List of Canadian provinces and territories by area - WikiMili, The Free Encyclopedia

List of Canadian provinces and territories by area

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As a country, Canada has ten provinces and three territories. These subdivisions vary widely in both land and water area. The largest subdivision by land area is the territory of Nunavut. The largest subdivision by water area is the province of Quebec. The smallest subdivision of both land and water area is the province of Prince Edward Island. [1]

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Its southern border with the United States, stretching some 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest bi-national land border. Canada's capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver.

Provinces and territories of Canada Top-level subdivisions of Canada

The provinces and territories of Canada are sub-national governments within the geographical areas of Canada under the authority of the Canadian Constitution. In the 1867 Canadian Confederation, three provinces of British North America—New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and the Province of Canada —were united to form a federated colony, becoming a sovereign nation in the next century. Over its history, Canada's international borders have changed several times, and the country has grown from the original four provinces to the current ten provinces and three territories. Together, the provinces and territories make up the world's second-largest country by area.

Nunavut Territory of Canada

Nunavut is the newest, largest, and most northerly territory of Canada. It was separated officially from the Northwest Territories on April 1, 1999, via the Nunavut Act and the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement Act, though the boundaries had been drawn in 1993. The creation of Nunavut resulted in the first major change to Canada's political map since incorporating the province of Newfoundland in 1949.

Contents

Pie chart of percentages of area. In order of portion size: Nunavut: 21.0; Quebec: 15.4; Northwest Territories: 13.5; Ontario: 10.8; British Columbia: 9.5; Alberta: 6.6; Saskatchewan: 6.5; Manitoba: 6.5; Yukon: 4.8; Newfoundland and Labrador: 4.1; New Brunswick: 0.7; Nova Scotia: 0.6; Prince Edward Island: 0.1 Area of Provinces and Territories of Canada Pie Chart.svg
Pie chart of percentages of area. In order of portion size: Nunavut: 21.0; Quebec: 15.4; Northwest Territories: 13.5; Ontario: 10.8; British Columbia: 9.5; Alberta: 6.6; Saskatchewan: 6.5; Manitoba: 6.5; Yukon: 4.8; Newfoundland and Labrador: 4.1; New Brunswick: 0.7; Nova Scotia: 0.6; Prince Edward Island: 0.1

Canada is the second-largest country in the world; it has the fourth-largest dry land area, and the largest freshwater area. [2]

Geography of Canada geographic features of Canada

The geography of Canada describes the geographic features of Canada, that occupies much of the continent of North America, sharing land borders with the contiguous United States to the south, and the U.S. state of Alaska to the northwest. Canada stretches from the Atlantic Ocean in the east to the Pacific Ocean in the west; to the north lies the Arctic Ocean. Greenland is to the northeast and to the southeast Canada shares a maritime boundary with the Republic of France's overseas collectivity of Saint Pierre and Miquelon, the last vestige of New France. By total area, Canada is the second-largest country in the world, after Russia. By land area alone, however, Canada ranks fourth, the difference being due to it having the world's largest proportion of fresh water lakes. Of Canada's thirteen provinces and territories, only two are landlocked while the other eleven all directly border one of three oceans.

Listings

Total area

The total area of a province or territory is the sum of its land area and the area of its internal water (freshwater only).

Areas are rounded to the nearest square kilometre or square mile. Percentages are given to the nearest tenth of a percent.

RankNameTotal area (km2) [1] Total area (mi2) [1] Percentage of
national total area [1]
1Flag of Nunavut.svg  Nunavut 2,093,190808,18521.0%
2Flag of Quebec.svg  Quebec 1,542,056595,39115.4%
3Flag of the Northwest Territories.svg  Northwest Territories 1,346,106519,73413.5%
4Flag of Ontario.svg  Ontario 1,076,395415,59810.8%
5Flag of British Columbia.svg  British Columbia 944,735364,7649.5%
6Flag of Alberta.svg  Alberta 661,848255,5416.6%
7Flag of Saskatchewan.svg  Saskatchewan 651,036251,3666.5%
8Flag of Manitoba.svg  Manitoba 647,797250,1166.5%
9Flag of Yukon.svg  Yukon 482,443186,2724.8%
10Flag of Newfoundland and Labrador.svg  Newfoundland and Labrador 405,212156,4534.1%
11Flag of New Brunswick.svg  New Brunswick 72,90828,1500.7%
12Flag of Nova Scotia.svg  Nova Scotia 55,28421,3450.6%
13Flag of Prince Edward Island.svg  Prince Edward Island 5,6602,1850.1%
TotalFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 9,984,6703,855,103100.0%

Land area

Land areas consist of dry land, excluding areas of freshwater, and salt water.

Areas are rounded to the nearest whole unit. Percentages are given to the nearest tenth of a percent.

RankName and flagLand area (km2) [1] Land area (mi2) [1] Percentage of
national land area
1Flag of Nunavut.svg  Nunavut 1,936,113747,53721.3%
2Flag of Quebec.svg  Quebec 1,365,128527,07915.0%
3Flag of the Northwest Territories.svg  Northwest Territories 1,183,085456,79213.0%
4Flag of British Columbia.svg  British Columbia 925,186357,21610.4%
5Flag of Ontario.svg  Ontario 917,741354,34210.1%
6Flag of Alberta.svg  Alberta 642,317248,0007.1%
7Flag of Saskatchewan.svg  Saskatchewan 591,670228,4456.5%
8Flag of Manitoba.svg  Manitoba 553,556213,7296.1%
9Flag of Yukon.svg  Yukon 474,391183,1635.2%
10Flag of Newfoundland and Labrador.svg  Newfoundland and Labrador 373,872144,3534.1%
11Flag of New Brunswick.svg  New Brunswick 71,45027,5870.8%
12Flag of Nova Scotia.svg  Nova Scotia 53,33820,5940.6%
13Flag of Prince Edward Island.svg  Prince Edward Island 5,6602,1850.1%
TotalFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 9,093,5073,511,023100.0%

Internal water area (fresh-water only)

The internal water area data below, includes freshwater (i.e., lakes, rivers, reservoirs, and canals). It excludes internal salt water and territorial waters claimed by Canada in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic Oceans. Canada considers its internal water area to include 1,600,000 km2 of salt water in Hudson Bay and the ocean within and around Canada's Arctic Archipelago. Canada's territorial sea is 200,000 km2. [3] [4] [5]

Reservoir A storage space for fluids

A reservoir is, most commonly, an enlarged natural or artificial lake, pond or impoundment created using a dam or lock to store water.

Canal Man-made channel for water

Canals are waterways channels, or artificial waterways, for water conveyance, or to service water transport vehicles. They may also help with irrigation. It can be thought of as an artificial version of a river.

Territorial waters Coastal waters that are part of a nation-states sovereign territory

The term territorial waters is sometimes used informally to refer to any area of water over which a state has jurisdiction, including internal waters, the territorial sea, the contiguous zone, the exclusive economic zone and potentially the continental shelf. In a narrower sense, the term is used as a synonym for the territorial sea.

Areas are given to the nearest whole unit. Percentages are given to the nearest tenth of a percent.

RankName and flagWater area (km2) [1] Water area (mi2) [1] Water area as
percentage of
total area
Percentage of
national
freshwater area
1Flag of Quebec.svg  Quebec 176,92868,31211.5%19.9%
2Flag of the Northwest Territories.svg  Northwest Territories 163,02162,94312.1%18.3%
3Flag of Ontario.svg  Ontario 158,65461,25714.7%17.8%
4Flag of Nunavut.svg  Nunavut 157,07760,6487.5%17.6%
5Flag of Manitoba.svg  Manitoba 94,24136,38714.5%10.6%
6Flag of Saskatchewan.svg  Saskatchewan 59,36622,9219.1%6.7%
7Flag of Newfoundland and Labrador.svg  Newfoundland and Labrador 31,34012,1007.7%3.5%
8Flag of British Columbia.svg  British Columbia 19,5497,5482.1%2.2%
9Flag of Alberta.svg  Alberta 19,5317,5413.0%2.2%
10Flag of Yukon.svg  Yukon 8,0523,1091.7%0.9%
11Flag of Nova Scotia.svg  Nova Scotia 1,9467513.5%0.2%
12Flag of New Brunswick.svg  New Brunswick 1,4585632.0%0.2%
13Flag of Prince Edward Island.svg  Prince Edward Island 000.0%0.0%
TotalFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 891,163344,0808.9%100.0%

See also

This article is about the demographic features of the population of Canada, including population density, ethnicity, religious affiliations and other aspects of the population among the People of Canada.

Related Research Articles

Northwest Territories Territory of Canada

The Northwest Territories is a federal territory of Canada. At a land area of approximately 1,144,000 km2 (442,000 sq mi) and a 2016 census population of 41,786, it is the second-largest and the most populous of the three territories in Northern Canada. Its estimated population as of 2019 is 44,826. Yellowknife became the territorial capital in 1967, following recommendations by the Carrothers Commission.

Yukon Territory of Canada

Yukon is the smallest and westernmost of Canada's three territories. It has the smallest population of any province or territory in Canada, with 35,874 people, although it has the largest city in any of the three territories. Whitehorse is the territorial capital and Yukon's only city.

Northern Canada Region in Canada

Northern Canada, colloquially the North, is the vast northernmost region of Canada variously defined by geography and politics. Politically, the term refers to three territories of Canada: Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. Similarly, the Far North may refer to the Canadian Arctic: the portion of Canada that lies north of the Arctic Circle, east of Alaska and west of Greenland. This area covers about 39% of Canada's total land area, but has less than 1% of Canada's population.

Endorheic basin Closed drainage basin that allows no outflow

An endorheic basin is a limited drainage basin that normally retains water and allows no outflow to other external bodies of water, such as rivers or oceans, but converges instead into lakes or swamps, permanent or seasonal, that equilibrate through evaporation. Such a basin may also be referred to as a closed or terminal basin or as an internal drainage system or interior drainage basin.

Geography of Quebec

Quebec, Canada's largest province, occupies a vast territory, most of which is very sparsely populated. With an area of 1,542,056 square kilometres, it is the second largest of Canada's provinces and territories and the tenth largest country subdivision in the world. More than 90 percent of Quebec's area lies within the Canadian Shield, and includes the greater part of the Labrador Peninsula. Quebec's highest mountain is Mont D'Iberville, which is located on the border with Newfoundland and Labrador in the northeastern part of the province in the Torngat Mountains. The addition of parts of the vast and scarcely populated District of Ungava of the Northwest Territories between 1898 and 1912 gave the province its current form.

Nunavut (electoral district) federal electoral district of Canada

Nunavut is a federal electoral district in Nunavut, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 1979. Before 1997, it was known as Nunatsiaq, and was one of two electoral districts in Northwest Territories.

Ontario, one of the 13 provinces and territories of Canada, is located in east-central Canada. It is Canada's most populous province by a large margin, accounting for nearly 40 percent of all Canadians, and is the second-largest province in total area. Ontario is fourth-largest in total area when the territories of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are included. It is home to the nation's capital city, Ottawa, and the nation's most populous city, Toronto.

Geography of Ontario

Ontario is located in East/Central Canada. It is Canada's second largest province in total land area. Its physical features vary greatly from the Mixedwood Plains in the southeast to the boreal forests and tundra in the north. Ontario borders Manitoba to the west, Hudson Bay and James Bay to the north, Quebec to the east, and the Great Lakes and the United States to the south. The province is named for Great Lake Ontario, an adaptation of the Iroquois word Onitariio, meaning "beautiful lake", or Kanadario, variously translated as "beautiful water". There are approximately 250,000 lakes and over 100,000 kilometres (62,000 mi) of rivers in the province.

Geography of Saskatchewan Geography of the prairie and boreal province of Saskatchewan, Canada

The geography of Saskatchewan (suskăchuwun"), is unique among the provinces and territories of Canada in some respects. It is one of only two landlocked regions and it is the only region whose borders are not based on natural features like lakes, rivers or drainage divides. The borders of Saskatchewan, which make it very nearly a trapezoid, were determined in 1905 when it became a Canadian province. Saskatchewan has a total area of 651,036 square kilometres (251,366 sq mi) of which 591,670 km2 (228,450 sq mi) is land and 59,366 km2 (22,921 sq mi) is water.

Nova Scotia is a Canadian province located on Canada's southeastern coast. It is the most populous province in the Atlantic Canada, and its capital, Halifax, is a major economic centre of the region. Nova Scotia is the second smallest province in Canada, with an area of 55,284 km². As of 2016, it has a population of 923,598 making it the second most densely populated province of the country.

Territorial claims in the Arctic

The Arctic consists of land, internal waters, territorial seas, exclusive economic zones (EEZs) and high seas above the Arctic Circle. All land, internal waters, territorial seas and EEZs in the Arctic are under the jurisdiction of one of the eight Arctic coastal states: Canada, Norway, Russia, Denmark, Iceland, Sweden, Finland and the United States. International law regulates this area as with other portions of the Earth.

Water supply and sanitation in Canada

Water supply and sanitation in Canada is nearly universal and generally of good quality. An important caveat being that a lack clean drinking water in many First Nations communities is a distinct problem. Water use in Canada is high compared to Europe, since water tariffs are low and 44% of users are not metered.

Land ownership in Canada is held by governments, Indigenous groups, corporations, and individuals. Canada is the second-largest country in the world by area; at 9,093,507 km² or 3,511,085 mi² of land it occupies more than 6% of the Earth's surface. Since Canada uses primarily English-derived common law, the holders of the land actually have land tenure rather than absolute ownership.

Western Canada geographical region of Canada

Western Canada, also referred to as the Western provinces and more commonly known as the West, is a region of Canada that includes the four provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan. British Columbia is culturally, economically, geographically, and politically distinct from the other parts of Western Canada and is often referred to as the "west coast" or "Pacific Canada", while Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba are grouped together as the Prairie Provinces and most commonly known as "The Prairies".

The demographics of Winnipeg reveal the city to be a typically Canadian one: multicultural and multilingual. Winnipeg is also prominent in the size and ratio of its First Nations population, which plays an important part in the city's makeup. About 11% of Winnipeggers are of First Nations descent, which vastly exceeds the national average of 4.3%.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "Land and freshwater area, by province and territory". Statistics Canada. 2005-02-01. Archived from the original on 2011-05-24. Retrieved 2009-11-30.
  2. Field Listing:: Area. CIA World Factbook. Central Intelligence Agency . Retrieved 2009-11-30.
  3. "The Arctic: Canada's Legal Claims". www.lop.parl.gc.ca. Retrieved 2016-03-04.
  4. Canada, Government of Canada, Statistics. "Land and freshwater area, by province and territory". www.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 2016-03-04.
  5. Branch, Government of Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Communications. "Oceans". www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca. Retrieved 2016-03-04.

Further reading

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.