List of comedy television series with LGBT characters

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This is a list of comedy television series (including web television and miniseries) which feature lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender characters. Non-binary, pansexual, asexual, and graysexual characters are also included. The orientation can be portrayed on-screen, described in the dialogue or mentioned.

1930s[edit]

Show Character Actor Notes Network
Series run
Byng Ho!
Queue For Song
Bawdy but British Douglas Byng Douglas Byng was the first female impersonator on UK television. His songs are full of sexual innuendo and double entendres. Byng-Ho! was a comedy sketch show with two episodes. Queue For Song was a variety show featuring comedy and music, with various performers. Byng was openly gay within his own theatrical world, but very discreet outside it. He also starred in music halls, burlesque revues and cabaret.[1][2][3][4] BBC One
1938–1939

1950s[edit]

Show Character Actor Notes Network
Series run
The Ernie Kovacs Show Percy Dovetonsils Ernie Kovacs Percy Dovetonsils was a wealthy, giddy and lisping effeminate poet. TV reviewers called him a sissy. Percy came closest to saying he was gay in a skit where he began plucking petals from a plastic flower saying, "he loves me, he loves me not..." John Barbour, who produced and narrated a documentary about Kovacs, said the Percy character was "the Alfred E. Neuman of the gay set".[5][6][7] CBS
1952–1954
The Ernie Kovacs Show Rock Mississippi Ernie Kovacs In a January 26, 1956 episode, Kovacs basically outed secretly-closeted Rock Hudson, when he played the character Rock Mississippi. Rock was a Hollywood film star who wore long false eyelashes and was swishy and effeminate. Rock was offering a preview of his latest movie, The Umbrella Salesman of Ranchipur.[5][8][9] NBC
1956
It’s A Great Life Mrs. Shufflewick Rex Jameson Rex Jameson was a female impersonator who created the character Mrs. Shufflewick at a BBC audition. Mrs. Shufflewick was a ruddy, tipsy cockney woman settled in the snug of her local pub, The Cock & Comfort: "a lot of comfort, but not much of anything else". In 1955 he was featured in the TV show It’s A Great Life, and was voted "TV Personality of the Year" for his performance. He also appeared on TV in other shows from the 1950s-1970s. Jameson was secretly gay, until he was outed in the 1970s.[1][10][11][12] BBC
1955
The Steve Allen Show Travel Correspondent Tom Poston Poston portrayed a TV news travel correspondent doing a report from Scotland, while wearing a kilt. When anchorman Allen asks him about his knees getting cold, Poston replies, no, but they do get a lot of compliments, I haven't paid for a drink since I got here. Poston also relays to Allen that a Duke proposed to him and they were engaged, while primping effeminately.[13] NBC
1959

1970s[edit]

Show Character Actor Notes Network
Series run
Agony Michael Peter Denyer First British sitcom to feature a gay couple in a non-camp fashion. Michael eventually committed suicide after being outed on a live phone-in radio show.[14][15] ITV
1979-1981
Rob Jeremy Bulloch
Alice Jack Newhouse Denny Miller Alice falls for Mel's friend Jack, a gay ex-professional football player. When he comes out to her, Alice is concerned about letting her son go fishing with him.[16] CBS
1976-1985
All in the Family Steve Philip Carey Archie’s friend Steve, an ex–professional football player, shocks him by telling him he's gay.[17][18] CBS
1971-1979
Veronica K Callan Veronica was the long time partner of Edith's cousin Liz.[19][20]
All That Glitters Linda Murkland Linda Gray Linda Murkland is a transgender woman. The show featured the first regular transgender character on TV.[21][22] Syndication
1977
Are You Being Served? Mr. Humphries John Inman Humphries is the junior menswear assistant working in the fictional Grace Brothers department store.[23] BBC1
1972-1985
Ball Four Bill Westlake David James Carroll Based on the book Ball Four. Featured a gay rookie baseball player.[24][25][26] CBS
1976
Barney Miller Marty Morrison Jack DeLeon Darryl and Marty are openly gay recurring characters, and partners. Series creator Danny Arnold worked with the National Gay Task Force in developing the characters of Darryl and Marty. Initially both were presented as flamboyantly gay, but as the series progressed Darryl began acting and dressing more conservatively.[27][28] ABC
1975-1982
Darryl Driscoll Ray Stewart
Officer Zitelli Dino Natali Zitelli comes out to Miller, after someone writes an anonymous letter threatening to reveal that one of the cops is gay. [29][30]
The Bob Newhart Show Craig Plager Howard Hesseman Craig joins Bob's group therapy and comes out to the group, with mixed reactions from them.[31] CBS
1972-1978
The Corner Bar Peter Panama Vincent Schiavelli The first continuing portrayal of a gay person on American television.[32] ABC
1972–1973
Hot l Baltimore George
Gordon
Lee Bergere
Henry Calvert
Middle aged couple living together. One of the first gay couples to be depicted on an American television series.[33][34] ABC
1975
Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman Ed McCullough Laurence Haddon Ed and Howard were introduced as a pair of brothers sharing a house in the Hartmans' neighborhood but were later revealed to be a gay couple hoping to live an open life in Fernwood.[35] Syndicated
1976–1977
Howard McCullough Beeson Carroll
The Mary Tyler Moore Show Ben Sutherland Robert Moore Ben is gay and the brother of Phyllis. In "My Brother's Keeper", she tries to set him up with Mary, but he instead hangs out with Rhoda who later tells Phyllis the reason why she's not interested in dating Ben.[36] CBS
1970–1977
Maude Barry Witherspoon Robert Mandan Walter is upset to hear that Maude's new friend, Barry Witherspoon, a local gay novelist, will be stopping by for drinks, feeling that he is a "pompous windbag."[37][38] CBS
1972-1978
1st man Craig Richard Nelson Maude's neighbor Arthur (Conrad Bain), is outraged about a new gay bar in town, so she takes him there to change Arthur's bigoted mind through thoughtful conversation with a young patron (1st man).[39][40]
The Nancy Walker Show Terry Folson Ken Olfson Terry is an out-of-work actor and personal assistant to lead character Nancy Kitteridge (Nancy Walker).[41] ABC
1976
Porridge Lukewarm Christopher Biggins Lukewarm is an openly gay inmate, he got his nickname from working in the prison kitchen and always preparing tepid food. Porridge is considered to be one of the greatest British sitcoms of all time.[42][43][44] BBC
1974-1977
Gay Gordon Felix Bowness Gay Gordon is a semi-regular character and worked in the kitchens. One of the episodes he appeared in was "Just Desserts".[43][45]
Soap Jodie Dallas Billy Crystal Jodie is openly gay, and dated a closeted football player, but later dates a woman. Jodie Dallas is one of the most memorable gay characters from the 70s, and played a central role in the series week after week.[46][47] ABC
1977–1981
Snip Michael Robert St. James Walter Wanderman Michael is an openly gay hairdresser. The show was created by James Komack, the creator of Chico and the Man and Welcome Back Kotter. The series was to premiere September 30, 1976, on NBC, but was shelved at the last minute and was never broadcast in the United States. The five completed episodes aired in Australia.[48][49][50] NBC
1976

1980s[edit]

Show Character Actor Notes Network
Series run
After Henry Russell Bryant Jonathan Newth Russell operated a second-hand bookstore, and was a good friend of Sarah France (Prunella Scales), who worked for him.[15] ITV
1988-1992
'Allo 'Allo! Lt. Hubert Gruber Guy Siner Lt. Gruber was seemingly gay, and interested in the series' lead character, Rene Artois (Gorden Kaye). In the series finale's flash-forward scene, however, it was revealed that Gruber eventually married Pvt. Helga Geerhart (Kim Hartman).[51] BBC
1982–1992
Anything but Love Jules Kramer Richard Frank Jules is Norman's (Louis Giambalvo) fawning assistant.[52] ABC
1989-1992
Brass Morris Hardacre James Saxon Morris is a gay college student with a fondness for teddy bears. Morris' character was based on Lord Sebastian Flyte from Brideshead Revisited.[53] ITV
1982-1984
Brothers Cliff Waters Paul Regina On the day of his wedding, Cliff comes out as gay, which does not sit well with his two older brothers, Joe (Robert Walden), an ex-professional football player, and Lou (Brandon Maggart), a conservative working-class man.[54][55] Showtime
1984–1989
Donald Maltby Philip Charles MacKenzie Donald is Cliff's best friend, openly gay, and proud of it. When Cliff's brother Joe calls him a fairy, Donald quips "actually we prefer the term hobgoblin".[54][55]
Check It Out! Leslie Rappaport Aaron Schwartz Leslie is openly gay, and a cashier at the fictitious supermarket Cobb's. The show is based on the British series Tripper's Day.[56] CTV
USA
1985-1988
CODCO Duncan Tommy Sexton Duncan and Jerome are a flamboyant pair of gay lawyers, appearing in a recurring segment called "Queen's Counselors".[57] CBC TV
1988-1993
Jerome Greg Malone
Daily at Dawn Leslie Windrush Terry Bader Leslie is the gay showbiz and social writer at the metropolitan newspaper, Daily at Dawn.[58] Seven Network
1981
Doctor Doctor Richard Stratford Tony Carreiro Richard is the openly gay brother of lead character Mike Stratford (Matt Frewer).[59] CBS
1989–1991
Dream Stuffing Richard Ray Burdis British sitcom about two unemployed girls who share a London flat. Their neighbor Richard is gay.[60] Channel 4
1984
Hail to the Chief Randy Joel Brooks Randy is a gay secret service agent to the first female U.S. president.[61] ABC
1985
Hooperman Rick Silardi Joseph Gian Police Officer Rick Silardi is openly gay, but seems to spend most of his time fending off the affections of his straight female police partner, Officer Mo DeMott (Sydney Walsh), who wants to save him from being gay by making passes at him whenever possible.[62][63] ABC
1987–1989
In Sickness and in Health Winston Churchill Eamonn Walker Eamonn, a gay black man, is sent by social services to assist Alf (Archie Bunker in the U.S. version), which infuriates him.[64] BBC
1985-1992
It Takes a Worried Man Simon Nicholas Le Prevost Simon is Phillips (Peter Tilbury) gay analyst, who he sees on a regular basis. Peter Tilbury wrote most of the episodes for this series.[64] ITV
Channel 4
1981-1983
The Kids in the Hall Buddy Cole Scott Thompson Recurring sketch on the show; Buddy is an effeminate gay socialite, with a penchant for going on long comedic rants about his personal life and the gay community.[65] CBC TV
CBS
HBO
1988-1995
Butch Scott Thompson Recurring sketch on the show called "Steps"; Three young stereotypical gay men sit on the steps of a café discussing current events, particularly those concerning the gay community. Riley is an effeminate airhead, Butch is an oversexed airhead who always talks about hot men, and Smitty is an intelligent fop who is usually exasperated by the other two.[65]
Riley Dave Foley
Smitty Kevin McDonald
Shona Bruce McCulloch Recurring sketch on the show; Shona is a loud-mouthed lesbian who appears in the "Humanoids for Humanism" sketches.[65]
Love, Sidney Sidney Shore Tony Randall Sidney is a middle-aged, Jewish, New York homosexual. Although his sexuality is never explicitly mentioned, Tony Randall said that it was undeniable there in every episode, but it wasn't incidental to the plot. One of the conditions for Randall accepting the role was that he be given complete creative control.[66] NBC
1981–1983
Roseanne Beverly Harris Estelle Parsons Roseanne and Jackie's mom.[67] ABC
1988–1997
Leon Carp Martin Mull Leon is Roseanne’s boss at the diner, and gets married to his partner Scott.[68][69]
Scott Fred Willard
Nancy Bartlett Sandra Bernhard After Nancy's marriage to Arnie was over, she came out as a lesbian, and later, as bisexual.[70][71]
Sara Dennis Kemper Bronson Pinchot Dennis is an openly gay attorney in the law firm at which the series is set.[72] NBC
1985
Thirtysomething Russell Weller David Marshall Grant Russell is a gay friend of Melissa's whom he met while she was photographing a wedding. Russell and Peter Montefiore have a one night stand. The episode featuring the one night stand with Russell and Peter, titled "Strangers", was the subject of controversy[73][74] ABC
1987–1991
Peter Montefiore Peter Frechette
Women in Prison Bonnie Harper Antoinette Byron Bonnie is a flirtatious openly lesbian in an all women's prison.[75][76] Fox
1987–1988

1990s[edit]

Show Character Actor Notes Network
Series run
After the Beep Mae Santos Genevieve Mooy Mae is a lesbian, runs a bridal botique, and is best friend of Josephine Donnelly (Genevieve Lemon). Every episode in the seven part series starts with a message "after the beep" on Josephine's answering machine.[15] ABC TV
1996
Agony Again Michael Lucas Sacha Grunpeter Michael is a gay college student, who meets Will Brewer (Robert Whitson), the star of an Australian soap opera. Short-lived sequel to 1979 sitcom Agony.[15] BBC
1995
Ally McBeal Stephanie Grant Wilson Cruz Stephanie is a trans woman facing jail time for a solicitation charge, but after she’s saved by Ally, she’s beaten and murdered for being trans.[77][78] Fox
1997-2002
Cindy McCauliff Lisa Edelstein Recurring character Cindy McCauliff is a trans woman challenging her employer’s requirement that she undergo a physical examination. Unaware of her trans status, Mark starts dating her, but when she does tell him, he feels betrayed, calls her a man, and is sick to his stomach.[79][78]
Beggars and Choosers Malcolm Laffley Tuc Watkins Laffley is a television casting director who came out to disprove sexual harassment charges leveled at him by a woman.[80] Showtime
1999–2001
The Brian Benben Show Billy Hernandez Luis Antonio Ramos Billy is gay, and the weatherman at the fictitious KYLA-TV news station.[53] CBS
1998
The Brittas Empire Gavin Featherly Tim Marriott Gavin and his partner Tim, were the first openly same-sex couple to ever appear in a British comedy on the BBC.[81] BBC
1991–1997
Tim Whistler Russell Porter
The Crew Paul Steadman David Burke Paul is a gay flight attendant that works for the fictitious Regency Airlines.[82] Fox
1995–1996
Cutters Troy King Julius Carry Troy was an Olympic gold medalist turned hairdresser.[82] CBS
1993
Cybill Waiter Tim Maculan The acerbic and riotous unnamed waiter at Cybill's favorite restaurant. In the episode titled "Whose Wife Am I, Anyway?", the waiter, who is nervous about telling his parents that he is gay, introduces Cybill as his fiancee.[83][84] CBS
1995-1998
Daddy's Girls Dennis Sinclair Harvey Fierstein Sinclair is a high-strung fashion designer. He was the first gay principal television character played by an openly gay actor.[85] CBS
1994
Drop the Dead Donkey Helen Cooper Ingrid Lacey Helen finally comes out to her mother, but discovers her secret was already well known.[86][87] Channel 4 1990–1998
Ellen Ellen Morgan Ellen DeGeneres Ellen Morgan comes out to her therapist (Oprah Winfrey), and then announces it over an airport loudspeaker, and then comes out to her friends, in the episode titled "The Puppy Episode".[88] ABC
1994–1998
Peter Barnes Patrick Bristow Peter and Barrett are Ellen's friends and an openly gay couple.[89]
Barrett Jack Plotnick
Fired Up Ashley Mann Mark Davis Ashley is a drag queen, and Gwen's neighbor. Mark Davis who portrays Ashley is an openly gay comic.[90][91] NBC
1997–1998
Friends Carol Willick Jane Sibbett Carol is lesbian and Ross's ex-wife. Susan is lesbian and Carol's girlfriend. Carol and Susan married in season 2 episode "The One with the Lesbian Wedding". It was the first lesbian wedding portrayed on U.S. television.[92][93] NBC
1994–2004
Susan Bunch Jessica Hecht
Gimme Gimme Gimme Tom Farrell James Dreyfus Tom is openly gay and a wannabe actor who has only had small roles on TV and on stage.[23] BBC2
BBC1
1999-2001
Grace & Favour Mr. Humphries John Inman A spin-off of Are You Being Served?. The employees of the fictional department store where they previously worked inherit an estate (Millstone Manor), that is the locale of the show.[23] BBC1
1992-1993
Head over Heels Ian Patrick Bristow Ian is a celibate bisexual who works at the fictional Head Over Heels video dating agency.[61] UPN
1997
Hearts Afire Diandra Julie Cobb Diandra is the ex-wife, now a lesbian, of John (John Ritter). Diandra and her lover Ruth had three guest appearances.[94] CBS
1992-1995
Ruth Conchata Ferrell
High Society Stephano Luigi Amodeo Stephano is Dot's (Mary McDonnell) assistant. The show was cancelled after 13 episodes. [90] CBS
1995–1996
The John Larroquette Show Pat Jazzmun A drag queen who hangs out at the bus station where the lead character works.[95] NBC
1993–1996
The Larry Sanders Show Brian Scott Thompson Hank Kingsley's personal assistant.[96] HBO
1992–1998
Living in Captivity Gordon Terry Rhoads Gordon is a gay security guard at a gated community, and often leers at the residents when they come through the gate.[97] FOX
1998
Los Beltrán Fernando Salazar Gabriel Romero Fernando and Kevin are gay. They are the first openly-gay characters on Spanish-language television, and first same-sex couple that marry.[98] Telemundo
1999–2001
Kevin Lynch James C. Leary
Lush Life Nelson "Margarita" Marquez John Ortiz Nelson is a gay bartender, hence the nickname Margarita. The show only lasted for four episodes.[90] Fox
1996
Mad About You Debbie Buchman Robin Bartlett Debbie is Paul's (Paul Reiser) sister, and came out in 1996 on the show. Joan is Debbie's life partner and is also Jamie's (Helen Hunt) gynecologist.[99] NBC
1992-1999
Dr. Joan Golfinos Suzie Plakson
Muscle Bronwyn Jones Amy Pietz Lead character Bronwyn is a lesbian news anchor.[100] The WB
1995
Northern Exposure Ron Bantz Doug Ballard Ron and Erick are a gay couple who buy a house from Maurice (Barry Corbin) in order to open an upscale bed and breakfast called the Sourdough Inn. They get married in the fifth season of the series.[101] CBS
1990-1995
Erick Hillman Don McManus
Cicely Yvonne Suhor The fictitious town of Cicely Alaska, where the show takes place, was founded by lesbian partners Cicely and Rosyln in 1908 when their car broke down in the Alaskan wilderness. Their story was told in the final episode of 1992.[101][102]
Rosyln Jo Anderson
Oh, Grow Up Ford Lowell John Ducey Ford is a married man who left his wife after realizing he was gay.[103] Sal is lead character Hunter's (Stephen Dunham) boss.[104] ABC
1999
Sal Ed Marinaro
Party Girl Derrick John Cameron Mitchell Short-lived sitcom based on the 1995 theatrical film.[90] Fox
1996
Public Morals John Irvin Bill Brochtrup John Irvin, an administrative assistant, imported into the show from NYPD Blue, and returned after the cancellation of Public Morals. The series was poorly received and was canceled after airing only one episode.[105][106] CBS
1996
The Pursuit of Happiness Alex Chosek Brad Garrett Alex comes out to his partner Steve.[105] NBC
1995
Rude Awakening Jackie Garcia Rain Pryor Jackie is a lesbian and recovering drug addict.[107][108] Showtime
1998-2001
Sex and the City Stanford Blatch Willie Garson Stanford and Anthony are married. Liza Minnelli sang at their wedding.[109] Samantha is bisexual and has a romance with a woman, Maria (Sônia Braga).[110] HBO
1998–2004
Anthony Marantino Mario Cantone
Samantha Jones Kim Cattrall
Spin City Carter Heywood Michael Boatman Carter is the openly gay minority affairs liaison.[111] ABC
1996–2002
Strangers with Candy Jerri Blank Amy Sedaris Jerri is bisexual, an ex-con, ex-junkie, ex-prostitute, and high-school freshman.[112] Comedy Central
1999–2000
Geoffrey Jellineck Paul Dinello Jellineck and Noblet are teachers at fictitious school Flatpoint High, and are having a secret gay affair.[113]
Chuck Noblet Stephen Colbert
Suddenly Susan Pete Fontaine Bill Stevenson Pete is gay and works in the mailroom. Pete and his partner Hank got married in the episode "Oh How They Danced".[114][115] NBC
1996-2000
Hank Fred Stoller
Carlos Bruno Campos Luis' (Nestor Carbonell) brother Carlos comes out in episode "A Boy like That".[114][116]
Terry and Julian Julian Julian Clary Julian is a very flamboyant gay that lives in Terry's flat. Clary is openly gay as well.[117][118] Channel 4
1992
Unhappily Ever After Barry Wallenstein Ant Barry is a recurring character, and Tiffany's (Nikki Cox) openly gay friend at Priddy High.[119] The WB
1995-1999
Veronica's Closet Josh Blair Wallace Langham Josh's sexuality was obfuscated as a running joke until he came out in the episode "Veronica Helps Josh Out".[120] NBC
1997–2000
The Vicar of Dibley Frank Pickle John Bluthal Frank came out as gay live on the radio. Unfortunately, such is his reputation for dullness, Geraldine is his only listener.[121] BBC
1994–1999
Will & Grace Will Truman Eric McCormack Will is a lawyer who lives in New York City with his best friend, Grace Adler. Jack is Will's best friend and helps Will come out and find the confidence to start dating men. Vince dated Will, and then eventually married him in the original series finale (2006). However, in the 2017 reboot of the series, Will’s marriage to Vince, and their child Ben is nixed, the whole previous finale explained away by a dream of Karens.[122][123] NBC
1998–2006
Jack McFarland Sean Hayes
Vince D'Angelo Bobby Cannavale
You Rang M'Lord? Cissy Meldrum Catherine Rabett Cissy is Lord Meldrum's elder daughter. She dresses in a masculine style, and takes part in men's sports and activities.[124][125] BBC
1990–1993

2000s[edit]

Show Character Actor Notes Network
Series run
30 Rock Devon Banks Will Arnett Devon is Jack Donaghy's (Alec Baldwin) smarmy gay nemesis. Arnett has earned four Emmy nominations for his guest role.[126][127] NBC
2006–2013
Jonathan Maulik Pancholy Jonathan is gay, and Jack's loyal and overprotective personal assistant, who at times appears to be possibly in love with Jack.[127]
J.D. Lutz John Lutz J.D. is bisexual, and a lazy overweight TGS writer who is often insulted or made fun of by the rest of the staff.[128]
Randy Lemon Jeffery Self Randy is Liz Lemon's (Tina Fey) naive gay cousin, who is constantly educating Liz about gay slang. Self is openly gay.[127]
Aquí no hay quien viva
(No One Could Live Here)
Mauri Hidalgo Luis Merlo Mauri is a gay journalist who used to work for a Cosmopolitan-type magazine. He is married to Fernando Navarro.[129] Antena 3
2003–2006
Fernando Navarro Adrià Collado Fernando is a gay lawyer who lost his job when he came out. He decided to start his own practice, and is married to Mauri.[129]
Bea Villarejo Eva Isanta Mauri's lesbian roommate and best friend. She moved in with Mauri after breaking up with her girlfriend.[129][130]
Diego Álvarez Mariano Alameda Diego has an affair with Mauri, but breaks it off after meeting Abel, the male nanny of Mauri's son. Diego and Abel are married.[131]
Rosa Izquierdo María Almudéver Rosa is a lesbian, and a lawyer and was Bea's girlfriend in season 3[131][130]
Ana Vanesa Romero Ana is an air hostess who, after a passionate night with Bea, ends up accepting she's a lesbian. She also sporadically works as a model.[130]
Abel Alberto Maneiro Abel is Mauri's nanny, and married to Diego.[129]
Arrested Development George Oscar "Gob" Bluth II Will Arnett GOB is a part-time magician, and founding member of the "Magicians' Alliance". He is hinted to be bisexual throughout the series, and ends up having sex with his enemy, Tony Wonder.[132] Fox
Netflix
2003–2006
2013–
Tony Wonder Ben Stiller Tony is a professional magician who commonly works at the fictitous Gothic Castle and is known for baking himself into a loaf of bread and emerging.[133][134]
Benidorm Kenneth Du Beke Tony Maudsley Kenneth is a gay hairdresser who doesn’t apologize for his behaviour.[135] ITV
2007–
Troy Ramsbottom
Gavin Ramsbottom
Paul Bazely
Hugh Sachs
Troy and Gavin are married. The pair have a successful hair salon.[136]
The Business Terrence Von Holtzen Matt Silver Terrence is a closeted intern who is the Associate Co-head of the Animation and Historical Adaptation Department.[137] The Movie Network
IFC
2006–2007
The Class Kyle Lendo
Aaron
Sean Maguire
Cristian de la Fuente
Kyle and Aaron are in a relationship. Kyle is a first-grade teacher at the fictitious Pembridge Academy, an elite private school. Aaron is a software engineer for an internet security firm.[138] CBS
2006–2007
The Comeback Mickey Deane Robert Michael Morris Mickey is a hairdresser and confidant to lead character Valerie Cherish (Lisa Kudrow) who, despite being obviously gay, believes he is closeted.[139] HBO
2005
Crumbs Mitch Crumb Fred Savage Mitch is a gay struggling movie screenwriter who returns home to take care of his mother (Jane Curtin), who has recently been released from a mental institution after trying to run over her husband (William Devane).[140] ABC
2006
Entourage Lloyd Rex Lee Lloyd is gay and the head of the TV department. The premise of the show is loosely based on Mark Wahlberg's experiences as an up-and-coming film star.[141][142] HBO
2004–2011
Glee Kurt Hummel Chris Colfer Kurt is the first gay character to come out in season one of Glee.[143] Fox
2009–2015
Sandy Ryerson Stephen Tobolowsky He is revealed to be gay in season two.[144]
Blaine Anderson Darren Criss Blaine and Kurt start dating and eventually get married.[143]
Dave Karofsky Max Adler Dave is the school bully who picks on the Glee crew, comes out in season two.[143]
Sebastian Smythe Grant Gustin Sebastian is gay and the lead singer of the fictitous Dalton Academy Warblers.[143]
Brittany Pierce Heather Morris Brittany is an openly bisexual cheerleader.[143]
Santana Lopez Naya Rivera Santana dates Brittany and in season two, she comes out to her grandmother.[143]
Hiram Berry
LeRoy Berry
Jeff Goldblum
Brian Stokes Mitchell
Hiram and LeRoy Berry are Rachel's fathers. They debuted in episode "Heart"[143]
Unique Adams Alex Newell Unique is a transgender girl.[143]
Sheldon Beiste Dot-Marie Jones In season six, he comes out as transgender making him the first trans man on the show.[143]
Go Girls Levi Hirsh Leon Wadham Levi is a sassy gay Jewish man whose pledge is to get revenge.[145] TVNZ 2
2009–2013
Kent Josh McKenzie Levi's ex-boyfriend and first love since high school.[146]
Grosse Pointe Richard Towers Michael Hitchcock A behind-the-scenes drama on the set of a television show. Richard is a closeted gay character who ogles his on-screen son and finds ways to see him without clothes on.[147][61] WB
2000–2001
How I Met Your Mother James Stinson Wayne Brady James is Barney Stinson's gay black brother. He is married to Tom and they have 2 children together.[148] CBS
2005–2014
It's All Relative Simon Banks
Philip Stoddard
Christopher Sieber
John Benjamin Hickey
Simon and Philip are life partners with an adoptive daughter, Liz (Maggie Lawson). Liz gets engaged to Bobby O'Neill (Reid Scott) who comes from a conservative blue-collar family. Bobby's father is a bigot, upset about Philip and Simon being a gay couple.[149] ABC
2003–2004
It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia Ronald "Mac" MacDonald Rob McElhenney A long-running theme on the show is the ambiguity surrounding Mac's sexuality which culminates in him coming out as gay in season 12.[150] The series is the longest-running live-action comedy series in American television history.[151] FXX
2005–
Country Mac Seann William Scott Country Mac is gay. Mac invites along his cousin, Country Mac, in episode "Mac Day", where each gang member gets their own day to do whatever they want with no complaints from the others. When they visit a gym full of bodybuilders, Mac insists the gang help oil them up. Country Mac is happy to assist, revealing to the gang that he is gay.[152]
It's Me...Gerald Gerald Gerald L'Ecuyer Gerald is a struggling gay theatre director trying to stage a production of Hedda Gabler. He tries to find the money by any means necessary to finance his vision, while a camera crew documents his efforts.[153] Showcase
2005
Kick Layla
Jackie
Nicole Chamoun
Romi Trower
Layla is a Muslim-Australian who lives with her conservative family and is engaged to Sharif. But when she falls in love with Jackie, she has to choose between following her heart or making her family happy.[154] SBS
2007
Modern Family Mitchell Pritchett
Cameron Tucker
Jesse Tyler Ferguson
Eric Stonestreet
Mitchell and Cam are married, and raising their adoptive daughter Lily.[155] ABC
2009–2020
Crispin Craig Zimmerman Crispin is one of Mitchell and Cameron's gay friends.[156]
Longines Kevin Daniels Longines is one of Mitchell and Cameron's gay friends.[157]
Ronaldo Christian Barillas Ronaldo is Pepper Saltzman's assistant and later husband.[158]
Pepper Saltzman Nathan Lane Pepper is one of Mitchell and Cameron's gay friends, and married to Ronaldo.[158][157]
Steven
Stefan
Colin Hanlon
Rodrigo Rojas
Recurring gay couple, friends of Mitchell and Cameron.[159]
Mord mit Aussicht
(Murder with a View)
Bärbel Schmied
Mathilde
Meike Droste
Alwara Höfels
Bärbel is bisexual, and falls in love with Mathilde. They have a short affair in "Waltzing Mathilde".[160][161] Das Erste
2008–2014
My Family Michael Harper Gabriel Thompson After coming home drunk, Michael comes out as gay to Ben and then later to Susan, in the second episode of series 10 "The Son'll Come Out".[162] BBC1
2000–2011
My Name is Earl Kenny James Gregg Binkley Kenny is gay, but kept it hidden until Earl helped him come out. He later was in a relationship with Stuart.[163] NBC
2005–2009
Stuart Daniels Mike O'Malley Stuart was a policeman who lost his badge after it was stolen by Earl. He was a closeted bisexual but later engaged in a relationship with Kenny.[163]
Normal, Ohio William "Butch" Gamble John Goodman Butch comes out to his wife Joan (Anita Gillette) and son Charlie (Greg Pitts), and moves to California. He returns home four years later to attend a going away party for his son, who's going to medical school. When Charlie decides not to leave, Butch stays in Ohio and moves in with his sister Pam (Joely Fisher). The original concept for this series was titled Don't Ask.[164] Fox
2000
Nurse Jackie Mohammed de la Cruz
Thor Lundgren
Haaz Sleiman Stephen Wallem Mohammed and Thor are gay nurses at the fictitous All Saints' Hospital. Mohammed was dropped after the first season. The producers stated the reason being "the character's storyline ran its course".[165] Showtime
2009–2015
Dr. Eleanor O'Hara Eve Best Eleanor is bisexual and in a relationship with a female journalist in season 2.[166]
The Office Oscar Martinez
Gil
Oscar Nuñez
Tom Chick
Oscar is an accountant at the office, and was outed by his boss Michael Scott (Steve Carell) during the episode called "Gay Witch Hunt" in season three. Gil is his partner who lived with him.[167][168] NBC
2005–2013
Matt Sam Daly Matt is known as the "gay warehouse guy" at the fictitous Dunder Mifflin Scranton Warehouse. Oscar secretly has a crush on him.[169]
Robert Lipton Jack Coleman Oscar realized Robert was gay as soon as they met. Oscar did eventually give in to Robert and the two started an affair.[168]
Out of Practice Regina Barnes Paula Marshall Regina is a lesbian E.R. doctor, who is infatuated with attractive women.[170][171] CBS
2005–2006
Peep Show Jeremy 'Jez' Usborne Robert Webb Hinted earlier in the series to be bisexual, and confirmed in episodes "Gregory's Beard", where Jez has sex with Joe, and "Threeism", where Jez has sex with Megan and Joe. He also discusses his sexuality openly with roommate Mark Corrigan.[172] Channel 4
2003–2015
Reaper Tony
Steve
Ken Marino
Michael Ian Black
Tony and Steve are a gay couple who live next door to the main trio of Sam, Sock, and Ben. It is later learned they are demons waging a war against the Devil. Steve is killed during the rebellion and manages to get into Heaven. He later becomes Sam's guardian angel.[173] The CW
2007–2009
Reno 911! Lieutenant Dangle Thomas Lennon Dangle is openly gay and sees no problem flirting with and trying to seduce straight men, even those he stops for infractions.[174] Comedy Central
2003–2009
Deputy Kimball Mary Birdsong She is a possibly closeted lesbian, and is perpetually accused of being a lesbian, despite her denials when asked, and when asked for dates by lesbians.[175]
The Sarah Silverman Program Brian
Steve
Brian Posehn
Steve Agee
Sarah's gay neighbors and friends, who are partners.[176] Comedy Central
2007–2010
Scrubs Todd Quinlan ("The Todd") Robert Maschio Initially portrayed as womanizing and heterosexual, Todd displays same-sex attractions as well and eventually reveals that he is attracted to almost everyone he sees, regardless of gender. He later enters into a three-way sexual relationship with a man and woman.[177] NBC
2001–2010
Seven Periods with Mr Gormsby Alisdair Morton Thomas Robins Alisdair is a teacher at the fictional Tepapawai High School. His life changes when he is outed by Mr Gormsby. Previously secretive about his sexuality he starts openly selling tickets to gay and lesbian balls and dressing more flamboyantly.[178] TVNZ 1
2005–2006
Lesley Tangaroa Grace Hoet Lesley teaches physical education at the fictional Tepapawai High School. She is a lesbian, and a totally unfit Ngāti Porou.[179]
Some of My Best Friends Warren Fairbanks Jason Bateman Warren is a mild-mannered gay writer living in Greenwich Village. The series was inspired by the film Kiss Me, Guido.[180] CBS
2001
Vern Limoso Alec Mapa Vern is Warren's flamboyant gay best friend, who lives upstairs and usually enters Warren's apartment by coming down the fire escape and through a window.[180]
So NoTORIous Sasan Zachary Quinto Sasan is an Iranian-American muslim who hasn't told his parents he's gay.[181] VH1
2006
Sophie Matt Scott Jeff Geddis Matt is gay and an OB/GYN and Sophie's best friend.[182] CBC
2008–2009
Sordid Lives: The Series Earl "Brother Boy" Ingram Leslie Jordan Brother Boy is a drag queen and likes to perform as Tammy Wynette. He tries to escape from treatments to "dehomosexualize" him.[183] Logo
2008
Ty Williamson Jason Dottley Ty is an actor in Los Angeles coming to terms with his homosexuality.[183]
That '80s Show Sophia Brittany Daniel Sophia is bisexual and has a crush on Katie.[184] CBS
2002
Trailer Park Boys Jim Lahey John Dunsworth Jim is bisexual, and a drunk trailer-park supervisor of the fictional Sunnyvale Trailer Park.[185] Showcase
Netflix
2001–2008
2014–
Randy Patrick Roach Randy is Jim's assistant at the trailer park, and his overweight bisexual lover.[185]
Twins Neil Christopher Fitzgerald Neil is a flamboyantly gay technician.[186] The WB
2005–2006
Two and a Half Men Evelyn Harper Holland Taylor Evelyn is bisexual and the mother of Charlie and Alan Harper.[187] CBS
2003–2015
Jenny Harper Amber Tamblyn Jenny, the previously unknown daughter of Charlie, is lesbian. She engages in several one-night stands with various women (introduced in season 11).[188]
United States of Tara Marshall Gregson
Lionel Trane
Keir Gilchrist
Michael J. Willett
Marshall is an openly gay teenager, and not once does he shy away from who he is. Lionel is Marshall's boyfriend.[189] Showtime
2009–2011
Ted Mayo Michael Hitchcock Openly gay neighbor of the family.[190]
The War At Home Khaleel "Kenny" Al-Bahir Rami Malek Kenny is a 16-year-old boy who harbors a secret crush on his best friend Larry and is subsequently kicked out of his house when his parents find out he's gay.[191] Fox
2005–2007

2010s[edit]

Show Character Actor Notes Network
Series run
195 Lewis Yuri
Camille
Rae Leone Allen
Sirita Wright
Yuri is lesbian. Camille is lesbian. Yuri and Camille are a couple experimenting with polyamory.[192][193] One Nine Five Lewis
2017
American Housewife Angela Carly Hughes Angela is a lesbian and one of Katie's best friends and fellow moms.[194] ABC
2016–
Andi Mack Cyrus Goodman
TJ Kippen
Joshua Rush
Luke Mullen
Cyrus is in a relationship with TJ Kippen. It is the first gay relationship on Disney Channel, and Cyrus is the first gay main character.[195] Disney Channel
2017–2019
Anger Management Patrick Michael Arden Patrick is gay and Charlie's passive-aggressive anger-management patient.[196] FX
2012–2014
Another Period Victor
Albert
Dr. John Goldberg
Brian Huskey
David Wain
Moshe Kasher
Victor and Albert are a gay couple. Dr. Goldberg is gay.[197] Comedy Central
2015–2018
Awkward Clark Stevenson Joey Haro Clark is outed by the school bully in the season one finale. Clark is caught making out with Ricky in the final episode of season two.[198] MTV
2011–2016
Ricky Schwartz Matthew Fahey Ricky is bisexual, and has had relations with Tamara and Sadie, and in the second season finale was with Clark.[198]
Tamara Kaplan Jillian Rose Reed Tamara comes out as bisexual in the second season finale.[198]
Theo Abbott
Cole Higgins
Evan Crooks
Monty Geer
Theo and Cole are openly gay, and best friends. They are a bit obnoxious, and trouble makers.[199]
Black Monday Keith Shankar Paul Scheer Keith is a closeted gay.[200] Showtime
2019–
Blue Mountain State Debra Simon Denise Richards Debra is the football coach’s ex-wife, she sleeps with a lot of the football players, her ex-husband, and a cheerleader.[201] Spike
2010–2011
Mary Jo Cacciatore Frankie Shaw Mary Jo is in love with the quarterback and a cheerleader. No one likes her, mostly because she comes to practice drunk.[201]
Boy Meets Girl Judy Rebecca Root Judy is a male-to-female transexual.[202] BBC Two
2015–2016
Charlie Tyler Luke Cunningham Charlie is a female-to-male transexual. Charlie and Judy both attend the same support group.[202]
Broad City Ilana Wexler Ilana Glazer Ilana is bisexual.[203][204] Comedy Central
2014–2019
Abbi Abrams Abbi Jacobson Abbi is bisexual.[203]
Jaime Castro Arturo Castro Jaime is gay.[204]
Matt Bevers John Gemberling Matt is a closeted bisexual.[204]
Lesley Marnel Clea DuVall Lesley is lesbian.[203][204]
Brooklyn Nine-Nine Captain Ray Holt
Kevin Cozner
Andre Braugher
Marc Evan Jackson
Captain Holt is the openly gay captain of the 99th Police Precinct. Kevin is Holt's husband.[205][206] Fox
NBC
2013–
Rosa Diaz Stephanie Beatriz Rosa Diaz is a detective and comes out as bisexual in episode "99" after a fellow detective overhears a woman calling her "babe" on the phone.[207]
Carol’s A Demon Carol Brittany Ashley Carol is a lesbian, and a 3,000 year old demon trying to get into heaven to be with her true love, a nun.[208][209][210] YouTube
2018
Sofia Ashly Perez Sofia is a lesbian. Sofia and her friends accidentally summon a 3,000 year old demon with a Ouija board. Sofia helps the demon (Carol) stop an impending apocalypse, so she get into heaven.[208][211][212]
Carol's Second Act Dr. Lexie Gilani Sabrina Jalees Lexie is lesbian.[213] CBS
2019–2020
Champions Michael Patel
Ruby
J.J. Totah
Fortune Feimster
Michael is a 15-year-old gay teenager who lives with his father and uncle in Brooklyn. Ruby is a lesbian and trainer at the gym.[214][215] NBC
2018
Clipped Buzzy
Tommy
George Wendt
Reginald VelJohnson
Buzzy is gay, and the owner of a hair salon. Tommy is a gay cop, his partner and later husband. [216] TBS
2015
The Cool Kids Sid Leslie Jordan Sid is an elderly gay man living in a retirement home. He claims to have come out to his wife just before Y2K.[217] Fox
2018–2019
Crazy Ex-Girlfriend 'White Josh' Wilson David Hull White Josh is gay.[218][219] The CW
2015–2019
Darryl Whitefeather Pete Gardner Darryl is bisexual, and in a relationship with White Josh.[220]
Maya Esther Povitsky Maya is bisexual.[221]
Valencia Perez Gabrielle Ruiz Valencia becomes aware that she is bisexual when she starts dating a woman named Beth (Emma Willmann) late in Season 3.[222]
Dead to Me Judy Hale
Michelle Gutierrez
Det. Ana Perez
Linda Cardellini
Natalie Morales
Diana-Maria Riva
Judy is bisexual. She was engaged to Steve Wood and becomes romantically involved with Michelle. Michelle is lesbian. Ana is lesbian and the ex-girlfriend of Michelle.[223] Netflix
2019–
Death Valley Carla Rinaldi Tania Raymonde Carla is a lesbian, and an officer in the Undead Task Force (UTF), a newly formed division of the LAPD, that captures the monsters that roam the streets of San Fernando Valley. She is in a relationship with Julia.[224] [225] MTV
2011
Julia Stacey LaBerge Julia is a bisexual bartender, and in a relationship with Carla Rinaldi.[226]
Derry Girls Clare Devlin Nicola Coughlan Clare comes out as a lesbian (series 1, episode 6).[227][228] Channel 4
2018–
Detroiters Lea Lailana Ledesma Lea is gay. In episode "Jefferson Porger", it is revealed that she has a girlfriend, Scarlett.[229] Comedy Central
2017–2018
Dickinson Emily Dickinson
Susan Gilbert
Hailee Steinfeld
Ella Hunt
Emily and Susan are in a secret homosexual relationship.[230][231] Apple TV+
2019–
Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency Panto Trost
Silas Dengdamor
Christopher Russell
Lee Majdoub
Panto and Silas are a gay couple.[232] BBC America
2016–2017
Dr. Ken Clark Leslie Beavers
Connor
Jonathan Slavin
Stephen Guarino
Clark and Connor are a gay couple.[233] ABC
2015–2017
Episodes Andy Button Joseph May Andy is gay and the head of casting of the network. By the end of Season 1, he is fired because he likes the talking dog show.[234] Showtime
2011–2017
Helen Basch Andrea Savage Helen is a lesbian who demonstrates good instincts about creative ideas, but is prone to jealousy.[235]
Carol Rance Kathleen Rose Perkins Carol is bisexual and the network's head of programming. She becomes good friends with Beverly, with whom she often goes hiking and smokes pot.[235]
Faking It Amy Raudenfeld Rita Volk Amy is a fake lesbian in the first season. In the second season, she has secret feelings for her best friend Karma.[236] MTV
2014–2016
Karma Ashcroft Katie Stevens Karma is a fake lesbian in the first season. In the second season, she kisses Amy passionately in a pool at a party (after showing hints that she might have feelings for her).[236]
Shane Harvey Michael J. Willett Shane, the most popular boy in school, is openly gay.[237]
Lauren Cooper Bailey De Young Lauren is intersex (the first intersex main character on a television show).[238]
Noah Elliot Fletcher Noah is transgender and gay.[239]
Brad Sidney Franklin Brad is asexual.[240]
Sabrina Sophia Taylor Ali Sabrina is Karma and Amy's old friend who later confess her love for Amy.[241]
Pablo Anthony Palacios Pablo is a celibate gay.[242]
Reagan Yvette Monreal Reagan is a lesbian.[243]
Duke Lewis Jr. Skyler Maxon Duke is a closeted gay MMA fighter/trainer.[244]
Fresh Off the Boat Nicole Ellis Luna Blaise Nicole comes out to Eddie by telling him she likes girls. In episode "A League Of Her Own" she comes out as a lesbian to her stepmother and father.[245] ABC
2015–
Friends from College Max Adler
Felix Forzenheim
Fred Savage
Billy Eichner
Max and Felix are a gay couple. Max is a literary agent, while Felix is a fertility doctor.[246] Netflix
2017–2019
Fuller House Casey Ben J. Pierce Casey is gay. He and Ramona go to the school prom together as friends. First openly gay character in series.[247] Netflix
2016–
The Girl's Guide to Depravity Tyler Joe Komara Tyler is gay and the wise-cracking bartender at the club frequented by several of the other characters.[248] Cinemax
2012–2013
GLOW Arthie Premkumar
Yolanda
Florian
Sunita Mani
Shakira Barrera
Alex Rich
Arthie may be lesbian or bisexual. Yolanda is a lesbian. In season 2 it's revealed that Florian is gay and dies from an AIDS illness. Arthie and Yolanda are roommates that fall for each other.[249][250][251] Netflix
2017–2020
Go On Anne Julie White Anne is a member of the show's central support group, a lesbian mother whose wife recently died.[252] NBC
2012–2013
Good Luck Charlie Susan
Cheryl
Desi Lydic
Lilli Birdsell
Susan and Cheryl are a lesbian couple, revealed in the fourth season episode "Down a Tree", when Amy and Bob arrange a play-date with one of Charlie's friends. They are the first openly gay couple to be featured on the Disney Channel.[253] Disney Channel
2010–2014
The Good Place Eleanor Shellstrop Kristen Bell Eleanor is bisexual. She has exhibited attraction to male and female characters, including Chidi Anagonye, Tahani Al-Jamil, and Janet.[254] NBC
2016–
John Wheaton Brandon Scott Jones John is a bitchy gay gossip columnist who frequently mocked Tahani on his blog.[255]
Grandfathered Annelise Kelly Jenrette Annelise is Jimmy's (John Stamos) assistant and right-hand woman who is openly a lesbian.[256] FOX
2015
Grandma's House Simon
Ben Theodore
Simon Amstell
Iwan Rheon
Simon is a fictionalized version of gay comedian and TV host Simon Amstell. Over the course of the series he develops a relationship with actor Ben Theodore.[257][258] BBC Two
2010–2012
The Great Indoors Mason Shaun Brown Mason is bisexual.[259] CBS
2016–2017
Grown-ish Nomi Segal
Big Dave
Emily Arlook
Barrett Carnahan
Nomi is bisexual, but not out to her family. Dave is bisexual.[260][261] Freeform
2018–
Happily Divorced Peter Lovett John Michael Higgins Peter, a realtor, comes out to his wife Fran (Fran Drescher) after 18 years of marriage. The series is based on the real story of Drescher and her ex-husband, Peter Marc Jacobson.[262] TV Land
2011–2013
Happy Endings Max Blum Adam Pally Max, a bearish slacker who constantly schemes ridiculous ideas to take advantage of his tendency toward laziness, is one of the show's central characters.[263] ABC
2011–2013
Derrick Stephen Guarino Derrick, a recurring character, is a friend of Max from the gym. He marries his boyfriend Eric at the end of season two.[264]
Jane Kerkovich-Williams Eliza Coupe Jane is bisexual. In season 3, her husband found out that she was in love with several women during college.[265]
Grant James Wolk Grant is Max's former boyfriend who comes back into his life in season two when he shows up in Max's limo on Valentine's Day.[266]
Hart of Dixie Crickett Watts Brandi Burkhardt In season 4, Crickett comes out just as she was about to renew vows with Stanley Watts. After this she started dating Jaysene.[267] The CW
2011–2015
The Hard Times of RJ Berger Max Owens Jayson Blair RJ (Paul Iacono) discovers Max is secretly gay when he sees him making out in the high school locker room showers with Guillermo in the season 2 episode "Steamy Surprise".[268] MTV
2010–2011
Hot in Cleveland Caroline Moretti Laura San Giacomo Caroline is Melanie’s (Valerie Bertinelli) lesbian sister.[269] TV Land
2010–2015
House Husbands Kane
Tom
Alex
Gyton Grantley
Tim Campbell
Darren McMullen
Kane is gay and a stay at home dad. Tom is his partner and a firefighter. Tom is written off the show after season two. Kane then gets together with Alex who he marries. Kane and Tom mark the first time that an Australian drama has featured a gay couple raising a child.[270][271] Nine Network
2012–
Eve Justine Clarke Eve is a lesbian and a rival to Kane’s catering business.[272]
Heather Looby Louise Siversen Heather is a lesbian and when she’s off duty, is the principal of fictional Nepean South.[272]
House of Lies Roscoe Kaan Donis Leonard, Jr. Roscoe is the son of lead character Marty Kaan (Don Cheadle). He is into cross-dressing, and has expressed interest in both boys and girls.[273][274] Showtime
2012–2016
Ima ve'abaz
(Mom and Dads)
Erez
Sammy
Yehuda Levi
Yiftach Klein
Erez and Sammy are an Israeli gay couple raising a child with their best friend Talia (Maya Dagan).[275] HOT 3
2012–
Imposters Maddie Saffron
Julia "Jules" Langmore
Inbar Lavi
Marianne Rendón
Maddie is a bisexual con-artist who can seduce both men and women. She is Jule's ex-wife. Jules is a lesbian and was conned by Maddie.[276] Bravo
2017–2018
Jann Jann
Cynthia
Jann Arden
Sharon Taylor
Jann is bisexual and, among several turmoils, coping with the end of her relationship with Cynthia. Cynthia is lesbian.[277] CTV
2019–
Kidding Scott Perera
Rex Farpopolis
Bernard White
Andrew Tinpo Lee
Scott is a closeted gay. He and Rex had a secret affair.[278] Showtime
2018–
LA to Vegas Bernard Nathan Lee Graham Bernard is gay.[279] Fox
2018
Loudermilk Claire Anja Savcic Claire is lesbian.[280] Audience
2017–
Malibu Country Geoffrey Jai Rodriguez Geoffrey is openly gay and the gatekeeper assistant to a music industry executive.[281] ABC
2012–2013
Marry Me Kevin
Kevin
Dan Bucatinsky
Tim Meadows
Kevin and Kevin are a gay couple, with a daughter Annie.[282] NBC
2014
The McCarthys Ronny McCarthy Tyler Ritter Ronny is openly gay and an assistant high school basketball coach.[283] CBS
2014–2015
Merry Happy Whatever Kayla Quinn Ashley Tisdale After twice breaking up with Alan, Kayla thinks she may be lesbian.[284] Netflix
2019–
Metro Sexual Dr. Steph Huddleston
Dr. Langdon Marsh
Geraldine Hickey
Riley Nottingham
Steph is lesbian. Langdon is gay.[285][286] 9Go!
9Now
2019–
The Mick Barry Jason Kravits Barry is secretly gay. He is the family's financial adviser. A blackmail scheme against Barry backfires after the family learns he is not married, but rather living with his sister, who they assumed was his wife. In episode "The Hotel".[287] Fox
2017-2018
Rita Pemberton Judith Roberts Rita Pemberton is a lesbian, and 100 years old. She tries to seduce Mickey, when the kids go to their great-grandmother's 100th birthday party. In episode "The Matriarch".[288][289][290]
Mom Bonnie Plunkett Allison Janney Bonnie is bisexual, and was a drug using alcoholic as a teenager.[291] CBS
2013–
Mrs. Brown's Boys Rory Brown
Dino Doyle
Rory Cowan
Gary Hollywood
Rory and Dino are a gay couple. Actor Rory Cowan is openly gay.[292] RTÉ One
2011–
Mrs. Fletcher Margo Jen Richards Margo is a trans woman.[293] HBO
2019–
Murphy Brown Pat Patel Nik Dodani Pat is openly gay.[294] CBS
2018
Mystery Girls Nick Diaz Miguel Pinzon Nick is the perky gay assistant to two detectives. Miguel Pinzon, who plays the character is openly gay as well.[295] ABC Family
2014
The New Normal David Sawyer
Bryan Collins
Justin Bartha
Andrew Rannells
David and Bryan are a gay couple who have hired a surrogate mother.[296] NBC
2012–2013
No Good Nick Jeremy Thompson
Eric
Kalama Epstein
Gus Kamp
Jeremy and Eric are gay. Jeremy and Eric are seen kissing in Part 2, and Eric helps Jeremy come out to his family.[297] Netflix
2019
Now Apocalypse Ulysses
Gabriel
Isaac
Avan Jogia
Tyler Posey
Jacob Artist
Ulysses is bisexual. Gabriel is gay. Isaac is gay.[298][299] Starz
2019
One Big Happy Lizzy Elisha Cuthbert Lizzy is a lesbian, who decides to have a baby together with her best friend Luke.[300] NBC
2015
One Day at a Time Elena Alvarez
Syd
Isabella Gómez
Sheridan Pierce
Elena comes out as a lesbian in the second half of the first season. Elena befriends, and eventually dates Syd, who is non-binary.[301][302] Netflix
2017–2020
Other Space Karen Lipinski
Tina Shukshin
Bess Rous
Milana Vayntrub
Karen and Tina are revealed to have had a one-night stand in college.[303] Yahoo! Screen
2015
Stewart Lipinski Karan Soni Stewart mentions having had a boyfriend and is attracted to Tina's male fraternal twin in a dream.[303]
The Other Two Cary Dubek Drew Tarver Cary is openly gay.[304] Comedy Central
2019–
Partners Louis
Wyatt
Michael Urie
Brandon Routh
Louis is a gay architect who is business partners with his friend Charlie. Wyatt is his boyfriend, and a nurse.[305] CBS
2012
Please Like Me Josh Josh Thomas Josh is openly gay, and dates several men throughout the series.[306] ABC2
2013–2016
Ben David Quirk Ben is bisexual and was a one-night stand of Josh's.[307][308]
Geoffrey Wade Briggs Geoffrey was Josh's first boyfriend.[309]
Arnold Keegan Joyce Arnold was Josh's boyfriend through most of the series.[310]
Queering Harper
Val
Devon
Sophia Grasso
Susan Gallagher
Diana Oh
Harper is lesbian. Val is Harper's mother and comes out as bisexual. Devon is lesbian.[311][312] YouTube
2018–
The Real O'Neals Kenny O'Neal
Brett Young
Noah Galvin
Sean Grandillo
Sixteen year old Kenny comes out to his Catholic family. Sean is gay and Kenny's first boyfriend.[313][314][315] ABC
2016–2017
Rentnercops Victoria "Vicky" Adam
Greta Adam
Katja Danowski
Jutta Dolle
Vicky is a lesbian detective chief and head of her department. Greta is lesbian and Vicky‘s wife.[316][317][318][319] ARD
2015–
Running Wilde Mr. Lunt Robert Michael Morris Mr. Lunt is gay, and the personal assistant to lead character Steve Wilde (Will Arnett).[320] Fox
2010
Sally4Ever Sally
Emma
Catherine Shepherd
Julia Davis
Sally comes out as lesbian when she meets Emma and they get involved. Emma is a lesbian.[321][322] Sky Atlantic
HBO
2018–
Schitt's Creek David Rose
Patrick Brewer
Dan Levy
Noah Reid
David is pansexual, and married to Patrick who is gay.[323] CBC
Pop TV
2015–2020
Connor Matthew Tissi Connor is a gay high school student. Jocelyn asks David to counsel Connor whom she feels is not fitting in.[323]
Jake Steve Lund Jake is bisexual. He was dating Stevie and David at the same time.[citation needed]
Sebastien Raine François Arnaud David’s ex-boyfriend, who arrives in town to do a photoshoot with Moira.[324]
Ronnie Lee Karen Robinson Ronnie is a lesbian and a member of the town council.[325]
Scream Queens Sam Jeanna Han Sam is a lesbian.[326][327] FOX
2015–2016
Sadie Swenson / Chanel #3 Billie Lourd Chanel #3 is a bisexual.[328]
Boone Clemens Nick Jonas Boone is gay and a member of the Dicky Dollar Scholars.[329]
Sean Saves the World Sean Sean Hayes Sean is a divorced gay father with a successful, yet demanding, career.[330] NBC
2013–2014
Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll Gigi Rock Elizabeth Gillies Gigi is the lead singer of the fictional band The Assassins and Johnny's (Dennis Leary) daughter. She is shacked up with a much older bandmate and is starting to explore lesbian liaisons.[331] FX
2015–2016
$h*! My Dad Says Tim Tim Bagley Tim is the openly gay housekeeper. Tim helped Dr. Goodson (William Shatner), cheat on his driver’s license exam at the DMV in episode one. After getting fired for helping him cheat, Tim sees Dr. Goodson at a gay-themed restaurant where he now works. Dr. Goodson, feeling bad for Tim getting fired, hires him as his housekeeper.[332] CBS
2010–2011
Shrill Fran
Gabe Parrish
Lolly Adefope
John Cameron Mitchell
Fran is a lesbian and the main character's best friend. Gabe is gay and the main character's boss.[333] Hulu
2019–
Silicon Valley Dee Dee A.D. Miles Dee Dee is gay, and runs a gay christian fictional dating app called FirstSight.[334] HBO
2014–2019
Sirens (2011) Ashley Greenwick Richard Madden Ashley is a gay EMT.[335] Channel 4
2011
Sirens (2014) Hank St. Clare Kevin Daniels Hank is an openly gay EMT. The show is based on the British series of the same name.[336] USA Network
2014–2015
Valentina 'Voodoo' Dunacci Kelly O'Sullivan Voodoo is an asexual EMT.[337]
Suburgatory Mr. Wolfe Rex Lee Mr. Wolfe is a guidance counselor at fictional Chatswin High School. He comes out in the episode "Out in the Burbs".[338] ABC
2011–2014
Superstore Mateo
Jeff
Nico Santos
Michael Bunin
Mateo and Jeff are a gay couple with complications.[339] NBC
2015–
Survivor's Remorse M-Chuck Calloway Erica Ash M-Chuck Calloway is a lesbian and a womanizer. She is often loud-mouthed and vulgar.[340][341] Starz
2014-2017
Hazel-Fay Nicholle Tom Hazel-Fay is a lesbian. M-Chuck started arguing with Hazel-Fay while visiting a plantation museum and the two ended up having sex in one of the museum's beds.[342][343]
Julz Julieanna Marie Goddard Julz is bisexual, and has a one night stand with M-Chuck.[342][344]
Janine Anastacia McPherson Janine is bisexual. M-Chuck's neighbor, after finding her lost dog, they have sex.[342][345]
Maura Sandra Hinojosa Maura is a lesbian. M-Chuck has sex with Maura, not knowing she’s a sex-worker.[342][346]
The Switch Nyla Rose Trans woman played by trans actress.[347] OutTV
2015–
Telenovela
(Latin American soap opera)
Gael Garnica Jose Moreno Brooks Gael is gay.[348] NBC
2015
The Tick Dangerboat Alan Tudyk (voice) Dangerboat, Overkill's artificial intelligence watercraft, develops homosexual feelings for Arthur.[349] Prime Video
2016–2019
Trial & Error Larry Henderson John Lithgow Larry is bisexual, and on trial for murder.[350] NBC
2017–2018
Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Titus Andromedon Tituss Burgess Titus is gay and Kimmy's friend and roommate.[351] Netflix
2015–
Brandon Brandon Jones Brandon is the gay husband of Kimmy's friend, Cyndee.[351]
Mikey Politano Mike Carlsen Mikey is Titus's boyfriend.[351]
Undateable Brett David Fynn Brett is a gay bartender.[352] NBC
2014–2016
Vicious Freddie Thornhill
Stuart Bixby
Ian McKellen
Derek Jacobi
Freddie and Stuart are a gay couple in their 70's, who have lived together in a small flat for nearly 50 years. Freddie was a actor and Stuart a barman when they first met but their careers are now pretty much over and their lives now consist of reading books, walking their dog and bickering.[353] ITV
2013–2016
Weird Loners Zara Sandhu Meera Rohit Kumbhani Zara is bisexual and an angsty artist.[354] FOX
2015
Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp Ben
McKinley Dozen
Bradley Cooper
Michael Ian Black
Ben and Susie are known by everyone to be an item, except Ben is gay and in a secret relationship with gay counselor McKinley.[355][356] Netflix
2015
What We Do in the Shadows Nadja
Laszlo Cravensworth
Nandor
Natasia Demetriou
Matt Berry
Kayvan Novak
Nadja is a bisexual vampire. Laszlo is bisexual. He is an English nobleman turned into a vampire by Nadja and is now married to her. Nandor is a bisexual 757-year-old vampire.[357] FX
2019–
Whitney Neal Maulik Pancholy Neal comes out as gay after his friends catch him on a date with a man.[358] NBC
2012–2013
Work in Progress Abby
Chris
Abby McEnany
Theo Germaine
Abby is lesbian and describes herself as a "fat, queer dyke". Chris is a trans man.[359] Showtime
2019–
You Me Her Isabelle "Izzy" Silva Priscilla Faia Izzy is bisexual and turned the Jack and Emma couple into a throuple.[360] Audience Network
2016–
Emma Trakarsky Rachel Blanchard Emma is bisexual and admitted to having a few romantic and sexual relationships with women in the past.[361]
Zoe Ever After Valente Tory Devon Smith Valente is gay, and works at an up-and-coming cosmetics business.[362] BET
2016

2020s[edit]

Show Character Actor Notes Network
Series run
Avenue 5 Ryan Clark Hugh Laurie Clark has a husband and a wife, indicating he is bi or pansexual.[363] HBO
2020–
Boy Luck Club JJ Lai Kit DeZolt JJ is a yoga instructor who gets together with his five 'gaysian' best friends every Friday night for cocktails via online chats to offer support to help each other navigate life under quarantine.[364][365] AsianAmericanMovies.com
2020–
Julian Tran David Vi Hoang
Otis Wu Eric Cheng
Aiden Wong Stanson Chung
Ronald Cruz Justin Madriaga
Felix Costa Xavier Durante
Danger Force Dustan Brandon Claybon Dustan and Justin are a gay couple raising their adoptive child Ellis. When Ellis gets lost, the Danger Force rescues him and reunites him with his dads.[366] Nickelodeon
2020–
Justin Tommy Dickie
Diary of a Future President Camila Jessica Marie Garcia Camila is lesbian. She has a girlfriend, but is apprehensive about coming out to her parents.[367] Disney+
2020–
Everything's Gonna Be Okay Nicholas Josh Thomas Nicholas and Adam are a gay couple. When Nicholas' father dies, he is responsible for taking care of his teenage half-sisters.[368][369] Freeform
2020–
Alex Adam Faison
Feel Good Mae Mae Martin Mae and George are in a relationship.[370][371] Channel 4
Netflix
2020–
George Charlotte Ritchie
High Fidelity Robyn "Rob" Brooks Zoë Kravitz Rob is bisexual, and works at the record store she owns. The series is based on Nick Hornby’s novel High Fidelity and the film.[372] Hulu
2020
Simon Miller David H. Holmes Simon and Blake are a gay couple. Simon works at the record store, while Blake is a bartender. The series was canceled after one season.[373]
Blake Edmund Donovan
Home Economics Sarah Caitlin McGee Sarah and Denise are a lesbian couple. They are married with two kids. Sarah is unemployed, while Denise is a school teacher.[374][375] ABC
2021
Denise Sasheer Zamata
Indebted Joanna Jessy Hodges Joanna is lesbian.[376] NBC
2020
Julie and the Phantoms Alex Mercer Owen Joyner Alex is a gay ghost, and the drummer for the fictional band Julie and the Phantoms. He falls in love with another gay ghost named Willie, an avid skateboarder.[377][378] Netflix
2020–
Willie Booboo Stewart
Saved by the Bell Lexi Haddad-DeFabrizio Josie Totah Lexi is a trans woman, and Queen bee of the school.[379] Peacock
2020–
Space Force Dr. Adrian Mallory John Malkovich Dr. Mallory is gay and Space Force's chief scientist. He is frequently frustrated by the ineptitude of everyone surrounding him.[380] Netflix
2020–
Twenties Hattie Jonica "Jojo" T. Gibbs Hattie is a queer aspiring screenwriter, living in Los Angeles.[381] BET
2020–
YYY Nott Yoon Phusanu YYY is a Thai boys' love comedy series, about boys living in the same apartment together.[382] Nott and Pun are gay love interests.[383] Line TV
2020–
Pun Lay Talay
Porpla Poppy Ratchapong Porpla is a trans woman, and one of the roommates.[384]
Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist Mo Alex Newell Mo is Zoey's gay, gender non-conforming neighbor and DJ who tries to help her understand the extent of her power.[385] NBC
2020–
Eddie Patrick Ortiz Eddie is gay and Mo's love interest.[386]

See also[edit]

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Book Sources[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • GLAAD Primetime Television Season Reports