Gentlemen Don't Eat Poets (1995) - IMDb
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Gentlemen Don't Eat Poets (1995)

The Grotesque (original title)
Sir Hugo (Sir Alan Bates) is more interested in reconstructing dinosaur bones than in paying attention to his wife, Lady Harriet (Theresa Russell). He's not thrilled when daughter Cleo (... See full summary »

Director:

John-Paul Davidson

Writers:

Patrick McGrath (novel), Patrick McGrath (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Alan Bates ... Sir Hugo Coal
Theresa Russell ... Lady Harriet Coal
Sting ... Fledge
Lena Headey ... Cleo Coal
Jim Carter ... George Lecky
Anna Massey ... Mrs. Giblet
Trudie Styler ... Doris
Maria Aitken ... Lavinia Freebody
James Fleet ... Inspector Limp
Steven Mackintosh ... Sidney Giblet
John Mills ... Sir Edward Cleghorn
Chris Barnes Chris Barnes ... Johm Lecky
Timothy Kightley Timothy Kightley ... Harbottle
Richard Durden ... Sykes-Herring
Nick Lucas Nick Lucas ... Hubert Cleggie
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Storyline

Sir Hugo (Sir Alan Bates) is more interested in reconstructing dinosaur bones than in paying attention to his wife, Lady Harriet (Theresa Russell). He's not thrilled when daughter Cleo (Lena Headey) brings home her betrothed, Sidney (Steven Mackintosh), who aspires to be a poet. The new butler, Fledge (Sting), provides Lady Harriet with the attention she's been missing, and then seduces Sidney. Did he have a role in Sidney's disappearance as well? Written by Dennis Lewis <dsl@sprynet.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Beneath the surface of respectability lies the shadow of our darker side.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sexuality and some gore | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Sir Edward Cleghorn: You can't go around telling people dinosaurs were birds. They've been reptiles since Darwin was a boy.
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Crazy Credits

At the end of the song in the closing credits, there is an off-screen exchange of dialogue between Fledge and Sir Hugo: "More tea, Sir Hugo?"; "Yes, Fledge, thank you". See more »

User Reviews

Sting exposes everything in the English countryside!
9 June 2000 | by kate.o'donnellSee all my reviews

If you have been itching to see more Sting on film here's your chance! You'll get to see all of him and often. As some other reviews point out this is not the standard American thriller, it requires a lot more attention to innuendos and symbolism. Anyone who is familiar with English country life will know that the understated aversive actions of the characters are dictated by the unspoken societal rules of such a setting. With his wife on and off the screen Trudy Styler,Sting puts on one of his most erotic, and intriguing performances. (For the boys and the girls!)


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 March 1997 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Gentlemen Don't Eat Poets See more »

Filming Locations:

Norfolk, England, UK

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$35,855

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$35,855
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby

Color:

Color
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