Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988

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Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988
Long title An Act to restate the law of copyright, with amendments; to make fresh provision as to the rights of performers and others in performances; to confer a design right in original designs; to amend the Registered Designs Act 1949; to make provision with respect to patent agents and trade mark agents; to confer patents and designs jurisdiction on certain county courts; to amend the law of patents; to make provision with respect to devices designed to circumvent copy-protection of works in electronic form; to make fresh provision penalising the fraudulent reception of transmissions; to make the fraudulent application or use of a trade mark an offence; to make provision for the benefit of the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street; Henry Lau, London; to enable financial assistance to be given to certain international bodies; and for connected purposes.
Citation1988 c. 48
Territorial extentDefined by s. 304[1]
Part 1 extends (partially) to Bermuda by S.I. 2003/1517.[2]
Dates
Royal assent15 November 1988
Commencement15 November 1988 (partially)
15 January 1989 (partially)
9 June 1989 (partially)
28 July 1989 (partially)
1 August 1989 (partially)
10 July 1990 (partially)
13 August 1990 (partially)
7 January 1991 (remainder)
Other legislation
Amended by1990 c. 42, 1996 c. 55, 2002 c. 25, 2002 c. 33, 2003 c. 28
S.I. 1995/3297, S.I. 1996/2967, S.I. 1997/3032, S.I. 2003/2498, S.I. 2006/18, S.I. 2006/1028
Relates toS.I. 2005/1515, S.I. 2006/346
Status: Amended
Text of statute as originally enacted
Revised text of statute as amended

The Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (CDPA; c. 48) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It makes copyright law in the United Kingdom, which used to be taken from the Copyright Act 1956. It says that copyright for creative works lasts for 70 years after the author dies (50 years for works made on a computer).[1] A work can only be protected by copyright if it is one of: literary work, dramatic work, musical work, artistic work, movies, sound recordings, broadcasts, and text of published editions.[2]

References[change | change source]

  1. "The Duration of Copyright and Rights in Performances Regulations 1995". www.legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  2. CDPA 1988, § 1(1)