Fukuoka | Facts, History, & Points of Interest | Britannica

Fukuoka

Japan
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Fukuoka, city and port, capital of Fukuoka ken (prefecture), northern Kyushu, Japan. It is located on the southern coast of Hakata Bay, about 40 miles (65 km) southwest of Kitakyūshū, and incorporates the former city of Hakata.

Mt. Fuji from the west, near the boundary between Yamanashi and Shizuoka Prefectures, Japan.
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Hakata Bay was the site of a storm—what the Japanese called a kamikaze (“divine wind”)—in 1281 that scattered and sank a large fleet of invading Mongols and thus saved Japan from foreign occupation.

An ancient port, Fukuoka is now a regional commercial, industrial, administrative, and cultural centre. The city contains an active fishing port and has extensive rail and road connections with Kitakyūshū and with cities along the western side of Kyushu, including a branch of the Shinkansen (bullet train). Fukuoka is the seat of Kyushu University (1911). Hakata ningyo (“dolls”), elaborately costumed ceramic figurines found in most Japanese homes, are made in the city. Pop. (2010) 1,463,743; (2015) 1,538,681.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Michael Ray, Editor.
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