 November 3, 2020 36.2% 58.9% 4.9% Trump +22.8
Average 35.6% 59.6% 4.8% Trump +24.0

Polls[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[c]
Margin
of error
Donald
Trump

Republican
Joe
Biden

Democratic
Jo
Jorgensen

Libertarian
Howie
Hawkins

Green
Other Undecided
SurveyMonkey/Axios Oct 20 – Nov 2, 2020 1,309 (LV) ± 4% 61%[d] 38% - -
SurveyMonkey/Axios Oct 1–28, 2020 2,239 (LV) 60% 38% - -
University of Arkansas Oct 9–21, 2020 591 (LV) ± 3.9% 65% 32% - - 3%
Hendrix College/Talk Business & Politics Oct 11–13, 2020 647 (LV) ± 4.9% 58% 34% 2% 1% 2%[e] 4%
SurveyMonkey/Axios Sep 1–30, 2020 771 (LV) 62% 38% - - 1%
SurveyMonkey/Axios Aug 1–31, 2020 689 (LV) 67% 32% - - 1%
SurveyMonkey/Axios Jul 1–31, 2020 747 (LV) 66% 32% - - 2%
SurveyMonkey/Axios Jun 8–30, 2020 354 (LV) 59% 38% - - 2%
Hendrix College/Talk Business & Politics Jun 9–10, 2020 869 (LV) ± 3.3% 47% 45% - - 5%[f] 3%

Fundraising[edit]

According to the Federal Election Commission, in 2019 and 2020, Donald Trump and his interest groups raised $2,732,436.64,[36] Joe Biden and his interest groups raised $2,088,712.78,[37] and Jo Jorgensen and her interest groups raised $5,289.19[38] from Arkansas-based contributors.

Candidate ballot access[edit]

The candidates on the ballot were listed in the following order:[39]

Political party candidates were eligible via a primary election or party convention and had to have filed an affidavit of eligibility, political practices pledge, and party certificate with the Arkansas Secretary of State by March 1, 2020, as did independent candidates. Independents also had to file a petition with at least 1,000 signatures of eligible voters from up to 90 days before the petition filing deadline on August 3, 2020. Write-in candidates cannot run in presidential, municipal, or primary elections.[41][42]

Electoral slates[edit]

Technically the voters of Arkansas cast their ballots for electors, or representatives to the Electoral College, rather than directly for president and vice president. Arkansas is allocated 6 electors because it has 4 congressional districts and 2 senators. All candidates who appear on the ballot must submit a list of 6 electors who pledge to vote for their candidate and their running mate. Whoever wins the most votes in the state is awarded all 6 electoral votes. Their chosen electors then vote for president and vice president. Although electors are pledged to their candidate and running mate, they are not obligated to vote for them. An elector who votes for someone other than their candidate is known as a faithless elector. In the state of Arkansas, there are no laws regarding faithless electors, meaning their vote is counted and not penalized.[43]

The electors of each state and the District of Columbia met on December 15, 2020, to cast their votes for president and vice president. All 6 pledged electors cast their votes for incumbent President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence. The Electoral College itself never meets as one body. Instead, the electors from each state and the District of Columbia met in their respective capitols. The electoral vote was tabulated and certified by Congress in a joint session on January 6, 2021 per the Electoral Count Act.

These electors were nominated by each party in order to vote in the Electoral College should their candidate win the state:[44]

Donald Trump and Mike Pence
Republican Party
Joe Biden and Kamala Harris
Democratic Party
Jo Jorgensen and Spike Cohen
Libertarian Party
Kanye West and Michelle Tidball
Independent
Howie Hawkins and Angela Nicole Walker
Green
Phil Collins and Billy Joe Parker
Independent
Brock Pierce and Karla Ballard
Independent
Don Blankenship and William Mohr
Constitution
Brian Carroll and Amar Patel
American Solidarity
Ed Bethune
Sharon Brooks
Iverson Jackson
J.D. McGehee
Rod Soubers
Doyle Webb
Connie Castleberry
Nicole Clowney
Frederick Freeman
Megan Godfrey
Philip Hood
Asad Khan
James Hood
Christopher Olson
Morgan Reynolds
Brian Shank
Jake Simpson
Joe Swafford
Addison Blakely
Audrey Buckner
Christopher Blakely
Christopher Donegan
Trista Nicole Donegan
Courtney Johnson
Ryan Giglio
Chad Jones
Lowel Lybarger
Marilyn Rumph
Robin Rumph
Andrew Waldron
None submitted Joni Bilhartz
Erin Krus
Jeremy Plumlee
Kelly Shadlow
Susan Shadow
Christopher Smiley
Jonathan Baker
Spencer Graham
Mitchell Ingram
Margie Mullins
Trently Mullins
Brian Webb
Angela Clark-Chandler
Everett DePangher
Ashley Evans
Gary Evans
Lee Evans
Adam Wheeless
C.L. Gammon and Phil Collins
Independent
John Richard Myers and Tiara Lusk
Life and Liberty
Gloria La Riva and Sunil Freeman
Socialism and Liberation
Rocky De La Fuente and Darcy Richardson
Independent
None submitted Jacob Faught
Brenda Hinesly
William Whitfield Hyman
Brian Leach
Zachary Caleb Mulson
Glen Schwarz
Taylor Adams
Karl Brown
Aaron Gibson
Jill Neimeier
Destin Reishus
Achal Thakore
Gevina Jackson
Orlando Jones
Phyllis McCullor
Elisha Patrick
Tiara Peters
Therma L. Propps, Jr.

Results[edit]

Statewide results[edit]

2020 United States presidential election in Arkansas[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Donald Trump
Mike Pence
760,647 62.40% +1.83%
Democratic Joe Biden
Kamala Harris
423,932 34.78% +1.13%
Libertarian Jo Jorgensen
Spike Cohen
13,133 1.08% -1.56%
Independent Kanye West
Michelle Tidball
4,099 0.34% N/A
Green Howie Hawkins
Angela Walker
2,980 0.24% -0.60%
Independent Phil Collins
Billy Joe Parker
2,812 0.23% N/A
Independent Brock Pierce
Karla Ballard
2,141 0.18% N/A
Constitution Don Blankenship
William Mohr
2,108 0.17% -0.24%
American Solidarity Brian Carroll
Amar Patel
1,713 0.14% N/A
Independent C. L. Gammon
Phil Collins[g]
1,475 0.12% N/A
Life and Liberty John Richard Myers
Tiara Lusk
1,372 0.11% N/A
Socialism and Liberation Gloria La Riva
Sunil Freeman
1,336 0.11% N/A
Independent Rocky De La Fuente
Darcy Richardson
1,321 0.11% N/A
Total votes 1,219,069 100% +2.83%

Results by county[edit]

County Donald Trump
Republican
Joe Biden
Democratic
Jo Jorgensen
Libertarian
Kanye West
Independent
Other votes Total
votes
% # % # % # % # % #
Arkansas 68.40% 4,304 28.89% 1,818 0.73% 46 0.30% 19 1.67% 105 6,292
Ashley 70.00% 5,548 26.81% 2,125 0.32% 25 0.54% 43 2.34% 185 7,926
Baxter 75.38% 15,836 22.06% 4,635 0.87% 183 0.34% 72 1.34% 281 21,007
Benton 61.68% 73,965 35.23% 42,249 1.64% 1,972 0.27% 323 1.17% 1,403 119,912
Boone 79.77% 13,652 17.90% 3,064 0.89% 153 0.23% 39 1.21% 206 17,114
Bradley 63.90% 2,335 33.22% 1,214 0.90% 33 0.41% 15 1.55% 57 3,654
Calhoun 74.98% 1,636 21.95% 479 0.73% 16 0.55% 12 1.78% 39 2,182
Carroll 62.93% 7,424 34.10% 4,023 0.85% 100 0.34% 40 1.78% 210 11,797
Chicot 42.70% 1,752 55.08% 2,260 0.41% 17 0.49% 20 1.32% 54 4,103
Clark 54.99% 4,616 40.95% 3,438 0.94% 79 0.44% 37 2.69% 225 8,395
Clay 78.83% 4,086 18.56% 962 1.02% 53 0.21% 11 1.37% 71 5,183
Cleburne 81.45% 10,328 15.68% 1,988 0.83% 105 0.23% 29 1.83% 230 12,680
Cleveland 79.64% 2,867 18.08% 651 0.75% 27 0.14% 5 1.40% 50 3,600
Columbia 63.83% 5,500 32.66% 2,814 0.62% 53 0.22% 19 2.67% 230 8,616
Conway 65.56% 5,694 30.11% 2,615 0.90% 78 0.36% 31 3.06% 267 8,685
Craighead 66.37% 25,558 30.95% 11,921 1.14% 440 0.41% 157 1.13% 435 38,511
Crawford 77.24% 18,607 20.58% 4,959 1.14% 274 0.20% 49 0.84% 202 24,091
Crittenden 44.80% 7,333 52.02% 8,514 0.68% 112 0.78% 128 1.70% 280 16,367
Cross 71.25% 4,946 25.53% 1,772 0.69% 48 0.53% 37 2.00% 139 6,942
Dallas 59.38% 1,573 36.35% 963 0.53% 14 0.72% 19 3.02% 80 2,649
Desha 46.13% 1,921 48.41% 2,016 0.43% 18 0.58% 24 4.44% 185 4,164
Drew 62.96% 4,349 35.12% 2,426 0.39% 27 0.55% 38 0.98% 68 6,908
Faulkner 63.24% 34,421 33.71% 18,347 1.54% 840 0.35% 189 1.16% 631 54,428
Franklin 79.63% 5,677 18.24% 1,300 0.94% 67 0.15% 11 1.04% 74 7,129
Fulton 77.38% 3,961 20.22% 1,035 0.74% 38 0.18% 9 1.50% 76 5,119
Garland 65.77% 29,069 31.78% 14,045 0.90% 396 0.20% 88 1.36% 601 44,199
Grant 82.85% 6,794 15.46% 1,268 0.68% 56 0.11% 9 0.89% 73 8,200
Greene 78.70% 12,670 18.99% 3,058 1.17% 188 0.27% 43 0.88% 141 16,100
Hempstead 65.27% 4,470 31.22% 2,138 0.45% 31 0.85% 58 2.21% 151 6,848
Hot Spring 73.28% 9,202 24.54% 3,082 0.74% 93 0.30% 38 1.13% 142 12,557
Howard 69.65% 3,367 27.72% 1,340 0.56% 27 0.35% 17 1.71% 83 4,834
Independence 77.52% 11,250 19.34% 2,806 1.01% 147 0.40% 58 1.73% 251 14,512
Izard 79.71% 4,631 17.57% 1,021 0.95% 55 0.24% 14 1.57% 89 5,810
Jackson 70.58% 3,593 26.81% 1,365 0.73% 37 0.49% 25 1.39% 71 5,091
Jefferson 37.84% 9,521 59.55% 14,981 0.42% 106 0.52% 132 1.67% 418 25,158
Johnson 73.05% 6,938 24.04% 2,283 1.02% 97 0.32% 30 1.58% 150 9,498
Lafayette 65.58% 1,757 31.32% 839 0.34% 9 0.82% 22 1.95% 52 2,679
Lawrence 78.01% 4,569 18.44% 1,080 0.89% 52 0.27% 16 2.40% 140 5,857
Lee 45.15% 1,286 49.96% 1,423 0.28% 8 0.53% 15 4.06% 116 2,848
Lincoln 70.43% 2,729 26.63% 1,032 0.54% 21 0.36% 14 2.04% 79 3,875
Little River 71.76% 3,715 23.68% 1,226 0.85% 44 0.33% 17 3.38% 175 5,177
Logan 78.31% 6,441 18.77% 1,544 1.07% 88 0.29% 24 1.56% 128 8,225
Lonoke 74.63% 22,884 21.81% 6,686 1.31% 403 0.23% 71 2.01% 618 30,662
Madison 76.97% 5,658 21.26% 1,563 0.73% 54 0.14% 10 0.89% 66 7,351
Marion 77.08% 5,783 20.41% 1,531 0.87% 65 0.09% 7 1.54% 117 7,503
Miller 72.12% 11,920 25.68% 4,245 0.61% 101 0.17% 28 1.41% 235 16,529
Mississippi 59.12% 7,296 36.93% 4,558 0.97% 120 0.40% 49 2.59% 319 12,342
Monroe 54.87% 1,545 40.73% 1,147 0.43% 12 0.36% 10 3.62% 102 2,816
Montgomery 78.65% 3,046 18.87% 731 0.67% 26 0.10% 4 1.70% 66 3,873
Nevada 63.52% 2,133 32.04% 1,076 0.24% 8 0.15% 5 4.05% 136 3,358
Newton 79.84% 3,192 17.73% 709 0.58% 23 0.33% 13 1.54% 61 3,998
Ouachita 54.98% 5,294 41.49% 3,995 0.82% 79 0.42% 40 2.29% 221 9,629
Perry 75.19% 3,479 21.87% 1,012 0.76% 35 0.56% 26 1.62% 75 4,627
Phillips 38.72% 2,417 58.04% 3,623 0.24% 15 0.70% 44 2.29% 143 6,242
Pike 82.88% 3,519 15.17% 644 0.97% 41 0.28% 12 0.71% 30 4,246
Poinsett 78.69% 5,918 18.93% 1,424 0.53% 40 0.13% 10 1.73% 129 7,521
Polk 82.86% 7,035 14.68% 1,246 0.98% 83 0.27% 23 1.21% 103 8,490
Pope 74.01% 18,081 23.62% 5,772 0.98% 240 0.30% 74 1.08% 265 24,432
Prairie 79.71% 2,786 18.71% 654 0.46% 16 0.23% 8 0.90% 31 3,495
Pulaski 37.47% 63,687 59.98% 101,947 0.98% 1,668 0.42% 719 1.14% 1,935 169,956
Randolph 78.61% 5,355 17.84% 1,215 0.81% 55 0.53% 36 2.22% 151 6,812
Saline 69.45% 39,556 28.20% 16,060 1.04% 595 0.26% 148 1.05% 600 56,959
Scott 83.41% 2,962 13.60% 483 0.87% 31 0.14% 5 1.96% 70 3,551
Searcy 83.73% 3,365 14.63% 588 0.75% 30 0.17% 7 0.71% 29 4,019
Sebastian 66.18% 31,198 30.73% 14,487 1.71% 804 0.31% 148 1.07% 503 47,140
Sevier 74.66% 3,884 21.45% 1,116 1.06% 55 0.33% 17 2.51% 130 5,202
Sharp 78.48% 5,938 18.48% 1,398 0.69% 52 0.17% 13 2.18% 165 7,566
St. Francis 45.61% 3,242 50.70% 3,604 0.52% 37 0.28% 20 2.88% 205 7,108
Stone 77.74% 4,616 19.87% 1,180 0.79% 47 0.35% 21 1.24% 74 5,938
Union 63.09% 10,478 33.62% 5,584 1.10% 182 0.28% 46 1.91% 317 16,607
Van Buren 77.29% 6,034 20.40% 1,593 0.69% 54 0.19% 15 1.41% 111 7,807
Washington 50.39% 47,504 46.49% 43,824 1.50% 1,414 0.38% 361 1.23% 1,163 94,266
White 78.30% 24,182 19.36% 5,978 1.28% 395 0.25% 78 0.82% 252 30,885
Woodruff 62.32% 1,543 34.57% 856 0.57% 14 0.36% 9 2.17% 54 2,476
Yell 77.53% 5,226 19.05% 1,284 0.98% 66 0.39% 26 2.06% 139 6,741

By congressional district[edit]

[45]

District Trump Biden Representative
1st 69.1% 27.9% Rick Crawford
2nd 53.1% 44.3% French Hill
3rd 61.9% 35.2% Steve Womack
4th 67.7% 29.6% Bruce Westerman

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The other six states were California, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Nevada, and Utah
  2. ^ Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined.
  3. ^ Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  4. ^ Overlapping sample with the previous SurveyMonkey/Axios poll, but more information available regarding sample size
  5. ^ "Someone else" with 2%
  6. ^ "Another candidate" with 5%
  7. ^ a b C. L. Gammon was the original Presidential nominee of the Prohibition Party, with Phil Collins as his running mate. After Gammon withdrew, Collins was given the party's nomination for President, but appears on the ballot a second time as Gammon and Collins' original candidacy was never removed.[40]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kelly, Ben (August 13, 2018). "US elections key dates: When are the 2018 midterms and the 2020 presidential campaign?". The Independent. Archived from the original on January 3, 2019. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  2. ^ "Distribution of Electoral Votes". National Archives and Records Administration. Archived from the original on January 9, 2019. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  3. ^ "Ballot access requirements for political candidates in Arkansas". Ballotpedia. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  4. ^ "2016 General Election and Nonpartisan Runoff Election - Official County Results". Arkansas Secretary of State. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  5. ^ a b "2020 General Election and Nonpartisan Judicial Runoff". Arkansas Secretary of State. Retrieved November 28, 2020.
  6. ^ a b "Arkansas Presidential Election Voting History". 270toWin. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  7. ^ "Presidential Election Results: Biden Wins". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  8. ^ "Arkansas Voter Surveys: How Different Groups Voted". The New York Times. November 3, 2020. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 9, 2020.
  9. ^ Wells, Dylan; Talwar, Saisha (August 9, 2017). "Trump could face GOP challengers in the 2020 election". ABC News. Archived from the original on August 10, 2017. Retrieved August 9, 2017.
  10. ^ Millar, Lindsey (August 6, 2017). "Cotton figures in New York Times roundup on 2020 presidential race". Arkansas Times. Archived from the original on August 10, 2017. Retrieved August 10, 2017.
  11. ^ Beaumont, Thomas (May 19, 2017). "GOP's Cotton in Iowa: "I'm ready for that new beginning."". The Seattle Times. Archived from the original on October 20, 2017. Retrieved October 19, 2017.
  12. ^ "Sample ballots in Arkansas". January 28, 2020.
  13. ^ "Election Night Reporting". results.enr.clarityelections.com. Arkansas Secretary of State. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  14. ^ "Election Night Reporting". Arkansas Secretary of State. May 18, 2020. Retrieved April 26, 2021.
  15. ^ Silver, Nate (January 9, 2020). "2020 Democratic Primary: Who will win the Arkansas primary?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved April 26, 2021.
  16. ^ Strand, C. C. (March 3, 2020). "Live Arkansas Democratic Primary Results: Biden Wins". Heavy. Retrieved April 26, 2021.
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Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]