Barton Hills, Michigan

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Barton Hills, Michigan
Barton Hills Village
Walter Esch Village Hall on Barton Shore Drive
Walter Esch Village Hall on Barton Shore Drive
Location within Washtenaw County
Location within Washtenaw County
Barton Hills is located in Michigan
Barton Hills
Barton Hills
Location within the state of Michigan
Coordinates: 42°19′00″N 83°45′21″W / 42.31667°N 83.75583°W / 42.31667; -83.75583Coordinates: 42°19′00″N 83°45′21″W / 42.31667°N 83.75583°W / 42.31667; -83.75583
CountryUnited States
StateMichigan
CountyWashtenaw
TownshipAnn Arbor
Incorporated1973
Government
 • TypeBoard of Trustees
 • PresidentAlicia Torres
 • ClerkForrest Butterwick
Area
 • Total0.76 sq mi (1.97 km2)
 • Land0.76 sq mi (1.97 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
942 ft (287 m)
Population
 • Total294
 • Estimate 
(2019)[3]
307
 • Density404.48/sq mi (156.13/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code(s)
48105 (Ann Arbor)
Area code(s)734
FIPS code26-05660[4]
GNIS feature ID2398044[5]
WebsiteOfficial website
Maple/Foster wrought iron bridge

Barton Hills is a village in Ann Arbor Charter Township within Washtenaw County in the U.S. state of Michigan. Originally established by Detroit Edison president Alex Dow on land acquired for the Barton Dam, Barton Hills was designed as an exclusive, forested residential enclave just outside Ann Arbor. In 1944, the community was sold to its residents, and a village was incorporated in 1973.

As of the 2010 census, the village population was 294.[6] The village is located just northwest of Ann Arbor. The streets in the village were formerly owned by the Barton Hills Maintenance Corporation but were purchased by the village itself in 2010.

History[edit]

Adjacent to the City of Ann Arbor, an area known as "Huron Farms" was established by the Detroit Edison Company in 1913.[7] The company acquired 2,000 acres in Ann Arbor township on both sides of the Huron River to build a series of dams for electric power production, including the Barton Dam.[7][8] Land owned by the company was also used for agricultural purposes, including farms, dairy cattle, and fruit orchards.[7]

Detroit Edison's president, Alex Dow, devote parted of the company's acquisition as an exclusive residential community for company executives.[8] Dow and his wife Vivienne selected a site just north of the Barton Dam, on former pastureland, for their own house. In 1915, the company contracted with the Olmstead Brothers, famous for their park and subdivision designs, as landscape architects for the new community.[7][9] At first a denuded hill sloping into the pond, jokingly referred to as "Barren Hill," the Olmstead Brothers plan prescribed that the area be reforested.[7] When homes were constructed in the 1920s, restrictions attached to each deed stipulated that the homes must be designed by a registered architect.

The Barton Hills Country Club, the only business establishment within the township, was founded in 1917.[9] Membership in the Barton Hills Country Club was considered by many to be a mark of distinction.[citation needed] In 2020, about 45% of Barton Hills residents were members of the country club.[8]

Barton Shore Drive

By the 1940s, through the economic and social turmoil of the Great Depression and World War II, the community had become an economic liability for a public utility.[citation needed] The company shareholders decided to make an outright gift of its holding to the residents of the community in exchange for assuming responsibility for maintaining the water system, roads, and other municipal services.ref name="Shackman-Kane"/>

However, the community did not seek municipal status until some thirty years later. On December 12, 1973, the community became the first home rule village in Washtenaw County.[citation needed]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.75 square miles (1.94 km2), all land.[10] Barton Hills sits on the north bank of Barton Pond, the impoundment of the Huron River, created by the Barton Dam, a low-head hydroelectric dam originally built by Detroit Edison.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1980357
1990320−10.4%
20003354.7%
2010294−12.2%
2019 (est.)307[3]4.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 294 people, 123 households, and 93 families residing in the village. The population density was 392.0 inhabitants per square mile (151.4/km2). There were 137 housing units at an average density of 182.7 per square mile (70.5/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 88.1% White, 1.0% African American, 6.8% Asian, 1.7% from other races, and 2.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.8% of the population.

There were 123 households, of which 25.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.9% were married couples living together, 2.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 24.4% were non-families. 21.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.74.

The median age in the village was 53.7 years. 21.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 10.2% were from 25 to 44; 37.3% were from 45 to 64; and 29.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 48.0% male and 52.0% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 335 people, 136 households, and 112 families residing in the village. The population density was 418.2 per square mile (161.7/km2). There were 141 housing units at an average density of 176.0 per square mile (68.1/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 88.96% White, 1.49% African American, 5.07% Asian, 0.30% Pacific Islander, 0.30% from other races, and 3.88% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.19% of the population.

There were 136 households, out of which 25.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them. 81.6% of households were married couples living together, 0.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.6% were non-families. 15.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 2.73.

The village population was 18.8% under the age of 18, 3.6% age 18 to 24, 14.6% age 25 to 44, 40.6% age 45 to 64, and 22.4% age 65 and older. The median age was 52. For every 100 females, there were 92.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.7 males.

The median household income was $149,056, and the median family income was $153,166. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $51,111 for females. The per capita income for the village was $110,683. None of the families and 0.6% of the population were living below the poverty line, none of whom were under the age of eighteen or over 64.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 25, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-25.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  4. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Barton Hills, Michigan
  6. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Barton Hills village, Michigan". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 5, 2012.
  7. ^ a b c d e Shackman, Grace; Kane, Lois (June 2005). "The Buried History of Barton Hills". Ann Arbor Observer.
  8. ^ a b c Rahal, Sarah (18 April 2020). "If you've never heard of Michigan's richest community, that's just fine". Detroit News.
  9. ^ a b Houghton, Kathryn (2018). Little Michigan A Nostalgic Look at Michigan’s Smallest Towns. ISBN 9781591937692.
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2012-11-25.
  11. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.

External links[edit]