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Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association

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Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association
Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association logo.svg
Established1912
Association NCAA
Division Division II
Members13 (12 in 2019–20)
Sports fielded
  • 16
    • men's: 8
    • women's: 8
Region Middle Atlantic States,
South Atlantic States
Former namesColored Intercollegiate Athletic Association
Headquarters Charlotte, North Carolina
CommissionerJacqie McWilliams (since 2012)
Website theciaa.com
Locations
Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association, coverage map2.png

The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) is a collegiate athletic conference, mostly consisting of historically black colleges and universities. CIAA institutions are affiliated at the Division II level of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

Contents

The twelve member institutions are located primarily along the central portion of the East Coast of the United States of the United States, in the states of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina. Because a majority of the members are in North Carolina, the CIAA moved its headquarters to Charlotte, North Carolina from Hampton, Virginia in August 2015. [1]

The CIAA sponsors 16 annual championships and is divided into Northern and Southern divisions for some sports. The most notable CIAA sponsored championship is the CIAA Basketball Tournament which has become one of the largest college basketball events in the nation.

History

Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association
Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association
Location of CIAA members: Blue pog.svg current and Black pog.svg departing

The CIAA, founded on the campus of Hampton Institute (now Hampton University) in 1912, is the oldest African-American athletic conference in the United States. It was originally known as the Colored Intercollegiate Athletic Association and adopted its current name in December 1950. The conference is composed predominantly of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) spanning the east coast from Pennsylvania to South Carolina.

Founding leaders were Allen Washington and C.H. Williams of Hampton Institute; Ernest J. Marshall of Howard University; George Johnson of Lincoln University (PA); W.E. Atkins, Charles Frazier, and H.P. Hargrave of Shaw University; and J.W. Barco and J.W. Pierce of Virginia Union University. [2]

Football is experiencing a major resurgence after going through a period of decline at several member universities. Football was absent from the campus of Saint Augustine's University for nearly three decades, before getting reinstated by the administration in 2002. Shaw University then brought back its football program in 2003, following a hiatus of 24 years.

Lincoln University, a charter member, added varsity football in 2008 and was readmitted to the CIAA after nearly three decades in Division III. Chowan University joined the CIAA in 2008 for football only. On October 14, 2008, the CIAA Board of Directors admitted Chowan as a full member effective July 1, 2009, the first non-HBCU to play in the conference.

On August 27, 2012, the CIAA announced the appointment of Jacqie Carpenter, the first African-American female commissioner to hold the position. [3]

In 2014, a collection of records, including the original 1912 documents leading to the formation of the CIAA and meeting minutes from 1913 to 1922, were sold at auction after being discovered in a storage locker. The lot sold for $11,500 to an unnamed bidder. [4]

On May 22, 2018, Chowan University announced its athletic department will realign with the Conference Carolinas as a full-member while maintaining an associate relationship with the CIAA for both football and women's bowling. [5]

Conference membership

Current members

InstitutionLocationFoundedTypeEnrollmentNicknameColorsJoined
Bowie State University Bowie, Maryland 1865 Public 5,561 Bulldogs         1979
Claflin University Orangeburg, South Carolina 1869Private (United Methodist)1,978 Panthers         2018
Elizabeth City State University Elizabeth City, North Carolina 1891Public2,421 Vikings         1957
Fayetteville State University Fayetteville, North Carolina 1867Public5,000 Broncos         1954
Johnson C. Smith University Charlotte, North Carolina 1867Private (Presbyterian)1,500 Golden Bulls         1926
Lincoln University Oxford, Pennsylvania 1854Public2,650 Lions         1912;
2008
Livingstone College Salisbury, North Carolina 1879Private (A.M.E. Church)1,200 Blue Bears         1931
Saint Augustine's University Raleigh, North Carolina 1867Private (Episcopal)1,500 Falcons         1933
Shaw University Raleigh, North Carolina 1865Private (Baptist)2,800 Bears         1912
Virginia State University Ettrick, Virginia 1882Public7,100 Trojans         1920
Virginia Union University Richmond, Virginia 1865Private (Baptist)1,700 Panthers         1912
Winston–Salem State University Winston-Salem, North Carolina 1892Public6,000 Rams         1945;
2010
  • Chowan — football was an affiliate member in 2008–09.
  • Chowan — will realign with the Conference Carolinas for most sports beginning in the 2019–20 school year while maintaining an associate membership with the CIAA for both football and women's bowling. (The Hawks currently compete as an associate member of Conference Carolinas in nine sports)
  • Winston-Salem State — left after the 2005–06 season, re-joined in the 2010–11 season.
  • For some sports, the following division alignment goes as follows:
    • CIAA North — Bowie State, Elizabeth City State, Lincoln (PA), Virginia State, Virginia Union
    • CIAA South — Claflin, Fayetteville State, Johnson C. Smith, Livingston, Saint Augustine's, Shaw, Winston-Salem State

Former members

InstitutionLocationFoundedTypeNicknameJoinedLeftCurrent
Conference
Bluefield State College Bluefield, West Virginia 1895 Public Big Blues 19321955 NCAA D-II Independent, USCAA
Chowan University Murfreesboro, North Carolina 1848Private Hawks 20092019 Conference Carolinas
Delaware State University Dover, Delaware 1891Public Hornets 19451970 Mid-Eastern Athletic
(NCAA D-I)
Hampton University Hampton, Virginia 1868 Private (Nonsectarian) Pirates 19121995 Big South
(NCAA D-I)
Howard University Washington, D.C. 1867Private (Nonsectarian) Bison 19121970 Mid-Eastern Athletic
(NCAA D-I)
University of Maryland Eastern Shore Princess Anne, Maryland 1886Public Hawks 19541970 Mid-Eastern Athletic
(NCAA D-I)
Morgan State University Baltimore, Maryland 1867Public Bears 19291970 Mid-Eastern Athletic
(NCAA D-I)
Norfolk State University Norfolk, Virginia 1935Public Spartans 19621996 Mid-Eastern Athletic
(NCAA D-I)
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University Greensboro, North Carolina 1891Public Aggies 19241970 Mid-Eastern Athletic
(NCAA D-I)
North Carolina Central University Durham, North Carolina 1910Public Eagles 1928;
1980
1970;
2007
Mid-Eastern Athletic
(NCAA D-I)
Saint Paul's College Lawrenceville, Virginia 1888Private (Episcopal) Tigers 19232011Closed in 2013
Virginia University of Lynchburg Lynchburg, Virginia 1886Private (Christian) Dragons 19211954 NCCAA
West Virginia State University Institute, West Virginia 1891Public Yellow Jackets 19421955 Mountain East

Membership timeline

Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association

 Full member (all sports)  Full member (non-football)  Associate member (football-only)  Associate member (sport) 

Sports

A divisional format is used for basketball (M / W), bowling, football, softball, tennis (W), and volleyball.
Northern
  • Bowie State
  • Chowan
  • Elizabeth City State
  • Lincoln
  • Virginia State
  • Virginia Union
Southern
  • Fayetteville State
  • Johnson C. Smith
  • Livingstone
  • Saint Augustine's
  • Shaw
  • Winston–Salem State
Conference sports
SportMen'sWomen's
Baseball Green check.svg
Basketball Green check.svgGreen check.svg
Bowling Green check.svg
Cross Country Green check.svgGreen check.svg
Football Green check.svg
Golf Green check.svg
Softball Green check.svg
Tennis Green check.svgGreen check.svg
Track & Field Indoor Green check.svgGreen check.svg
Track & Field Outdoor Green check.svgGreen check.svg
Volleyball Green check.svg

Men's sponsored sports by school

SchoolBaseballBasketballCross
Country
FootballGolfTennisTrack
& Field
Indoor
Track
& Field
Outdoor
Total
CIAA
Sports
Bowie StateGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg5
ChowanGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg4
ClaflinGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg5
Elizabeth City StateGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg4
Fayetteville StateGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg4
Johnson C. SmithGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg7
LincolnGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg6
LivingstoneGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg6
Saint Augustine'sGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg7
ShawGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg4
Virginia StateGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg8
Virginia UnionGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg7
Winston-Salem StateGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg4
Totals5131312848873
  • Chowan University currently competes as an associate member of Conference Carolinas in baseball and men's tennis, as well as three other men's sports not sponsored by the CIAA.
  • Claflin University currently competes as an associate member of Peach Belt Conference in baseball.

Women's sponsored sports by school

SchoolBasketballBowling Cross
Country
SoftballTennisTrack
& Field
Indoor
Track
& Field
Outdoor
VolleyballTotal
CIAA
Sports
Bowie StateGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg8
ChowanGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg6
ClaflinGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg5
Elizabeth City StateGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg6
Fayetteville StateGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg6
Johnson C. SmithGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg8
LincolnGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg6
LivingstoneGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg8
Saint Augustine'sGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg7
ShawGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg7
Virginia StateGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg8
Virginia UnionGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg8
Winston-Salem StateGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svgGreen check.svg7
Totals1310131399101391
  • — D-I sport
  • Chowan University currently competes as an associate member of Conference Carolinas in women's tennis, plus four other women's sports not sponsored by the CIAA.

Other sponsored sports by school

SchoolMenWomen
BaseballLacrosseSoccerSwimming
& Diving
TennisGolfLacrosseSoccerTennisSwimming
& Diving
Chowan CC CC CC CC CC CC CC CC CC CC
Lincoln ECC
Shaw IND IND

Conference facilities

SchoolFootballBasketball
StadiumCapacityArenaCapacity
Bowie StateBulldog Stadium2,964A.C. Jordan Arena2,200
Chowan Garrison Stadium 5,000Helms Center3,500
Claflin
non-football school
Edward Tullis Arena3,000
Elizabeth City State Roebuck Stadium 6,500 R. L. Vaughn Center 5,000
Fayetteville State Luther "Nick" Jeralds Stadium 5,520Felton J. Capel Arena4,000
Johnson C. Smith Irwin Belk Complex 4,500Brayboy Gymnasium2,316
LincolnLincoln University Stadium2,600 Manuel Rivero Hall 3,000
Livingstone Alumni Memorial Stadium 5,500William Trent Gymnasium1,500
Saint Augustine'sGeorge Williams Athletic Complex2,500Emery Gymnasium1,000
Shaw Durham County Stadium 8,500C.C. Spaulding Gym1,500
Virginia State Rogers Stadium 7,909VSU Multi-Purpose Center6,000
Virginia Union Hovey Field 10,000Barco-Stevens Hall2,000
Winston–Salem State Bowman Gray Stadium 22,000 C.E. Gaines Center 3,200

CIAA Basketball Tournament

The CIAA is the first NCAA Division II conference to have its tournament televised as part of Championship Week on ESPN. Over 100,000 fans and spectators are in attendance annually and it has become one of the largest college basketball events in the nation. During the week of the tournament, there are many high-profile social and celebratory events associated with the event. [6] [7] The last day of the tournament is known as "Super Saturday" in which the men's and women's tournament champions are crowned. For 15 years, the tournament had an annual $55 million economic impact on Charlotte, North Carolina and was consistently the largest event held in the city every year. [8] The conference was offered better incentives to move it to Baltimore, Maryland which is where it will be held beginning in 2021. [9] [10]

Men's Tournament results
YearChampion [11] Venue (Location) [12]
1946 North Carolina College Turner's Arena (Washington, DC)
1947 Virginia State Turner's Arena (Washington, DC)
1948 West Virginia State Turner's Arena (Washington, DC)
1949West Virginia State Uline Arena (Washington, DC)
1950 North Carolina Central Uline Arena (Washington, DC)
1951 Virginia Union Uline Arena (Washington, DC)
1952Virginia Union Hurt Gymnasium (Baltimore, MD)
1953 Winston-Salem State McDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1954Virginia UnionMcDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1955Virginia UnionMcDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1956 Maryland State McDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1957Winston-Salem StateMcDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1958 North Carolina A&T McDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1959North Carolina A&TMcDougald Gymnasium (Durham, NC)
1960Winston-Salem State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1961Winston-Salem State War Memorial Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1962North Carolina A&TWar Memorial Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1963Winston-Salem StateWar Memorial Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1964North Carolina A&TGreensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1965 Norfolk State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1966Winston-Salem StateGreensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1967North Carolina A&TGreensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1968Norfolk StateGreensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1969 Elizabeth City State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1970Winston-Salem StateGreensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1971Norfolk StateGreensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1972Norfolk StateGreensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1973 Fayetteville State Greensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1974Norfolk StateGreensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1975Norfolk StateGreensboro Coliseum (Greensboro, NC)
1976Norfolk State Hampton Coliseum (Hampton, VA)
1977Winston-Salem StateHampton Coliseum (Hampton, VA)
1978Norfolk StateHampton Coliseum (Hampton, VA)
1979Virginia Union Norfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1980Virginia UnionNorfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1981Elizabeth City StateNorfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1982 Hampton Norfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1983HamptonNorfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1984Norfolk StateNorfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1985Virginia UnionNorfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1986Norfolk State Richmond Coliseum (Richmond, VA)
1987Virginia UnionRichmond Coliseum (Richmond, VA)
1988Virginia StateNorfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1989Virginia StateNorfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1990Norfolk StateNorfolk Scope (Norfolk, VA)
1991HamptonRichmond Coliseum (Richmond, VA)
1992Virginia UnionRichmond Coliseum (Richmond, VA)
1993Virginia UnionRichmond Coliseum (Richmond, VA)
1994Virginia Union LJVM Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1995Virginia UnionLJVM Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1996Norfolk StateLJVM Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1997 Saint Augustine's LJVM Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1998Virginia UnionLJVM Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
1999Winston-Salem StateLJVM Coliseum (Winston-Salem, NC)
2000Winston-Salem State Entertainment & Sports Arena (Raleigh, NC)
2001 Johnson C. Smith Entertainment & Sports Arena (Raleigh, NC)
2002 Shaw Entertainment & Sports Arena (Raleigh, NC)
2003 Bowie State RBC Center (Raleigh, NC)
2004Virginia UnionRBC Center (Raleigh, NC)
2005Virginia UnionRBC Center (Raleigh, NC)
2006Virginia Union Charlotte Bobcats Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2007Elizabeth City StateCharlotte Bobcats Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2008Johnson C. SmithCharlotte Bobcats Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2009Johnson C. Smith Time Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2010Saint Augustine'sTime Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2011ShawTime Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2012Winston-Salem StateTime Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2013Bowie StateTime Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2014 Livingstone Time Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2015LivingstoneTime Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2016Virginia StateTime Warner Cable Arena (Charlotte, NC)
2017Bowie State Bojangles' Coliseum (Charlotte, NC)
Spectrum Center (Charlotte, NC)
2018Virginia Union Bojangles' Coliseum (Charlotte, NC)
Spectrum Center (Charlotte, NC)
2019Virginia State Bojangles' Coliseum (Charlotte, NC)
Spectrum Center (Charlotte, NC)
2020Winston-Salem State Bojangles' Coliseum (Charlotte, NC)
Spectrum Center (Charlotte, NC)

CIAA cheerleading

One of the signature events of "Super Saturday" at the CIAA Basketball Tournament is the Cheer Exhibition. At the exhibition, CIAA cheer squads showcase elaborate routines to entertain spectators and display their talents. [13] [14] Every cheerleading team in the CIAA is a "Stomp-N-Shake" squad which is a unique style of cheer that is most common among predominately African-American schools and colleges located in the East Coast region.

The CIAA is one of the only conferences in the country that has an annual All-Conference Cheerleading Team. The All-Conference Cheerleading Team is a recognition bestowed on select cheerleaders in the conference that exemplify the epitome of school spirit, leadership, athleticism, and academic excellence. [15]

InstitutionSquad name
Bowie State UniversityThe "Golden Girls"
Chowan UniversityThe "Sapphires"
Claflin UniversityThe "Panther Dolls"
Elizabeth City State UniversityThe "D'Lytes"
Fayetteville State University"Cheer Phi Smoov"
Johnson C. Smith UniversityThe "Luv-A-Bulls"
Lincoln UniversityThe "Fe Fe's"
Livingstone CollegeThe "La La's"
Saint Augustine's UniversityThe "Bluechips"
Shaw UniversityThe "Chi Chi's"
Virginia State UniversityThe "Woo Woo's"
Virginia Union UniversityThe "Rah Rah's"
Winston-Salem State UniversityThe "Powerhouse of Red and White"

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References

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