Talk:Hormel

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request edit September 23, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if the image currently on the page labeled Strike at Hormel Packing Plant, Austin, 1933 is appropriate for fair-use and free usage on Wikipedia. Thank you. Hello-Mary-H (talk) 21:46, 23 September 2019 (UTC)

Reply 23-SEP-2019[edit]

Crossing arrows in rounded blue square.svg  Please use WP:FFD  

  • Questions over fair-use legitimacy may be posed at files for discussion, where informed editors over there may assist you better than I can in that subject. Regards,  Spintendo  05:07, 24 September 2019 (UTC)

request edit September 23, #2[edit]

Hello, in the 2010–present Corporate Responsibility paragraph, I would like to suggest updated text and new independent sources. Thank you.

Suggested new info: Delete: In 2016, 2017 and 2018, the company was named to the Human Rights Campaign's Best Places to Work for LGBT equality.[51]

Add: Since 2016, the company was named to the Human Rights Campaign's Best Places to Work for LGBT equality for each consecutive year.

https://www.chowhound.com/food-news/230616/2019-best-and-worst-companies-for-lgbt-rights-and-protections/

https://www.hrc.org/resources/best-places-to-work-2017

https://www.hrc.org/resources/best-places-to-work-2018

https://assets2.hrc.org/files/assets/resources/CEI-2019-FullReport.pdf?_ga=2.180780775.1198793162.1569275368-1767889406.1569275368

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 22:00, 23 September 2019 (UTC)

Reply 23-SEP-2019[edit]

Breezeicons-emblems-16-emblem-checked.svg  Edit request implemented    Spintendo  05:07, 24 September 2019 (UTC)

Request edit Sept 24, 2019, #1[edit]

Hello, for the infobox I would like to suggest some possible changes, based on the statement that “As of July 28, 2019, the Company had approximately 18,700 employees worldwide” from a 10-K annual report SEC filing by Hormel. Thank you.

Suggested new link: Delete: Number of employees 20,000 (2018)[3]

Add: Employees 18,700

http://www.snl.com/Cache/c399450492.html

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 19:17, 24 September 2019 (UTC)

Reply 24-SEP-2019[edit]

Breezeicons-emblems-16-emblem-checked.svg  Edit request implemented    Spintendo  20:41, 24 September 2019 (UTC)

request edit Sept 24 #2[edit]

Hello, I would like to suggest some possible changes. Can we please delete:

The line was developed in concert with three parties, as "Hormel brought food formulation, packaging and shelf stability knowledge, (chef de cuisine) Ron DeSantis brought taste and texture expertise, and the Cancer Nutrition Consortium offered the nutritional framework."[45]

Add suggested text: The line was developed in concert with three parties, as "Hormel brought food formulation, packaging and shelf stability knowledge, (chef de cuisine) Ron DeSantis brought taste and texture expertise, and the Cancer Nutrition Consortium offered the nutritional framework"[45] with input from nutritionists Dr. Stacey Bell and Kathy McManus.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/health-wellness/2013/12/02/new-nutrition-group-offers-dietary-help-cancer-patients/dyTOo8ICzthcIgOYmUrwLL/story.html

https://www.cancernutrition.org/board/dr-stacey-bell/

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 21:32, 24 September 2019 (UTC)

The problem with this claim is that while the Weintraub Boston Globe source does mention Bell and MaManus as being part of the Cancer Nutrition Consortium (CNC)'s board, that same source does not say that those two members of the board are the ones who provided input on CNC's nutritional framework delivered to Hormel for the development of the Hormel products. The Chicago Tribune source currently used in the article likewise doesn't state their involvement. Dr. Bell's info page at CNC does not mention her work with Hormel. To suppose that these two individuals had involvement merely because they were members of CNC's board would constitute WP:SYNTH. What we need is a company provided source which clearly states that they provided a "nutritional framework" for these products. Regards,  Spintendo  23:18, 24 September 2019 (UTC)
Thank you Spintendo. I wonder, does this https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/results-of-first-of-its-kind-cancer-nutrition-research-project-to-be-released-232506631.html press release cover the nutritional framework? Perhaps the "nutritional framework" would need to be stated differently. Hello-Mary-H (talk) 21:35, 25 September 2019 (UTC)

request edit Sept 25, #1[edit]

Is it possible to add a red link for Cancer Nutrition Consortium for a new article to be created since it is notable and verifiable? Thank you.

References[edit]

https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/mayo-clinic-radio-cancer-nutrition-consortium/

https://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/health-wellness/2013/12/02/new-nutrition-group-offers-dietary-help-cancer-patients/dyTOo8ICzthcIgOYmUrwLL/story.html

http://www.zimbio.com/pictures/sSrhtFb3M0h/Cancer+Nutrition+Consortium+Celebrates+Launch

https://www.fooddive.com/news/hormel-takes-cue-from-nestle-with-new-medical-foods-line/418505/

https://www.cancernutrition.org/research/

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 22:17, 25 September 2019 (UTC)

HI Mary, I can add a redlink, but I'm not sure that CNC would meet WP:ORGCRITE based on the material supplied here. More material meeting those requirements would have to be found for the article to be created. Regards,  Spintendo  04:53, 26 September 2019 (UTC)

Oct 30 request edit #1[edit]

Hello, I would like to suggest some possible changes. Note I have included new company sources that hopefully show nutritional expertise.

Edit request

Can we please delete:

The line was developed in concert with three parties, as "Hormel brought food formulation, packaging and shelf stability knowledge, (chef de cuisine) Ron DeSantis brought taste and texture expertise, and the Cancer Nutrition Consortium offered the nutritional framework."[45]

Add suggested text: The line was developed in concert with three parties, as "Hormel brought food formulation, packaging and shelf stability knowledge, (chef de cuisine) Ron DeSantis brought taste and texture expertise, and the Cancer Nutrition Consortium offered the nutritional framework"[45] with input from nutritionists Dr. Stacey Bell and Kathy McManus.

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/results-of-first-of-its-kind-cancer-nutrition-research-project-to-be-released-232506631.html

https://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/health-wellness/2013/12/02/new-nutrition-group-offers-dietary-help-cancer-patients/dyTOo8ICzthcIgOYmUrwLL/story.html

https://www.cancernutrition.org/board/dr-stacey-bell/

https://www.cancernutrition.org/board/katherine-mcmanus-m-s-r-d-l-d-n/ Hello-Mary-H (talk) 23:10, 30 October 2019 (UTC)

Edit request Oct 30 #2

Hormel page Oct 30 #2


Hello, I would like to suggest some possible changes. Can we please add:

In June 2019, the company announced the product launch of a vegan pizza topping for foodservice customers and in September 2019, launched a vegan, soy-based, non-GMO ground meat substitute called Happy Little Plants for foodservice and retail customers.

https://www.happylittleplants.com/

https://www.convenience.org/Media/Daily/2019/Sept/6/4-Kellogg-Hormel-Start-Plant-Product_Marketing

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/10/hormel-ceo-plant-based-meat-line-went-to-market-in-just-two-months.html

https://www.livekindly.co/hormel-vegan-meat-happy-little-plants/

https://www.foodbusinessnews.net/articles/14443-hormel-enters-meat-alternative-market-with-happy-little-plants

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 23:49, 30 October 2019 (UTC)

Edit request Oct 30 #3

Hello, I would like to suggest some possible changes. Can we please add:

In April 2019, together with Harvard University Dining Services, the company hosted the first ever Small Change Big Impact Food Summit at Harvard University, where ideas were offered to improve the future of food.


https://www.bostonglobe.com/lifestyle/food-dining/2019/04/08/tackling-tough-topics-small-change-big-impact-food-summit-harvard/BKOSKGwyhdOmqCaHPpDNmM/story.html

https://www.triplepundit.com/story/2019/7-insider-predictions-about-future-food/83156/

https://foodforfree.org/what-were-up-to-summer-2019-edition/

https://www.theshelbyreport.com/2019/04/04/hormel-hosts-food-summit/

http://thefoodimpactsummit.com/summit-2019/

https://www.forbes.com/sites/arielknoebel/2019/04/15/hormel-harvard-team-up-to-change-minds-about-big-food/#6aea0812607c

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 00:03, 31 October 2019 (UTC)

Reply 30-OCT-2019[edit]

Breezeicons-emblems-16-emblem-checked.svg  Edit request partially implemented  

  1. Red XN Regarding the Cancer Nutrition Consortium information, I'll reiterate my original objections to adding these two names to the article. The Weintraub Boston Globe source does mention Bell and MaManus as being part of the Cancer Nutrition Consortium (CNC)'s board, but that same source does not state that those two members of the board are the ones who provided input on CNC's nutritional framework delivered to Hormel for the development of the Hormel products. The Chicago Tribune source currently used in the article likewise doesn't state their involvement. Dr. Bell's info page at CNC does not mention her work with Hormel. The Cision source mentions Kathy McManus, but does not state her involvement in the development of these products. To suppose that these two individuals had involvement merely because they were members of CNC's board would constitute WP:SYNTH. What we need is a company provided source which clearly states that they provided a "nutritional framework" for these products.
  2. Red XN The second request is not referenced by reliable, independent secondary sources.
  3. Green tickY The third request was added to the article, as it was referenced by the Boston Globe.

Regards,  Spintendo  00:57, 31 October 2019 (UTC)

Edit request Oct 31 #1[edit]

Hello, I would like to suggest some possible changes. Can we please add:

In June 2019, the company announced the product launch of a vegan pizza topping for foodservice customers and in September 2019, launched a vegan, soy-based, non-GMO ground meat substitute called Happy Little Plants for foodservice and retail customers. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9]

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 16:26, 31 October 2019 (UTC)

References

Daily Mail and other sources are not considered reliable for use on Wikipedia. Please also avoid citing trade publications and articles based on company press releases. ~Anachronist (talk) 18:30, 31 October 2019 (UTC)

I agree with Anachronist. The only two independent reliable sources are CBS News and CNBC, but in this case they would both be considered as company-related, as the CBS News source is based on a Hormel press release while CNBC is an interview with the CEO. The article's percentage of sources originating from Hormel (calculated under the To-do list shown at the top of this talk page) currently hovers at just under 40% (with the number of ref tags linked to Hormel at 42%). Using these two sources would not improve those figures. Regards,  Spintendo  01:44, 1 November 2019 (UTC)
That said, I do think that it's worthwhile to mention (briefly) Hormel's foray into vegan food products, but only if this are given coverage that is clearly independent. ~Anachronist (talk) 17:40, 1 November 2019 (UTC)
Thank you Anachronist and Spintendo, I will reformat the request to see if two new sources work for this. Hello-Mary-H (talk) 20:16, 5 November 2019 (UTC)

Edit request Nov 5 #1[edit]

Hello, I would like to suggest some possible changes. Can we please add:

In September 2019, the company launched a vegan, soy-based, non-GMO ground meat substitute called Happy Little Plants for foodservice and retail customers.[1][2]

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 20:49, 5 November 2019 (UTC)

References

References

  1. ^ Yaffe-Bellany, David (14 October 2019). "The New Makers of Plant-Based Meat? Big Meat Companies". New York Times. Retrieved 5 November 2019. Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods, scrappy start-ups that share a penchant for superlatives and a commitment to protecting the environment, have dominated the relatively new market for vegetarian food that looks and tastes like meat. But with plant-based burgers, sausages and chicken increasingly popular and available in fast-food restaurants and grocery stores across the United States, a new group of companies has started making meatless meat: the food conglomerates and meat producers that Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods originally set out to disrupt. In recent months, major food companies like Tyson, Smithfield, Perdue, Hormel and Nestlé have rolled out their own meat alternatives, filling supermarket shelves with plant-based burgers, meatballs and chicken nuggets.
  2. ^ Greenfield, Beth (30 October 2019). "Burger wars heat up as plant-based meat faces backlash". Yahoo. Retrieved 5 November 2019. Anyone who food shops or eats out, even occasionally, has likely noticed the influx of plant-based meat alternatives on the market — from Burger King’s Impossible Whopper and Dunkin’ Donuts’ Beyond Sausage Sandwich to the vast array of vegan meat imitators, with products by Gardein, Tofurkey, Field Roast and more filling supermarket aisles across the country….And several actual meat companies — Tyson, Hormel, Smithfield and Perdue — have now rolled out their own plant-based alternatives.

Reply 5-NOV-2019[edit]

Breezeicons-emblems-16-emblem-checked.svg  Edit request partially implemented  

  • The claim from the New York Times may be used, but only saying that Hormel introduced a vegetarian meat alternative product, as that is what the only line mentioning Hormel says. The claims that it is GMO-free and soy based are not found within the NYTimes piece. Yahoo is not an acceptable reference.

Regards,  Spintendo  03:00, 6 November 2019 (UTC)

request edit November 26, #1[edit]

Hello, looking to update article. Thank you. Suggested new info: Add: Hormel acquired the nut butter producer Justin's for reportedly $286M on May 18, 2016.[1]

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 18:08, 26 November 2019 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ "Hormel Foods acquires Justins". Retrieved November 26, 2019. Overview: Acquired Organization: Justin’s. Justin’s produces the most delicious nut butters, nut butter snacks and organic peanut butter cups. Acquiring Organization: Hormel Foods. Hormel Foods is a Fortune 500, multinational manufacturer and marketer of consumer-branded food and meat products. Announced Date: May 18, 2016. Acquisition Type: Acquisition. Price $286M. Acquisition Status: Complete.

Hi Mary, the reference that you're proposing to use here is Crunchbase, but the use of that site as a source in articles is deprecated, owing to this RfC held in February of this year. Do you have any other sources that may be used? Please advise. Thank you! Regards,  Spintendo  19:11, 26 November 2019 (UTC)

request edit November 26, #2[edit]

Hello, looking to update article. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Add: Hormel acquired the nut butter producer Justin’s for 280M on May 26, 2016.[1][2]

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 21:08, 26 November 2019 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ "ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K". SEC (U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission). Retrieved November 26, 2019. On May 26, 2016, the Company acquired Justin’s, LLC (Justin’s) of Boulder, Colorado, for a purchase price of $280.9 million. The transaction provides a cash flow benefit resulting from the amortization of the tax basis of assets, the net present value of which is approximately $70.0 million. The purchase price was funded by the Company with cash on hand and by utilizing short-term financing. This acquisition allowed the Company to enhance its presence in the specialty natural and organic nut butter category.
  2. ^ "Hormel, maker of Skippy, acquires Boulder nut-butter maker Justin's". MediaNews Group Inc. Retrieved November 26, 2019. Hormel Foods Corp., the Austin, Minn.-based maker of Skippy and Spam, has acquired Boulder-based nut butter company Justin’s…. Justin’s will continue operating in Boulder as a subsidiary of Hormel, said Justin Gold, the namesake and founder of the maker of nut butter spreads and squeeze packs, and chocolate peanut butter cups.
 Done Regards,  Spintendo  00:52, 27 November 2019 (UTC)

request edit December 13, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can update the info box in the article. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Delete: Net sales US$ 9.55 billion (2018)

Add: Net sales US$ 9.50 billion (2019)[1]

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 01:20, 14 December 2019 (UTC)

Hello, wondering if we can update the info box in the article. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Delete: Operating income US$ 459 million (2018)[2]

Add: Operating income US$ 673 million (2019)[2] Hello-Mary-H (talk) 01:26, 14 December 2019 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ "Hormel Foods Reports Record Fourth Quarter And Fiscal 2019 Earnings; Provides Fiscal 2020 Outlook". Hormel Foods. Retrieved December 13, 2019. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY – FISCAL 2019, Volume of 4.74 billion lbs., down 1%; organic volume1 flat, Net sales of $9.50 billion, down 1%; organic net sales1 up 1%, Operating income of $1.20 billion, up 1%.
  2. ^ "Hormel Foods Reports Record Fourth Quarter And Fiscal 2019 Earnings; Provides Fiscal 2020 Outlook". Hormel Foods. Retrieved December 13, 2019. Cash on hand increased to $673 million from $459 million at the beginning of the year.

Reply 14-DEC-2019[edit]

Emojione1 2705.svg  Edit request partially implemented  

  • Green tickY The operating income parameter was updated.
  • Red XN The net sales could not be updated, because no such parameter exists within the {{infobox company}} template. Please note that this template features only 6 financial indicator parameters and their related year parameters:
  1. |revenue=
  2. |operating_income=
  3. |net_income=
  4. |aum=
  5. |assets=
  6. |equity=
  • Usually, net sales are indicated through the |revenue= parameter. However, in this case the old figure to be deleted was described as 9.55 billion, while the revenue parameter is not currently used in the article. Please advise.

Regards,  Spintendo  08:14, 14 December 2019 (UTC)

@Spintendo: It looks like the operating income for 2019 is actually listed as "$1.20 billion, up 1%." --Hello-Mary-H (talk) 22:12, 14 December 2019 (UTC)
I've omitted the figure until an accurate one can be found and proposed here on the talk page. The figures listed in the source require the previous years figures in order to extrapolate a definite number, because they apparently only show increase or decrease amounts from the previous year, which we don't have. Even though combining the two sources to extrapolate a figure would be allowed under WP:CALC, it would be easier if we just had the updated figures in one source. Thank you!
Regards,  Spintendo  02:32, 15 December 2019 (UTC)
@Spintendo: could it work to say 9.5 billion dollars for sales, as reported https://csr.hormelfoods.com/about-hormel-foods/ and "Sales for 2019 were $9.5 billion dollars, down 1%" on https://www.fool.com/earnings/call-transcripts/2019/11/26/hormel-foods-corp-hrl-q4-2019-earnings-call-transc.aspx ? Thank you. Hello-Mary-H (talk) 21:27, 26 December 2019 (UTC)
There is still the question of where this information is to be placed, as there is no "sales" parameter in the infobox. Regards,  Spintendo  01:21, 27 December 2019 (UTC)
@Spintendo:I would suggest revenue since revenue refers to the money a company earns in the normal course of business. ... In accounting, "sales" means the same thing as revenue – and "sales" makes the concept even clearer. Would that possibly work? Hello-Mary-H (talk) 19:57, 27 December 2019 (UTC)
 Done Regards,  Spintendo  20:15, 27 December 2019 (UTC)
@Spintendo: last thing, for revenue, can we possibly have it say 2019 since the source is from this year? Thank you. Hello-Mary-H (talk) 18:45, 28 December 2019 (UTC)
The source says 2018. Regards,  Spintendo  19:04, 28 December 2019 (UTC)
@Spintendo: can we possibly add back in operating income and net income? Operating income is $1.20 billion per this financial filing press release https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/hormel-foods-reports-fourth-quarter-and-fiscal-2019-earnings-provides-fiscal-2020-outlook-300965055.html and net income is 979M per https://www.marketwatch.com/investing/stock/hrl/financials Please advise and thank youHello-Mary-H (talk) 01:47, 2 February 2020 (UTC)

request edit December 26, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can update the article. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Delete: Number of employees 18,700 (2019)[4]

Add: Number of employees 20,000 (2019)[1] — Preceding unsigned comment added by Hello-Mary-H (talkcontribs) 20:24, 26 December 2019 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ "Where are they now". Enterprise Pub. Retrieved December 26, 2019. She took a job at Hormel Foods Corporation right out of college. Hormel Foods has about 20,000 employees worldwide. The company’s headquarters is in Austin, Minn.
This is an odd source to use for that figure. Even though it's a news publication, the story is not about Hormel's employees — but rather — one employee. Aren't there company related sources we can use? If you're wary of adding another company source to an article that is already top heavy with them, it wouldn't make a difference because that source would replace the one being used now. Please advise. Also remember to sign all talk page posts using four tildes. Thank you! Regards,  Spintendo  20:39, 26 December 2019 (UTC)
@Spintendo: Thank you for the reminder, I am not sure what happened with my signature on the last one. Do either of these sources possibly work instead? https://krocnews.com/hormel-employees-share-in-the-profits/ https://www.hormelfoods.com/ask-and-answer/how-many-people-work-for-hormel-foods/ Thanks again. Hello-Mary-H (talk) 20:42, 26 December 2019 (UTC)
Hello-Mary-H (talk) 20:24, 26 December 2019 (UTC)
 Done  Spintendo  21:13, 26 December 2019 (UTC)

request edit December 28, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can update the article. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Delete: Total assets US$ 8.142 billion (2018)

Add: Total assets US$ 8.10 billion (2019)[1]

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 19:14, 28 December 2019 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ "UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Washington, D.C. 20549 FORM 10-K" (PDF). NASDAQ. Retrieved December 28, 2019. Financial position total assets 8,109,004

 Done  Spintendo  19:25, 28 December 2019 (UTC)

request edit December 28, #3[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can update the article. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Delete: Net income US$ 4.661 billion (2018)[3]

Add: US$ 9.49 billion (2019) [1] — Preceding unsigned comment added by Hello-Mary-H (talkcontribs) 21:23, 28 December 2019 (UTC)

References

Earlier you had stated that Net Sales was to be placed under the |revenue= parameter. Now you've asked for a net sales figure to be placed under net income. Please clarify. Regards,  Spintendo  23:36, 28 December 2019 (UTC)
@Spintendo: does it make sense to just remove the net income parameter with that in mind? Thank you. Also, when looking at both the Campbell Soup Company and Smithfield Foods pages for reference, it shows these parameters: revenue, operating income, net income, total assets and total equity. Hello-Mary-H (talk) 17:52, 29 December 2019 (UTC)
 Done Please note that in my reply dated December 14, 2019, I already mentioned each of those parameters.  Spintendo  18:34, 29 December 2019 (UTC)

request edit December 29, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can add this info to the article. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Add: Throughout the 1930s, Hormel ads were featured on the radio program The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show.[1][2]

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 18:19, 29 December 2019 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ "Now coming to food trucks: high end Spam". Quartz. April 22, 2015. Retrieved December 29, 2019. Spam was born. The catchy name for the amalgam of pork, salt, water, potato starch, sugar and sodium nitrite was registered as a trademark in 1937, and an all-out marketing campaign soon followed. Teams of young sales executives dubbed “Spam Crews” and a 60-member female performing troupe called “The Hormel Girls” extolled the product all over the country. George Burns and Gracie Allen promoted Spam on their radio show. By 1940, it was eaten in 70% of America’s urban homes.
  2. ^ Burckhardt, Ann (2004). A Cook’s Tour of Minnesota. 1940 Spammy the pig, SPAM’s mascot, appears with George Burns and Gracie Allen on their hit radio show.

Reply 29-DEC-2019[edit]

Ok-blue.png  Already done  

  • The requested claim is already in the article.

Regards,  Spintendo  18:34, 29 December 2019 (UTC)

@Spintendo: sorry, should have clarified that the source that is on the page for this claim does not match. So I am providing new sources. Thank you! Hello-Mary-H (talk) 18:50, 29 December 2019 (UTC)
Mary, if you take a look at this edit request (also shown in this diff) from December 14, 2018, you'll see that it was you yourself who requested that the reference in question be added to the Burns and Allen claim in the article. This page from the reference in question shows that it verifies the claim made in the article. Please clarify why you'd like this reference replaced.  Spintendo  19:12, 29 December 2019 (UTC)
@Spintendo: that December 2018 citation seems to need an update because it has a "citation needed" message, so I am adding updated relevant sources. Thank you. Hello-Mary-H (talk) 19:36, 29 December 2019 (UTC)
It was actually a {{page needed}} inline template, which I've since removed because the reference is a digital copy without any page numbers. The source otherwise does not need to be replaced. Regards,  Spintendo  19:42, 29 December 2019 (UTC)
@Spintendo: sounds good, thank you! Hello-Mary-H (talk) 19:54, 29 December 2019 (UTC)

request edit January 3, 2020, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can update the article with this info. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Add: According to the Military Times, the company has been listed in the Best for Vets Employers Top 100 consecutively since 2013.[1]

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 20:12, 3 January 2020 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ "Best for Vets Employers". Military Times. 2019. Retrieved January 3, 2020.

Reply 3-JAN-2020[edit]

Ok-blue.png  Already done  

  • This claim is already located in the 11th paragraph of the 2010—present section.
  • Please note that this is the second request inside of a week which has asked for items already in the article.

Regards,  Spintendo  20:21, 3 January 2020 (UTC)

@Spintendo: Thank you. It looks like the claim is only sourced for the years of 2013 through 2018. So I was providing the 2019 information link. If it was not needed, please advise. Thank you. Hello-Mary-H (talk) 21:54, 3 January 2020 (UTC)
☑ Done My apologies, but it wasn't clear that the URL was all that was needed to be added in the initial request. I've since added the link to the references. Thank you! Regards,  Spintendo  02:31, 4 January 2020 (UTC)
@Spintendo: Thanks! For future requests, I will be sure to clarify when I am providing an updated link vs. making a request for new text, so that it is not confusing. Regards, Hello-Mary-H (talk) 19:05, 5 January 2020 (UTC)
Face-smile.svg Thank you  Spintendo  00:01, 6 January 2020 (UTC)

request edit January 27, 2020, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if you can help me figure out if there is a broken link for Stagg Chili in the info box? Did a Stagg Chili WP page used to exist? Thank you.

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 23:39, 27 January 2020 (UTC)

It looks like the Stagg Chili page existed until March 2017, when at that time it was redirected to the Hormel page. No reason appears to have been given for the redirect. A standing request to merge the article with Hormel had been in place since February 2017, although I can find no evidence that a discussion took place. At the time of its redirect, the Stagg Chili article appears to have been a poorly-sourced stub. Regards,  Spintendo  03:08, 28 January 2020 (UTC)
@Spintendo: Thank you. That's interesting. What would you recommend? Best regards, Hello-Mary-H (talk) 02:08, 2 February 2020 (UTC)

request edit February 3, 2020, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can update the article with this info. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Add: Can we possibly add back in operating income and net income? Operating income is $1.20 billion per this financial filing press release and net income is 979M per Market Watch. Please advise and thank you.

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/hormel-foods-reports-fourth-quarter-and-fiscal-2019-earnings-provides-fiscal-2020-outlook-300965055.html

https://www.marketwatch.com/investing/stock/hrl/financials

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 18:08, 3 February 2020 (UTC)

Reply 3-FEB-2020[edit]

Emojione1 2705.svg  Edit request partially implemented  

  1. Green tickY The |operating income= parameter was added to the infobox.
  2. Red XN The |net income= parameter could not be added, because the source indicated a net sales figure. Although some companies make a comparison between net income and net sales, others do not. Please provide a source which unequivocally states the net income as "net income".

Regards,  Spintendo  20:55, 3 February 2020 (UTC)

@Spintendo: Thank you. I will check into a source that provides that info. Best regards, Hello-Mary-H (talk) 20:57, 3 February 2020 (UTC)

request edit Feb. 14, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if additional links can help restore the Stagg Chili page possibly. Or please advise if there is another way to proceed. Thank you.

https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2000-mar-25-sp-12551-story.html

https://www.staggchili.com.au/history/

https://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/articles/168379/bon-appetit

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 21:38, 14 February 2020 (UTC)

Reply 14-FEB-2020[edit]

  • Hi Mary! If I understand you correctly, you'd like to re-create the article on Stagg Chili. Depending on the reason why the page was deleted, there are several ways you can try to have it undeleted:
  1. If you feel the page was deleted in error, first contact the administrator responsible for the deletion. If you are still not satisfied after discussing it with the deleting admin, you may then start a deletion review. This review may take place only if there was a procedural error in deleting the page – for example, if there was no consensus to delete the page, or if it was deleted without discussion for a reason that did not apply to the page in question.
  2. If the article was deleted as a result of a proposed deletion ("prod"), any administrator should normally restore it on your request. In that case, please make your request at this noticeboard.
  3. If the page was deleted for any other reason, you may try resubmitting the article through articles for creation.
  • I hope that helps, and if you have any additional questions about these steps, please feel free to ask here or at the Wikipedia:Help desk.

Regards,  Spintendo  01:18, 15 February 2020 (UTC)

@Spintendo: Thank you. I will check into the options and post here if needed. Best, Hello-Mary-H (talk) 18:16, 15 February 2020 (UTC)

request edit March 6, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can update the article so that the source is independent. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Add: In 1986, Hormel Foods acquired Jennie-O Foods[1]

  1. ^ Albala, Ken; Allen, Gary (October 30, 2007). The Business of Food. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood. p. 307. ISBN 978-0313337253. Earl B. Olson launched Farmer’s Produce Company in Minnesota in 1949. It operated a small creamery and raised turkeys on the side. In 1953, the company named its eviscerated turkey the “Jennie-O,” after Earl and Dorothy Olson’s daughter, Jennifer. In 1971, the company changed its name to Jennie-O Foods and began expanding its operations and product line. Jennie-O in 1986 became part of Hormel Foods Corporation, which also acquired the Turkey Store in 2001. Hormel changed the name for the two brands to the Jennie-O Turkey Store, which is now America’s largest turkey producer.

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 23:22, 6 March 2020 (UTC)

 Done. Thank you for the request -- the old reference was improper as it was not about that particular acquisition, but a different one entirely. The new reference you gave covers this properly. –Erakura(talk) 04:36, 7 March 2020 (UTC)

request edit March 9, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can update the article in two places so that the source for each one is independent. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Add: Key People James Snee[1](Chairman, President, CEO)

Add: Leadership timeline James Snee[2]

References

  1. ^ Wall St, Simply (January 26, 2020). "Here's What We Think About Hormel Foods Corporation's (NYSE:HRL) CEO Pay". Simply Wall Street. Simply Wall Street Pty Ltd. Retrieved March 9, 2020. Jim Snee became the CEO of Hormel Foods Corporation (NYSE:HRL) in 2016.
  2. ^ Wall St, Simply (January 26, 2020). "Here's What We Think About Hormel Foods Corporation's (NYSE:HRL) CEO Pay". Simply Wall Street. Simply Wall Street Pty Ltd. Retrieved March 9, 2020. Jim Snee became the CEO of Hormel Foods Corporation (NYSE:HRL) in 2016.

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 22:34, 9 March 2020 (UTC)

 Done. I replaced the existing citations with this new one. We don't like identical citations appearing twice, so although it is cited twice, it appears once in the reference list. ~Anachronist (talk) 05:00, 10 March 2020 (UTC)

request edit March 11, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can update the article so that the source is independent of Hormel. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Add: That same year, Hormel Foods acquired The Turkey Store, the business was combined with Jennie-O Foods to form Jennie-O Turkey Store.[1]

References

  1. ^ Albala, Ken; Allen, Gary (October 30, 2007). The Business of Food. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood. p. 307. ISBN 978-0313337253. Earl B. Olson launched Farmer’s Produce Company in Minnesota in 1949. It operated a small creamery and raised turkeys on the side. In 1953, the company named its eviscerated turkey the “Jennie-O,” after Earl and Dorothy Olson’s daughter, Jennifer. In 1971, the company changed its name to Jennie-O Foods and began expanding its operations and product line. Jennie-O in 1986 became part of Hormel Foods Corporation, which also acquired the Turkey Store in 2001. Hormel changed the name for the two brands to the Jennie-O Turkey Store, which is now America’s largest turkey producer.

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 00:49, 12 March 2020 (UTC)

request edit March 12, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can update the article so that the source is independent. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Add: Leadership timeline Jeff Ettinger 2006-2016[1]

References

  1. ^ Strauss, Lawrence (August 25, 2012). "CEO Spotlight: Spam's Biggest Fan". Barron’s. Dow Jones & Co. Retrieved March 12, 2020. CEO Jeffrey Ettinger is already at his desk, orchestrating Hormel's rapid growth and plotting new ways to make the world love Spam…. Since becoming boss in 2006, the 53-year-old CEO has emphasized not just meat classics like ham, turkey, sausages, and bacon, but also faster-growing Mexican foods, such as burritos and guacamole, and higher-margin products such as microwaveable meals.

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 00:12, 13 March 2020 (UTC)

request edit March 15, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can update the article so that the source is independent. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Add: Leadership timeline Jeff Ettinger 2006-2016[1]

References

  1. ^ Strauss, Lawrence (August 25, 2012). "CEO Spotlight: Spam's Biggest Fan". Barron’s. Dow Jones & Co. Retrieved March 12, 2020. CEO Jeffrey Ettinger is already at his desk, orchestrating Hormel's rapid growth and plotting new ways to make the world love Spam…. Since becoming boss in 2006, the 53-year-old CEO has emphasized not just meat classics like ham, turkey, sausages, and bacon, but also faster-growing Mexican foods, such as burritos and guacamole, and higher-margin products such as microwaveable meals.

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 16:53, 15 March 2020 (UTC)

request edit March 15, #2[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can update the article so that the source is independent. Reformatting the request. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Add: That same year, Hormel Foods acquired The Turkey Store, the business was combined with Jennie-O Foods to form Jennie-O Turkey Store.[1]

References

  1. ^ Albala, Ken; Allen, Gary (October 30, 2007). The Business of Food. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood. p. 307. ISBN 978-0313337253. Earl B. Olson launched Farmer’s Produce Company in Minnesota in 1949. It operated a small creamery and raised turkeys on the side. In 1953, the company named its eviscerated turkey the “Jennie-O,” after Earl and Dorothy Olson’s daughter, Jennifer. In 1971, the company changed its name to Jennie-O Foods and began expanding its operations and product line. Jennie-O in 1986 became part of Hormel Foods Corporation, which also acquired the Turkey Store in 2001. Hormel changed the name for the two brands to the Jennie-O Turkey Store, which is now America’s largest turkey producer.

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 16:58, 15 March 2020 (UTC)

Unless there is something wrong with the references currently used (such as they do not corroborate the information) I'm not inclined to replace them. Regards,  Spintendo  13:28, 19 March 2020 (UTC)
@Spintendo: I don't know, it might be better to replace primary sources with secondary sources if possible. ~Anachronist (talk) 16:43, 19 March 2020 (UTC)
@Spintendo: I provided updated sources because they are from news outlets that are not perceived to be affiliated with the company. Which may hopefully improve the article. Thank you. Hello-Mary-H (talk) 18:42, 19 March 2020 (UTC)
Using secondary sources is something which I would usually prefer as well, especially in an article such as this one which is already top-heavy in sources related to the company. However, in this case the information that is being referenced is/are merely dates of employment and/or the date of an acquisition. In those cases, I would think that there would be no better source than the company itself (or a primary source dated closer to the event) as (a) the company is the final word on when an employee of theirs worked and (b) the date of when they acquired another company was certainly acquired by Mr Albala from the company itself (or other primary sources available to that author, which are likely no more accurate than the source already used here). There are many other claims in this article which would be better serviced through replacement with secondary sources, than are the ones that are simply referencing a CEO timeline. Unless the company is trying to hide employment dates (which is not the case here) the company is really the best source to use for these types of things. My question to Mary would be, are any of the dates being used here in this timeline under question? Please advise, thanks! Regards,  Spintendo  19:41, 19 March 2020 (UTC)
I would add that the Simply Wall St reference, as a publication which markets itself as "being open to new contributors" and "providing you with high quality financial data and analysis presented in a beautiful visual way everybody can understand, at a fraction of the cost" leaves a lot to be desired, and should not be seen as some kind of improved alternative to the company itself just sourcing this information. Regards,  Spintendo  21:13, 19 March 2020 (UTC)
Thank you @Spintendo: and @Anachronist:. There are no dates that are under question for the timeline. It sounds like you'd prefer to keep the article source list as is. I will keep in mind to not use Simply Wall St again. Thank you and best regards, Hello-Mary-H (talk) 21:58, 19 March 2020 (UTC)

request edit August 17, #1[edit]

Hello, wondering if we can update the article since there is new information that is not properly formatted. Also the source has not been verified and comes from an activist organization instead of a neutral one. Thank you. Suggested new info:

Delete:

2020 Abuse: Mother Pigs and Piglets Abused by Hormel Supplier https://investigations.peta.org/mother-pigs-piglets-abused-hormel-supplier/?utm_source=PETA::Google&utm_medium=Ad&utm_campaign=0518::gen::PETA::Google::Grant-Dynamic::::searchad&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIkMrZgaqb6wIVksDACh0jBgISEAAYASAAEgJCzvD_BwE


References[edit]

Hello-Mary-H (talk) 20:21, 17 August 2020 (UTC)