Stanley Kubrick filmography

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A black and white image of Kubrick
A 1949 self-portrait

Stanley Kubrick (1928–1999)[1] directed thirteen feature films and three short documentaries over the course of his career. His work as a director, spanning diverse genres,[2] is widely regarded as influential.[3][4][5]

Kubrick made his directorial debut in 1951 with the documentary short Day of the Fight, followed by Flying Padre later that year. In 1953, he directed his first feature film, Fear and Desire.[6] The anti-war allegory's themes reappeared in his later films.[7][8] His next works were the film noir pictures Killer's Kiss (1955) and The Killing (1956).[9][10] Critic Roger Ebert praised The Killing and retrospectively called it Kubrick's "first mature feature".[9] Kubrick then directed two Hollywood films starring Kirk Douglas: Paths of Glory (1957) and Spartacus (1960).[11][12] The latter won the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Drama.[13] His next film was Lolita (1962), an adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov's novel of the same name.[14] It was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay[15] His 1964 film, the Cold War satire Dr. Strangelove featuring Peter Sellers and George C. Scott,[16] received the BAFTA Award for Best Film.[17] Along with The Killing, it remains the highest rated film directed by Kubrick according to Rotten Tomatoes.

In 1968, Kubrick directed the space epic 2001: A Space Odyssey. Now widely regarded as among the most influential films ever made,[18] 2001 garnered Kubrick his only personal Academy Award for his work as a director of special effects.[19] His next project, the dystopian A Clockwork Orange (1971), was an initially X-rated adaptation of Anthony Burgess' 1962 novella.[20][21][22] After reports of crimes inspired by the film's depiction of "ultra-violence", Kubrick had the film withdrawn from distribution in the United Kingdom.[21] Kubrick then directed the period piece Barry Lyndon (1975), in a departure from his two previous futuristic films.[23] It did not perform well commercially and received mixed reviews, but won four Oscars at the 48th Academy Awards.[24][25] In 1980, Kubrick adapted a Stephen King novel into The Shining, starring Jack Nicholson and Shelley Duvall.[26] Although Kubrick was nominated for a Razzie Award for Worst Director,[27] The Shining is now widely regarded as one of the greatest horror films ever made.[26][28][29] Seven years later, he released the Vietnam War film Full Metal Jacket.[30] It remains the highest rated of Kubrick's later films according to Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic. In the early 1990s, Kubrick abandoned his plans to direct a Holocaust film titled The Aryan Papers. He was hesitant to compete with Steven Spielberg's Schindler's List and had become "profoundly depressed" after working extensively on the project.[2][31] His final film, the erotic thriller Eyes Wide Shut starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman, was released posthumously in 1999.[32] An unfinished project that Kubrick referred to as Pinocchio was completed by Spielberg as A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001).[33][34]

In 1997, the Venice Film Festival awarded Kubrick the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement. That same year, he received a Directors Guild of America Lifetime Achievement Award, then called the D.W. Griffith Award.[35][36] In 1999, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) presented Kubrick with a Britannia Award.[37] After his death, BAFTA renamed the award in his honor: "The Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film".[38] He was posthumously awarded a BAFTA Fellowship in 2000.[39]

Films[edit]

Poster for Paths of Glory featuring Kirk Douglas as a soldier
Poster for Paths of Glory (1957)
Film poster featuring young girl wearing sunglasses and sucking on a lollipop
Poster for Lolita (1962)
Poster displaying youth aiming arrow and text: "Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange"
Poster for A Clockwork Orange (1971)
Table featuring films directed by Stanley Kubrick
Year Film Director Writer Producer Notes Ref.
1951 Day of the Fight Yes Yes Yes Documentary short [40][41]
1951 Flying Padre Yes Uncredited Documentary short [42][43]
1953 Fear and Desire Yes Yes [7][44]
1953 The Seafarers Yes Yes Documentary short [45]
1955 Killer's Kiss Yes Yes [46]
1956 The Killing Yes Yes [10]
1957 Paths of Glory Yes Yes [47][48]
1960 Spartacus Yes [49]
1962 Lolita Yes Uncredited [50][51]
1964 Dr. Strangelove Yes Yes Yes [52]
1968 2001: A Space Odyssey Yes Yes Yes Also editor, director of special effects, and contributed breathing sound-effects [19][53][54][55]
1971 A Clockwork Orange Yes Yes Yes [21][56]
1975 Barry Lyndon Yes Yes Yes [57][58]
1980 The Shining Yes Yes Yes [59]
1987 Full Metal Jacket Yes Yes Yes [30]
1999 Eyes Wide Shut Yes Yes Yes Released posthumously [60][61]

Critical response[edit]

Table featuring the critical reception of films directed by Stanley Kubrick
Year Film Rotten Tomatoes[62] Metacritic[63]
1951 Day of the Fight N/A N/A
1951 Flying Padre N/A N/A
1953 Fear and Desire 75% (16 reviews) N/A
1953 The Seafarers N/A N/A
1955 Killer's Kiss 86% (21 reviews) N/A
1956 The Killing 98% (41 reviews) 91 (15 reviews)
1957 Paths of Glory 95% (60 reviews) 90 (18 reviews)
1960 Spartacus 93% (61 reviews) 87 (17 reviews)
1962 Lolita 91% (43 reviews) 79 (14 reviews)
1964 Dr. Strangelove 98% (91 reviews) 97 (32 reviews)
1968 2001: A Space Odyssey 92% (113 reviews) 84 (25 reviews)
1971 A Clockwork Orange 86% (71 reviews) 77 (21 reviews)
1975 Barry Lyndon 91% (74 reviews) 89 (21 reviews)
1980 The Shining 84% (95 reviews) 66 (26 reviews)
1987 Full Metal Jacket 92% (83 reviews) 76 (19 reviews)
1999 Eyes Wide Shut 75% (158 reviews) 68 (34 reviews)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  3. ^ Townend, Joe (July 20, 2018). "A Fifty-Year Odyssey: How Stanley Kubrick Changed Cinema". Sotheby's. Archived from the original on September 27, 2020. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  4. ^ Koehler, Robert (Fall 2017). "Kubrick's Outsized Influence". Directors Guild Of America. Archived from the original on January 8, 2018. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  5. ^ Chilton, Louis (September 29, 2019). "Stanley Kubrick's 10 best films – ranked: From A Clockwork Orange to The Shining". The Independent. Archived from the original on November 20, 2020. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
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  7. ^ a b French, Phillip (February 2, 2013). "Fear and Desire". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on May 8, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  8. ^ Burgess, Jackson (Autumn 1964). "The "Anti-Militarism" of Stanley Kubrick". Film Quarterl. University of California Press. 18 (1): 4–11. doi:10.2307/1210143. Retrieved January 22, 2021.
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  10. ^ a b Ebert, Roger (January 9, 2012). "A heist played like a game of chess". RogerEbert.com. Archived from the original on August 8, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  11. ^ Truit, Brian (February 5, 2020). "Five essential Kirk Douglas movies, from 'Paths of Glory' to (obviously) 'Spartacus'". USA Today. Archived from the original on February 10, 2020. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
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  47. ^ "Paths of Glory". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
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  50. ^ Crowther, Bosley (June 14, 1962). "Screen: Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov's Adaptation of His Novel:Sue Lyon and Mason in Leading Roles". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 4, 2018. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
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  57. ^ Gilbey, Ryan (July 14, 2016). "Stanley Kubrick's Barry Lyndon: 'It puts a spell on people'". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
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  63. ^ "Stanley Kubrick". Metacritic. Archived from the original on January 14, 2021. Retrieved February 14, 2021.

External links[edit]