RP2040

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The RP2040 is a 32-bit dual ARM Cortex-M0+ microcontroller integrated circuit by Raspberry Pi Foundation.[1][2][3] At the same time it was released as part of the Raspberry Pi Pico board.[1]

Overview[edit]

The chip was announced on 21st January 2021 and is the first processor designed by the Raspberry Pi Foundation.[1][2] The processor is low cost, with the Raspberry Pi Pico being introduced at US$4. The processor can be programmed in C/C++ and MicroPython.[1] It is powerful enough to run TensorFlow Lite.[1]

At announcement time four other manufacturers (Adafruit, Pimoroni, Arduino, SparkFun) were at advanced stages of their product design, awaiting the widespread availability of chips to be put in to production.[4] SparkFun has since released products based around the RP2040.[5]

Hackaday notes the benefits of the RP2040 as being from the Raspberry Pi Foundation, having a good feature set, and being released in low-cost packages.[6]

Per the datasheet, there are multiple version of the chip:
"The full source for the RP2040 bootrom can be found at https://github.com/raspberrypi/pico-bootrom.
This includes both version 1 and version 2 of the bootrom, which correspond to the B0 and B1 silicon revisions, respectively."

Features[edit]

The chip is 40nm silicon in a 7 × 7 mm QFN-56 SMD package.

  • Key features: [7]
    • 133 MHz dual ARM Cortex-M0+ cores (overclockable to over 400 MHz[8])
      • Each core has an integer divider peripheral, and two interpolators.
    • 264 KB SRAM in six independent banks
    • No internal Flash or EEPROM memory (after reset, the boot-loader loads firmware from either external flash memory or USB bus into internal SRAM)
    • QSPI bus controller, supporting up to 16 MB of external Flash memory
    • DMA controller
    • AHB crossbar, fully-connected
    • On-chip programmable LDO to generate core voltage
    • 2 on-chip PLLs to generate USB and core clocks
    • 30 GPIO pins, of which 4 can optionally be used as analog inputs
  • Peripherals:
    • 2 UARTs
    • 2 SPI controllers
    • 2 I²C controllers
    • 16 PWM channels
    • USB 1.1 controller and PHY, with host and device support
    • 8 PIO state machines

Boards[edit]

A number of manufacturers have announced their own boards using the RP2040.

Board name Manufacturer Link number of headers number of GND pins debug connection number of pads other connectors size (mm) castellated signal LEDs power LEDs RGB LEDs charging LEDs LCD flash size number of GPIO number of ADC buttons USB connector battery charger battery microphone IMU wifi Bluetooth silkscreen mounting holes
Pico Raspberry Pi [9] 40+3 8+1 via headers 6 51x21 yes 1 (green) 2MB 26 3 BOOTSEL micro-USB bottom 4
Nano RP2040 Connect Arduino [10] 30 2 via pads 5+4+2 45x18 yes 1 1 16MB 1 micro-USB yes 9-axis u-blox NINA-W102 as wifi 4
Tiny 2040 Pimoroni [11] 8+3 2+1 via headers 22.9x18.2x6 yes 1 8MB 12 4 BOOTSEL + RESET USB-C top 0
Keybow 2040 Pimoroni [12] 0 (USB only) 16 (1 per key) 16 keys USB-C n/a 0
PicoSystem Pimoroni [13] 0 (self contained) 240x240, colour 4 + joypad USB-C yes n/a 0
Feather RP2040 Adafruit [14] 28 1 via pins STEMMA QT, lipo battery 50.8x22.8x7 no 1 (red, GP13) 1 1 8MB 21 4 BOOTSEL + RESET USB-C yes both 4
ItsyBitsy RP2040 Adafruit [15] 33 via headers 36x18x4 no 1 (red) 1 4MB 23 4 BOOTSEL + RESET micro-USB no 0
Pro Micro - RP2040 Sparkfun [16] 24 3 4+2 QWIIC 36x18 yes 1 1 16MB 20 4 BOOTSEL + RESET USB-C both
Thing Plus RP2040 Sparkfun [17] 28 1 JTAG pins QWIIC, lipo battery 59x23 no 1 (blue) 1 (red) 1 1 (yellow) 16MB 18 4 BOOTSEL + RESET USB-C yes both 4
MicroMod RP2040 Sparkfun [18] 0 edge connector 22x22 n/a 1 16MB 29 3 none edge connector n/a

See also[edit]

  • Arduino - a popular microcontroller board family

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Meet Raspberry Silicon: Raspberry Pi Pico now on sale at $4". January 21, 2021.
  2. ^ a b Adams, James (1 February 2021). "Raspberry Pi RP2040: Our Microcontroller for the Masses". Arm Blueprint. Retrieved 20 February 2021.
  3. ^ "RP2040 Datasheet" (PDF). Raspberry Pi Foundation. Retrieved 20 February 2021.
  4. ^ "Tweet". twitter.com. Retrieved 2021-02-18.
  5. ^ "RP2040 - A microcontroller from Raspberry Pi - SparkFun Electronics". www.sparkfun.com. Retrieved 20 February 2021.
  6. ^ Williams, Elliot (20 January 2021). "Raspberry Pi Enters Microcontroller Game With $4 Pico". Hackaday. Retrieved 20 February 2021.
  7. ^ "RP2040 Datasheet" (PDF). RaspberryPi.org. Retrieved 2021-03-28.
  8. ^ "Robin Grosset Takes a Raspberry Pi Pico's RP2040 to New Heights with an Overclock to 420MHz". Hackster.io. Retrieved 2021-03-28.
  9. ^ https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/raspberry-pi-pico/
  10. ^ https://blog.arduino.cc/2021/01/20/welcome-raspberry-pi-to-the-world-of-microcontrollers/
  11. ^ https://shop.pimoroni.com/products/tiny-2040
  12. ^ https://shop.pimoroni.com/products/keybow-2040
  13. ^ https://shop.pimoroni.com/products/picosystem
  14. ^ https://www.adafruit.com/product/4884
  15. ^ https://www.adafruit.com/product/4888
  16. ^ https://www.sparkfun.com/products/17717
  17. ^ https://www.sparkfun.com/products/17745
  18. ^ https://www.sparkfun.com/products/17720

External links[edit]