COVID-19 pandemic in South Dakota

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
COVID-19 pandemic in South Dakota
COVID-19 rolling 14day Prevalence in South Dakota by county.svg
Map of the outbreak in South Dakota by confirmed new infections per 100,000 people (14 days preceding May 3)
  1,000+
  500–1,000
  200–500
  100–200
  50–100
  20–50
  10–20
  0–10
  No confirmed new cases or no/bad data
COVID-19 Prevalence in South Dakota by county.svg
Map of the outbreak in South Dakota by confirmed total infections per 100,000 people (as of May 3)
  10,000+
  3,000–10,000
  1,000–3,000
  300–1,000
  100–300
  30–100
  0–30
  No confirmed infected or no data
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationSouth Dakota, U.S.
First outbreakWuhan, Hubei, China
Index caseBeadle, Charles Mix, Davison, Minnehaha counties
Arrival dateMarch 10, 2020
Confirmed cases107,759
Active cases1,512
Suspected cases14,986
Hospitalized cases112 <current> 7,376 <to date>
Recovered119,263
Deaths
1,970
Fatality rate1.83%
Government website
covid.sd.gov
Suspected cases have not been confirmed by laboratory tests as being due to this strain, although some other strains may have been ruled out.

The COVID-19 pandemic in South Dakota is an ongoing viral pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a novel infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The state of South Dakota reported its first four cases and one death from COVID-19 on March 10, 2020. On May 3, 2021 South Dakota public health authorities reported 86 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state's cumulative total to 122,745 cases.[1] The state's COVID-19 death toll is 1,970, with three new deaths reported over the previous 24 hours.[1] The state ranks 8th in deaths per capita among U.S. states (with New York City counted separately), and 3rd in cases per-capita (13,865 cases per 100,000).[2]

The state has not utilized mitigation strategies such as stay-at-home orders or mandating face masks in public spaces, with Governor of South Dakota Kristi Noem citing a desire to respect residents' personal freedoms and responsibilities, and disputing studies demonstrating their efficacy. In October 2020, amid record cases and hospitalizations in the state, Noem told her Legislature that she had received praise from a "prominent national reporter" for not imposing a lockdown. The absence of state-wide action has faced criticism from local officials, and prompted health orders to be issued at the municipal level instead of statewide.

The first major outbreak in the state was centered upon at Smithfield Foods processing plant in Sioux Falls in April 2020, causing Minnehaha County to have over 3,000 confirmed cases alone by May 11. In August 2020, a major spike in cases was induced by several superspreader events, including the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally (which has officially been tied to at least 290 cases in South Dakota and other states), concerts, and other forms of community transmission. The state peaked in new cases by mid-November 2020; by December, the average rate of new cases in South Dakota had begun to decline, but as of April 2021 South Dakota has among the highest hospitalizations and deaths among all U.S. states.[3]

As of May 3, 2021, South Dakota has administered 596,860 COVID-19 vaccine doses, providing 54.79% of the state's population with at least one dose of vaccine.[1]

Timeline[edit]

On March 10, 2020, Governor Kristi Noem's office announced the first four cases, and one death in a man in his 60s with underlying health conditions; all patients had recently traveled outside South Dakota.[4]

On April 9, 2020 over 80 employees at a Smithfield Foods pork processing plant in Sioux Falls were confirmed to have COVID-19. The plant announced it would suspend operations beginning April 11.[5] By that day, Smithfield employees accounted for the majority of active cases in South Dakota. Some activity continued at the plant on April 14, as it planned to shut down completely.[6] On April 15, 2020 438 Smithfield employees tested positive for COVID-19.[7]

Independence Day event at Mount Rushmore[edit]

On June 4, Noem announced that Mount Rushmore's Independence Day festivities on July 3 would go on as originally scheduled and planned, with no additional reduction in ticketed capacity (beyond the number of tickets having already been lowered to 7,500, in a decision that was made prior to the pandemic) or "enforcement" of social distancing, and with President Donald Trump expected to attend. Secretary of Tourism Jim Hagen stated that "we're doing everything we can to work diligently to make this a safe and fun event for all attendees." Noem downplayed the possibility that the event could lead to new outbreaks, arguing that the state "[hasn't] even come close to reaching the capacity of the amount of people that we can take care of."[8] The majority of the audience did not practice social distancing or wear face masks.[9]

After the event, it was reported that Noem had interacted with Kimberly Guilfoyle—a Trump aide who later tested positive for COVID-19, and flew back to Washington, D.C. on Air Force One. On July 7, Noem stated that she had tested negative, stated that Guilfoyle was asymptomatic, and claimed that "the science of the virus tells us that it's very, very difficult to spread the virus when you're asymptomatic". Noem added that it was "incredibly important that we do what we can to mitigate the spread of this virus, but we also know that we can't stop it."[10][11]

Sturgis Motorcycle Rally and subsequent spike[edit]

On August 3, 96 out of 328 people who attended Camp Judson, a Christian summer camp near Keystone, tested positive for COVID-19, with an average age of 15 years old.[12]

The Sturgis Motorcycle Rally was held as scheduled from August 7–16, with an estimated 250,000 expected to attend.[13] Although the rally itself was classified by infectious disease professor Carlos del Rio as being of a relatively lower risk due to it being an outdoor event, concerns were raised that attendees would engage in indoor gatherings at bars and restaurants, and that travelers could potentially export COVID-19 cases back to their home states. Mayor of Sturgis Mark Carstensen questioned why the event still went on, admitting that "we cannot stop people from coming."[14][15] Attendees were encouraged, but not required, to wear a mask.[13][14] A week after the rally, three days of mass testing were scheduled in Sturgis for local residents.[16]

Footage of a concert at Buffalo Chip Campground as part of the festivities showed wide defiance of mask-wearing and social distancing, and Smash Mouth lead singer Steve Harwell telling the audience to "fuck that COVID shit".[17][18] Public health notices were issued regarding possible exposures at a bar and a tattoo parlor in Sturgis, and a restaurant in Hill City, recommending that visitors monitor for symptoms.[19][20][21] By August 26, the number of cases attributed to the rally had reached 70, including 35 cases in Minnesota, 17 in North Dakota, and seven cases in the Nebraska Panhandle.[22] By September 2, the number had increased to 260, and Minnesota reported the first known COVID-19 death among an attendee.[23][24]

The Sturgis Rally and other public events, including concerts at the Sioux Empire Fair, the return to school, and exposures at local businesses, resulted in a surge of new COVID-19 cases in South Dakota. A single-day record of 623 new cases were reported on August 27.[1] On August 30, it was reported that there had been over 2,000 new cases over the past seven days.[25][21][26] The next day, Governor Noem downplayed the surge, arguing that "none of this was a surprise", hospitalizations were low in comparison to models, and deaths had trended downward. She also claimed that most of the new cases were among younger residents with a higher chance of recovery, despite cases in people over 70 having increased since the 27th.[27]

In September, a non-peer-reviewed study was released by San Diego State University's Center for Health Economics and Policy Studies, which projected that up to 260,000 COVID-19 cases were tied to the rally nationwide. The estimate was based on case trends following the event in the regions from which its attendees originated, as determined by cellphone data, rather than contact tracing — which an author of the study considered unfeasible due to the scale of the event.[28]

The study was criticized by state officials, including Governor Noem, Secretary of Health Kim Malsam-Rysdon, and state epidemiologist Josh Clayton, who felt it was an overestimate in comparison to case totals reported locally and by the Associated Press (which, by then, had projected 124 in-state cases tied to Sturgis, and 290 across multiple states), and noted that the study was not peer-reviewed. Noem also criticized media outlets for reporting on the study, describing it as a "fiction" based on "incredibly faulty assumptions that do not reflect the actual facts and data here in South Dakota."[28]

Continued surge[edit]

From August 16 to September 26, 2020, the seven-day moving average quadrupled from an average of 95.6 cases per-day to 384 cases per-day.[1] On September 16, a single-day record of eight new deaths was reported.[1] By September 23, the state's number of new, active, and hospitalized cases reached new peaks.[29] Along with North Dakota, South Dakota saw the largest per-capita increases in new cases nationwide.[30] On October 1, the state set a single-day record for new deaths, with 13.[31][1]

On October 7, the South Dakota Department of Health (SDDoH) began to identify test positives on antigen tests (which are faster, but less-accurate than PCR tests)[32] in its statistics as "probable" cases.[33] For health care and contact tracing purposes, they are handled the same as those that are confirmed via PCR test. If a probable case is tested via PCR as a follow-up by a clinician, they will be reclassified as a "confirmed" case. However, probable cases might not necessarily be retested.[33]

On October 13, Noem attributed the present spike in cases as "expected" due to increased testing, despite a case positivity rate of over 10%.[34] On October 15, the state set a single-day record for new cases, at 876, surpassing previous peaks experienced throughout the month.[35]

Cases continued to rapidly increase into November; on November 5, the state surpassed 51,000 cases, with the South Dakota Department of Health (SDDoH) reporting that the state's test positivity percentage had increased to nearly 17%, and its 14-day rolling average was at 19.5%.[36] Test positivity increased to nearly 24% by November 10, with the SDDoH reporting a rolling average of 19.9%.[37] By mid-November, the state's 7-day rolling average per-capita peaked at 165 cases per-100,000.[38] On December 1, the number of active cases in South Dakota fell to its lowest total since early-November, after the state reported a single-day record of 3,542 newly-inactive cases.[39] During the first week of December 2020, South Dakota had the highest mortality rate per-capita among all U.S. states.[38]

Declines[edit]

By December 7, the state's seven-day average had begun to decline, with South Dakota ranking third behind Rhode Island and Minnesota in new cases per-capita nationwide.[40] On December 21, Avera Health reported that South Dakota had the highest mortality rate of all U.S. states over the past week, second-highest test positivity, and was 14th in new hospitalizations.[41] On February 22, 2021, the state recorded its fewest new daily cases since July 2020.[42]

It has been suggested that personal impacts of the pandemic on residents had led to increased use of masks in South Dakota. Both of the Dakotas had seen noticeable declines in the rate of new cases since December, albeit slower in the South due to the lack of formal mandate.[43]

Response[edit]

On March 13, 2020, Governor Kristi Noem declared a state of emergency. Schools were closed beginning March 16.[44][45] An executive order was issued to encourage social distancing, remote work, and following the CDC guideline of capping enclosed spaces to 10 people at a time.[46] On April 6, Noem ordered vulnerable residents of Lincoln and Minnehaha counties who are 65 years of age or older or have a chronic condition to stay home until further notice.[47] The order was lifted May 11.[48]

In contrast to the majority of states (but in line with other rural, Republican-led states such as Nebraska), Governor Noem resisted imposing a mandatory, state-wide stay-at-home order, having argued that "the people themselves are primarily responsible for their safety", and that she wanted to respect their rights to "exercise their right to work, to worship and to play. Or to even stay at home".[49][50] Following the lead of President Donald Trump, Noem also promoted the unproven efficacy of hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19 symptoms.[50] In late-April 2020, Noem unveiled a "Back to Normal plan", which contains guidance for migrating from the previous recommendations in areas where the rate of new cases had lessened.[46][51]

In late July, Noem ruled out a state mandate on the wearing of face masks in public spaces. Noem disputed studies that had determined face masks to be an effective means of reducing spread of viral particles, arguing that the research was "very mixed" and that "science has not proven what's effective and what isn't and what type of mask. We have to stay objective when we look at it". Noem claimed that studies recommending the use of masks did not use "reliable data sets", and that asymptomatic spread was rare.[52][53]

Noem declined to participate in a federal scheme providing enhanced unemployment benefits, citing a low level of unemployment in the state.[54] In late-August, Noem stated that she would not change her guidance on masks, despite an intensifying surge in new cases.[27] On September 8, despite the continued surge, Noem announced plans to spend $5 million of relief money on an advertising campaign for state tourism.[55] This included an $819,000 buy on Fox News.[56]

During a special session of the South Dakota Legislature on October 5, Noem stated that a "very prominent national reporter" had praised her for "[standing] against" lockdowns and proving they were "useless".[57] On October 7, President Trump posted a clip of the session on Twitter captioned "Great job South Dakota!"; Noem replied, thanking Trump for giving her government "the flexibility to respect Freedom and personal responsibility", and arguing that they made decisions "based on science, facts, and data". This praise came despite South Dakota having recently set new records for active cases and hospitalizations.[58]

On December 7, 2020, Noem published an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal, which defended and addressed criticism of her approach by comparing South Dakota to larger states with stricter mitigation measures.[59] She argued that Illinois presently had a higher number of new cases per-capita than South Dakota had at any point during the pandemic, and had reported a record 238 new deaths on December 2 (the result of backlogged reports from over the Thanksgiving holiday),[60] despite their use of "harsh lockdowns" and mask mandates.[38] She also stated that despite having mandated masks in June, New Jersey "still has had the most deaths in the country per capita", and that "over the last two weeks of November, its hospitalizations increased by 34 percent, a six-month high".[38]

Aaron Blake of The Washington Post questioned the validity of some of the statistics Noem quoted, noting that South Dakota's mortality rate per-capita on the specified date was "more than twice" that of Illinois, and that Illinois's seven-day average per-capita at the time of writing (79 per-100,000) was lower than South Dakota's peak (165).[38] In regards to New Jersey, Blake noted that the state had the highest mortality rate per-capita overall, but that the majority of these deaths took place in the early stage of the pandemic prior to the mask mandate. In addition, he pointed out that while New Jersey did have a recent spike in hospitalizations, South Dakota had multiple two-week spikes in hospitalizations over the past few months that were higher than 34%, and presently had the second-highest number of hospitalizations per-capita nationwide, 58 (behind only Nevada), as opposed to 38 in New Jersey, and 28 in California (another state singled out in the op-ed).[38]

On April 21, 2021, Governor Noem issued an executive order banning government entities from issuing "vaccine passports", arguing that they are "un-American" and used to justify the discrimination of citizens who are not yet vaccinated.[61][62][63]

Local responses[edit]

Noem has faced criticism from residents, as well as other city and county leaders, for her lack of state-wide actions to control local spread of COVID-19. The resistance forced municipalities to implement their own ordinances to enforce social distancing, including Sioux Falls—which enacted a "no lingering" ordinance on March 26 to restrict all non-essential businesses to only serving a maximum of 10 customers at a time.[64][65]

Mayor of Sioux Falls Paul TenHaken introduced a proposal for a municipal stay-at-home order on April 14,[66] but it was rejected by city council.[67][49][7][50] On May 8, the "no lingering" ordinance was eased ("no mingling") to allow restaurants to expand to capacity (subject to six-foot social distancing between patrons), and fitness, entertainment, and recreation facilities to expand to half of their licensed capacity, or 10, whichever is greater.[68] On May 19, TenHaken tabled a proposal to sunset the ordinance, citing a slowing in new cases in the city since the new ordinance was implemented. City Health Director Jill Franken also reported that the number of hospitalizations in the area was lower than projected. On May 26, Sioux Falls City Council voted in favor, with the ordinance officially repealed on May 29.[69][70]

Medical responses to the pandemic have largely been coordinated by South Dakota's Avera Health, Monument Health, and Sanford Health systems, including testing, vaccination, and public awareness.[43]

On September 8, the city of Brookings became the first in the state to mandate the wearing of face masks in public spaces.[71] The mandate has been credited with lowering the rate of new cases in Brookings County; by late-November, it had the lowest number of cases per-100,000 among South Dakota's 10 most populous counties, at 74.[72][73]

Tribal responses[edit]

The Cheyenne River and Pine Ridge Sioux reservations have established highway checkpoints to regulate access to their territory.[74][75] On May 8, Governor Noem sent letters to the two tribes' leaders, declaring the checkpoints illegal for "interfering with or regulating traffic on US and state highways" without permission, and threatening a federal lawsuit if not removed.[76][77] The Oglala and Cheyenne River Sioux tribes maintained their checkpoints due to safety concerns.[78]

On May 12, Noem sent a second letter to the leader of the Cheyenne River reservation, clarifying that it was within their rights of tribal sovereignty to establish checkpoints on roads leading into their reservation (rather than the highway itself) to help protect their populations, as long as they provide "reasonable access" for essential goods, emergency services, and access to private property situated on the land.[79] On May 20, after the tribes continued the checkpoints, Noem sought assistance from the federal government in resolving the dispute.[80] On June 24, the Cheyenne River Sioux filed a lawsuit against the federal government.[81]

The Indian Health Service has worked with local tribes on vaccine distribution.[43]

Universities and colleges[edit]

On August 25, it was reported that the University of South Dakota had 61 active COVID-19 cases, and 300 students self-quarantining.[82]

Since August 26, the South Dakota Department of Health has released case numbers for universities on a weekly basis, including data for individual schools.[83]

Statistics[edit]

COVID-19 cases in South Dakota, United States  ()
     Deaths        Recoveries        Active cases
2020202020212021
MarMarAprAprMayMayJunJunJulJulAugAugSepSepOctOctNovNovDecDec
JanJanFebFebMarMarAprAprMayMay
Last 15 daysLast 15 days
Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-03-10
5(n.a.)
2020-03-11
8(+60%)
2020-03-12
2020-03-13
9(n.a.)
2020-03-14
9
2020-03-15
9
2020-03-16
10(+11%)
2020-03-17
11(+10%)
2020-03-18
11 1(n.a.)
2020-03-19
14(+27%) 1
2020-03-20
2020-03-21
14 1
2020-03-22
21(+50%) 1
2020-03-23
28(+33%) 1
2020-03-24
30(+7.1%) 1
2020-03-25
41(+37%) 1
2020-03-26
46(+12%) 1
2020-03-27
58(+26%) 1
2020-03-28
68(+17%) 1
2020-03-29
90(+32%) 1
2020-03-30
101(+12%) 1
2020-03-31
108(+6.9%) 1
2020-04-01
108 1
2020-04-02
165(+53%) 2(+100%)
2020-04-03
187(+13%) 2
2020-04-04
212(+13%) 2
2020-04-05
240(+13%) 2
2020-04-06
288(+20%) 4(+100%)
2020-04-07
320(+11%) 6(+50%)
2020-04-08
393(+23%) 6
2020-04-09
447(+14%) 6
2020-04-10
536(+20%) 6
2020-04-11
626(+17%) 6
2020-04-12
730(+17%) 6
2020-04-13
868(+19%) 6
2020-04-14
988(+14%) 6
2020-04-15
1,168(+18%) 6
2020-04-16
1,311(+12%) 7(+17%)
2020-04-17
1,411(+7.6%) 7
2020-04-18
1,542(+9.3%) 7
2020-04-19
1,635(+6%) 7
2020-04-20
1,685(+3.1%) 7
2020-04-21
1,755(+4.2%) 7
2020-04-22
1,858(+5.9%) 9(+29%)
2020-04-23
1,956(+5.3%) 9
2020-04-24
2,040(+4.3%) 10(+11%)
2020-04-25
2,147(+5.2%) 10
2020-04-26
2,212(+3%) 11(+10%)
2020-04-27
2,245(+1.5%) 11
2020-04-28
2,313(+3%) 11
2020-04-29
2,373(+2.6%) 13(+18%)
2020-04-30
2,449(+3.2%) 17(+31%)
2020-05-01
2,525(+3.1%) 21(+24%)
2020-05-02
2,588(+2.5%) 21
2020-05-03
2,631(+1.7%) 21
2020-05-04
2,668(+1.4%) 21
2020-05-05
2,721(+2%) 24(+14%)
2020-05-06
2,779(+2.1%) 29(+21%)
2020-05-07
2,905(+4.5%) 31(+6.9%)
2020-05-08
3,144(+8.2%) 31
2020-05-09
3,393(+7.9%) 34(+9.7%)
2020-05-10
3,517(+3.7%) 34
2020-05-11
3,614(+2.8%) 34
2020-05-12
3,663(+1.4%) 39(+15%)
2020-05-13
3,732(+1.9%) 39
2020-05-14
3,792(+1.6%) 43(+10%)
2020-05-15
3,887(+2.5%) 44(+2.3%)
2020-05-16
3,959(+1.9%) 44
2020-05-17
3,987(+0.71%) 44
2020-05-18
4,027(+1%) 44
2020-05-19
4,085(+1.4%) 46(+4.5%)
2020-05-20
4,177(+2.3%) 46
2020-05-21
4,250(+1.7%) 48(+4.3%)
2020-05-22
4,356(+2.5%) 50(+4.2%)
2020-05-23
4,468(+2.6%) 50
2020-05-24
4,563(+2.1%) 50
2020-05-25
4,586(+0.5%) 50
2020-05-26
4,653(+1.5%) 50
2020-05-27
4,710(+1.2%) 54(+8%)
2020-05-28
4,793(+1.8%) 54
2020-05-29
4,866(+1.5%) 59(+9.3%)
2020-05-30
4,960(+1.9%) 62(+5.1%)
2020-05-31
4,993(+0.67%) 62
2020-06-01
5,034(+0.82%) 62
2020-06-02
5,067(+0.66%) 62
2020-06-03
5,162(+1.9%) 62
2020-06-04
5,247(+1.6%) 64(+3.2%)
2020-06-05
5,277(+0.57%) 65(+1.6%)
2020-06-06
5,367(+1.7%) 65
2020-06-07
5,438(+1.3%) 65
2020-06-08
5,471(+0.61%) 65
2020-06-09
5,523(+0.95%) 68(+4.6%)
2020-06-10
5,604(+1.5%) 69(+1.5%)
2020-06-11
5,665(+1.1%) 73(+5.8%)
2020-06-12
5,742(+1.4%) 74(+1.4%)
2020-06-13
5,833(+1.6%) 75(+1.4%)
2020-06-14
5,898(+1.1%) 75
2020-06-15
5,928(+0.51%) 75
2020-06-16
5,966(+0.64%) 77(+2.7%)
2020-06-17
6,050(+1.4%) 78(+1.3%)
2020-06-18
6,109(+0.98%) 78
2020-06-19
6,158(+0.8%) 81(+3.8%)
2020-06-20
6,225(+1.1%) 81
2020-06-21
6,297(+1.2%) 81
2020-06-22
6,326(+0.46%) 81
2020-06-23
6,353(+0.43%) 83(+2.5%)
2020-06-24
6,419(+1%) 84(+1.2%)
2020-06-25
6,479(+0.93%) 87(+3.6%)
2020-06-26
6,535(+0.86%) 88(+1.1%)
2020-06-27
6,626(+1.4%) 91(+3.4%)
2020-06-28
6,681(+0.83%) 91
2020-06-29
6,716(+0.52%) 91
2020-06-30
6,764(+0.71%) 91
2020-07-01
6,826(+0.92%) 93(+2.2%)
2020-07-02
6,893(+0.98%) 97(+4.3%)
2020-07-03
6,978(+1.2%) 97
2020-07-04
7,028(+0.72%) 97
2020-07-05
7,063(+0.5%) 97
2020-07-06
7,105(+0.59%) 97
2020-07-07
7,163(+0.82%) 98(+1%)
2020-07-08
7,242(+1.1%) 98
2020-07-09
7,336(+1.3%) 101(+3.1%)
2020-07-10
7,401(+0.89%) 107(+5.9%)
2020-07-11
2020-07-12
7,499(n.a.) 109(n.a.)
2020-07-13
2020-07-14
7,572(n.a.) 109
2020-07-15
7,652(+1.1%) 111(+1.8%)
2020-07-16
7,694(+0.55%) 115(+3.6%)
2020-07-17
7,789(+1.2%) 116(+0.87%)
2020-07-18
7,862(+0.94%) 116
2020-07-19
7,906(+0.56%) 118(+1.7%)
2020-07-20
7,943(+0.47%) 118
2020-07-21
8,019(+0.96%) 118
2020-07-22
8,077(+0.72%) 119(+0.85%)
2020-07-23
8,143(+0.82%) 121(+1.7%)
2020-07-24
8,200(+0.7%) 122(+0.83%)
2020-07-25
8,305(+1.3%) 122
2020-07-29
8,685(n.a.) 129(n.a.)
2020-08-02
9,020(n.a.) 135(n.a.)
2020-08-15
10,118(n.a.) 152(n.a.)
2020-08-16
10,274(+1.5%) 153(+0.66%)
2020-08-17
10,360(+0.84%) 153
2020-08-18
10,443(+0.8%) 154(+0.65%)
2020-08-19
10,566(+1.2%) 155(+0.65%)
2020-08-20
10,691(+1.2%) 157(+1.3%)
2020-08-21
10,884(+1.8%) 159(+1.3%)
2020-08-22
11,135(+2.3%) 160(+0.63%)
2020-08-23
11,276(+1.3%) 161(+0.62%)
2020-08-24
11,425(+1.3%) 161
2020-08-25
11,505(+0.7%) 161
2020-08-26
11,571(+0.57%) 162(+0.62%)
2020-08-27
12,194(+5.4%) 162
2020-08-28
12,517(+2.6%) 165(+1.9%)
2020-08-29
12,942(+3.4%) 167(+1.2%)
2020-08-30
13,322(+2.9%) 167
2020-08-31
13,509(+1.4%) 167
2020-09-01
13,749(+1.8%) 167
2020-09-02
14,003(+1.8%) 169(+1.2%)
2020-09-03
14,377(+2.7%) 169
2020-09-04
14,596(+1.5%) 170(+0.59%)
2020-09-05
14,889(+2%) 173(+1.8%)
2020-09-06
15,109(+1.5%) 173
2020-09-07
15,300(+1.3%) 173
2020-09-08
15,403(+0.67%) 173
2020-09-09
15,571(+1.1%) 173
2020-09-10
15,834(+1.7%) 177(+2.3%)
2020-09-11
16,117(+1.8%) 177
2020-09-12
16,437(+2%) 183(+3.4%)
2020-09-13
16,638(+1.2%) 184(+0.55%)
2020-09-14
16,801(+0.98%) 184
2020-09-15
16,994(+1.1%) 184
2020-09-16
17,291(+1.7%) 192(+4.3%)
2020-09-17
17,686(+2.3%) 193(+0.52%)
2020-09-18
18,075(+2.2%) 198(+2.6%)
2020-09-19
18,444(+2%) 200(+1%)
2020-09-20
18,696(+1.4%) 202(+1%)
2020-09-21
18,869(+0.93%) 202
2020-09-22
19,189(+1.7%) 202
2020-09-23
19,634(+2.3%) 202
2020-09-24
20,097(+2.4%) 210(+4%)
2020-09-25
20,554(+2.3%) 216(+2.9%)
2020-09-26
21,133(+2.8%) 218(+0.93%)
2020-09-27
21,541(+1.9%) 218
2020-09-28
21,738(+0.91%) 218
2020-09-29
21,997(+1.2%) 223(+2.3%)
2020-09-30
22,389(+1.8%) 223
2020-10-01
23,136(+3.3%) 236(+5.8%)
2020-10-02
23,522(+1.7%) 237(+0.42%)
2020-10-03
23,986(+2%) 248(+4.6%)
2020-10-04
24,418(+1.8%) 248
2020-10-05
24,598(+0.74%) 248
2020-10-06
24,876(+1.1%) 248
2020-10-07
25,433(+2.2%) 258(+4%)
2020-10-08
25,961(+2.1%) 272(+5.4%)
2020-10-09
26,711(+2.9%) 277(+1.8%)
2020-10-10
27,401(+2.6%) 286(+3.2%)
2020-10-11
28,564(+4.2%) 286(=)
2020-10-12
28,925(+1.3%) 288(+0.7%)
2020-10-13
29,339(+1.4%) 288
2020-10-14
30,215(+3%) 291(+1%)
2020-10-15
31,012(+2.6%) 304(+4.5%)
2020-10-16
31,805(+2.6%) 307(+0.99%)
2020-10-17
32,611(+2.5%) 315(+2.6%)
2020-10-18
33,269(+2%) 323(+2.5%)
2020-10-19
33,836(+1.7%) 323
2020-10-20
34,457(+1.8%) 330(+2.2%)
2020-10-21
35,044(+1.7%) 333(+0.91%)
2020-10-22
36,017(+2.8%) 347(+4.2%)
2020-10-23
37,202(+3.3%) 356(+2.6%)
2020-10-24
38,159(+2.6%) 366(+2.8%)
2020-10-25
39,203(+2.7%) 375(+2.5%)
2020-10-26
39,741(+1.4%) 375
2020-10-27
40,730(+2.5%) 375
2020-10-28
42,000(+3.1%) 384(+2.4%)
2020-10-29
43,000(+2.4%) 403(+4.9%)
2020-10-30
44,559(+3.6%) 415(+3%)
2020-10-31
45,992(+3.2%) 425(+2.4%)
2020-11-01
47,324(+2.9%) 437(+2.8%)
2020-11-02
47,850(+1.1%) 438(+0.23%)
2020-11-03
48,854(+2.1%) 446(+1.8%)
2020-11-04
49,791(+1.9%) 460(+3.1%)
2020-11-05
51,151(+2.7%) 482(+4.8%)
2020-11-06
52,639(+2.9%) 510(+5.8%)
2020-11-07
53,976(+2.5%) 523(+2.5%)
2020-11-08
55,404(+2.6%) 536(+2.5%)
2020-11-09
56,311(+1.6%) 537(+0.19%)
2020-11-10
57,334(+1.8%) 540(+0.56%)
2020-11-11
58,696(+2.4%) 567(+5%)
2020-11-12
60,716(+3.4%) 567
2020-11-13
62,327(+2.7%) 568(+0.18%)
2020-11-14
64,182(+3%) 621(+9.3%)
2020-11-15
65,381(+1.9%) 644(+3.7%)
2020-11-16
66,278(+1.4%) 644
2020-11-17
67,284(+1.5%) 644
2020-11-18
68,671(+2.1%) 674(+4.7%)
2020-11-19
69,742(+1.6%) 705(+4.6%)
2020-11-20
71,070(+1.9%) 741(+5.1%)
2020-11-21
72,214(+1.6%) 777(+4.9%)
2020-11-22
73,065(+1.2%) 819(+5.4%)
2020-11-23
73,848(+1.1%) 819
2020-11-24
74,859(+1.4%) 821(+0.24%)
2020-11-25
76,142(+1.7%) 849(+3.4%)
2020-11-26
76,142 849
2020-11-27
78,280(+2.8%) 888(+4.6%)
2020-11-28
79,099(+1%) 942(+6.1%)
2020-11-29
79,900(+1%) 943(+0.11%)
2020-11-30
80,464(+0.71%) 946(+0.32%)
2020-12-01
80,912(+0.56%) 948(+0.21%)
2020-12-02
82,203(+1.6%) 995(+5%)
2020-12-03
83,348(+1.4%) 1,033(+3.8%)
2020-12-04
84,398(+1.3%) 1,064(+3%)
2020-12-05
85,304(+1.1%) 1,091(+2.5%)
2020-12-06
85,991(+0.81%) 1,110(+1.7%)
2020-12-07
86,500(+0.59%) 1,110
2020-12-08
87,038(+0.62%) 1,111(+0.09%)
2020-12-09
88,023(+1.1%) 1,147(+3.2%)
2020-12-10
88,727(+0.8%) 1,177(+2.6%)
2020-12-11
89,672(+1.1%) 1,210(+2.8%)
2020-12-12
90,407(+0.82%) 1,243(+2.7%)
2020-12-13
91,038(+0.7%) 1,259(+1.3%)
2020-12-14
91,354(+0.35%) 1,259
2020-12-15
91,699(+0.38%) 1,261(+0.16%)
2020-12-16
92,603(+0.99%) 1,300(+3.1%)
2020-12-17
93,197(+0.64%) 1,301(+0.08%)
2020-12-18
93,772(+0.62%) 1,329(+2.2%)
2020-12-19
94,336(+0.6%) 1,350(+1.6%)
2020-12-20
94,727(+0.41%) 1,361(+0.81%)
2020-12-21
95,074(+0.37%) 1,381(+1.5%)
2020-12-22
95,509(+0.46%) 1,381
2020-12-23
96,040(+0.56%) 1,389(+0.58%)
2020-12-24
96,546(+0.53%) 1,430(+3%)
2020-12-25
96,546 1,430
2020-12-26
96,963(+0.43%) 1,446(+1.1%)
2020-12-27
97,390(+0.44%) 1,446
2020-12-28
97,657(+0.27%) 1,446
2020-12-29
98,158(+0.51%) 1,446
2020-12-30
98,720(+0.57%) 1,464(+1.2%)
2020-12-31
99,164(+0.45%) 1,488(+1.6%)
2021-01-01
99,164 1,488
2021-01-02
99,829(+0.67%) 1,501(+0.87%)
2021-01-03
100,532(+0.7%) 1,513(+0.8%)
2021-01-04
100,643(+0.11%) 1,513
2021-01-05
101,076(+0.43%) 1,513
2021-01-06
101,684(+0.6%) 1,519(+0.4%)
2021-01-07
102,132(+0.44%) 1,544(+1.6%)
2021-01-08
102,580(+0.44%) 1,556(+0.78%)
2021-01-09
102,901(+0.31%) 1,570(+0.9%)
2021-01-10
103,318(+0.41%) 1,585(+0.96%)
2021-01-11
103,499(+0.18%) 1,585
2021-01-12
103,743(+0.24%) 1,585
2021-01-13
104,195(+0.44%) 1,604(+1.2%)
2021-01-14
104,512(+0.3%) 1,614(+0.62%)
2021-01-15
104,937(+0.41%) 1,629(+0.93%)
2021-01-16
105,278(+0.32%) 1,633(+0.25%)
2021-01-17
105,544(+0.25%) 1,656(+1.4%)
2021-01-18
105,659(+0.11%) 1,667(+0.66%)
2021-01-19
105,786(+0.12%) 1,667
2021-01-20
106,063(+0.26%) 1,667
2021-01-21
106,400(+0.32%) 1,673(+0.36%)
2021-01-22
106,716(+0.3%) 1,684(+0.66%)
2021-01-23
106,963(+0.23%) 1,696(+0.71%)
2021-01-24
107,148(+0.17%) 1,705(+0.53%)
2021-01-25
107,180(+0.03%) 1,705
2021-01-26
107,380(+0.19%) 1,705
2021-01-27
107,608(+0.21%) 1,739(+2%)
2021-01-28
107,795(+0.17%) 1,763(+1.4%)
2021-01-29
107,955(+0.15%) 1,768(+0.28%)
2021-01-30
108,070(+0.11%) 1,775(+0.4%)
2021-01-31
108,250(+0.17%) 1,778(+0.17%)
2021-02-01
108,315(+0.06%) 1,778
2021-02-02
108,431(+0.11%) 1,779(+0.06%)
2021-02-03
108,639(+0.19%) 1,782(+0.17%)
2021-02-04
108,813(+0.16%) 1,788(+0.34%)
2021-02-05
108,944(+0.12%) 1,798(+0.56%)
2021-02-06
109,132(+0.17%) 1,804(+0.33%)
2021-02-07
109,229(+0.09%) 1,809(+0.28%)
2021-02-08
109,283(+0.05%) 1,809
2021-02-09
109,405(+0.11%) 1,809
2021-02-10
109,580(+0.16%) 1,815(+0.33%)
2021-02-11
109,859(+0.25%) 1,829(+0.77%)
2021-02-12
110,068(+0.19%) 1,831(+0.11%)
2021-02-13
110,205(+0.12%) 1,838(+0.38%)
2021-02-14
110,315(+0.1%) 1,844(+0.33%)
2021-02-15
110,376(+0.06%) 1,844
2021-02-16
110,593(+0.2%) 1,844
2021-02-17
110,685(+0.08%) 1,844
2021-02-18
110,871(+0.17%) 1,847(+0.16%)
2021-02-19
111,018(+0.13%) 1,853(+0.32%)
2021-02-20
111,165(+0.13%) 1,859(+0.32%)
2021-02-21
111,304(+0.13%) 1,863(+0.22%)
2021-02-22
111,334(+0.03%) 1,863
2021-02-23
111,546(+0.19%) 1,863
2021-02-24
111,808(+0.23%) 1,864(+0.05%)
2021-02-25
111,964(+0.14%) 1,872(+0.43%)
2021-02-26
112,107(+0.13%) 1,879(+0.37%)
2021-02-27
112,293(+0.17%) 1,886(+0.37%)
2021-02-28
112,427(+0.12%) 1,888(+0.11%)
2021-03-01
112,470(+0.04%) 1,888
2021-03-02
112,652(+0.16%) 1,888
2021-03-03
112,833(+0.16%) 1,893(+0.26%)
2021-03-04
113,065(+0.21%) 1,896(+0.16%)
2021-03-05
113,229(+0.15%) 1,896
2021-03-06
113,378(+0.13%) 1,898(+0.11%)
2021-03-07
113,589(+0.19%) 1,900(+0.11%)
2021-03-08
113,596(+0.01%) 1,901(+0.05%)
2021-03-09
113,753(+0.14%) 1,901
2021-03-10
113,962(+0.18%) 1,904(+0.16%)
2021-03-11
114,163(+0.18%) 1,905(+0.05%)
2021-03-12
114,347(+0.16%) 1,907(+0.1%)
2021-03-13
114,493(+0.13%) 1,909(+0.1%)
2021-03-14
114,623(+0.11%) 1,912(+0.16%)
2021-03-15
114,649(+0.02%) 1,912
2021-03-16
114,791(+0.12%) 1,912
2021-03-17
114,966(+0.15%) 1,915(+0.16%)
2021-03-18
115,203(+0.21%) 1,919(+0.21%)
2021-03-19
115,518(+0.27%) 1,919
2021-03-20
115,723(+0.18%) 1,922(+0.16%)
2021-03-21
115,867(+0.12%) 1,923(+0.05%)
2021-03-22
115,972(+0.09%) 1,923
2021-03-23
116,100(+0.11%) 1,923
2021-03-24
116,370(+0.23%) 1,924(+0.05%)
2021-03-25
116,624(+0.22%) 1,927(+0.16%)
2021-03-26
116,833(+0.18%) 1,928(+0.05%)
2021-03-27
117,081(+0.21%) 1,933(+0.26%)
2021-03-28
117,244(+0.14%) 1,933
2021-03-29
117,336(+0.08%) 1,933
2021-03-30
117,495(+0.14%) 1,935(+0.1%)
2021-03-31
117,759(+0.22%) 1,935
2021-04-01
117,989(+0.2%) 1,938(+0.16%)
2021-04-02
118,186(+0.17%) 1,938
2021-04-03
118,361(+0.15%) 1,938
2021-04-04
118,361 1,938
2021-04-05
118,517(+0.13%) 1,938
2021-04-06
118,680(+0.14%) 1,938
2021-04-07
118,975(+0.25%) 1,938
2021-04-08
119,197(+0.19%) 1,939(+0.05%)
2021-04-09
119,467(+0.23%) 1,946(+0.36%)
2021-04-10
119,705(+0.2%) 1,946
2021-04-11
119,705 1,946
2021-04-12
119,892(+0.16%) 1,947(+0.05%)
2021-04-13
120,154(+0.22%) 1,947
2021-04-14
120,379(+0.19%) 1,948(+0.05%)
2021-04-15
120,613(+0.19%) 1,949(+0.05%)
2021-04-16
120,856(+0.2%) 1,952(+0.15%)
2021-04-17
121,056(+0.17%) 1,953(+0.05%)
2021-04-18
121,056 1,953
2021-04-19
121,189(+0.11%) 1,953
2021-04-20
121,360(+0.14%) 1,953
2021-04-21
121,517(+0.13%) 1,954(+0.05%)
2021-04-22
121,651(+0.11%) 1,956(+0.1%)
2021-04-23
121,850(+0.16%) 1,957(+0.05%)
2021-04-24
121,986(+0.11%) 1,958(+0.05%)
2021-04-25
121,986 1,958
2021-04-26
122,080(+0.08%) 1,960(+0.1%)
2021-04-27
122,228(+0.12%) 1,961(+0.05%)
2021-04-28
122,398(+0.14%) 1,962(+0.05%)
2021-04-29
122,532(+0.11%) 1,962
2021-04-30
122,660(+0.1%) 1,967(+0.25%)
2021-05-01
122,660 1,967
2021-05-02
122,660 1,967
2021-05-03
122,745(+0.07%) 1,970(+0.15%)
Cases: The number of cases confirmed and probable in South Dakota.
Sources: SD DOH.


County[a] Cases[b] Deaths Recov. Vaccine[c] Population[d] Cases / 100k
66 / 66 122,660 1,967 119,069 328,114 884,659 13,865.2
Aurora 471 15 452 1,046 2,751 17,121.0
Beadle 2,933 40 2,868 6,883 18,453 15,894.4
Bennett 390 9 380 422 3,365 11,589.9
Bon Homme 1,543 27 1,501 3,019 6,901 22,359.1
Brookings 4,184 37 4,041 13,331 35,077 11,928.0
Brown 5,509 91 5,341 15,843 38,839 14,184.2
Brule 712 9 693 1,581 5,297 13,441.6
Buffalo 425 13 410 127 1,962 21,661.6
Butte 1,043 20 1,004 2,456 10,429 10,001.0
Campbell 130 4 126 853 1,376 9,447.7
Charles Mix 1,376 22 1,337 2,945 9,292 14,808.4
Clark 454 5 441 1,478 3,736 12,152.0
Clay 1,917 15 1,881 5,913 14,070 13,624.7
Codington 4,591 81 4,394 10,965 28,009 16,391.2
Corson 478 12 465 242 4,086 11,698.5
Custer 830 12 810 2,942 8,972 9,251.0
Davison 3,219 66 3,115 8,456 19,775 16,278.1
Day 703 29 663 2,486 5,424 12,960.9
Deuel 523 9 506 1,563 4,351 12,020.2
Dewey 1,462 27 1,433 285 5,892 24,813.3
Douglas 454 9 444 1,124 2,921 15,542.6
Edmunds 508 13 492 1,355 3,829 13,267.2
Fall River 591 15 571 2,365 6,713 8,803.8
Faulk 369 13 353 1,001 2,299 16,050.5
Grant 1,037 42 986 2,888 7,052 14,705.0
Gregory 579 30 546 1,523 4,185 13,835.1
Haakon 262 10 252 447 1,899 13,796.7
Hamlin 794 39 751 1,940 6,164 12,881.2
Hand 362 6 353 1,383 3,191 11,344.4
Hanson 386 4 381 600 3,453 11,178.7
Harding 96 1 93 152 1,298 7,396.0
Hughes 2,476 39 2,405 8,235 17,526 14,127.6
Hutchinson 914 27 857 3,389 7,291 12,536.0
Hyde 141 1 140 463 1,301 10,837.8
Jackson 289 14 275 354 3,344 8,642.3
Jerauld 273 16 257 829 2,013 13,561.8
Jones 93 0 93 553 903 10,299.0
Kingsbury 814 16 783 2,571 4,939 16,481.1
Lake 1,362 18 1,324 4,932 12,797 10,643.1
Lawrence 2,959 47 2,876 9,012 25,844 11,449.5
Lincoln 8,621 77 8,422 25,961 61,128 14,103.2
Lyman 647 11 623 778 3,781 17,111.9
Marshall 370 6 359 1,941 4,935 7,497.5
McCook 804 25 773 2,282 5,586 14,393.1
McPherson 244 4 239 269 2,379 10,256.4
Meade 2,745 30 2,695 6,449 28,332 9,688.7
Mellette 260 2 255 43 2,061 12,615.2
Miner 298 9 287 892 2,216 13,447.7
Minnehaha 31,343 352 30,502 85,336 193,134 16,228.6
Moody 649 17 619 1,825 6,576 9,869.2
Oglala Lakota 2,107 49 2,050 185 14,177 14,862.1
Pennington 13,606 191 13,260 35,135 113,775 11,958.7
Perkins 355 14 339 631 2,865 12,390.9
Potter 390 4 385 961 2,153 18,114.3
Roberts 1,357 39 1,307 3,655 10,394 13,055.6
Sanborn 342 3 338 1,031 2,344 14,590.4
Spink 840 26 808 2,738 6,376 13,174.4
Stanley 347 2 342 1,219 3,098 11,200.8
Sully 142 3 137 421 1,391 10,208.5
Todd 1,226 29 1,191 162 10,177 12,046.8
Tripp 755 17 731 1,703 5,441 13,876.1
Turner 1,168 56 1,097 3,266 8,384 13,931.3
Union 2,213 43 2,149 3,840 15,932 13,890.3
Walworth 766 16 747 1,584 5,435 14,093.8
Yankton 3,069 30 2,987 10,124 22,814 13,452.3
Ziebach 344 9 334 53 2,756 12,481.9
Updated April 30, 2021
Data is publicly reported by South Dakota Department of Health (SD-DOH)[84]
  1. ^ County where individuals with a positive case reside. Location of diagnosis and treatment may vary.
  2. ^ Reported confirmed and probable cases. Actual case numbers are probably higher.
  3. ^ Includes 7,678 nonresidents or persons from unknown counties.
  4. ^ July 2019 population estimate from "U.S. Census Bureau Quick Facts: South Dakota". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 26, 2020.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Updates and Information". South Dakota Dept. of Health COVID-19 Daily Update. January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  2. ^ "CDC COVID Data Tracker". Center for Disease Control. January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  3. ^ "CDC COVID Data Tracker". Center for Disease Control. January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  4. ^ "South Dakota reports 5 'presumptive positive' cases of coronavirus with one death". Argus Leader. Retrieved March 19, 2020.
  5. ^ "Smithfield Temporarily Shuts Pork Plant Due to Coronavirus". US News and World Report. 2020-04-09. Archived from the original on 2020-07-28. Retrieved 2020-04-11.
  6. ^ Wiener-Bronner, Danielle. "One of the largest pork processing facilities in the US is closing until further notice". CNN. WarnerMedia, Cable News Network, Inc. Archived from the original on 4 November 2020. Retrieved 14 April 2020.
  7. ^ a b Bradner, Eric. "South Dakota governor faces criticism over refusal to issue stay-at-home order after pork plant outbreak". CNN. WarnerMedia, Cable News Network, Inc. Archived from the original on November 18, 2020. Retrieved April 16, 2020.
  8. ^ "South Dakota will not enforce social distancing at Mount Rushmore Fourth of July event". The Hill. June 4, 2020. Retrieved 2020-06-04.
  9. ^ Kaczke, Lisa; Khalyleh, Hana. "Trump speaks at Mount Rushmore: See the packed, mostly mask-free crowd". Argus Leader. Retrieved 2020-07-04.
  10. ^ Kaczke, Lisa. "Gov. Kristi Noem flew on Air Force Once after close contact with positive coronavirus case". Argus Leader. Retrieved 2020-07-10.
  11. ^ Riess, Rebekah; Kelly, Caroline. "Noem says she has tested negative for coronavirus after being exposed to top Trump campaign official". CNN. WarnerMedia, Cable News Network, Inc. Retrieved 2020-07-10.
  12. ^ Matzen, Morgan (August 3, 2020). "DOH now reports 96 cases of COVID-19 from Camp Judson near Keystone". Rapid City Journal. Archived from the original on August 6, 2020. Retrieved August 5, 2020.
  13. ^ a b Shannon, Joel (August 7, 2020). "No masks required as 250,000 expected at 10-day Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Here's what to know". USA Today. Archived from the original on August 9, 2020. Retrieved August 8, 2020.
  14. ^ a b Kallingal, Mallika; Toropin, Konstantin; Said, Samira; Young, Ryan. "Riders begin to gather in South Dakota for biker rally". CNN. WarnerMedia, Cable News Network, Inc. Archived from the original on August 9, 2020. Retrieved 2020-08-08.
  15. ^ Blistein, Jon (2020-08-12). "'Freedom-Loving People': Behind the Scenes at That Controversial Smash Mouth Show in South Dakota". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2020-08-22.
  16. ^ "COVID-19 mass testing underway in Sturgis". KELOLAND.com. Nexstar Media Group. 2020-08-21. Retrieved 2020-08-22.
  17. ^ Maxouris, Christina. "Rock band Smash Mouth performed to a packed crowd of hundreds during the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally". CNN. WarnerMedia, Cable News Network, Inc. Retrieved 2020-08-31.
  18. ^ Willman, Chris (2020-08-26). "Smash Mouth Posts Hate Mail From Sturgis Backlash, as States Report Rally-Based COVID Spread". Variety. Retrieved 2020-08-31.
  19. ^ "DOH: COVID-19 potential exposure at Bumpin' Buffalo Bar and Grill in Hill City". KELOLAND.com. Nexstar Media Group. 2020-08-14. Retrieved 2020-08-21.
  20. ^ "Employee at tattoo shop in Sturgis tests positive for coronavirus". KELOLAND.com. Nexstar Media Group. 2020-08-20. Retrieved 2020-08-21.
  21. ^ a b Levenson, Eric. "A person with Covid-19 may have exposed others at a bar during Sturgis motorcycle rally". CNN. WarnerMedia, Cable News Network, Inc. Retrieved 2020-08-31.
  22. ^ Maxouris, Christina (2020-08-26). "Experts feared the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally could be a superspreading event. More than 70 coronavirus cases are already linked to it". CNN. WarnerMedia, Cable News Network, Inc. Retrieved 2020-08-31.
  23. ^ "First COVID-19 death linked to Sturgis motorcycle rally reported in Minnesota". Washington Post. September 2, 2020. Retrieved September 2, 2020.
  24. ^ Shannon, Joel. "First COVID-19 death linked to massive Sturgis biker rally; cases reported across the nation". USA Today. Retrieved 2020-09-28.
  25. ^ "COVID-19 cases reach another high in South Dakota". KELOLAND.com. Nexstar Media Group. 2020-08-21. Retrieved 2020-08-22.
  26. ^ "Spike in cases continues across South Dakota". Rapid City Journal. 2020-08-30. Retrieved 2020-09-02.
  27. ^ a b Sneve, Joe. "Noem won't mandate masks, issue stay-at-home orders as COVID-19 cases spike". Argus Leader. Retrieved 2020-09-28.
  28. ^ a b Raposa, Megan. "SD governor criticizes study suggesting Sturgis bike rally led to 260,000 COVID-19 cases". USA Today. Retrieved 2020-09-09.
  29. ^ Matzen, Morgan (2020-09-24). "South Dakota sets records for new, active COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths". Rapid City Journal. Retrieved 2020-09-28.
  30. ^ Higgins-Dunn, Noah (2020-10-08). "U.S. reports uptick in daily coronavirus cases as outbreaks surge in Great Plains". CNBC. Archived from the original on 2020-11-01. Retrieved 2020-10-11.
  31. ^ "South Dakota Covid Map and Case Count". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-10-11.
  32. ^ Meyer, Alexis C. Madrigal, Robinson (2020-10-09). "Why Trump's Rapid-Testing Plan Worries Scientists". The Atlantic. Retrieved 2020-10-11.
  33. ^ a b Brandon Martin (2020-10-07). "South Dakota adds probable cases to its COVID-19 Dashboard". KTIV. Retrieved 2020-10-11.
  34. ^ Fugleberg, Jeremy; Marvel, Shannon (2020-10-13). "Noem claims more testing responsible for South Dakota's COVID-19 case surge". The Mitchell Republic. Retrieved 2020-10-15.
  35. ^ "COVID-19 in South Dakota: 876 new total cases; Death toll rises to 291; Active cases at 6,604". KELOLAND.com. Nexstar Media Group. 2020-10-14. Retrieved 2020-10-15.
  36. ^ "Total cases surpass 50,000 in South Dakota, 22 new COVID-19 deaths Thursday". KOTA Territory News. 2020-11-05. Retrieved 2020-11-10.
  37. ^ "Hospitalizations pass 600 in South Dakota Tuesday". KOTA Territory News. Retrieved 2020-11-10.
  38. ^ a b c d e f "Kristi Noem hails South Dakota as a coronavirus success story — using badly cherry-picked numbers". Washington Post. December 8, 2020. Retrieved December 8, 2020.
  39. ^ Ellis, Jonathan. "COVID-19 recoveries in South Dakota reach new record". Argus Leader. Retrieved 2020-12-22.
  40. ^ Ellis, Jonathan. "South Dakota continues to see encouraging trend in new COVID-19 cases". Argus Leader. Retrieved 2020-12-22.
  41. ^ "South Dakota's COVID-19 death rate highest in the nation according to health professionals". KELOLAND.com. 2020-12-21. Retrieved 2020-12-22.
  42. ^ Sabato, Nick. "South Dakota records lowest new COVID-19 case count since July". The Dickinson Press. Retrieved 2021-03-08.
  43. ^ a b c "North Dakota and South Dakota set global Covid records. How did they turn the tide?". NBC News. Retrieved 2021-03-08.
  44. ^ "Noem signs State of Emergency order; Requests schools to close throughout South Dakota next week". KELOLAND.com. Nexstar Media Group. March 13, 2020.
  45. ^ Hayworth, Bret. "Noem orders South Dakota K-12 schools to close next week; Iowa, Nebraska holding off on similar moves". Sioux City Journal.
  46. ^ a b "Governor Noem outlines "Back to Normal" plan for South Dakota". KELOLAND.com. Nexstar Media Group. 2020-04-28. Retrieved 2020-08-31.
  47. ^ "New executive order will target Minnehaha & Lincoln Counties". KELOLAND.com. 2020-04-06. Retrieved 2020-05-13.
  48. ^ Kaczke, Lisa. "Gov. Kristi Noem lifts stay-at-home order for those 65+ in Sioux Falls area". Argus Leader. Retrieved 2020-05-13.
  49. ^ a b McGreal, Chris (2020-04-21). "'I believe in our freedoms': the governor who resists lockdown and stresses American liberty". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2020-05-13.
  50. ^ a b c Wittle, Griff (2020-04-13). "South Dakota's governor resisted ordering people to stay home. Now it has one of the nation's largest coronavirus hot spots". Washington Post. Retrieved 2020-05-12.
  51. ^ "Gov. Noem announces 'Back to Normal' plan for South Dakota". SiouxlandProud. Nexstar Media Group. 2020-04-28. Retrieved 2020-08-31.
  52. ^ Strubinger, Lee. "Noem Questions Mask Studies Despite CDC Recommendation". SDPB. Retrieved 2020-09-28.
  53. ^ Strubinger, Lee. "South Dakota Health Systems Agree On Masks, Noem Questions Efficacy". SDPB. Retrieved 2020-09-28.
  54. ^ Luhby, Tami (August 16, 2020). "South Dakota turns down Trump's unemployment benefits boost". CNN. Archived from the original on November 16, 2020. Retrieved August 30, 2020.
  55. ^ "South Dakota governor uses coronavirus relief funds for $5 million tourism ad despite COVID surge". CBS News. Archived from the original on November 16, 2020. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  56. ^ Groves, Stephen; Beaumont, Thomas (September 3, 2020). "South Dakota spends $819,000 on Fox News ad pitching tourism in the state". The Billings Gazette. Associated Press. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  57. ^ Sneve, Joe. "Gov. Kristi Noem to lawmakers: South Dakota shows lockdowns are 'useless'". Argus Leader. Retrieved 2020-10-11.
  58. ^ Huber, Makenzie. "President Trump tweets support of Gov. Kristi Noem's COVID-19 response". Argus Leader. Retrieved 2020-10-11.
  59. ^ Noem, Kristi (2020-12-07). "Opinion | South Dakota's Balanced Covid Response". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved 2020-12-24.
  60. ^ "Illinois sees biggest spike in reported COVID-19 deaths to date after holidays delay some data, officials say". WGN News. Nexstar, Inc. 2020-12-02. Retrieved 2020-12-03.
  61. ^ Ellis, Jonathan. "Gov. Noem bans government-instituted COVID-19 vaccine passports". Argus Leader. Retrieved 2021-04-28.
  62. ^ "Gov. Noem bans vaccine passports in South Dakota". KELOLAND.com. 2021-04-21. Retrieved 2021-04-28.
  63. ^ Goss, Austin. "Governor Kristi Noem bans "vaccine passports" in South Dakota". KOTA Territory News. Retrieved 2021-04-28.
  64. ^ Sneve, Joe. "Coronavirus restrictions on bars, restaurants have Sioux Falls owners clamoring for change". USA Today. Retrieved 2020-05-13.
  65. ^ Conlon, Shelly. "TenHaken clarifies businesses covered by proposed 'no more than 10' ordinance". Argus Leader. Retrieved 2020-05-13.
  66. ^ "Mayor TenHaken to propose stay at home order to City Council because of coronavirus numbers". NewsTalk 1320 KELO. Midwest Communications. Archived from the original on 20 April 2020. Retrieved 9 May 2020.
  67. ^ "No stay-at-home order for Sioux Falls but additional steps likely to help health care facilities handle the COVID-19 peak". KELOLAND.com. Nexstar Media Group. 2020-04-17. Retrieved 2020-05-13.
  68. ^ "Sioux Falls City Council passes ordinance reducing some COVID-19 restrictions". Dakota News Now. Gray Television. Retrieved 2020-05-29.
  69. ^ Sneve, Joe. "COVID-19 restrictions on Sioux Falls businesses repealed". Argus Leader. Retrieved 2020-05-29.
  70. ^ "Sioux Falls City Council advances motion to repeal 'no mingling' ordinance". Dakota News Now. Gray Television. Retrieved 2020-05-29.
  71. ^ Conlon, Shelly. "Brookings mandates masks in public places, indoor businesses". Argus Leader. Retrieved 2020-09-28.
  72. ^ "Brookings mask mandate working to keep COVID-19 cases down". KELOLAND.com. 2020-12-03. Retrieved 2020-12-22.
  73. ^ "Covid-19: The mask-wearing US city that bucked the trend". BBC News. 2020-12-10. Retrieved 2020-12-22.
  74. ^ Kaczke, Lisa. "Pine Ridge Reservation on coronavirus lockdown until Wednesday". Argus Leader. Retrieved 2020-05-14.
  75. ^ Zionts, Arielle. "Rules, reality and rumors at COVID-19 reservation checkpoints". Rapid City Journal. Retrieved 2020-05-14.
  76. ^ Lakhani, Nina (2020-05-14). "South Dakota governor threatens to sue over Sioux's coronavirus roadblocks". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2020-05-14.
  77. ^ "South Dakota Sioux tribe refuses to take down checkpoints that governor says are illegal". CNN. WarnerMedia, Cable News Network, Inc.url-status=live. Retrieved 2020-05-14.
  78. ^ "South Dakota tribes defy governor and maintain checkpoints in coronavirus fight". NBC News. May 11, 2020. Retrieved 2020-06-04.
  79. ^ "South Dakota's governor will allow checkpoints on tribal roads, but not state highways in a possible compromise". CNN. WarnerMedia, Cable News Network, Inc. Retrieved 2020-05-14.
  80. ^ "Dispute over South Dakota tribal checkpoints escalates after Gov. Kristi Noem seeks federal help". NBC News. May 21, 2020. Retrieved 2020-06-04.
  81. ^ Walker, Mark; Cochrane, Emily (2020-06-24). "Tribe in South Dakota Seeks Court Ruling Over Standoff on Blocking Virus". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-06-25.
  82. ^ Matzen, Morgan (2020-08-25). "University of South Dakota has 61 active COVID-19 cases". Rapid City Journal. Retrieved 2020-09-03.
  83. ^ "South Dakota universities share COVID-19 case numbers online". KELOLAND.com. Nexstar Media Group. 2020-08-26. Retrieved 2020-09-03.
  84. ^ "COVID-19 South Dakota Case Updates". South Dakota Department of Health. Retrieved April 30, 2021.

External links[edit]