Accent | music | Britannica

Accent

music
Alternate titles: stress
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Accent, also called Stress, in music, momentary emphasis on a particular rhythmic or melodic detail; accent may be implied or specifically indicated, either graphically for example, >, —) or verbally (sforzato, abbreviated sfz). In metrically organized music, accents serve to articulate rhythmic groupings, especially in dances where regular accentuation facilitates the patterning of steps. As a rule, the heaviest accent falls on the first beat of the measure (actually it is the accent that determines where the measure begins). In compound metres a lesser accent marks the beginning of the second half of the measure (e.g., the third beat in 4/4 or the fourth in 6/8).

Entire measures, also, may be subject to greater or lesser accentuation, which contributes vitally to meaningful phrasing, especially in periodically structured music. Dynamic accents, realized through a temporary increase in sonorous volume, are to be distinguished from agogic accents, produced by slight durational extensions. Regular implied accents may be temporarily displaced through the process known as syncopation (q.v.). In a typical instance, the accent on the first beat will be suppressed by a quarter rest followed by a half note (in 4/4). Or, instead of being replaced by a rest, the first beat may be tied across the bar line to the last note of the preceding measure.