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December 3 - Your energy is out of sync with that of a friend or loved one, but don't interpret this as a sign of bad things to come. Sometimes you just need to work through the rough patches to get to the good times.

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  • E!

    Pregnant Mandy Moore Says Her Heart Is "Utterly Shattered" After Death of Dog Joni

    Mandy Moore took to Instagram to share the tragic news of the death of her 13-year-old dog, Joni. Keep scrolling to read the heartbreaking tribute.

    E!

    Pregnant Mandy Moore Says Her Heart Is "Utterly Shattered" After Death of Dog Joni

    Mandy Moore took to Instagram to share the tragic news of the death of her 13-year-old dog, Joni. Keep scrolling to read the heartbreaking tribute.

  • Motley Fool

    4 Reasons the Stock Market Could Crash in the Next 3 Months

    When the curtain closes on 2020, we'll be putting one of the wildest year on record for the stock market into the rearview mirror. Although it's impossible to predict when stock market crashes and corrections will occur, how long they'll last, or how steep the decline will be, there's a pretty good chance that if we see a crash or correction within the next three months, it'll be due to the following four factors.

    Motley Fool

    4 Reasons the Stock Market Could Crash in the Next 3 Months

    When the curtain closes on 2020, we'll be putting one of the wildest year on record for the stock market into the rearview mirror. Although it's impossible to predict when stock market crashes and corrections will occur, how long they'll last, or how steep the decline will be, there's a pretty good chance that if we see a crash or correction within the next three months, it'll be due to the following four factors.

  • Associated Press

    People magazine reveals its '2020 People of the Year'

    People magazine has named George Clooney, Dr. Anthony Fauci, Selena Gomez and Regina King as the “2020 People of the Year.” The magazine revealed its list Wednesday morning as part of a year-end double issue with four covers. Clooney, Fauci, Gomez and King will be separately featured on the magazine covers of the issue, which is out Friday.

    Associated Press

    People magazine reveals its '2020 People of the Year'

    People magazine has named George Clooney, Dr. Anthony Fauci, Selena Gomez and Regina King as the “2020 People of the Year.” The magazine revealed its list Wednesday morning as part of a year-end double issue with four covers. Clooney, Fauci, Gomez and King will be separately featured on the magazine covers of the issue, which is out Friday.

  • CoinDesk

    Ripple CEO Walks Back Threat to Leave US

    Prolonged but fruitless efforts to get regulators on the firm’s side seem to have exhausted Ripple’s patience as it eyes a potential IPO and fights a lawsuit.

    CoinDesk

    Ripple CEO Walks Back Threat to Leave US

    Prolonged but fruitless efforts to get regulators on the firm’s side seem to have exhausted Ripple’s patience as it eyes a potential IPO and fights a lawsuit.

  • Reuters

    Australian Open to start on February 8, players can train during quarantine - reports

    Next year's Australian Open could be pushed back to a Feb. 8-21 window and players would be allowed to train outside their hotel rooms during quarantine, Australian media reported on Wednesday. Tennis Australia has been in talks with the Victoria state government over the coronavirus protocols to be established for those arriving ahead of the Grand Slam at Melbourne Park, which is currently scheduled for Jan. 18-31. State officials have confirmed players will have to undergo quarantine and that the tournament will likely start one or two weeks later than scheduled.

    Reuters

    Australian Open to start on February 8, players can train during quarantine - reports

    Next year's Australian Open could be pushed back to a Feb. 8-21 window and players would be allowed to train outside their hotel rooms during quarantine, Australian media reported on Wednesday. Tennis Australia has been in talks with the Victoria state government over the coronavirus protocols to be established for those arriving ahead of the Grand Slam at Melbourne Park, which is currently scheduled for Jan. 18-31. State officials have confirmed players will have to undergo quarantine and that the tournament will likely start one or two weeks later than scheduled.

  • Motley Fool

    2 Reasons Amazon Will Keep Taking Ad Sales From Google

    Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) has quickly gone from $1 billion to $15 billion in ad sales over the last four years as it ramps up its advertising businesses. While it still pales in comparison to Alphabet (NASDAQ: GOOG) (NASDAQ: GOOGL) subsidiary Google, which brought in about 10 times as much ad revenue as Amazon in 2019, Amazon's eating into the search giant's share of search ad spending growth.

    Motley Fool

    2 Reasons Amazon Will Keep Taking Ad Sales From Google

    Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) has quickly gone from $1 billion to $15 billion in ad sales over the last four years as it ramps up its advertising businesses. While it still pales in comparison to Alphabet (NASDAQ: GOOG) (NASDAQ: GOOGL) subsidiary Google, which brought in about 10 times as much ad revenue as Amazon in 2019, Amazon's eating into the search giant's share of search ad spending growth.

  • Bloomberg

    The City of London's Supremacy Goes Very Deep

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Nerves are fraying about what happens to the financial services industry once the dust clears from Brexit. No one really knows whether there will be some form of equivalence between the City of London and the European Union on securities trading, even if common rules on derivatives clearing have been extended until mid-2022. Those bankers who were asking the “can I trade?” question have been reassured by their employers’ comprehensive contingency planning. Wall Street’s finest have had to make sure there will be no disruptions for their clients. The implementation of new mirror trading venues on the continent has picked up pace with recent announcements by Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and the London Stock Exchange’s Turquoise Europe platform. But that is prudent planning to ensure smooth access for clients, not a guarantee that trading volumes will migrate from London.The more important medium-term question for traders and their clients, when thinking about taking their business across the Channel, will be “how much more will this cost me?” and “why should I change?” Until the post-Brexit regulatory regime is set in stone, liquidity will determine the answer.Until critical mass has built across European marketplaces, it might not be practicable — or cost-effective — to shift much business from London, beyond what has to be traded within the EU. And even Brussels might balk at forcing the finance industry’s hand with a sudden grab for full regulatory control. It would be far better to win business that sticks for continental Europe’s capitals via a better product or an old-fashioned price battle.Institutions first and foremost need to go to where the volume is to get trades completed efficiently, and the real risk for Europe is that liquidity becomes dispersed in several small national pools rather than the catch-all, deeper venues in London. Longer-term trading costs will rise if people are forced to trade within the EU, but can’t optimize their capital usage over different national venues.A Dutch fund manager will be trading in German, Italian and French assets too. Can Europe offer them the same costs as if they were trading all of this stuff in one place? Take cross-margining, where the collateral required to finance one bunch of trades can also be used to offset against other pools of trades. This is a substantial benefit that London provides courtesy of a single infrastructure that Europe can’t replicate.That’s why bankers and hedge funds will always love London. The City is a global marketplace, whereas the EU is looking to control flows of euro-denominated trading. It’s logical for the EU to want jurisdiction over these markets now the U.K. is separating. But it’s important to understand why so much of it is London-based in the first place. This is about free will not regulatory strong-arming.London has become the dominant financial hub because of lower costs, ample liquidity and a relatively proactive regulatory mindset. Unless European market venues can compete commercially, volumes will remain largely where they are. It’s one thing for EU regulators to build their desired market architecture, but another to fill the space. The City of London has decades of experience in devising clever ways to take risk outside of restricted-access markets.The only real example of a successful European attempt at seizing back control is the benchmark German Bund futures contract, which used to be traded largely on the London International Financial Futures Exchange. The Deutsche Terminboerse won the “Battle of the Bund” in 1997 by incentivizing the big German banks to trade on the domestic exchange — which they part-owned — with lower costs. It required a more attractive proposition to prevail. The DTB’s current owner, Deutsche Boerse AG, might win some of London’s derivatives trading and clearing business if it remembers this episode.Still, never count out the innate adaptability of London, especially if Brussels overdoes the regulatory regime.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Marcus Ashworth is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering European markets. He spent three decades in the banking industry, most recently as chief markets strategist at Haitong Securities in London.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    Bloomberg

    The City of London's Supremacy Goes Very Deep

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Nerves are fraying about what happens to the financial services industry once the dust clears from Brexit. No one really knows whether there will be some form of equivalence between the City of London and the European Union on securities trading, even if common rules on derivatives clearing have been extended until mid-2022. Those bankers who were asking the “can I trade?” question have been reassured by their employers’ comprehensive contingency planning. Wall Street’s finest have had to make sure there will be no disruptions for their clients. The implementation of new mirror trading venues on the continent has picked up pace with recent announcements by Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and the London Stock Exchange’s Turquoise Europe platform. But that is prudent planning to ensure smooth access for clients, not a guarantee that trading volumes will migrate from London.The more important medium-term question for traders and their clients, when thinking about taking their business across the Channel, will be “how much more will this cost me?” and “why should I change?” Until the post-Brexit regulatory regime is set in stone, liquidity will determine the answer.Until critical mass has built across European marketplaces, it might not be practicable — or cost-effective — to shift much business from London, beyond what has to be traded within the EU. And even Brussels might balk at forcing the finance industry’s hand with a sudden grab for full regulatory control. It would be far better to win business that sticks for continental Europe’s capitals via a better product or an old-fashioned price battle.Institutions first and foremost need to go to where the volume is to get trades completed efficiently, and the real risk for Europe is that liquidity becomes dispersed in several small national pools rather than the catch-all, deeper venues in London. Longer-term trading costs will rise if people are forced to trade within the EU, but can’t optimize their capital usage over different national venues.A Dutch fund manager will be trading in German, Italian and French assets too. Can Europe offer them the same costs as if they were trading all of this stuff in one place? Take cross-margining, where the collateral required to finance one bunch of trades can also be used to offset against other pools of trades. This is a substantial benefit that London provides courtesy of a single infrastructure that Europe can’t replicate.That’s why bankers and hedge funds will always love London. The City is a global marketplace, whereas the EU is looking to control flows of euro-denominated trading. It’s logical for the EU to want jurisdiction over these markets now the U.K. is separating. But it’s important to understand why so much of it is London-based in the first place. This is about free will not regulatory strong-arming.London has become the dominant financial hub because of lower costs, ample liquidity and a relatively proactive regulatory mindset. Unless European market venues can compete commercially, volumes will remain largely where they are. It’s one thing for EU regulators to build their desired market architecture, but another to fill the space. The City of London has decades of experience in devising clever ways to take risk outside of restricted-access markets.The only real example of a successful European attempt at seizing back control is the benchmark German Bund futures contract, which used to be traded largely on the London International Financial Futures Exchange. The Deutsche Terminboerse won the “Battle of the Bund” in 1997 by incentivizing the big German banks to trade on the domestic exchange — which they part-owned — with lower costs. It required a more attractive proposition to prevail. The DTB’s current owner, Deutsche Boerse AG, might win some of London’s derivatives trading and clearing business if it remembers this episode.Still, never count out the innate adaptability of London, especially if Brussels overdoes the regulatory regime.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Marcus Ashworth is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering European markets. He spent three decades in the banking industry, most recently as chief markets strategist at Haitong Securities in London.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Variety

    Trump Claims He’ll Veto Defense Spending Bill Unless Congress Repeals Legal Shield for Social Media Companies

    President Trump, upset that Twitter and Facebook have been fact-checking his conspiracy theories alleging widespread fraud in the 2020 election, is attempting to strong-arm Congress into rolling back legal protections for social media companies by threatening to veto a $740 billion defense spending bill. Trump, with less than two months remaining in office before he's […]

    Variety

    Trump Claims He’ll Veto Defense Spending Bill Unless Congress Repeals Legal Shield for Social Media Companies

    President Trump, upset that Twitter and Facebook have been fact-checking his conspiracy theories alleging widespread fraud in the 2020 election, is attempting to strong-arm Congress into rolling back legal protections for social media companies by threatening to veto a $740 billion defense spending bill. Trump, with less than two months remaining in office before he's […]

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Markets
SymbolPriceChange% Chg
ES=F3,662.50-4.75-0.13%
YM=F29,799.00-69.00-0.23%
NQ=F12,478.0023.750.19%
RTY=F1,832.30-5.20-0.28%
CL=F44.85-0.43-0.95%
GC=F1,840.3010.100.55%
SI=F24.210.130.54%
EURUSD=X1.21-0.00-0.01%
^TNX0.95--
^VIX21.130.361.73%
GBPUSD=X1.340.000.20%
JPY=X104.28-0.15-0.14%
BTC-USD19,347.40398.142.10%
^CMC200379.5614.644.01%
^FTSE6,435.00-28.39-0.44%
^N22526,809.378.390.03%

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