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Fyc: Critics Choice Best Young Performer of 2016

Each year one of our awards traditions is to help fellow Bfca members choose more wisely when it comes to the "Young Performer" category by sharing an eligibility list. The lazy nominations each year prove that help is needed. Here's the thing: it can be difficult to even think of who is eligible when you're filling out a ballot because you don't get a list of choices and it's not a category people campaign for or one that the internet talks about. So we solve that problem right here. Our other belief, which is why we do this, is that if you actually pay attention there are enough worthy performances each year to divvy this category up into male and female as the other acting categories are divvied up. But, yes, you have to be paying attention beyond 5 or 6 movies and leading roles to notice the truly special work. 

Ballots
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Witch: period horror with a modern edge

Ryan Lambie Jul 21, 2016

As horror drama The Witch arrives on disc, Ryan looks at the modern themes beneath its period setting...

Nb: The following contains spoilers for The Witch

When Robert Eggers’ debut movie The Witch screened at Sundance last year, the critical response was rapturous. When wider audiences saw it on its wider cinematic release, the reaction was far more ambivalent. It isn’t difficult to see why; like Gareth Edwards’ breakthrough movie Monsters from 2010. which was a road trip drama with kaiju as its backdrop, so The Witch is a period drama delicately laced with a crimson thread of terror.

In pacing and atmosphere, The Witch is closer to an arthouse film than a mainstream horror, where the jolts and scares are precision-milled to leave viewers throwing boxes of popcorn around their local multiplexes. Eggers’ film is generously steeped in history and years of research; its characters speak a molasses-thick northern British dialect,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Blu-ray Review – The Witch (2015)

The Witch, 2015.

Written and Directed by Robert Eggers.

Starring Anya Taylor-Joy, Ralph Ineson, Kate Dickie, Harvey Scrimshaw, Ellie Grainger, and Lucas Dawson.

Synopsis:

A family in 1630s New England is torn apart by the forces of witchcraft, black magic and possession.

Much to the chagrin of its fans, the horror genre is often incorrectly dismissed by the wider critical market as little more than ‘trashy movies low on substance’. However there is usually one or two movies per year that penetrate the crusty exterior of those who write for Variety and Roger Ebert, and gain praise from snooty film snobs. In 2014 it was Jennifer Kent’s fabulous The Babadook, in 2015 it was the equally tremendous It Follows, and this year it has been Robert Egger’s debut The Witch, a 1600s period drama about a New England family torn apart by evil forces. Perhaps it’s the setting that swayed
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Watch Robert Eggers’ Short Film ‘Brother’ and Explore the Religious Aspects of ‘The Witch’

Robert Eggers‘ directorial debut followed a 17th-century Puritan family through a nightmare of Grimm proportions. Hailed by many critics as a new modern classic (read our review ), the film has already garnered close examination by essayist and scholars. Before Eggers’ foray into television with a mini-series following Rasputin and a feature remake of Nosferatu, delve into a video essay exploring the themes of The Witch.

Created by Renegade Cut, the essay covers many topics related to religion embedded in The Witch in its ten-minute runtime. Particularly of interest is its study of the inherent contradictions within a fundamentalist approach to religion, one which the father William learns the hard way. This, the essay states, leads to inescapable sin of which the family is all guilty of.

Also of note are parallels discovered between Adam and Eve and the familial exile that opens the film, as well as a particular use of an apple. Another wonderful parallel is drawn that explores William’s masculine pride (a sin, after all) and a stack of wood, created by his own hand, that leads to his downfall. It also briefly touches upon the themes of feminism and empowerment that director Eggers himself have said rose to the top despite his efforts to remain objective with the material.

See the video below but be careful, he summarizes and spoils the entire film within the first two minutes, so stay away, ye sinners who have not yet sinned. One can also see another video essay here and our discussion below.

Additionally, watch Eggers’ 2014 short film Brother, featuring The Witch’s own Harvey Scrimshaw (Caleb), courtesy of Le Cinema Club, available to stream until June 18th.
See full article at The Film Stage »

The VVitch

This is not your garden-variety horror picture -- its scares stem from primal guilt and fear of supernatural demons and devils that we can't entirely dismiss because people still believe in them enough to do terrible things. Robert Eggers' first film is the best-reviewed horror picture of its year, and quite an achievement. The VVitch: A New-England Folktale Blu-ray + Digital HD Lionsgate/ A24 2015 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 92 min. / Street Date May 17, 2016 / 24.99 Starring Anya Taylor-Joy, Ralph Ineson, Kate Dickie, Harvey Scrimshaw, Ellie Grainger, Lucas Dawson, Bathsheba Garnett, Sarah Stephens. Cinematography Jarin Blaschke Film Editor Louise Ford Original Music Mark Korven Produced by Daniel Bekerman, Lars Knudsen, Jodi Redmond, Rodrigo Teixeira, Jay Van Hoy Written and Directed by Robert Eggers

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

I don't find most modern horror pictures scary. The ones that scare usually do so with ideas, reaching beyond our defenses to find and exploit a personal weakness.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Second Opinion – Midnight Special (2016)

Midnight Special, 2016.

Directed by Jeff Nichols

Starring Michael Shannon, Joel Edgerton, Kirsten Dunst, Adam Driver and Jaeden Lieberher.

Synopsis:

A sci-fi thriller exploring the government’s interest in the power a kidnapped boy possesses, and his journey that reconnects him with his father.

Jeff Nichols’ latest film, Midnight Special, delves into territory unfamiliar to the director, in the latest over-hyped film to hit the cinema screen this year. The acclaimed director of Mud and Take Shelter approaches the science fiction genre disjointedly, providing an original modern twist on the classic supernatural sci-fi genre that does more to weaken the genre than to strengthen it.

Nichols’ film explores the relationship between a boy and his parents who reconnect after years of separation, on a journey to secure the boys safety from the pursuit of the U.S. Government that are concerned about the powers he possesses, and a cult that believes
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Watch the red band re-release trailer for The Witch

With Robert Egger’s acclaimed supernatural horror The Witch set to return to Us cinemas this Friday, distributor A24 Films has debuted a new red band re-release trailer, which you can view below…

See Also: Read our ★ ★ ★ ★ review of The Witch

New England, 1630: William and Katherine lead a devout Christian life, homesteading on the edge of an impassible wilderness, with five children. When their newborn son mysteriously vanishes and their crops fail, the family begins to turn on one another. In his debut feature, writer/director Robert Eggers painstakingly designs an authentic re-creation of New England — generations before the 1692 trials in Salem — evoking the alluring and terrifying power of the timeless witch myth. Told through the eyes of Thomasin, the teenage daughter (in a star-making performance by Anya Taylor-Joy), and supported by haunting camera work and an ominous score, The Witch is a chilling portrait of a family unraveling
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

'The Witch' Returns to Theaters This Friday, Watch the Scary New Trailer

'The Witch' Returns to Theaters This Friday, Watch the Scary New Trailer
'Wouldst thou like to live deliciously... again?' The possessions. The raven. The twins. And Black Philip! Like a nightmare you just can't shake, The Witch is back in theaters nationwide, this weekend only! That's right, starting Friday, April 1st, you can relive all the terror with this year's scariest movie! "A film so f*cked up, Satan would see it twice," comes back into theaters nationwide for a limited time. Once more, experience the unnerving terror of Robert Eggers' instant horror classic.&#160To celebrate this eerie occasion, a new trailer has been unleashed from the depths of hell.&#160

New England, 1630. Upon threat of banishment by the church, an English farmer leaves his colonial plantation, relocating his wife and five children to a remote plot of land on the edge of an ominous forest - within which lurks an unknown evil. Strange and unsettling things begin to happen almost immediately - animals turn malevolent,
See full article at MovieWeb »

The Witch Returns to Theaters this Friday, New Trailer Released

If you missed out on seeing The Witch in theaters but wanted to experience the evil in the woods on the big screen, then you’re in luck, as A24 revealed a new trailer announcing a theatrical re-release of Robert Eggers’ acclaimed horror film this Friday:

Press Release: Wouldst thou like to live deliciously… again? You’ll have your chance this Friday, April 1 when A24’s The Witch, “a film so f*cked up, Satan would see it twice,” comes back into theaters nationwide for a limited time. Once more, experience the unnerving terror of Robert Eggers’ instant horror classic.

To celebrate this eerie occasion, a new trailer has been unleashed from the depths of hell.

Written and directed by Robert Eggers, The Witch stars Anya Taylor-Joy, Ralph Ineson, Kate Dickie, Harvey Scrimshaw, Ellie Grainger, and Lucas Dawson.

Synopsis: In this exquisitely made and terrifying new horror film, the age-old concepts of witchcraft,
See full article at DailyDead »

Black Phillip Is Back In Re-Release Trailer For Horror Sensation 'The Witch'

With no new major movies going into wide release this weekend, A24 is using the opportunity to bring one of their biggest hit films ever back to the big screen. Yep, "The Witch" is returning, so get ready, because Black Phillip is fucking back. Starring Anya Taylor-Joy, Ralph Ineson, Kate Dickie, Harvey Scrimshaw, Ellie Grainger, and Lucas Dawson, the film about a colonial-era family living in exile who are beset by terrifying happenings was both a critical smash and box office hit. In February, "The Witch" scored the biggest wide release opening ever for A24 with $8.8 million, and has since tallied up $24 million, putting it a shade behind the $25.4 million haul of "Ex Machina" for the studio's all time record. Here's the official synopsis:  In this exquisitely made and terrifying new horror film, the age-old concepts of witchcraft, black magic and possession are innovatively brought together to tell the intimate
See full article at The Playlist »

Movie Review – The Witch (2016)

The Witch, 2016.

Written and Directed by Robert Eggers.

Starring Anya Taylor-Joy, Ralph Ineson, Kate Dickie, Harvey Scrimshaw, Ellie Grainger, and Lucas Dawson.

Synopsis:

A family in 1630s New England is torn apart by the forces of witchcraft, black magic and possession.

With “jump scare” horror dominating our screens, The Witch is a refreshingly chilling and simply told horror story that is genuinely unnerving throughout.

The film opens with William (Ineson) and his family leaving a plantation and setting up their own small farm on the outskirts of a wood. It’s a solitary life and Eggers long wide shots make the small house and barn feel miniscule against the landscape. Everything seems perfectly normal until teen Thomasin (Taylor-Joy) is looking after her baby brother and he is seemingly snatched right before her eyes. Subtlety is Eggers power in this film and it is all the more frightening for it. The
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Second Opinion – The Witch (2016)

The Witch, 2016.

Written and Directed by Robert Eggers.

Starring Anya Taylor-Joy, Ralph Ineson, Kate Dickie, Harvey Scrimshaw, Ellie Grainger, and Lucas Dawson.

Synopsis:

A family in 1630s New England is torn apart by the forces of witchcraft, black magic and possession.

There can, unfortunately, be degree of snootiness when it comes to horror films. People who think they know more will try to tell you that the slightly weird, unconventional films are the only worthwhile forms of horror, and that if you enjoy the types of film that draw in the masses (i.e. Paranormal Activity, The Conjuring), you’re not a real horror fan. That those films are just pandering and designed by studio heads who have no artistic intent but plenty of monetary greed. To quote Mark Kermode, “The Conjuring is a horror film for people who don’t like horror films”. It’s an argument which still makes no sense to me.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Review – The Witch (2016)

The Witch, 2016.

Written and Directed by Robert Eggers.

Starring Anya Taylor-Joy, Ralph Ineson, Kate Dickie, Harvey Scrimshaw, Ellie Grainger, Lucas Dawson and Julian Richings.

Synopsis:

A family in 1630’s New England is torn apart by the forces of witchcraft, black magic and possession.

In the forest, no-one can hear you scream. Except for the horrid witches lurking in amongst the darkened trees and muddy terrain as they wait patiently before pouncing on you in the most unsuspecting ways. Witches, whether flying broomsticks in Oz, hiding in plain sight on the hunt for smelly children or the more vile incarnations, have frightened many for generations, but none have managed to capture their true, unyielding terror than in writer – director Robert Eggers’ debut The Witch (or The VVitch as it’s known), this year’s most unforgettable horror film.

To say The Witch will stay with you long after the final credits
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Witch (2016) director Robert Eggers – exclusive interview

In this special Bonus Episode of the Flickering Myth Podcast, Scott Davis talks to director Robert Eggers about his crazy successful arthouse horror movie The Witch, which made 8 times its budget back at the Us box office last weekend. This is the full, unedited version of the 5 minute interview featured in the Flickering Myth Podcast #15 (which you can listen to at the bottom of this article). What a nice guy.

Subscribe to our YouTube channel for more movie awesomeness.

New England, 1630: William and Katherine lead a devout Christian life, homesteading on the edge of an impassible wilderness, with five children. When their newborn son mysteriously vanishes and their crops fail, the family begins to turn on one another. In his debut feature, writer/director Robert Eggers painstakingly designs an authentic re-creation of New England — generations before the 1692 trials in Salem — evoking the alluring and terrifying power of the timeless witch myth.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Witch Does Not Make Her Presence Known: A Film Review

Director/writer: Robert Eggers. Cast: Anya Taylor-Joy, Ralph Ineson, Kate Dickie and Harvey Scrimshaw. The Witch is a small, indie film from first time director Robert Eggers. The film has been screened at Sundance, in 2015. And, the film is currently receiving a wide release in North America. Set in New England, in the 1600s, The Witch focuses on a Puritan family and a supernatural denizen, which inhabits the nearby woods. Minimalist in nature, the film's conflict is reduced to accusations; the actual witch is mostly off-screen. Also, the Devil makes an appearance, but all of his sinful seductions are saved for a single scene. Characters are powerless to resist and their lack reduces any real tension. While entertaining and dark, The Witch reduces any possibility of real terror, by keeping the major players in the distant background. A family of seven is cast out from their local, religious community. Once out in the wilderness,
See full article at 28 Days Later Analysis »

Box Office Democracy: The Witch

  • Comicmix
I will never love The Witch but I absolutely respect it. It’s a horror movie without jump scares, without the score leading you to every moment; instead it’s a slow build and a more psychological form of terror. It feels earned, and that goes a long way in a landscape bogged down by a wave of films going for the cheapest scares available. I’m never going to be the kind of person who genuinely loves horror movies, I just don’t like being scared that much in these ways, but I appreciate the craft here and hope (likely in vain) that this is a step towards a better path.

In the end credits the makers of The Witch claim that the film was compiled from contemporary reports, diaries, and official records and that the majority of the dialogue is from those real sources. While that’s a
See full article at Comicmix »

Movie Review: The Witch

Even before any form of narrative kicks in, The Witch wastes no time establishing a mood that’s toxic for the faint of heart. Unsettling close-ups, a banishment of undetermined nature, and a disgraced Puritan family make for the forest under the frightening stillness of a looming long shot. Matters are made worse by the wailing choruses that undercut each of the film’s opening images, drizzling dread over the viewer as if in preparation for a ritualistic embalming. “We will conquer this wilderness!” says patriarch William (Ralph Ineson), in the midst of incessant wood chopping. But, neither he, his wife (Kate Dickie), nor his four children are prepared for what these New England woods have in store.

Things manifest pretty quickly. The script does away with any preconceived notions of when a scary movie is “supposed” to become truly scary, instead opting for infant atrocities nearly ten minutes into a ninety-minute runtime.
See full article at CinemaNerdz »

‘The Witch’ Review

  • Nerdly
Stars: Anya Taylor-Joy, Ralph Ineson, Kate Dickie, Harvey Scrimshaw, Ellie Grainger, Lucas Dawson, Bathsheba Garnett, Sarah Stephens, Julian Richings, Wahab Chaudhry | Written and Directed by Robert Eggers

“Dost thou remember that I love thee?”

The Witch is a searing emotional calamity of a film. Its scope is at once frighteningly vast and achingly intimate, its themes of societal violence and perversion borne out in miniature through the collapse of a desperate Calvinist family struggling to survive their self-imposed exile on the American frontier. While religious hysteria drives the sense of inevitable doom and insecurity on which the film trades, it feeds in turn on a surprising source. Love, the genuine love that exists between members of a close-knit family, and a sense of flawed but deep-seated goodness in the film’s driving personality, give The Witch its particular heartbreaking strength. Horror thrives on violations of the status quo, and this
See full article at Nerdly »

The Witch Has One of Horror's Greatest Endings

David Crow Oct 31, 2019

Just in time for Halloween, we re-examine The Witch ending, and how it is a macabre triumph in storytelling and theme.

This article contains The Witch spoilers.

The Witch is one of those special kind of moviegoing horror experiences. Rather than relying on jump scares, copious amounts of gore, or the kind of cheap thrills that mirror being at an amusement park, director Robert Eggers in his stunning debut picked up unsuspecting audiences and transported them to 1630s New England. As deliberately paced as the modest lives of its Calvinist protagonists, The Witch takes its delicious time stirring the cauldron and, ever so slowly, increasing the demonic heat until only in the last moments do you realize how monstrous things are about to turn.

While the film may not ultimately be for everyone, it is an undeniably unique cinematic experience that feels authentically archaic in its superstitions,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Review: The Witch [Monte’s Take]

The horror genre has seen a variety of evil beings throughout its illustrious history. The living dead, vengeful spirits, stalking slashers, and giant monsters have all had their day to scare onscreen. But there is one monster that consistently holds a place in nightmares: the witch.

More than a few people were creeped out as kids by The Wizard of Oz’s cackling green wicked witch and the decrepit, cloaked witch offering an apple in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. While the mythology behind witches has become restrained by kid-friendly renditions seen in the Harry Potter franchise, the reality is that the historical nature of the witch is far more dark and malicious. The Witch is an impressive directorial debut from Robert Eggers, who transforms folklore into a mature examination of fear on numerous levels, fashioning one of the most stunning and unsettling horror films of the last decade.
See full article at DailyDead »
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