King Charles' life will change, Winston Churchill's grandson says

King Charles' life will change, Winston Churchill's grandson says

Getty Images Prince Charles and Sir Nicholas Soames at ChartwellGetty Images
Prince Charles and Sir Nicholas Soames visited Chartwell in Kent, the home of Sir Winston Churchill, in June 2017

The grandson of Sir Winston Churchill, Sir Nicholas Soames, has said King Charles' life will change.

Sir Nicholas, a former Mid Sussex MP, also said it did not matter if his friend of 65 years had expressed his views on issues in the past.

He said he will observe "constitutional principles" in his new role.

Winston Churchill, who lived in Chartwell in Kent, greeted Queen Elizabeth after she returned from Kenya following the death of her father.

Getty Images Prince Charles, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and Sir Nicholas Soames watch the sheep race at The Prince's Countryside Fund Raceday at Ascot in March, 2015Getty Images
Prince Charles, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall and Sir Nicholas Soames watch the sheep race at The Prince's Countryside Fund Raceday at Ascot in March, 2015

Sir Nicholas told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "As the King said last night, as he embarks on his new responsibilities, clearly his life will change, and his views and the way that he conducts himself will observe, of course, the constitutional principles.

"He made absolutely plain that he intends to uphold the constitutional principles at the heart of the nation that he understands very well," he said.

"The Prince of Wales has served a long apprenticeship at the feet of an absolute master and he knows very well what the constitutional obligations are."

He added King Charles' opinions on the environment and climate change are not "in the least bit contentious".

He said: "Each sovereign is their own person, and he will be his own person.

Getty Images Queen Elizabeth, Sir Winton Churchill with Prince Charles and Princess AnneGetty Images
Queen Elizabeth and Sir Winton Churchill with Prince Charles and Princess Anne in November 1954

Sir Nicholas said King Charles had recently been through "a very unhappy time", losing both his parents.

He added: "His address was deeply moving and very touching. It was a wonderful speech.

"He's a very authentic and straight-forward person. What you see is what you get."

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