C. T. Newman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Charles Thomas Newman)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Charles Thomas Newman (15 October 1841 – 20 August 1911), generally known as Rev. C. T. Newman, was a Methodist minister in South Australia and New South Wales.

He was the eldest son of Thomas Newman (c. 1813 – 15 September 1881) and his wife Elizabeth, née Pomeroy (c. 1813 – 18 May 1888), who emigrated to South Australia on the barque Baboo, arriving in March 1840, and was at first engaged in farming,[1] then opened a grocery store in Thebarton.

Also on the Baboo were George Dew (c. 1817–1877) and his wife Dinah née Pomeroy (c 1816–1866), who may have been a sister of Elizabeth Newman; they also settled in Thebarton and opened a bakery. George was a longtime member of the District Council of West Torrens from its inception;[2] his name is commemorated in Dew Street, Thebarton.

Charles was born at Alberton and as a young man was converted to Wesleyan Methodism, and was associated with the Thebarton Methodist church. At age 16 he was Sunday School secretary, at 18 class leader and at age 20 he was a local preacher.[3] In 1863 he joined the ministry and was ordained in 1865. His first year he served in Wallaroo, followed by Port Adelaide (1866–1867), when he initiated work on a new church at LeFevre Peninsula. He was next in Goolwa, then Angaston, Yankalilla (1870–1871), Mount Gambier (1872–1875),[4] Kent Town, Clare (–1881), Kadina (1881–), Brompton, Norwood, and Glenelg.[1]

He was elected president of the SA Methodist Conference in 1888, and served concurrently as president of Prince Alfred College. He also at various times served as Connexional Editor, Book Steward, and Home Mission Secretary. In 1902, at his request, he was transferred to New South Wales and was put in charge of the Darling Street, Balmain church, followed by the Parramatta (1903–1905) then Burwood circuits. In 1909 he was put on the supernumerary list, and settled at Strathfield.[5] During his superintendence of the Parramatta Methodist circuit he was involved with Joseph (son of Ebenezer) Vickery in the purchase of site and erection of Strathfield Methodist Church.[6] He was also involved in the foundation of the new church at Concord.

Family[edit]

Thomas had sons Charles Thomas Newman (1841–1911); George Herbert Newman (1843 – 2 November 1893), Thomas Newman (1845 – ) married Alice Bennett on 20 October 1867; fourth son William Pomeroy Newman (1849 – 12 February 1885) married Catherine Jane Lean on 28 December 1871; fifth son Edward Newman (1851 – ) married Jessie J. Stewart on 19 May 1875; and sister Sarah Elizabeth Newman (1847 – ) married David Norman on 27 October 1868.

Charles married Emma Ann Rose Fisher ( – 1896), daughter of M. M. Fisher, in 1869. He married again, to Elizabeth "Bessie" Vickery ( – ) on 13 November 1900. Bessie was the second daughter of Eben Vickery MLC. Their children included:

  • Ethel Annie Newman (18 March 1870 – 6 May 1909) married Alfred Calbert Dunn on 25 April 1894. Alfred was a grandson of John Dunn of Mount Barker, South Australia
  • E(dward) Percival "Percy" Newman (11 September 1871 – 4 September 1951) married Laura Mary Goode ( – ) on 9 May1906, was with Crooks and Brooker in Western Australia.
  • Edgar Harrold Newman LLB (1873 – 1932), was a solicitor, lived in Parramatta
  • Alfred Gambier Newman (1875 – 18 January 1921) married Elsie Marion Murphy ( – ) on 26 November 1913, architect of Methodist churches in Strathfield, Young and elsewhere.
  • Lilian Emma Newman (1878 – 21 July 1937) lived at "Kumalla", 126 Beecroft Road, Beecroft
  • C(harles) Stanley Newman (1880 – ) married Isabella Helen Mary McNab ( – ) on 25 January 1912. He sang bass with Ada Crossley's company, lived in England. His son John Newman was killed by rebels in Iraq in 1935.[7]
  • Florence May Newman (1882 – 7 November 1951) lived 126 Beecroft Road, Beecroft
  • Clarence Fisher Newman (1884 – 10 April 1954) lived at 126 Beecroft Road, Beecroft
  • (Arnold) Leslie Newman (1887 – ) businessman, lived Epping, New South Wales
  • Ivor Vickery Newman PhD ( – ) married Florence Rewa Burton. He was a botanist, lived Colombo, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), and author of The living plant;: A laboratory study of its structure, reproduction and general classification 1946; also book of poems, privately published 1924. Rewa was a daughter of Rev. J. W. Burton. Son Ian Anstruther Newman was a noted biophysicist.
  • Eben Vickery Newman ( – ) married Yolande Margery Ena Smith ( – ) on 24 January 1934, lived Queanbeyan. He was author of Does it make sense? Epworth Press, Sydney 1944, and Freedom and Control : a Christian interpretation S.C.M. Press, London, 1946. Their son Sandy Newman (1937–2013) was noted conductor, founder of the Taverner Consort of Voices, Sydney in 1975.[8]

Their last residence was "Tip Tree", Strathfield

Recognition[edit]

A pair of stained glass windows was installed in Strathfield Methodist church in his memory.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Death of an Old Colonist". South Australian Register. XLVI, (10, 872). South Australia. 17 September 1881. p. 4. Retrieved 15 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  2. ^ "Complimentary Dinner to Mr. Dew". South Australian Register. XLI, (9329). South Australia. 7 October 1876. p. 6 (Supplement to the South Australian Register.). Retrieved 15 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  3. ^ "Concerning People". The Register (Adelaide). LXXVI, (20, 211). South Australia. 22 August 1911. p. 4. Retrieved 15 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  4. ^ "Methodist Church Jubilee". The Border Watch. LI, (5024). South Australia. 10 April 1912. p. 4. Retrieved 15 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  5. ^ "The Conning Tower". The Methodist. XX, (34). New South Wales, Australia. 26 August 1911. p. 7. Retrieved 14 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  6. ^ "The Late Mr. Joseph Vickery". The Methodist. 39, (33). New South Wales, Australia. 16 August 1930. p. 9. Retrieved 14 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  7. ^ "Out among the People". The Chronicle. LXXVIII, (4, 107). South Australia. 1 August 1935. p. 66. Retrieved 14 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  8. ^ Sally Newman (1 November 2013). "Conductor drew depth and passion from his choristers". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 14 April 2016.
  9. ^ "Strathfield". The Methodist. XXI, (39). New South Wales, Australia. 28 September 1912. p. 9. Retrieved 15 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)