a man of few words

a man of few words

A man who does not speak often or at length. Despite being a man of few words, Joseph was well-respected in his field because of his actions.
See also: few, man, of, word
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

man of few words

Fig. someone, not necessarily a man, who speaks concisely or not at all. He is a man of few words, but he usually makes a lot of sense.
See also: few, man, of, word
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

man of few words

see under few words.
See also: few, man, of, word

of few words, man of

Also, woman of few words. A person who does not speak much; also, a person of action rather than words. For example, A woman of few words, Susan hardly seemed like a successful lawyer, or Harry's a man of few words but he gets things done. This characteristic has been considered praiseworthy since Homer's time, but the precise idiom dates only from about 1600. Shakespeare had it in Henry V (3:2): "Men of few words are the best men."
See also: few, man, of
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a man (or woman) of few words

a taciturn person.
See also: few, man, of, word
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a man/woman of few ˈwords

a person who does not talk much: Mr Robins was a man of few words, but his opinions were always respected.
See also: few, man, of, woman, word
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

man of few words, a

A person who speaks little but to the point; also, by implication, a person of action rather than words. Although most writers trace this expression to the Old Testament (“Let thy words be few,” Ecclesiastes 5:2), it is actually much older, appearing in Homer’s Iliad (“Few were his words, but wonderfully clear”). It appeared in John Ray’s 1678 proverb collection, and a version of “Few words are best” occurs in numerous other languages as well. See also strong silent type.
See also: few, man, of
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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