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List of LGBT slang terms

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This is a list of slang terms used by people to describe LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) people. Many terms are slurs against LGBT people. Some terms originate from the LGBT community itself.

For lesbians

A member of the Dykes on Bikes motorcycle club
  • Bean flicker, "Likening the clitoris to a bean"[1]
  • Butch, butch-broad[2]
  • Carpet muncher (or "rug muncher")[3]
  • Dyke ("bull dyke", "bull dagger", alternatively "bulldagger", "bulldicker"[4]), from 1920s black American slang[5][6][7]
  • Gillette Blade, a 1950s era term for bisexual women, whose sexuality "cuts both ways"[11]
  • Kiki, a term used primarily from the 1940s until the 1960s to indicate a lesbian who was not butch or femme and did not have a preference for either butch or femme partners[12]
  • Kitty puncher or pussy puncher, with both "kitty" and "pussy" referring to a woman's vagina, and "puncher" as a variation on various derogatory terms for gay men, such "donut puncher".[13]
  • Lezzie/Lesbo/Leso/Les/Leb (also "lezzer" or "lesser") (abbreviation for "lesbian")[citation needed]
  • Lipstick lesbian, a lesbian who exhibits a greater amount of feminine gender attributes, such as wearing make-up, dresses, skirts, etc.[citation needed]
  • Muff diver[14]
  • The Game of Flats (an 18th century English term for sex between women)[15]

For gay men

  • Bean queen (also taco queen or Salsa queen), gay man attracted to Hispanic men[50]
  • Brownie queen, obsolete slang for gay man interested in anal sex (used by men who disliked anal sex)[51]
  • Chicken queen, older gay man interested in younger or younger appearing men[52]
  • Grey queen, a gay person who works for the financial services industry (this term originates from the fact that in the 1950s, people who worked in this profession often wore grey flannel suits).[53]
  • Potato queen, gay Asian man attracted mainly to white men.[54]
  • Rice queen, gay man attracted mainly to East Asian men.[54]

For bisexuals or pansexuals

  • Switch hitter, from the baseball term[citation needed]
  • Bicon: portmanteau of the words bisexual and icon. Used to refer to a bisexual celebrity[58]
  • Unicorn/Hot Bi Babe (HBB): a bisexual person who desires multiple partners and is willing to join an existing married couple (known as a "Dyad", versus a "Triad" when there are three people),[59] the presumption being the "unicorn" will date and become sexually involved with both members of the couple.[60] "Unicorns" are so named because people willing to agree to such arrangements are rare, whereas couples looking for a lovers who will agree to these terms are common. "Dyads" actively seeking unicorns are called "unicorn hunters".[61]

For androgynous or intersex people

For transgender and nonbinary people

  • Cuntboy / Dickgirl, a female-to-male (FtM) and male-to-female (MtF) transgender/transsexual person, respectively, who has not had genital surgery.[citation needed]
  • Egg, a transgender person who has not yet realized they are trans.[65]
  • Enby, from the acronym NB ("nonbinary").[66]
  • Lady Boy ("ladyboy" or "lady-boy"), English translation of kathoey, similar or equivalent to transgender woman.[citation needed]
  • Shemale, a trans woman with male genitalia and possibly female secondary sex characteristics.[67] Primarily a term used in pornography and often considered derogatory.[citation needed]
  • T-girl, short for transgender / transsexual girl, considered derogatory by some.[68]
  • Tranny, slur used for transgender people.[69][70]
  • Transbian (non-derogatory), (portmanteau of "trans" and "lesbian"), a transgender lesbian.[citation needed]

Gender-neutral terms

  • Molly and Tommy, In 18th century England, the term "molly" was used for male homosexuals, implying effeminacy; "tommy", a slang term for a homosexual woman in use by 1781, and may have been coined by analogy. See Molly house.[71]
  • Skoliosexual, to describe attraction to non-binary people.[72][73]

Cisgender

See also

References

  1. ^ (Green 2005, p. 82)
  2. ^ (Green 2005, p. 222)
  3. ^ (Dalzell 2008, p. 170)
  4. ^ (Green 2005, p. 146)
  5. ^ Krantz, Susan E. (1995). "Reconsidering the Etymology of Bulldike". American Speech. 70 (2): 217–221. doi:10.2307/455819. JSTOR 455819.
  6. ^ "Prisons and Prisoners". GLBTQ Encyclopedia. 2006. Archived from the original on 12 November 2007. Retrieved 15 October 2007.
  7. ^ (Dynes et al. 1990, p. 335)
  8. ^ (Dalzell 2008, p. 287)
  9. ^ Matthew Rottnek, Sissies and Tomboys: Gender Nonconformity and Homosexual Childhood, NYU Press, May 1, 1999 -
  10. ^ (Green 2005, p. 444)
  11. ^ [1] Gay L. A.: A History of Sexual Outlaws, Power Politics, And Lipstick Lesbians (2006)
  12. ^ Haggerty, George; Zimmerman, Bonnie (2003-09-02). Encyclopedia of Lesbian and Gay Histories and Cultures edited by George Haggerty, Bonnie Zimmerman. ISBN 9781135578701. Retrieved 2018-03-27.
  13. ^ a b (Green 2005, p. 440)
  14. ^ (Dalzell 2008, p. 679)
  15. ^ Norton, Rictor (30 March 2003) [14 April 2000]. "The Game of Flats, 1749" Homosexuality in Eighteenth Century England: A Sourcebook. Sterling Publishing. ISBN 978-0-304-36636-1. Archived from the original on 2008-01-24. Retrieved 15 October 2007. The reference is to A. G. Busbequius, Travels into Turkey, English translation (London, 1744). The original book, published much earlier, was invariably cited whenever lesbianism was mentioned, e.g., William Walsh's A Dialogue Concerning Women (London, 1691) and in Martin Schurig's Muliebria Historico-Medica (1729).
  16. ^ a b c (Green 2005, p. 161)
  17. ^ Duffy, Nick. "UKIP candidate ranted about 'arse bandit' pride on Facebook". PinkNews. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  18. ^ [2]
  19. ^ (Green 2005, p. 49)
  20. ^ George Mazzei, (1979). Who's Who in the Zoo?. "The Advocate", pages 42–43.
  21. ^ a b (Dalzell 2008)
  22. ^ (Green 2005, p. 154)
  23. ^ (Green 2005, p. 188)
  24. ^ (Green 2005, p. 206)
  25. ^ (Green 2005, p. 208)
  26. ^ "David Kato". The Economist. 15 Feb 2011. Retrieved 25 June 2011.
  27. ^ Spears, Richard A. (2001). Slang and Euphemism: A Dictionary of Oaths, Curses, Insults, Ethnic Slurs, Sexual Slang and Metaphor, Drug Talk, College Lingo, and Related Matters (3 ed.). Signet. p. 59. ISBN 978-0-451-20371-7.
  28. ^ a b (Green 2005, p. 226)
  29. ^ C Gutzmore, Casting the First Stone, Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, 2004 – Taylor & Francis, Volume 6, Number 1, April 2004, pp. 118–134(17)
  30. ^ Allan, Keith; Kate Burridge (2006). Forbidden Words: Taboo and the Censoring of Language. Cambridge University Press. p. 156. ISBN 978-0-521-81960-2. Retrieved 15 October 2007.
  31. ^ a b Spears, Richard A. (2001-01-01). Slang and Euphemism: A Dictionary of Oaths, Curses, Insults, Ethnic Slurs, Sexual Slang and Metaphor, Drug Talk, College Lingo, and Related Matters. Signet. ISBN 9780451203717.
  32. ^ (Green 2005, p. 232)
  33. ^ "crafty butcher". Green’s Dictionary of Slang. Retrieved 3 January 2021.
  34. ^ "Faggot". Reference.com. Retrieved November 16, 2013.
  35. ^ 2008, Paul Ryan Brewer, Value war: public opinion and the politics of gay rights, page 60
  36. ^ The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin. 2000. ISBN 978-0-618-70172-8.
  37. ^ ""Fag" definition, meaning". dictionary.cambridge.org. Cambridge Dictionaries Online. Retrieved 1 March 2015. [C] US slang an offensive word for a gay man
  38. ^ (Green 2005, p. 485)
  39. ^ Edward Anthony Gibbons (2008). A Cultural Affair. iUniverse. p. 6. ISBN 9780595611614. On many, a cold freezing night, of temperatures hovering near zero, the finocchios tease and try to encourage Tedesco to join in their warm body orgies.
  40. ^ "Definition of flamer". The Online Slang Dictionary. Retrieved 28 February 2015. flower n. #A homosexual who takes the female role in a gay relationship. Source: [1950's]
  41. ^ (Green 2005, p. 522)
  42. ^ "flower - Gay Slang Dictionary". Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 28 February 2015.
  43. ^ Leap, William; Boellstorff, Tom (2003). Speaking in Queer Tongues: Globalization and Gay Language. University of Illinois Press. p. 98. ISBN 0-252-07142-5.
  44. ^ (Green 2005, p. 549)
  45. ^ "The Gaysian".
  46. ^ a b (Partridge, Dalzell & Victor 2006, p. 1208)
  47. ^ Partridge, Dalzell & Victor (2006). p. 1208. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  48. ^ Hirschhorn, Joel (July 19, 2005). "Oklahomo!: (Third Stage; 50 seats; $18 top)". Variety. Retrieved 15 October 2007.
  49. ^ Kemp, A.C. (2002–2005). "Bad Baby Names". Slang City. Retrieved 15 October 2007.
  50. ^ "Dictionary of Sexual Terms". Sex-lexis.com. Retrieved 2011-01-20.
  51. ^ "Interview". Gay Today. Retrieved 2013-09-01.
  52. ^ "Crossing Signals". Time. September 8, 1975. Retrieved 16 July 2007.
  53. ^ Rodgers, Bruce Gay Talk (The Queen's Vernacular): A Dictionary of Gay Slang New York: 1972 Parragon Books, an imprint of G.P. Putnam's Sons Page 99
  54. ^ a b Ayres T (1999). China doll - the experience of being a gay Chinese Australian. Journal of Homosexuality, 36(3-4): 87-97
  55. ^ "Online Etymology Dictionary". Retrieved 8 January 2015.
  56. ^ "Twink definition". Online dictionary. Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved 18 February 2013.
  57. ^ (Dalzell & Victor 2007) page 706.
  58. ^ Davis, Chloe O. (2021). The Queens' English: The LGBTQIA+ Dictionary of Lingo and Colloquial Phrases. Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale. ISBN 978-0-593-13500-6.
  59. ^ "How to be a Sexual Unicorn".
  60. ^ admin. "Unicorn Polyamory". Unicorns Rule!. Retrieved 2021-07-05.
  61. ^ "Hunting the Elusive Unicorn". 2012-04-22.
  62. ^ Leupp, Gary P. (1995). Male Colors: The Construction of Homosexuality in Tokugawa Japan. Berkeley, California: University of California Press. p. 174. ISBN 9780520919198. Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  63. ^ (in German) Krauss, Friedrich Salomo et al. Japanisches Geschlechtsleben: Abhandlungen und Erhebungen über das Geschlechtsleben des japanischen Volkes; folkloristische Studien, Schustek, 1965
  64. ^ James, Edward (2003). The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. ISBN 9781107494671.
  65. ^ VanDerWerff, Emily (2019-03-30). "How The Matrix universalized a trans experience — and helped me accept my own". Vox. Retrieved 2021-06-12.
  66. ^ Bergman, S. Bear; Barker, Meg-John (2017). "Non-binary Activism". In Richards, Christina; Bouman, Walter Pierre; Barker, Meg-John (eds.). Genderqueer and Non-Binary Genders. Critical and Applied Approaches in Sexuality, Gender and Identity. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 43. ISBN 978-1-137-51052-5.
  67. ^ Autumn Sandeen, Blaming The Victim, Angie Zapata, For Her Own Death, Shadowproof, 19 Mar 2009
  68. ^ "What Is A "T-Girl"?". Dictionary.com. Retrieved 2021-06-12.
  69. ^ Kaveney, Roz (2010-06-30). "Why trans is in but tranny is out". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 2012-10-06.
  70. ^ "GLAAD's Transgender Resources". Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. 2011-09-11. Retrieved 2012-10-06.
  71. ^ Andreadis, 10, 51.
  72. ^ Michelson, Noah (16 October 2015). "What's a Skoliosexual?". Huffington Post. Retrieved 16 July 2017.
  73. ^ Anderson-Minshall, Jacob (18 May 2017). "Is Fetishizing Trans Bodies Offensive?". The Advocate. Retrieved 14 October 2017.
  74. ^ Sian Ferguson (23 September 2019). "Cisgender and Straight Don't Mean the Same Thing — Here's Why". healthline. Retrieved 21 January 2020.