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  • Student Loan Hero

    5 Best Consumer Loans and Lines of Credit of 2021

    It’s a fact that for many, consumer loans and lines of credit can help us finance necessary purchases we can’t afford on our own. Consumer loans are essentially any kind of loan you can take out as an individual, including mortgages, auto loans, student loans, and personal loans. Lines of credit, however, are a form of revolving credit, which means that you can borrow money up to your credit limit, pay it off, and then borrow again.

    Student Loan Hero

    5 Best Consumer Loans and Lines of Credit of 2021

    It’s a fact that for many, consumer loans and lines of credit can help us finance necessary purchases we can’t afford on our own. Consumer loans are essentially any kind of loan you can take out as an individual, including mortgages, auto loans, student loans, and personal loans. Lines of credit, however, are a form of revolving credit, which means that you can borrow money up to your credit limit, pay it off, and then borrow again.

  • Barrons.com

    Get Credentials to Get Ahead, No College Degree Required

    Education is still the most powerful lever for shaping the future, even as the Covid-19 pandemic dramatically changes how students learn. Since March, there have been four times as many industry certifications issued by the digital credentialing platform Credly, where one of us works, than the nearly 2 million bachelor’s degrees issued by all U.S. colleges and universities in 2019. Hiring on the basis of validated abilities, rather than degrees, is creating a talent marketplace with skills as its currency, providing access to a broader range of qualified applicants, and creating a more diverse workforce where people are granted opportunities on the basis of what they can do, rather than which institutions or networks they were able to enter.

    Barrons.com

    Get Credentials to Get Ahead, No College Degree Required

    Education is still the most powerful lever for shaping the future, even as the Covid-19 pandemic dramatically changes how students learn. Since March, there have been four times as many industry certifications issued by the digital credentialing platform Credly, where one of us works, than the nearly 2 million bachelor’s degrees issued by all U.S. colleges and universities in 2019. Hiring on the basis of validated abilities, rather than degrees, is creating a talent marketplace with skills as its currency, providing access to a broader range of qualified applicants, and creating a more diverse workforce where people are granted opportunities on the basis of what they can do, rather than which institutions or networks they were able to enter.

  • The Wrap

    Tony Hsieh’s Nitrous Oxide Use, Love of Candles May Have Contributed to Tragic Death

    Former Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh’s affinity for nitrous oxide, alcohol and candles concerned those closest to him in his final days — and has led some to believe his hard-partying ways contributed to his inability to escape the fire that ultimately killed him, TheWrap has learned.In the months leading up to his Nov. 27 death in Connecticut, Hsieh, 46, had gone on a buying spree in Park City, Utah, the posh mountain town that is home to the Sundance Film Festival and a go-to vacation spot for celebrities like Will Smith, Robert Redford and Michael Jordan.The entrepreneur raised eyebrows there with his use of nitrous oxide and massive use of candles – a dangerous combination.“People in Park City say Tony Hsieh was high on nitrous oxide all the time and behaved very erratically — Howard Hughes-style — with 500 candles burning in his home — creating a fire threat that the local fire department had to manage,” a person with knowledge of Hsieh’s relationships in Park City told TheWrap.Also Read: Tony Hsieh's Bizarre Death Details Emerge: Former Zappos CEO Was 'Locked' In BasementSince March, Hseih had purchased 15 Park City homes, totaling 57 bedrooms, 71.5 bathrooms and more than 68,000 square feet, according to Curbed. Throw in two vacant lots he purchased, and Hseih’s Park City investment was worth around $56 million.Park City Fire District reps did not respond to TheWrap’s request for comment. Nitrous oxide is not flammable but can accelerate the burning process.It’s unclear why Hsieh had spent millions on Park City real estate; one possibility is that he was looking for a new tech hub to replicate his success in revitalizing downtown Las Vegas where he’d invested hundreds of millions of dollars.Also Read: Tony Hsieh, Former Zappos CEO, Dies at 46The Daily Mail on Wednesday also reported that Hsieh’s drug use worried those closest to him and had accelerated since stepping down as Zappos CEO last summer. Hsieh’s “drug of choice” was nitrous oxide, the site reported, in the form of “whippets” from whipped cream dispensers.“His heavy alcohol and drug use was known by everyone around him,” one unnamed colleague told the Daily Mail. “Anyone that challenged him about it was cast aside.”The colleague said many in his inner circle are now asking if Hsieh’s drug use could have played a role in his tragic death.Early on the morning of Nov. 18, firefighters were called to a home in New London, Connecticut, and told Hsieh was trapped inside, according to the Hartford Courant. Hsieh was pulled unconscious from the home and CPR was administered before he was later taken to a local hospital. He died last Friday, nine days after the fire. Medical examiners on Monday ruled it an accident and said his death was due to injuries caused by smoke inhalation.Still, the circumstances surrounding Hsieh’s death remain unclear. An emergency dispatcher, in audio obtained by The Daily Mail, said the fire was in a “shed that is attached to the exterior of the house,” and that a “male is barricaded inside” and unresponsive. “Everyone else is outside the house,” the dispatcher said. “They are trying to get him to open up.” Later, New London Fire Captain Brian Wright said that people at the home told firefighters Hsieh was “locked inside” a storage area and that first responders had to bust the door in to get to him.The discrepancies have left a handful of lingering questions, including whether Hsieh was “barricaded” or “locked” inside the room. The fire, as well as Hsieh’s inability to escape it, could be tied to his drug use, the colleague said.“The talk among his former colleagues at Zappos is that Tony was likely in the shed blacked out drunk and on drugs,” the colleague said. “He was a major alcoholic and a drug addict. He was hardcore.”Also Read: Tony Hsieh's Bizarre Death Details Emerge: Former Zappos CEO Was 'Locked' In BasementThe son of Taiwanese immigrants, Hsieh graduated from Harvard University before embarking on a successful career as an entrepreneur, venture capitalist and civic leader.Prior to joining Zappos, Hsieh co-founded the online advertising network LinkExchange, which he sold to Microsoft in 1998 for $265 million.While at Zappos, he also became a leading figure in public and private efforts to redevelop downtown Las Vegas. In 2013, he moved Zappos’ headquarters to the former Las Vegas City Hall building and pledged $350 million to other revitalization efforts.“Tony Hsieh played a pivotal role in helping transform Downtown Las Vegas,” Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak tweeted. “Kathy and I send our love and condolences to Tony’s family and friends during this difficult time.”Read original story Tony Hsieh’s Nitrous Oxide Use, Love of Candles May Have Contributed to Tragic Death At TheWrap

    The Wrap

    Tony Hsieh’s Nitrous Oxide Use, Love of Candles May Have Contributed to Tragic Death

    Former Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh’s affinity for nitrous oxide, alcohol and candles concerned those closest to him in his final days — and has led some to believe his hard-partying ways contributed to his inability to escape the fire that ultimately killed him, TheWrap has learned.In the months leading up to his Nov. 27 death in Connecticut, Hsieh, 46, had gone on a buying spree in Park City, Utah, the posh mountain town that is home to the Sundance Film Festival and a go-to vacation spot for celebrities like Will Smith, Robert Redford and Michael Jordan.The entrepreneur raised eyebrows there with his use of nitrous oxide and massive use of candles – a dangerous combination.“People in Park City say Tony Hsieh was high on nitrous oxide all the time and behaved very erratically — Howard Hughes-style — with 500 candles burning in his home — creating a fire threat that the local fire department had to manage,” a person with knowledge of Hsieh’s relationships in Park City told TheWrap.Also Read: Tony Hsieh's Bizarre Death Details Emerge: Former Zappos CEO Was 'Locked' In BasementSince March, Hseih had purchased 15 Park City homes, totaling 57 bedrooms, 71.5 bathrooms and more than 68,000 square feet, according to Curbed. Throw in two vacant lots he purchased, and Hseih’s Park City investment was worth around $56 million.Park City Fire District reps did not respond to TheWrap’s request for comment. Nitrous oxide is not flammable but can accelerate the burning process.It’s unclear why Hsieh had spent millions on Park City real estate; one possibility is that he was looking for a new tech hub to replicate his success in revitalizing downtown Las Vegas where he’d invested hundreds of millions of dollars.Also Read: Tony Hsieh, Former Zappos CEO, Dies at 46The Daily Mail on Wednesday also reported that Hsieh’s drug use worried those closest to him and had accelerated since stepping down as Zappos CEO last summer. Hsieh’s “drug of choice” was nitrous oxide, the site reported, in the form of “whippets” from whipped cream dispensers.“His heavy alcohol and drug use was known by everyone around him,” one unnamed colleague told the Daily Mail. “Anyone that challenged him about it was cast aside.”The colleague said many in his inner circle are now asking if Hsieh’s drug use could have played a role in his tragic death.Early on the morning of Nov. 18, firefighters were called to a home in New London, Connecticut, and told Hsieh was trapped inside, according to the Hartford Courant. Hsieh was pulled unconscious from the home and CPR was administered before he was later taken to a local hospital. He died last Friday, nine days after the fire. Medical examiners on Monday ruled it an accident and said his death was due to injuries caused by smoke inhalation.Still, the circumstances surrounding Hsieh’s death remain unclear. An emergency dispatcher, in audio obtained by The Daily Mail, said the fire was in a “shed that is attached to the exterior of the house,” and that a “male is barricaded inside” and unresponsive. “Everyone else is outside the house,” the dispatcher said. “They are trying to get him to open up.” Later, New London Fire Captain Brian Wright said that people at the home told firefighters Hsieh was “locked inside” a storage area and that first responders had to bust the door in to get to him.The discrepancies have left a handful of lingering questions, including whether Hsieh was “barricaded” or “locked” inside the room. The fire, as well as Hsieh’s inability to escape it, could be tied to his drug use, the colleague said.“The talk among his former colleagues at Zappos is that Tony was likely in the shed blacked out drunk and on drugs,” the colleague said. “He was a major alcoholic and a drug addict. He was hardcore.”Also Read: Tony Hsieh's Bizarre Death Details Emerge: Former Zappos CEO Was 'Locked' In BasementThe son of Taiwanese immigrants, Hsieh graduated from Harvard University before embarking on a successful career as an entrepreneur, venture capitalist and civic leader.Prior to joining Zappos, Hsieh co-founded the online advertising network LinkExchange, which he sold to Microsoft in 1998 for $265 million.While at Zappos, he also became a leading figure in public and private efforts to redevelop downtown Las Vegas. In 2013, he moved Zappos’ headquarters to the former Las Vegas City Hall building and pledged $350 million to other revitalization efforts.“Tony Hsieh played a pivotal role in helping transform Downtown Las Vegas,” Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak tweeted. “Kathy and I send our love and condolences to Tony’s family and friends during this difficult time.”Read original story Tony Hsieh’s Nitrous Oxide Use, Love of Candles May Have Contributed to Tragic Death At TheWrap

  • Deadline

    Discovery+ Unveils Original Content Slate Including ‘90 Day Fiancé’ Spinoff & Series From Kevin Hart, David Schwimmer, Martha Stewart & Michael Urie

    Discovery is launching a new 90 Day Fiancé tentpole series, a topiary competition series with Michael Urie and Martha Stewart and a road-trip adventure series as part of its ambitious original content plans for its new streaming service. Discovery+ will have around 1,000 hours of original content in its first year when the service launches in […]

    Deadline

    Discovery+ Unveils Original Content Slate Including ‘90 Day Fiancé’ Spinoff & Series From Kevin Hart, David Schwimmer, Martha Stewart & Michael Urie

    Discovery is launching a new 90 Day Fiancé tentpole series, a topiary competition series with Michael Urie and Martha Stewart and a road-trip adventure series as part of its ambitious original content plans for its new streaming service. Discovery+ will have around 1,000 hours of original content in its first year when the service launches in […]

  • Bloomberg

    Trump's Election-Fraud Business Is Booming

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The president of the United States, a self-described multibillionaire, is still claiming the 2020 election was rigged — and he wants you to give him some of your money to help him sort that out.Ever since it became clear Joe Biden was the president-elect, Donald Trump’s campaign has pushed out a tsunami of text messages and email solicitations seeking donations to defray legal bills it’s incurred while trying, unsuccessfully, to overturn the election. Already, the effort has raised between $150 million and $170 million, according to the Washington Post and the New York Times.What’s the likelihood all of that money will actually be used to defray Trump’s legal bills? You already know the answer.As Bloomberg News and others reported weeks ago, most of the donations to the Trump Make America Great Again Committee get funneled to Save America, Trump’s new political action committee. The rest goes to the Republican National Committee. Trump’s PAC isn’t required to use the money exclusively for legal fees; it can also be used for political expenses such as travel, fundraising and donations to other candidates.While Trump’s team continues to hit up small donors enamored of the idea that somebody managed to unfairly steer about 7 million votes to Biden that should have gone to Trump, reality has intruded. Attorney General William Barr — the same guy who helped Trump dodge former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation and has run other interference for the president — told the Associated Press on Tuesday that “the Justice Department has not uncovered evidence of widespread voter fraud that would change the outcome of the 2020 presidential election.”In addition to Barr, Trump has also lost courageous local officials from both parties who have ensured that the country enjoyed a secure and reliable election. The pivotal states Trump needed to win in his voting fraud charade have now certified their results in Biden’s favor.It’s over. No fraud.But it never was really about the fraud, and I suspect Trump hasn’t really believed for a single minute that he was robbed of the presidency.Trump has had multiple reasons for trying to taint the election: He can’t come to terms with the idea of being a loser. He faces legal and financial challenges that would have been made less harrowing if he could remain in the Oval Office and continue enjoying the protections of the presidency. And now we can add another factor to the mix: Trump has discovered that running around claiming the sky is falling is a money-making proposition.Preying on the sentiments of others to make a buck isn’t an entirely new experience for Trump, of course. He has spent a lifetime surfing waves created by other people’s money, including from his father, his investors and his bankers.He and his three eldest children presided over a “charity,” the Trump Foundation, that the New York State attorney general’s office put out of business in 2018 because of a “shocking pattern of illegality” and “willful self-dealing” that allowed them to turn the faux philanthropy into the family’s piggy bank. Trump eagerly solicited donations from others to fund his foundation but was never willing to be as generous with his own money.Back in September, Trump’s presidential campaign was running on financial fumes after months of profligate spending had caused his operation to blow through almost $1 billion. Trump claimed at the time that he’d be willing to put $100 million of his own money into his campaign if it needed a shot in the arm. Did he? No.Trump has made his newest fundraising push a family affair. On Twitter, his son Eric has asked donors to contribute to his father’s “Election Defense Fund.” For anywhere from $45 (get it?) to $2,020 (get it?) you can “Join the Election Defense Team.” If you don’t want to give money to the defense team, some of Eric’s other tweets invite you to buy discounted vino from the Trump Winery.It’s possible the lawyers fronting Trump’s election putsch also see the financial upside for the president and themselves as reason to shred their own ethics and reputations. (Rudy Giuliani apparently has an added incentive: He’s reportedly seeking a pardon from the president.)But if you’re not Trump, his child or one of his lawyers, why tie your fortunes to him? Anybody contributing to Trump’s “Election Defense” should remember he’s never put his own money on the table when he’s found suckers willing to take the risk instead.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Timothy L. O'Brien is a senior columnist for Bloomberg Opinion.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    Bloomberg

    Trump's Election-Fraud Business Is Booming

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The president of the United States, a self-described multibillionaire, is still claiming the 2020 election was rigged — and he wants you to give him some of your money to help him sort that out.Ever since it became clear Joe Biden was the president-elect, Donald Trump’s campaign has pushed out a tsunami of text messages and email solicitations seeking donations to defray legal bills it’s incurred while trying, unsuccessfully, to overturn the election. Already, the effort has raised between $150 million and $170 million, according to the Washington Post and the New York Times.What’s the likelihood all of that money will actually be used to defray Trump’s legal bills? You already know the answer.As Bloomberg News and others reported weeks ago, most of the donations to the Trump Make America Great Again Committee get funneled to Save America, Trump’s new political action committee. The rest goes to the Republican National Committee. Trump’s PAC isn’t required to use the money exclusively for legal fees; it can also be used for political expenses such as travel, fundraising and donations to other candidates.While Trump’s team continues to hit up small donors enamored of the idea that somebody managed to unfairly steer about 7 million votes to Biden that should have gone to Trump, reality has intruded. Attorney General William Barr — the same guy who helped Trump dodge former Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation and has run other interference for the president — told the Associated Press on Tuesday that “the Justice Department has not uncovered evidence of widespread voter fraud that would change the outcome of the 2020 presidential election.”In addition to Barr, Trump has also lost courageous local officials from both parties who have ensured that the country enjoyed a secure and reliable election. The pivotal states Trump needed to win in his voting fraud charade have now certified their results in Biden’s favor.It’s over. No fraud.But it never was really about the fraud, and I suspect Trump hasn’t really believed for a single minute that he was robbed of the presidency.Trump has had multiple reasons for trying to taint the election: He can’t come to terms with the idea of being a loser. He faces legal and financial challenges that would have been made less harrowing if he could remain in the Oval Office and continue enjoying the protections of the presidency. And now we can add another factor to the mix: Trump has discovered that running around claiming the sky is falling is a money-making proposition.Preying on the sentiments of others to make a buck isn’t an entirely new experience for Trump, of course. He has spent a lifetime surfing waves created by other people’s money, including from his father, his investors and his bankers.He and his three eldest children presided over a “charity,” the Trump Foundation, that the New York State attorney general’s office put out of business in 2018 because of a “shocking pattern of illegality” and “willful self-dealing” that allowed them to turn the faux philanthropy into the family’s piggy bank. Trump eagerly solicited donations from others to fund his foundation but was never willing to be as generous with his own money.Back in September, Trump’s presidential campaign was running on financial fumes after months of profligate spending had caused his operation to blow through almost $1 billion. Trump claimed at the time that he’d be willing to put $100 million of his own money into his campaign if it needed a shot in the arm. Did he? No.Trump has made his newest fundraising push a family affair. On Twitter, his son Eric has asked donors to contribute to his father’s “Election Defense Fund.” For anywhere from $45 (get it?) to $2,020 (get it?) you can “Join the Election Defense Team.” If you don’t want to give money to the defense team, some of Eric’s other tweets invite you to buy discounted vino from the Trump Winery.It’s possible the lawyers fronting Trump’s election putsch also see the financial upside for the president and themselves as reason to shred their own ethics and reputations. (Rudy Giuliani apparently has an added incentive: He’s reportedly seeking a pardon from the president.)But if you’re not Trump, his child or one of his lawyers, why tie your fortunes to him? Anybody contributing to Trump’s “Election Defense” should remember he’s never put his own money on the table when he’s found suckers willing to take the risk instead.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Timothy L. O'Brien is a senior columnist for Bloomberg Opinion.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    EU criticises 'hasty' UK approval of COVID-19 vaccine

    The European Union criticised Britain's rapid approval of Pfizer and BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine on Wednesday, saying its own procedure was more thorough, after Britain became the first western country to endorse a COVID-19 shot. The move to grant emergency authorisation to the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine has been seen by many as a political coup for UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who has led his country out of the EU and faced criticism for his handling of the pandemic. In an unusually blunt statement, the European Medicines Agency (EMA), which is in charge of approving COVID-19 vaccines for the EU, said its longer approval procedure was more appropriate as it was based on more evidence and required more checks than the emergency procedure chosen by Britain.

    Reuters

    EU criticises 'hasty' UK approval of COVID-19 vaccine

    The European Union criticised Britain's rapid approval of Pfizer and BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine on Wednesday, saying its own procedure was more thorough, after Britain became the first western country to endorse a COVID-19 shot. The move to grant emergency authorisation to the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine has been seen by many as a political coup for UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who has led his country out of the EU and faced criticism for his handling of the pandemic. In an unusually blunt statement, the European Medicines Agency (EMA), which is in charge of approving COVID-19 vaccines for the EU, said its longer approval procedure was more appropriate as it was based on more evidence and required more checks than the emergency procedure chosen by Britain.

  • Investopedia

    Best Marijuana ETFs for Q1 2021

    Marijuana exchange-traded funds (ETFs) provide investors with exposure to equities of companies that engage in the cultivation, distribution, and sale of marijuana and related products. Products of marijuana companies include dried flowers, oils, seeds, edibles, and more.

    Investopedia

    Best Marijuana ETFs for Q1 2021

    Marijuana exchange-traded funds (ETFs) provide investors with exposure to equities of companies that engage in the cultivation, distribution, and sale of marijuana and related products. Products of marijuana companies include dried flowers, oils, seeds, edibles, and more.

  • Harper's Bazaar

    This Is the Holiday Jewelry That Will Complete Any Look

    Just add sparkle and shine.From Harper's BAZAAR

    Harper's Bazaar

    This Is the Holiday Jewelry That Will Complete Any Look

    Just add sparkle and shine.From Harper's BAZAAR

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