Snakes on a Plane (Bring It)

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"Snakes on a Plane (Bring It)"
Bring It.jpg
Single by Cobra Starship featuring William Beckett, Travie McCoy and Maja Ivarsson
from the album Snakes on a Plane: The Album and While the City Sleeps, We Rule the Streets
Released28 August 2006[1]
GenrePop punk
Length3:19
LabelNew Line, Decaydance, Fueled by Ramen
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)S*A*M and Sluggo
Cobra Starship singles chronology
"Snakes on a Plane (Bring It)"
(2006)
"The Church of Hot Addiction"
(2006)
William Beckett singles chronology
"Snakes on a Plane (Bring It)"
(2006)
"Benny & Joon"
(2013)
Travie McCoy singles chronology
"Snakes on a Plane (Bring It)"
(2006)
"Daylight"
(2008)
Maja Ivarsson singles chronology
"Snakes on a Plane (Bring It)"
(2006)
"Mitt bästa for dig"
(2012)

"Snakes on a Plane (Bring It)",[2] also referred to as "Bring It (Snakes on a Plane)", is the debut single by Cobra Starship, released in 2006 as the main single from the soundtrack to the film Snakes on a Plane.[3] In addition to Cobra Starship vocalist Gabe Saporta, the song features William Beckett of The Academy Is..., Travie McCoy of Gym Class Heroes, and Maja Ivarsson of The Sounds.[4] Before being written specifically for the film, the song was titled "Bring It".[5]

Music video[edit]

The video, directed by Lex Halaby,[6] shows McCoy, Ivarsson, Saporta and Beckett walking through Honolulu International Airport, acting as if they were villains hired by Eddie Kim (the antagonist of Snakes on a Plane) sneaking snakes on board in their suitcase and guitar case. They are able to pass through security when Ivarsson distracts the airport worker by taking off her jacket. Pete Wentz of Fall Out Boy makes a cameo appearance[5] (at 1:46), talking on a payphone nervously as the band members pass ominously. Samuel L. Jackson (who plays Neville Flynn, the main protagonist of the movie) also makes a cameo appearance, lowering his shades and eyeing the band members as they pass, unaware of the true contents inside their cases before returning to his 100 Bullets comic.[6] He is also seen wearing the unofficial Snakes on a Plane T-shirt designed by webcomic artist Jeffrey Rowland (with snakes flying a plane). The video ends with a sign for South Pacific Airlines Flight 121 as the band boards the plane, the same flight as in the film.

The video was filmed in Burbank, California.

Charts[edit]

Chart (2006) Peak
position
US Alternative Songs (Billboard)[7] 32

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/snakes-on-a-plane-bring-it-single/id182590168
  2. ^ Payne, Chris (March 5, 2019). "From Cobra Starship to Full-Time Manager: Gabe Saporta's Untold Story". Billboard. Retrieved 15 September 2019. Snakes On a Plane (Bring it),” their debut single, soundtracked the patently absurd 2006 Samuel Jackson flick and introduced Cobra Starship as glammed-up party rockers rumored to have formed out of a peyote trip in the Arizona desert, or at least be good friends with Fall Out Boy.
  3. ^ Cochrane, Greg (June 10, 2009). "Gossip Girl star helps out band". BBC Newsbeat. Retrieved 15 September 2019. The fivesome announced their arrival with Snakes On A Plane (Bring It), a song written for the cult film three years ago.
  4. ^ Campbell, Rachel (September 27, 2018). ""Snakes On A Plane" is a mid-2000s nightmare come true". Alternative Press. Retrieved 15 September 2019. The scene’s first introduction to reptiles on an aircraft came via Cobra Starship and their 2006 hit “Bring It! (Snakes On A Plane).” Made for the Snakes On A Plane soundtrack and with appearances by William Beckett (the Academy Is…), Travie McCoy (Gym Class Heroes) and Maja Ivarsson (the Sounds), the track is a scene staple to this day.
  5. ^ a b Moss, Corey (June 8, 2006). "Cobra Starship And 'Snakes On A Plane': A Match Made In Reptilian Heaven". MTV. Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  6. ^ a b Collis, Clark (August 8, 2006). "Snakes on a Plane: The folks behind its theme song". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  7. ^ [1] Archived April 30, 2013, at the Wayback Machine

External links[edit]