Ananthu (screenwriter)

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Ananthu
Died1998
OccupationFilm director, Screenwriter
Years active1970–1997

Ananthu was an Indian screenwriter working on Tamil language films, often collaborating with K. Balachander. He is also considered to be the mentor of actor Kamal Haasan.[1][2][3][4]

Career[edit]

Ananthu was a screenwriter and close associate of director K. Balachander. He also worked with director C. Rudraiah on his two films. In the title card, Rudhraiya had dedicated the film Aval Appadithan to Ananthu. Ananthu was sub-dialogue writer with Chitralaya Gopu for the films Anubhavam Pudhumai and Galatta Kalyanam directed by C. V. Rajendran. Ananthu acted in the film Galatta Kalyanam with Sivaji Ganesan and Jayalalitha after intermission.[5][6]

In 1991, Ananthu directed Sigaram starring S. P. Balasubrahmanyam, Anand Babu, Radha and Ramya Krishnan.[7] A critic noted "with an eye for realism and a talent for profound dialogue, Ananthu makes this a memorable entry into the annals of parallel cinema."[8]

Work with Kamal Haasan[edit]

Ananthu was considered by Kamal Haasan as a close associate and mentor.[9] Through Ananthu, Haasan was able to maintain close ties with K. Balachander.[10]

In the early 1970s, Kamal Haasan had become jaded and suicidal with the monotonous, low-key roles that he was receiving from Tamil cinema. He later credited Ananthu for reinvigorating his interest in films, after taking up his suggestion of moving to work on Malayalam films.[11] During the period, Ananthu continued to nurture Kamal Haasan's talent by evaluating his on-screen performances and by introducing him to world cinema.[12] Haasan has also credited Ananthu for teaching him screenwriting.

Ananthu continued to work closely with Haasan for a number of his films in the 1990s through various capacities. He was behind the title of Nammavar, a term also later adapted by Kamal Haasan in his political activities.[13]

Following Ananthu's death in 1998, Kamal Haasan's first Tamil directorial venture Hey Ram (2000) was dedicated to Ananthu.[14] After winning the Henri Langlois award in 2016, Kamal Haasan dedicated the award to Ananthu.[15] An official portrait of Ananthu was inaugurated in 2019 at Kamal Haasan's offices as a part of celebrations marking the actor's 60th year in the film industry.[16]

Partial filmography[edit]

Year Work Credited for Notes Ref.
Story Screenplay Dialogues Direction Acting
1968 Galatta Kalyanam Yes
1970 Kalyaana Oorvalam Yes
1978 Aval Appadithan Yes Yes
1980 Gramathu Athiyayam Yes Yes
1981 Meendum Kokila Yes
1981 Raja Paarvai Yes
1984 Pudhiavan Yes Yes
1987 Kadamai Kanniyam Kattupaadu Yes
1988 Sathya Yes
1988 En Thamizh En Makkal Yes
1989 Apoorva Sagodharargal Yes
1989 Siva Yes
1990 Unnai Solli Kutramillai Yes
1990 Michael Madana Kama Rajan Yes
1990 Raja Kaiya Vacha Yes
1990 Oru Veedu Iru Vaasal Yes [17]
1991 Sigaram Yes [18]
1991 Gunaa Yes [19]
1995 Sathi Leelavathi Yes
1996 Kalloori Vaasal Yes
1996 Kadhal Pagadai Yes TV series
1997 Aahaa Yes

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kamal, as we know him". Rediff.com. 8 November 2000. Archived from the original on 11 March 2019. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  2. ^ "'Kamal does not have money': Rajini at Chandrahasan memorial meet". Coastal Digest. 6 April 2017. Archived from the original on 22 November 2020. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  3. ^ Raman, Mohan (3 January 2015). "KB: Kollywood's Discovery Channel". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 1 May 2015. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  4. ^ Guy, Randor (2 May 2011). "The KB school". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 28 April 2015. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  5. ^ "Rudhraiya: The man whose film shook the Tamil industry". The Hindu. 19 November 2014. Archived from the original on 25 July 2020. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  6. ^ "'Aval Appadithan': Why this '70s drama was ahead of its time in telling women's stories". The News Minute. 18 November 2017. Archived from the original on 26 February 2020. Retrieved 17 August 2020.
  7. ^ "SPB's masterly voice, a tonic for all seasons". dtNext.in. 3 November 2016. Archived from the original on 23 October 2020. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  8. ^ "Sigaram". GeoCities. 19 January 2004. Archived from the original on 22 November 2020. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  9. ^ Nurullah, Abdullah (7 December 2017). "Kamal Haasan reveals names of writers who have inspired him". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 7 May 2019. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  10. ^ Gupta, Priya (22 June 2015). "I was possessive about K Balachander: Kamal Haasan". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 20 October 2016. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  11. ^ "When Kamal Haasan Skyped AR Rahman In Thalaivanirukkindraan". Film Companion. 13 June 2020. Archived from the original on 24 August 2020. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  12. ^ "Kamal Haasan's heart-to-heart with AISFM students!". AISFM Blog. 22 December 2015. Archived from the original on 29 January 2020. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  13. ^ Shoba, V (2 August 2018). "Kamal Haasan: A Star in Search of a Bigger Sky". Open. Archived from the original on 22 November 2020. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  14. ^ Rangan, Baradwaj (17 October 2014). "Master of Arts". Baradwaj Rangan. Retrieved 22 November 2020.
  15. ^ "Henri Langlois award for Kamal Haasan". Sify. 31 March 2016. Archived from the original on 12 May 2016. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  16. ^ "Kamal Haasan and Rajinikanth join hands to unveil their mentor K Balachander's statue". The Hindu. 8 November 2019. Archived from the original on 31 August 2020. Retrieved 16 August 2020.
  17. ^ "Oru Veedu Iru Vaasal". The Indian Express. 7 September 1990. p. 7.
  18. ^ Krishnaswamy, N. (25 January 1991). "Sigaram". The Indian Express. p. 5.
  19. ^ Rajendar, Gopinath (14 June 2018). "Santhana Bharathi talks about going in circles for 'Guna'". The New Indian Express. Archived from the original on 14 January 2019. Retrieved 22 November 2020.

External links[edit]