The Detroit Sunday Journal:: March 31 - April 6, 1996 - Wayne State University Digital Collections

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P u
MARCH 31-APR
LLOUT SECTIO
IL 6, 1996 S
N INSIDE; TV LIST
INGS FOR T
0L. 1 NO. 20
75 CENTS
23 ♦ ♦ ♦
Sunday Iourna
L
©TDSJ
INSIDE
CITY & STATE
In a gang-plagued
southwest Detroit
neighborhood, an
activist chisels out a
“rock of hope.” Page 3.
BUSINESS
David P. Turner knows
the art of the deal. He
links medium-sized
businesses to each
other through his new
company. Page 12.
entertaYnment
Actor Alan Alda chucks
his sensitive image to
play an aging hippie in
the highly acclaimed
film “Flirting With
Disaster.” Page 25.
SPORTS
It looks like it will be a
long summer for Tigers
fans. But if they are
patient, rewards may
be lurking in the farm
system. Page 40.
INDEX
Classifieds
Page 32
Crossword
Page 33
Editorials
Page 14
Food
Page 30
Life & Times
Page 31
Nation & World
Page 16
Susan Watson Page 3
Journal photo by JETTA FRASER
Martin Luther King III takes a picket sign from striking Teamster Rene Fedishinin as Newspaper Guild member
Robert Ourlian looks on. King walked the picket line at the Detroi* News on Friday.
King joins strikers
Son of civil rights legend slams exec, papers
By Keith Owens
Journal Staff Writer
The son of slain civil rights leader
Dr. Martin Luther King accused a
Detroit newspaper executive of twist
ing the spirit and message of his
father.
Martin Luther King III, in Detroit
for a weekend rally in support of strik
ing newspaper workers, also asked the
community to shun the Detroit News
and Free Press.
“The only way you can smoke them
out is by the technique of not patron
izing them,” King said.
King called the March 10 column
by Detroit News Executive Editor
and Publisher Robert Giles “totally
backward,” saying “it is the epitome
of white arrogance ”
In his column, Giles claimed
strikebreakers, not strikers, repre
sent the spirit of civil disobedience
espoused by Dr. Martin Luther King
Jr.
Dr. King’s son doesn’t agree.
“I know what is being said is total
ly wrong,” said King, who had read
Giles’ commentary
King said some leadership figures
have tried to pervert the image and
the message of his father to suit their
own ends.
Giles’ comment, which specifically
attacked an earlier striker demon
stration, is an example of that phe
nomenon, he said.
Giles wrote, “The clerics and the
politicians who sat in protest
Wednesday morning engaged in a par
ody that mocked the ideals of civil dis
obedience. ... [It] is pure fiction for
them to claim that this is civil disobe-
See KING, Page 6


PAGE 2
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
MARCH 31, 1996
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Ron Miller, left,
said his 42-year-
old daughter
Sheriy was so
disabled by
multiple
sclerosis that
“we had to do
eveiything for
her, practically."
Dr. Jack
Kevorkian goes
on trial this
week for aiding
in her death.
Journal photo by GEORGE WALDMAN
Common law to be used
in bid to convict Kevorkian
By Michael Betzold
Journal Staff Writer
Dr. Jack Kevorkian goes on trial this
week for aiding in the deaths of two
troubled, disabled women who were
not terminally ill. The trial could raise
difficult questions about his assisted
suicide crusade:
■ Do disability and mental anguish
justify a doctor’s help in dying?
■ Should Kevorkian be convicted
under a law deemed relevant years
after the deaths occurred?
In two past trials over his role in the
deaths of three terminally ill people,
Kevorkian was acquitted of violating a
now-expired 1993 state legislative ban
on assisted suicide.
For the newest trial, scheduled to
start Monday in Pontiac, Kevorkian is
charged under “common law” for
assisting in two 1991 deaths, a charge
made possible only after the state
Supreme Court ruled, in 1994, that
common law did indeed forbid such
assistance.
A common-law crime is an act con-
corrections
An article in the March 17 editions
identified Carlo John Catenacci as
the owner of C. J. Barrymore’s restau
rant in Mt. Clemens. Owner Rick E.
Iceberg bought out Catenacci’s inter
est in 1991.
An article in the March 24 editions
should have said that Detroit police
shot and killed a man identified as
John Kolniak, 21, in the same incident
in which Officer Jerry Philpot was
killed last May.
The name of designer Ron Rea was
misspelled in a March 24 article on
the new owner of the Magic Bag in
Ferndale.
The Detroit Sunday Journal corrects
all errors of fact. If you find an error,
please call our newsroom at 313-567-
9818.
sidered illegal by tradition dating
back centuries to British law. Geoffrey
Fieger, Kevorkian’s attorney, says
prosecuting Kevorkian under that rul
ing is like trying to put someone on
trial today for practicing witchcraft.
“This is not a law; it’s all made up,”
Fieger said. “It’s clearly unconstitu
tional. It’s a joke.”
Nevertheless, it’s the first time
jurors will decide the merits of
Kevorkian’s aid to people who weren’t
terminally ill.
Sherry Miller and Marjorie Wantz
died Oct. 23,1991, in a rented cabin at
Bald Mountain Recreation Area near
Lake Orion. Miller, of Roseville, had
multiple sclerosis and said she wanted
to die because “I feel like a 42-year-old
baby, and I hate it.”
Ron Miller, her father, said last
week that she was not in any pain but
wanted to die because she was rapidly
losing physical abilities and “didn’t
want to be a burden to her parents. We
had to do everything for her, practical
ly” he said.
Wantz, from Sodus in southwestern
Michigan, had endured multiple laser
surgeries for mysterious pelvic pain.
She had been diagnosed as severely
depressed and had barely escaped
psychiatric commitment in August of
1991. In an autopsy, doctors found
nothing physically wrong with her.
But Verna Spayth, an Ann Arbor
activist with ADAPT (American
Disabled for Attendant Programs
Today), said that isn’t the point.
“It’s not the pain, it’s not the disabil
ity, it’s the feeling of worthlessness,”
said Spayth, who uses a wheelchair.
“And that doesn’t come from inside
your own head.” Both Wantz and
Miller had needed more support,
Spayth said.
Ron Miller, however, said he couldn’t
get much help for his daughter from
any agency.
“I didn’t like it,” he said of her plan
to get help to commit suicide, “but it
was her decision. Some people want to
live that way, some don’t.”
YOU + Pines Mortgage = $$$


MARCH 31, 1996
They’re singing the praises of a safe zone
“The church is going to carve out a rock of
hope. You want to find something immediate,
specific and winnable, and then issue a
demand.”
- Bill O’Brien, neighborhood organizer
By Roger Chesley
Journal Staff Writer
Neighborhood organizer Bill O’Bri
en is preaching the gospel of change to
eager parishioners at All Saints
Church in southwest Detroit.
Sure, there are abandoned buildings
and vacant lots in the community,
says the executive director of the
Jeremiah Project, a coalition of 22
churches. True, gangs often battle for
turf in the area, and streetlights don’t
always flash on when it’s dark.
Though the problems sometimes
seem overwhelming, O’Brien says,
residents can take back the communi
ty. “The church is going to carve out a
rock of hope,” O’Brien told about 25
people last week at a church meeting.
“You want to find something immedi
ate, specific and winnable, and then
issue a demand” for change from city
officials.
From that meeting, a core group of
volunteers is helping launch the
Jeremiah Project’s first “safe zone” in
an area bordered by Longworth,
Woodmere, Olivet and Mullane. The
volunteers were to have canvassed the
600-plus households in the zone
Saturday to find out what residents
want done in the community.
“We’re trying to focus attention on
this 15-block area and make public
officials accountable,” said Patrick
Brennan, the safe zone coordinator at
All Saints. Organizers want to reduce
crime and fight the blight in that
neighborhood so people feel safer.
“We’re hoping people will see a rea
son for rehabilitating the neighbor
hood or rejuvenating the area,” Bren
nan added.
The idea for the safe zone comes
from a similar program that has had
some success in Cleveland. Organ
izers in Detroit want to replicate the
All Saints safe zone in the 21 other
churches in the Jeremiah Project,
which was formed in 1994 and
includes congregations in southwest
Detroit, Ecorse, Melvindale and River
Rouge.
This first area will be named the
“Jerry Philpot Safe Zone.” The desig
nation honors the Detroit police officer
who was shot and killed in the neigh
borhood last May while aiding a resi
dent who was being threatened by
gang members. A 19-year-old man, the
reputed leader of the Latin Counts,
went on trial last week in the slaying.
Following Saturday’s neighborhood
survey, church members will urge
public officials to pledge to make spe
cific improvements at a community
meeting at 7 p.m. April 17. Those
scheduled to attend include Detroit
Police Chief Isaiah McKinnon, Wayne
County Sheriff Robert Ficano and
recreation, public works and housing
officials.
Already the Jeremiah Project has
successfully pushed for the demolition
of 300 decrepit structures in south
west Detroit. Officials said the safe
zone concept is another effort at revi
talizing the city.
Said All Saints Deacon Joe Iskra,
“It’s about time to make things turn
around.”
For more information on the safe
zone or the community meeting, call
Patrick Brennan at 313-381-3691 or
the church at 313-841-1428. All Saints
Community Center is at 8300 Long-
worth, at Mullane.
It’s just affection, Sweetie Pie, not harassment
Thank goodness Christopher
Held is not on strike with us.
If he were, I’d be in a world
of trouble.
Held recently accused 58-year-old
cashier Bernice Harris of sexual
harassment for calling him “Baby”
when he went through her line in a
U.S. Senate coffee shop. Harris, a
grandmother who ladles out sweet
nothings as easily as she makes
change, was stung by the criticism.
“‘I call all my customers Baby,
Honey, Sweetheart - senators and
all,” Harris told a reporter. “I don’t
know his problem,” she said of Held,
who works part-time for Sen. Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky.
I don’t know Held’s problem, either.
I just want him to stay the heck away
from me. Like Bernice Harris, I lib
erally sprinkle my conversations with
endearments like “Sweetie,” “Sugar
Lump,” “Darlin’,” “Baby Girl” and
“Pumpkin.” To make matters worse, 1
walk up to strikers I barely knew
eight months ago and greet them
with a hug and a kiss.
It doesn’t matter who the striker is
I\ Susan
I Watson
- young or old, tall or short, blond or
brunet. All are like family to me, and
in my family, we hug, kiss and
exchange “I love you” at the end of
every conversation. I come from a
family in which my aunts still call
me “Baby” even though I’m old
enough to have grandkids. I come
from a family in which I recently
watched my 47-year-old cousin stroke
her mother’s soft white hair and mur
mur, “I love you, Baby,” against her
warm forehead.
In a world in which the sting of bit
ter words can raise ugly welts on
your soul, I have always appreciated
the wondrous balm of terms like
“Baby Darlin’” and “Sweetheart.”
When offered in kindness, they are
like smiles that have found a voice.
For a few seconds, they reaffirm your
connection with all humanity.
It feels so good to be on the receiv
ing end of such affection that I natu
rally dole it out to others.
But to some folks, like Christopher
Held, such endearments are unwant
ed, even threatening. In a letter that
began with the phrase “Sexual
Harassment,” he told Harris that her
use of the word “Baby” was bother
some to him. It annoyed him, irked
him. Maybe it made him think
Bernice Harris was not treating him
with the respect due a young man
working on the Hill.
What a pity for Held. He fails to
understand that when Harris called
him “Baby,” she gave him the great
est form of respect - she acknowl
edged him as a human being innately
worthy of love.
Although I wouldn’t know Bernice
Harris if she walked up to me on
Woodward Avenue and called me
“Sugar Dumpling,” I’m certain she
wasn’t trying to get fresh with the
Senate aide. She wasn’t trying to hit
on him or take advantage of the fact
that he relied on her for correct
change. She was just being nice,
treating him as she would like to be
treated.
For her efforts, she wound up in
trouble. Her bosses told her they
were transferring her to another
cafeteria to put some distance
between her and Held. When Harris
got the news, she quit her job of 30
years. “It wasn’t right,” she said of
the transfer.
Fortunately, a number of regulars
at her old coffee shop agreed with
her. Senators and staff aides came to
her defense. Before long, Bernice
Harris was back at her old job, doling
out change and affection. Everyone,
even Christopher Held, was richer for
it.
As for me, I have passed out
enough “Honeys” and “Dears” and
“Sweeties” to keep Held and his ilk
writing letters for years. And, if I
have offended any of my brothers and
sisters on the picket line by my effu
sive show of affection, I just have this
to say:
I’m real sorry, Baby Darlin’. Come
over here and let me give you a hug.
Journal/ MOSES HARRIS


PAGE 4
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
MARCH 31, 1996
Abuse charge to linger over woman’s trial
By Roger Chesley and Ann Sweeney
Journal Staff Writers
A murder charge rooted in domestic
abuse angered women’s rights
activists after an allegedly battered
wife was ordered to stand trial for
murder last week.
Taniccia Henry, 20, shot and killed
her estranged husband Edward
Toliver, 23, Feb. 28 in her apartment
in the Chicago-Linwood area.
According to testimony, Toliver bat
tered Henry in an argument over her
car, and later wrestled with her over a
gun.
“She had every right to defend her
self and her children because she
believed he meant to kill or injure
her,” said Henry’s lawyer, Eileen
Scheff. “He had beaten her before and
had even broken her arm. She called
911 for help, but the police didn’t get
there. He’d leave, but he kept coming
back.”
The case speaks to the difficulties in
deciding where the line should be
drawn in reported domestic violence
cases, and whether the ruling in such
slayings should be justifiable homi
cide.
In this particular case, however,
Toliver’s relatives say he did not have
a history of beating his wife. Some of
his relatives, in fact, felt that Henry
should have been charged with the
tougher first-degree murder charge,
which mandates a life sentence with
no parole on conviction.
“I don’t know anything about physi
cal abuse from my son,” said Lucille
White, Toliver’s mother. Asked about
the earlier incident in which Henry’s
arm was broken, White replied: “He
never would have broken her arm if
she hadn’t taken the tire iron and hit
him upside the head. He took a tree
branch and hit her” after Henry struck
Toliver.
In refusing to dismiss charges of sec
ond-degree murder and felony firearm
at Henry’s preliminary examination,
36th District Judge David Bradfleld
said it was a matter for a jury to
decide. Bradfleld set Henry’s appear
ance in Recorder’s Court for April 12,
and allowed her to remain free on a
bond of 10 percent of $25,000.
But Scheff and others believe the
case should not come to trial.
“Prosecutors are fond of saying the
woman in an abusive situation can
always leave,” Scheff said. “Well, she
had the first baby by this man when
she was 15 and she had left. She and
her children were living on their own.
It was her apartment and her car.”
Their second child, a 1 1/2-year-old
son, was in the same room with his
parents when the slaying occurred.
Dick Padzieski, chief of operations
for the Wayne County Prosecutor’s
Office, countered that he would let the
courts decide the merits of the case.
“Defense attorneys can try their
cases in the newspapers. I won’t,”
Padzieski replied. He declined to dis
cuss specifics.
“We try to charge fairly” Padzieski
added.
Another prosecutor, speaking on
condition of anonymity, said that war
rants often are issued in such suspect
ed abuse cases where the defendant’s
accounts “don’t fit correctly.” The pros
ecutor claimed not to know the
specifics of the Henry case.
Yet, the charges troubled officials at
domestic violence shelters. They say
women overwhelmingly are the vic
tims in abuse cases.
Michigan State Police statistics from
1993 show that of 34,505 reported
domestic violence cases that year,
females were the victims in 26,495
cases. FBI statistics from 1991 show
that 28 percent of all female murder
victims that year were killed by their
husbands or boyfriends.
Karen Porter, associate director at
the First Step domestic violence pro
ject in Canton Township, said women
sometimes turn the tables on their
mates when they feel threatened.
Porter said she does not know all the
details in the Henry case. However,
The case speaks to the
difficulties in deciding
where the line should be
drawn in reported
domestic violence cases,
and whether the ruling
in such slayings should
be justifiable homicide.
Porter said, “What I know from my
work is that we need to look at self-
defense. . . . Their perception is that
they had no other choice and they had
to protect themselves.”
According to court testimony, Henry
told an abusive Toliver to leave when
he showed up that night, but she will
ingly loaned him her car for a trip to
the store. When he did not return, she
attempted to track him through friends
who told her he was drunk and high.
Taking a cab, she found her car outside
a bar and drove it to her grandmother’s
house, where she hid it.
Henry returned home to find an
angry Toliver ransacking her bedroom
in search of a gun. She called 911, and
after he left called 911 again saying she
had the gun, and “if he comes back he’s
gone.”
Toliver did come back, she said,
berating her for calling police, beating
her and wrestling for the gun. Henry
told police she raised the gun, and as
Toliver threw the car keys in her face,
“it went off.”
“The key hit me in the eye. It just
reflexed,” she said in a statement read
in court.
According to police, there were three
more frantic calls to 911.
Scheff claims that beatings by
Toliver were a regular occurrence, and
that last summer, he had broken
Henry’s arm with a baseball bat.
But Gladys Coney, Henry’s aunt, who
lived in the apartment below, con
founded the defense by saying that she
never recalled the couple fighting, even
when they lived with her for a time.
Toliver, who had asked to use her
phone that night, was calm and nor
mal, Coney said.
The bindover to trial disappointed
women’s rights activists, who carried
signs outside the courthouse saying
“Free Taniccia Henry.”
And it failed to appease members of
Toliver’s family who were inside the
courtroom.
“The judge should have raised the
charge to first- degree murder,” said a
woman who identified herself as
Toliver’s sister but declined to give her
name.
“She had the gun, and she meant to
kill him,” she said. “They’re trying to
make her out like she’s a star. She was
n’t even living with him for a long time
because he had been in jail.” Toliver
was jailed for six months last year.
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v :
<< ’ ■
Journal photo by DAYMON H. HARTLEY
Oxford Police Chief Gaiy Ford reacts to comments in a hearing last week on allegations that he altered a fatal traffic accident report last June.
Municipal League for some guidance.
In a March 17, 1995, letter, the league
responded that while Ford had many
positive qualities there was a question
about his back problems, which
required him to retire in Harper
Woods, and also the probability that
he would have to be recertified.
The MLEOTC, a branch of the state
police, was asked to review Ford’s cer
tification. That review apparently con
sisted of receiving a one-page, two-
sentence letter from Leidlein certify
ing Ford’s employment dates which
made him eligible.
But other documents inspected by
The Journal and others suggest other
wise. Among them:
■ September 1990 and December 1993
concealed weapons license applica
tions in Wayne County in which Ford
lists his employment as “retired police
chief.”
■ A December 1991 worker’s compen
sation settlement form in which Ford
obtained $50,000 that lists his final
separation with the police department
as Dec. 11,1991.
■ A Dec. 13, 1994 letter to Oxford in
which Ford said he retired as Harper
Woods Police chief in 1992 in order to
take advantage of a onetime buyout
offer.
Ford insists any document that indi
cates he was not a police chief or a
police officer in Harper Woods after
The Michigan Law
Enforcement Officers
Training Council is
investigating charges
that Gary Ford
misrepresented his
work history to quali
fy for the Oxford
police chief job.
1991 “is incorrect.” He could not ex
plain the discrepancies.
“It (employment) didn’t stop,” said
Ford. “I worked in a variety of circum
stances ... the city had labor problems.
There were problems with the fire
department. ... I worked for the city
manager directly.”
City Clerk Mickey Todd said he had
been specifically instructed not to
release any information regarding
Ford’s employment history with the
city and referred questions to an
attorney who did not return calls.
This is the second time in recent
weeks that Ford has found himself in
a hot seat over questionable use of
official documents.
The Sunday Journal has reported
how testimony in court documents
alleged Ford altered a fatal traffic acci
dent report to absolve the village of
liability in a death. Ford was said to
have deleted a portion of a June 1995
police report bound for the prosecu
tor’s office that detailed how nonwork
ing city street lights could have con
tributed to conditions in which a pe
destrian was struck and killed by a
motorist.
The matter has been reviewed by
the prosecutor’s office.
“There’s no question the (accident)
report was altered,” said Lawrence
Kozma, an assistant prosecutor. “But
at the time our office received the
information about the streetlights
from another accident investigator
(from the sheriff’s department), so it
wasn’t as if something was hidden
from us. We find no violation of any
law.”
And Judge says that may ultimately
turn out to be the case regarding ques
tions of Ford’s certification. He said
the MLEOTC will determine whether
Ford was an active officer through
1993. Judge said “active” is defined as
being regularly compensated for work,
“as in a paycheck.”
“It’s all very curious and we are
treating it seriously,” said Judge. “I
find it difficult to believe someone
would stick his neck out in being a
part of falsifying something like this.”
Certification issue hounds Oxford police chief
By Mike Martindale
Journal Staff Writer
Did a Harper Woods city official and
the city’s former police chief conspire
to circumvent state law in order to
land the ex-chief a job in Oakland
County?
That’s a question in Harper Woods,
Oxford, Lansing and Pontiac as facts
surface regarding how Oxford Police
Chief Gary L. Ford obtained his
$51,000-a-year job one year ago.
Documents obtained by the Detroit
Sunday Journal indicate that Ford -
apparently with the help of Harper
Woods City Manager James Leidlein -
may have misrepresented his work
history so that he would qualify for a
police chief vacancy in Oxford and take
over the 12-man department.
Some believe the pair could face
criminal charges.
“We are looking into some charges
that some information we received
was not accurate,” said Patrick Judge,
executive director of the Michigan Law
Enforcement Officers Training Council
(MLEOTC). “I’ve been here 25 years
and I’ve never heard of something like
this before.
“If that proves true, I’m going to
want to know why” Judge said. “We
are asking the city manager to reaf
firm his original letter to us.
“In the worst case scenario - if this
was a conspiracy - it could result in a
hearing and possibly criminal
charges,” said Judge. “It’s very rare but
it’s happened before.” f
Leidlein, who sent a March 1995 let
ter to the MLEOTC certifying that
Ford was employed in Harper Woods
from October 1969 through Aug. 8,
1993, did not return repeated phone
calls last week from the Sunday
Journal.
Ford, 48, insists nothing improper
was done.
“I was employed by the city of
Harper Woods and worked there up to
August of 1993,” said Ford. “The
MLEOTC has confirmed that I am a
certified officer.”
Ford’s certification as a police officer
appears to have lapsed in 1993 - more
than two years after documents show
Ford took a $50,000 duty disability
buyout from Harper Woods because of
a back injury, suffered while walking
down a flight of stairs at City Hall.
Among requirements for the Oxford
job that Ford applied for in March
1995 was that he be a qualified, certi
fied police officer. Since 1977 it has
been state law that all inactive police
officers must be recertified if they have
been out of law enforcement work for
two years. Recertification requires
passing physical and written tests, a
physical exam - including a drug test
- and qualifying on a firearms range.
When considering Ford’s applica
tion, the Oxford Emergency Safety
Authority, which supervises police and
fire in Oxford, relied on the Michigan


PAGE 6
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
MARCH 31, 1996
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Dear Reader,
We hope you have enjoyed your complimentary
issues of The Detroit Sunday Journal. As we move
on to sample different areas of the community you
can continue to receive The Sunday Journal. Inside
this issue is a list of stores that sell The Journal in
your neighborhood. Or you can receive The Journal
by mail by purchasing a subscription using the
coupon below. We hope you’ll invite us into your
home each week.
We are proud of our newspaper, and value you
as a reader. Call us any time at (313) 567-9818.
Your Detroit Sunday Journal staff
Now Available
MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS TO
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DETROIT NEWSPAPER WORKERS
3 months $15 or 6 months $30
Enclose a check or money order, or fill out charge card information to bill your
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If The Sunday Journal ceases publication for any rea
son, unused portions of subscriptions cannot be
refunded and will be considered as contributions.
Mail subscriptions available in the U.S. only.
Start date
Check No.
Auth. No.
Thank you for helping make The Detroit Sunday Journal a success!
FORM 102-REV. 3/28/96
‘Father’ of court’s one day,
one trial jury system dies
Richard Devere Dunn, the jurist
who pioneered and organized the One
Day-One Trial jury system now
accepted throughout U.S. trial courts,
died of a heart attack on March 21 at
the age of 79.
Judge Dunn retired from the Wayne
County Circuit Court bench in 1987
after serving as its chief judge for
eight years. He was also instrumental
in creating the Wayne County
Mediation Tribunal, the first of its
kind in the United States, which
helped alleviate court docket backlogs.
That, too, has been adopted widely.
Judge Dunn served in World War II,
after which he enrolled in Detroit
College of Law. He was appointed
Dearborn Township attorney and
later became a District Court judge in
Dearborn Heights before his election
as a Wayne County Circuit judge. He
served as president of the Michigan
Association of District Judges, as well
as president of the National Associa
tion of Trial Judges. He was an avid
hunter and golfer and a devoted
Catholic.
Judge Dunn was preceded in death
by his wife, Theda. Survivors include
his brother, Edward D. Dunn, and sis
ter-in-law Doreen, and their children
and grandchildren.
A memorial mass will be offered at
9:30 a.m. April 20 at Divine Child
Church, 1055 North Silvery Lane,
Dearborn. Contributions may be sent
to the American Heart Association of
Michigan or the Alzheimer’s Associa
tion.
King speaks for strikers
KING, from Page 1
dience. ... [It] is pure fiction for them
to claim that this is civil disobedience
in the spirit of Henry David Thoreau
or Martin Luther King.”
In response, the younger King said,
“By what I have seen displayed by the
strikers, it IS civil disobedience.”
Labor needs to address some issues,
King said, such as racism within its
ranks and the lack of proportional
represention of minorities in leader
ship positions. Still, without labor’s
assistance, he said, the civil rights
movement of the 1960s would have
faced much more of an uphill struggle.
“Labor enhanced what we were able
to do,” he said. “Labor as a whole has
supported us in our causes.”
King said he views the Detroit
newspaper strike as an important
one, and that in a city with a labor his
tory such as Detroit’s, it takes on
added meaning. He urged advertising
agencies and other companies to sup
port the strike by shunning both
papers.
While he understands the need for
companies to streamline their opera
tions, King also believes “there’s a
compassionate way to do it.”
“They (the Detroit News and Free
Press) have not acknowledged that
they are engaged in a scenario of dis
placing families. ... They’re only look
ing at a business decision, not what’s
in the best interest of this city.”
King emphasized that much rides
on the outcome of the Detroit newspa
per strike, and encouraged the strik
ers to stick with it.
“In this day and age, nine months is
a long time, but in my father’s day, it
wasn’t that long,” he said, recalling
the lengthy Montgomery bus boycott
when African Americans chose to walk
miles to work rather than ride on seg
regated buses.
“The race is not given to the swift...”
Polish church tour is Thursday
The annual tour of some of the
most splendid churches in the old
east-side Polish community will be
Thursday, but reservations must be
made by Monday.
The tour, including dinner and
transportation, costs $25 per person
and is sponsored by the American
Polish Assistance Association.
“We start at the Byzantine-
Romanesque Church of St.
Hyacinth, where we’ll have dinner,”
said Michael Krolewski, president
of the association. “Then we tour
seven other churches in the
Poletown area and Hamtramck.”
Krolewski said tour proceeds are
used for a senior citizens program
for Americans of Slavic descent,
and to help supply hospitals in
Poland.
The buses will depart from the
municipal parking lot in
Eastpointe, 1/4 mile north of Nine
Mile on Gratiot, at 5:15 p.m.
For reservations, call 810-772-
2378.
-Bill Halls


MARCH 31, 1996
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 7 S
Vietnamese boat people face double threat
By Linda Chong
United Press International
HONG KONG - Just north of Hong
Kong at the border with China, a
huge digital clock reminds all that
Beijing retakes control of the British
colony in fewer than 500 days.
But the Vietnamese boat people
who live behind barbed wire in
metal-roofed huts that dot the hills of
northern Hong Kong need no
reminder that time is running out.
In addition to Beijing’s demand
they leave before it takes over July 1,
1997, the United Nations recently
announced it was refocusing its
money and efforts on refugees in
Rwanda and Zaire.
Funding for 35,000 Vietnamese
boat people in Southeast Asia is
scheduled to end June 30. Though
that deadline has been extended for
Hong Kong, the reluctant host to
nearly 20,000 of them, the UN High
Commission for Refugees is warning
the boat people to get ready to go
home - voluntarily or otherwise.
Many have spent years in Hong
Kong camps, refusing even cash
incentives to return home, and a gen
eration of Vietnamese youngsters
know nothing but the detention cen-
New ACLU leader takes on
the issue of censorship
ATTORNEY, from Page 16
19th Century Comstock Act, a federal
law against disseminating such infor
mation.
A three-judge panel of the U.S.
Court of Appeals is hearing the
ACLU’s appeal. One witness who is an
expert on marketing in cyberspace
testified that the law would force
many “mom and pop” web sites to
close because of uncertainty about
penalties for indecency And Strossen
says the law already has damaged the
First Amendment even though the
government hasn’t enforced it yet.
“There’s a huge chilling effect
already,” she said. “Some service
providers already have taken some
sexually oriented material off-line.
“Cyberspace truly does allow highly
individualized decision-making as to
what you will see or won’t see. And
parents who want to shield their chil
dren can get software that allows
them on a very sophisticated level to
filter out materials they don’t want
their children to have access to.”
The ACLU is expected to wrap up
its case Monday. Then the government
will call witnesses. The trial is sched
uled to conclude April 26. A direct
appeal to the Supreme Court is
expected.
Strossen argues that no new laws
are needed to police the on-line world.
As for the telecommunications act’s
provisions forcing television networks
to adopt a ratings system for use with
the V-chip, Strossen says the crude
blocking technology would drive pro
ducers to sanitize programs to avoid
earning the 1990s version of the scar
let letter.
“It will make television even more
bland than it already is,” she says.
Strossen favors the development of
a “choice chip” to allow parents to sub
scribe to any rating system they want,
whether designed by Parents maga
zine or the Christian Coalition.
Strossen is a magna cum laude
“Cyberspace truly
does allow highly
individualized
decision-making as
to what you will see
or won’t see.”
- Nadine Strossen,
ACLU president
graduate of Harvard Law School and
professor of constitutional law at New
York University. In 1991, Strossen,
then 40, became the youngest person
to be named president of the ACLU.
She took on MacKinnon and other
antipornography feminists in her
1995 book “Defending Pornography:
Free Speech, Sex, and the Fight for
Women’s Rights.” The book experience
increased Strossen’s discomfort with
the way conglomerates control the
media.
Scribner, her publisher, packaged
and marketed the book “with an eye
for the bottom line,” Strossen said,
ignoring her pleas to change the title
to something more accurate. “The title
conveys the complete misimpression
that I’m a cultural critic saying some
thing positive about pornography,”
Strossen said.
What she does believe, Strossen
said, is that cyberspace should be kept
as free as possible from corporate and
government controls.
‘The Internet could be a wonderful
counter to these developments,” she
said. “It allows every one of us to be
our own publisher. It would be tragic
to have that exciting new medium be
subject to these unconstitutional con
straints.”
ters. And though British Prime
Minister John Major recently
pledged that London would to do all
it can to send the Vietnamese home
before the Union Jack comes down
next year, such efforts may run into
big trouble - Hong Kong’s boat peo
ple are growing increasingly aggres
sive.
Earlier this month, they held a
security guard hostage for 12 hours
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< • • * vi
PAGE 8
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
MARCH 31, 1996
nm SNOWMOBILE PRE-SEASON SALEHO
UP TO $ 650
SNOW CHECK & _ „„ 1<=
POLRRE
FREE CLUB JACKET S ““" DS
LaBARON’S SPORTS
34711 Dequindre, Troy, Mi
Believe It.
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HOURS: MON., THURS., FRI. 10-8
TUES., WED. & SAT. 10-6
SPECIAL SUNDAY HOURS: 11-4 PM
VOTE
Judge
Sean F.
cox
WAYNE COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT
Friends of Belle Isle
Are seeking qualified individuals to fill
vacant directors seats. Candidates should
be willing to give a minimum 5 hours a
month. Submit resumes emphasizing par
ticular skills which you feel can be utilized
by this volunteer tax exempt, organiza
tion. Send resumes by April 12, 1996 to
Friends of Belle Isle, 8909 E. Jefferson,
Detroit, Ml 48214, Atten: Board Position.
Resumes can be faxed to (313) 884-9527
or e-mailed to a-L7141 @ix.netcom.com.
LOCAL,
372
SUPPORTS THE STRIKING
NEWSPAPER WORKERS
AND THE DETROIT
SUNDAY JOURNAL
SOLIDARITY FOREVER!
DON LINGAR
PRESIDENT
J.
The Rochester Area
Democratic Club
Supports
Striking Newspaper
Workers!!
Join us I
Meetings are the 2nd Thursday
of every month at 7:30 pm and
are held at the Rochester Hills
Precinct 5 Building, (corner of
Auburn & Emmons/Auburn
between Dequindre & John R)
For more info, call:
( 810 ) 656-5777
Local 599
%
\
Cola On
Pensions
In 1906
Teamsters Local 25 - Boston, MA
George W. Cashman, President
oliilSito
Supports the Striking
Newspaper Workers
*rt* {f*% U 4 «
9tt
NO
SC A
Supporters of
striking
newspaper
employees march
down Fort Street
Thursday from
the Detroit News
to the Detroit
Free Press. More
than 60 people,
none strikers,
were arrested at
the rally,
sponsored by
Readers United.
Journal photo by PATRICIA BECK
Oakland Press takes over
as county’s top newspaper
By John Lippert
Journal Labor Writer
What’s the biggest daily newspaper
in Oakland County, the yuppie home
land that advertisers want most? It’s
the Oakland Press, according to Media
Audit, a Houston pollster.
The Detroit News and Free Press
tried to buy exclusive rights to the
poll, apparently so they could sit on it.
No wonder. In November/December,
according to the data, the Oakland
Press reached 20.7 percent of the
county’s 857,400 adults. The Free
Press reached 20.3 percent and the
News 12.1 percent. Before the current
strike, the Freep was leading the
Oakland Press by at least 10 percent
age points.
In an effort to boost circulation,
Mike Cashin, a suburban distribution
manager for the Detroit dailies, had
his staff post fliers on lots of telephone
poles last week, asking 12- to 16-year-
old kids to go door to door soliciting
subscriptions. He promised $50-$ 150
per week. Marilyn Svaluto, principal
of Gerisch Middle School in Southgate,
had the fliers removed. School officials
would be remiss, she said, if by letting
the fliers stay they seemed to support
the newspapers’ use of replacement
workers.
At the same time, Shifrin-
Hayworth, a Southfield market
research firm, was busy running focus
groups for the News and Free Press.
At a Thursday meeting of 12 readers
who’d been screened carefully for,
among other things, race, religion and
TV viewing habits, seven voted to sup
port the strikers, four voted for the
newspapers, and one abstained, a par
ticipant said. They were paid $75 for
showing up. Ministers who’d previous
ly signed a statement supporting the
strikers were worth just $50 to show
up and react to “proposals for ending
the standoff” as described by Shifrin-
Hayworth.
The National Labor Relations
Board, meanwhile, again delayed a
trial on what it regards as the news
papers’ labor law violations. The delay,
the newspaper strike
until April 15, allows all sides to
review stacks of subpoenaed docu
ments. It doesn’t mean much legally,
but some strikers were dismayed.
The Wall Street Journal, quoting an
NLRB official, said the delay was
requested by the newspapers. The
Detroit News blamed the delay on
union attorneys.
In other labor news
■ Tony Mazocchi, former head of the
Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers
union, was in Detroit last week to pro
mote Labor Party Advocates. The
group, endorsed by unions with a mil
lion members, will launch a Labor
Party at a convention in Cleveland in
June. “The bosses have two parties,”
Mazocchi said. “We need one of our
own.” For information, call 202-234-
5194.
■ UAW Local 160 at the General
Motors Tech Center, after counting up
proceeds from a March 12 spaghetti
dinner, announced it has raised
$51,000 for striking newspaper work
ers.
■ Mike Oblak, chairman of UAW Local
900 at the Ford assembly plant in
Wayne, received a written company
apology after a Free Press reporter
participated in a March 19 ceremony
launching the new Escort. The
Freepster, according to Ford flacks,
snuck in without permission.
■ Jeff Washington, the UAW president
at the Wayne plant, was one of 67
unionists arrested last week after
blocking the Freep front door. “Unions
were born here in Detroit,”
Washington said. “If they die here,
they die all over the country.” Similar
sentiments will be heard on
Wednesday morning, when 2,000
UAW delegates, after concluding their
own meetings at Cobo Hall, are slated
to march en masse on the News and
Free Press buildings.


MARCH 31, 1996
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 9
State photo
group honors
Daymon Hartley
Dramatic photos from the
Detroit newspaper
strike earned a Detroit
Sunday Journal staff
photographer honors in this
year’s Michigan Press
Photographers Association’s
annual photo contest.
Daymon J. Hartley won second
place in the news photo story cat-
egory for his strike
coverage.
The shot of
Sterling Heights
Police Lt. Jack
Severance kicking
pressman Frank
Brabanec outsids the Detroit
Newspapers’ north plant, top, is
one of the most notorious images
of the more than eight-month-old
strike.
Hartley also captured picketers
squaring off against Sterling
Heights police using pepper
spray against them.
A Clarkston resident, Hartley is
married to striking Free Press
reporter Margaret Trimer-
Hartley and the father of a 5-
month-old son.
Photos by DAYMON J. HARTLEY
Teamsters lobby Kmart for seat on board
By Vickie Elmer
Journal Business Writer
First it was institutional sharehold
ers standing up to Kmart manage
ment. Last year, laid-off workers and
some employees gave them the works.
This year, it may be the Teamsters
tearing into Kmart’s executives and
strategy at its annual meeting.
The International Brotherhood of
Teamsters has started a campaign to
elect one director to Kmart’s board of
directors. The candidate: Stephen
Hester, a 59-year-old investment
banker and attorney who has worked
with organized labor for some 20 years.
The Teamsters, who represent some
Kmart warehouse workers in several
states, aren’t stopping there. They’re
challenging Kmart’s directors to con
sider a sale or merger, and pushing
directors to eliminate their own pen
sion plans, much the way management
cut off workers’ basic pension plans
last year.
Still, Hester said in an interview
with the Detroit Sunday Journal:
“This isn’t about a revolution at
Kmart. It’s about communication”
with shareholders.
Hester will start communicating on
Monday, with a speech to the Council
of Institutional Investors. The group is
composed of major shareholders such
as pension funds and money man
agers.
Kmart, which has racked up more
than a dozen quarters of lower earn
ings, isn’t happy about the Teamsters’
attention. The Troy-based company
thinks it’s making progress with its
own executives and strategy to make
the company profitable and competi
tive with Wal-Mart and Target.
In a preliminary prospectus filed
last week, the Teamsters said “a turn
around of our company is far from
assured.” It urged Kmart shareholders
to vote in favor of Hester and three
proposals backed by the Teamsters
and UNITE, another union.
This isn’t the first time unions have
4 '- ( - ‘ t. iki'j j ? « , f i-, j } ,V, ' • r i ,
targeted Kmart, which operates large
ly as a non-union labor force. The
United Food and Commercial Workers
union urged shoppers to go to other
stores since Kmart’s grocery workers
do not have union representation,
health benefits and more. Kmart
workers in North Carolina are trying
to organize and have drawn communi
ty support. Some Teamsters spoke out
at Kmart’s 1995 annual meeting
because of unsafe working conditions
and other problems at a warehouse.
And Kmart is one of a number of major
retailers targeted by striking newspa
per workers for continuing its adver
tisements in the Detroit Free Press
and Detroit News.
The Teamsters had hoped that
Kmart’s Chairman Floyd Hall would
agree to appoint Hester to the board.
But those negotiations went nowhere
and the unions took their case to
shareholders.
Just this month, Hall named three
other directors. They are James B.
* mmm
Adamson, 47, chairman and CEO of
Flagstar Cos. Inc.; Robert D. Kennedy,
63, retired chairman and CEO of
Union Carbide Corp., and William P.
“Pat” Weber, vice chairman of Texas
Instruments Inc.
Hester is the senior partner of
American Capital Strategies Ltd. and
worked for a number of years for a law
firm that represented labor clients. He
bought 1,000 Kmart shares on Feb. 9.
He has worked with the Teamsters
before, helping with Northwest Air
lines concessions and employee owner
ship and representing unions in a
number of cases.
If he’s on Kmart’s board, though,
Hester says he will represent share
holders. He concedes he may have
“greater sensitivity and experience in
human resources issues” than other
board members do, but said his goal is
increasing shareholders’ values.
Said Hester: “You do have a greater
freedom if you come in from outside
than if you’re nominated from inside.”


PAGE 10 S
MARCH 31, 1996
“The Detroit Sunday Journal has more in-depth reporting!!!
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MOBIL GAS
Ford & Gulley
Ford Rd. & Wyoming
Michigan & Outer Dr.
PLACE MKT.
4200 Schaefer
RIVER OAKS PHARMACY
20145 Ann Arbor Trail
SUNOCO GAS
12841 Michigan Ave.
VARIETY FOOD MINI MART
7345 Schaefer
DEARBORN HGTS.
AMOCO GAS
Ford & Gulfey
BARRELS OF FUN
Warren and Telegraph
KURK BROTHERS HARDWARE
Van Born
MARATHON FOOD CENTER
Telegraph & Hass
MARATHON GAS
Warren & Gulley
Ford & Silvery Lane
MOBIL GAS
27349 W. Warren at Inkster
27380 Cherry Hill at Inkster
Ford & Beech Daly
Ford & Gulley
SAVE-MOR
Telegraph & Joy
SHELL GAS
Ford & Telegraph
SATURN FOODS
25100 Van Born
STACEY MOBIL GAS
27327 Van Born
TRI-DALY DRUGS
Ford & Beech Daly
VIP CAR WASH
Ford & Inkster
WISE OWL BOOK STORE
Ford & Beech Daly
XPRESS 500 CITGO
8438 Telegraph
DETROIT
DOWNTOWN
CALUMET
300 Ren. Cen.
CASS CAFE
4620 Cass
CASS CORRIDOR FOOD CO-OP
Cass & Willis
CITY COUNTY BLDG.
2 Woodward
EPICUREAN SMOKE SHOP
645 Griswold (Penobscot)
FOOD PLAZA ONE
555 Brush
HILL & HILL
300 E. Jefferson, Tower 200
JIMMY ZACKS
1600 W. Fort
MICH. STATE ASSOCIATION
LETTER CARRIERS
400 Trumbull
OMNI PHARMACY
333 E. Jefferson
STAR DRUGS
660 Woodward at Fort
TERESA’S SMOKE SHOP
660 Woodward at Fort
UNIVERSITY MARKET
2nd & Prentis
A & W MARKET
17275 9 Mile
BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSTORE
Mack & Moross
BP GAS
Jefferson & Alter
CHENE TROMBLY MARKET
3700 E. Edsel Ford
CITGO GAS
8 Mile & VanDyke
Jefferson & Mt. Elliot
EASTWOOD NURSING CENTER
E. Grand River & Charlevoix
ERA (New Center Realty)
3040 E. Grand Blvd.
GABE’S MKT
15435 E. Warren
H & A MARKET
9504 Whittier
HANDY SPOT PARTY STORE
8 Mile & Redmond
HAYES & TROESTER MKT
Hayes & Troester
HIBBARD PARTY STORE
8935 E. Jefferson
HOLY COMMUNION CHURCH
11111 Whittier
HONEST JOHN’S
416 Field
1-75 WARREN SHELL
980 E. Warren
JEFF-CHENE SHELL
Jefferson & Chene
J & J MKT.
13990 Gratiot
L & T FOODS
10240 Whittier
LIQUOR & CO.
1680 E. Grand Blvd.
MARATHON GAS
8 Mile & Mound
MARYLAND BEV.
15015 Mack
MCDONNELL DRUG
16636 Harper
MOBIL GAS
Chalmers & Houston-Whittier
8 Mile & Gratiot
MR S PARTY STORE
12337 Morang
MR S SHOPPE'GO
15803 Mack
NARRAS MKT
7 Mile'& Schoenherr
NEW COLONY MARKET
12018 Morang
NINO'S MKT
15901 E. Warren
PARKIES PARTY STORE
17255 Mack
PETE SCOTT MKT
4230 Anderson
PICADILLY MKT
8 Mile & Schoenherr
RIGHT STOP
7 Mile & Hoover
ROYAL FOOD
8 Mile & Boulder
7-11
11052 Morang
17631 E. Warren
SHELL GAS
Cadieux & Harper
SHENNA'S LIQUOR
7875 E. Jefferson
ST. RITA CHURCH
1000 E. State Fair
THRIFTY FOODS
15200 E. Warren
UNIVERSAL MKT
16226 E. Warren
WALTHAM DRUGS
6 Mile & Waltham
WINE BASKET PARTY STORE
16450 E.Warren
WRIGLEY PARTY STORE
Gratiot & Lorreto
YALDO PARTY STORE
15500 E. Warren
YORKSHIRE MARKET
16711 Mack
ALL AMERICAN FOODS
Dearborn Ave. & I-75
AMANDA MARKET
8128 Fullerton
AMOCO GAS
18137 Joy Rd.
15525 Schoolcraft & Greenfield
B-MART
17537 Grand River & Longacre
BENCHMARK MKT
Joy & Prest
BIG VALLEY MARKET
14120 Wyoming
BOOK CORNER
19621 W. McNicholS
BP GAS
15303 Fenkell & Whitcomb
Livernois & I-94
Warren & Evergreen
19840 W. Warren
Outer Drive & 1-96
BREAKTIME PARTY STORE
3440 Wyoming
CALIFORNIA BAR-B-Q
16810 Joy
CARSON’S
8642 Puritan
CITGO
Warren & Livernois
10000 Wyoming
16343 Fenkell & Ferguson
15911 Livernois
CITY CONEY ISLAND
Vernor & Springwells
CITY FOOD MKT.
Fort & Junction
CLARK OIL
15880 Livernois
COZY CORNERS
18750 W. Warren
DETROIT PALACE
8105 Fenkell
DOG HOUSE CONEY ISLAND
19334 W. Warren
DULY’S CONEY ISLAND
Junction & Vernor
DUNKIN DONUTS
20005 W. Warren
EASY STOP MARKET
15000 Fenkell
* EXPRESS MKT.
Livernois & Devereaux
FOODLAND
20441 Puritan
FARMER ZEKE
7 Mile & Schaefer
FILLUP GAS
Michigan & Casper
GEORGE’S CONEY ISLAND
Michigan & Gilbert
GLENN LIQUOR
1000 W. Chicago
GRAND RIVER COM. MKT.
16535 Grand River
GRAND RIVER EXPRESS
16210 Grand River
GREATER GRACE CHURCH
7 Mile & Schaefer
HANNON'S PARTY STORE
16611 W. Warren
IN & OUT
6 Mile & Huntington
6 Mile & Trinity
19000 W. Warren
JIMMY ZACK’S
1600 W, Fort
JORDAN’S REST.
Michigan* & Martin* ’ ’
KELLY’S TRUCK STOP
377 S. Schaefer
KENNEDY'S LIQUOR
13344 W. 7 Mile Rd. & Snowden
LA BELLAS PIZZA
Michigan & Addison
LAWNDALE MKT.
Lawndale & Chamberlain
LIQUOR LOCKER
Michigan & Lawndale
METRO FOOD
Warren & Cicotte
MGM
13433 8 Mile at Schaefer
MOBIL GAS
7 Mile & Southfield
13151 Grand River
15510 Fenkell
Clark & 1-75
Dix & Vernor
Springwells & 1-75
8820 Wyoming
17221 Schoolcraft
MOTT’S
Fort & Green
NARAS MKT.
19535 Warren
NATIONAL FOOD MKT.
Fort & Green
ORAM'S MARKET
Michigan & Lumley
PARADISE FOODS
7747 Puritan
PARTY PLUS
9924 Wyoming
PAY N SAVE
Michigan & Wesson
PIASKOWSKI DRUG STORE
Michigan & Florida
PICK-N-PARTY
7 Mile & Shaiwassee
PRINCE VALLEY
Michigan & Wesson
PURITAN COMM. MARKET
8910 Puritan
QUALITY MKT.
Michigan & Addison
R0SEDALE DRUGS
6 Mile & Southfield
SAVE UP
2041 Puritan
SEMMA'S MKT.
19345 W. Warren
SENATE CONEY ISLAND
Michigan & Cicotte
7-11
Telegraph & Joy
7-TEL PARTY STORE
7 Mile & Appleton
SHELL GAS
13600 Fenkell & Schaefer
13580 Grand River
17776 Grand River
11511 Wyoming
SPECIAL WAY MARKET
19322 Grand River
SPOTLIGHT LIQUOR
6 Mile & Wormer
SPRINGWELLS LIQUOR
Springwells & Gartner
STARLITE REST.
Michigan & 52nd
SUNFLOWER BAKERY
18900 W. Warren
SUNOCO GAS
Vernor & Woodmere
W. Grand Blvd. & Vernor
Warren & Wyoming
TARGET MKT.
12603 Dexter
TELWAY HAMBURGERS
Michigan & Martin
TRUMBULL/BAGLEY MARKET
Corner of Trumbull & Bagley
TODAY STORE
6 Mile & Lahser
TRADEWINDS
Livernois & Santa Clara
UNION 76
14444 Fenkell & Strathmoor
15439 Schoolcraft & Greenfield
6 Mile & Winston
8 Mile & Meyers
Michigan & Wesson
Vernor & Central
UNIQUE MKT.
Lawndale & Lake
WALLY’S MARKET
7 Mile & Lenore
YUM-YUM DONUTS
Michigan & Wyoming
ECORSE
AMOCO GAS
4445 W. Jefferson
BIG VALUE
3425 W. Jefferson
CITGO
111 Southfield
151 Southfield
4165 W. Jefferson
4167 W. Jefferson
ECORSE FAMILY VIDEO
3859 W. Jefferson
LOVELAND DRUG STORE
4030 W. Jefferson
!. >.• a is Vt■. h'i (.-'o M j V\
FLAT ROCK
JIM’S BUTCHER SHOP
28418 Telegraph
MARATHON GAS
Telegraph
SUNOCO GAS
S. Telegraph
MOBIL GAS
28453 Telegraph
SUNOCO GAS
S. Telegraph
GROSSE ILE
GROSSE ILE BAKERY
7767 Macomb at E. River Rd.
GROSSE PTE.
ALGER DELI & LIQUOR
173200 Mack
NOTRE DAME PHARMACY
Kercheval & St. Clair
GROSSE PTE. PARK
FAIRFAX MARKET
Fairfax & Beaconsfield
PARK SQUARE MARKET
15230 Charlevoix & Beaconsfield
VILLAGE WINE SHOP
Jefferson & Beaconsfield
GROSSE PTE. WOODS
BOB’S DRUGS
Mack & Roslyn
MERIT WOODS PHARMACY
19325 Mack
HAMTRAMCK
ALEXANDER’S BOOKSTORE
12104 Conant
CONANT SUPERMARKET
9729 Conant
CONANT MARKET
11303 Conant
DALE’S
3041 Holbrook
MOBIL GAS
Caniff & I-75
ROADRUNNER’S RAFT
2363 Yeman at Brombach
SHELL GAS
6 Mile & Conant
PAPER PLACE
9417 Conant
VIDEO 22
12495 Conant
WALLY'S VIDEO
11841 Conant
WALTER’S SHOPPING PLACE
1297 Conant
WHIZZBANG BOOKSTORE
11417 Joseph Campau
WINNER’S SQUARE
12169 Jos. Campau
HARPER WOODS
AMOCO GAS
8 Mile & Kelly
MARATHON GAS
Kelly & Eastwood
SHELL GAS
19202 Harper & Kingsville
INKSTER
CHERRY BELT PARTY STR
29395 Cherry Hill & Middlebelt
DR. FUN
20017 Michigan nr. Beech Daly
METRO LIQUOR
27455 Cherry Hill & Inkster
UNION 76
1021 Inkster
LINCOLN PARK
AMOCO GAS
27520 Outer Dr. at I-75
QUICK GAS
Moran & Dix
D. B. MARKET
1086 Dix
FREEWAY LIQUOR
2568 Dix at Champaign
MOBIL GAS
Goddard & Fort
7-11
Dix & Moran
1010 Southfield & Ferris
1365 Dix & Cicotte
3833 Dix
RIVER DRIVE MARKET
455 Southfield
MELVINDALE
KELLY’S MOBIL MKT.
18060 Allen Rd.
LOU’S 7-11
18210 Allen Rd.
MELVINDALE MARKET
17973 Allen Rd.
TOM-BOY MARKET
4 18800 Dix Ave.. .
UNION 76 GAS MART
4310 Oakwood
VINEYARD PARTY STORE
24692 Outer Drive
METRO AIRPORT
Royal Hotel Gift Shop
NEW BOSTON
COUNTRY PANTRY
36888 Huron River Dr.
NEW BOSTON IGA MARKET
36961 Huron River Dr.
TELLA-FOODS TWO
21005 Middlebelt at King
NEWPORT
BREST BAY PARTY STORE
4990 N. Dixie
FERMI III
N. Dixie
REDFORD
KWICKY LIQUOR
25825 7 Mile & Beech Daly
MOBIL GAS
Telegraph & W. Chicago
REDFORD FOOD MKT.
27222 Grand River
7 MILE ONE SHOP
27221 W. 7 Mile
7-11
Schoolcraft & Inkster
RIVER ROUGE
AAA LIQUOR
10700 W. Jefferson
BI-RITE
W. Jefferson near KFC
FRANK’S QUICK STOP
11347 W. Jefferson
J’S MARKET
10432 W. Jefferson
LEE'S MKT.
10249 W. Jefferson
PET PARTY SHOPPE
99 Leroy
SUNOCO GAS
1030 W. Jefferson
RIVERVIEW
ACE DISCOUNT
17108 Fort
DAIRY MART
12705 Pennsylvania
LIQUOR STORE
12860 Sibley
ROCKWOOD
SAM'S LIQUOR
32117 Old Fort
ROMULUS
BP GAS
15024 Middlebelt & Eureka
GOLDEN GALLON PARTY STORE
37575 Huron River Dr.
MADCO TRUCK PLAZA
27416 Ecorse at Inkster
MID-SIBLEY PARTY STORE
18957 Middlebelt at Sibley
MOBIL GAS
35426 Goddard at Wayne
POLKA DOT PANTRY
37135 Goddard Rd.
ROYCE GIFT SHOP
31500 Wick Road
ROMULUS PETRO
29240 Ecorse at Middlebelt
WINK MARKET
9152 Inkster
2-MART
13034 Huron River Dr.
SOUTHGATE
AWAN SHELL
12660 Fort
BUSSATTIS' PARTY STORE
12868 Eureka
MARATHON GAS
13169 Northline
NORTHLINE AMOCO
15300 Northline
NORTHLINE DRUGS
13894 Northline
ROYAL DISCOUNT
13772 Fort
SIX STARS RESTAURANT
14900 Fort
SAM’S AMOCO
19141 Goddard
7-11
14555 Dix-Toledo Rd.
19313 Eureka & Trenton Rd.
14515 Northline
, V ,14426 Pennsylvania Rd.
TAYLOR
ALL SEASONS PARTY
Van Born & Beck
AMOCO GAS
9225 Telegraph & Wick
CITGO
27350 Eureka & Inkster
10924 Telegraph & Goddard
THE CORDIAL SHOPPE
9045 Telegraph & Mary
GET’n’GO PARTY STORE
10950 Beech Daly & Goddard
GODDARDVIEW LAUNDROMAT
21270 Goddard
JEFF’S PARTY STORE
8744 Pelham
MARATHON GAS
11000 Telegraph & Goddard
Van Born & Monroe
MITCH’S PIZZA & SUBS
16950 Allen & Pennsylvania
MOBIL GAS
12980 Telegraph & Northline
Telegraph & Eureka
THE NEWSBOYS
Across from Merry-Go-Round
Inside Southland Shop. Ctr.
NORM’S MKT.
25760 Ecorse Rd.
PARTY FACTORY
22399 Northline & Pardee
PARDEE MART
7110 Pardee & Ecorse
R&R RENDEZVOUS
20648 Ecorse
SAX DISCOUNT DRUGS
22455 Wick & Pardee
SAX DISCOUNT STORE
24730 Eureka & Troy
7-11
20945 Ecorse Rd.
26150 Eureka & Harold
9300 Northline & Wier
Pardee & Wick
SHELL GAS
14850 Telegraph & Eureka
TAYLOR PARTY STORE
9018 Telegraph & Wick
UNION 76
25775 Eureka & Beech Daly
VERMONT LIQUOR
20212 Ecorse
WICKVIEW PARTY STORE
4182 Mortenview & Wick
TRENTON
AMOCO GAS
4407 Fort St.
DAIRY MART
3720 Fort
MARATHON GAS
3610 West
MOBIL GAS
1875 West Rd.
RON’S PARTY STORE
3800 Fort
7-11
1901 King
2842 Grange
UNION 76
3461 W. Jefferson
WOODHAVEN
AMOCO GAS
Allen Rd. & Van Horn
West Rd. & I-75
MOBIL GAS
West Rd. & Allen
7-11
Allen Rd. & Vreeland
SHELL GAS
Hall Rd. & West Rd.
VREELAND MKT.
Allen Rd. & Vreeland
WAYNE
AL’S MARKET
4568 Howe & Wayne Rd.
CRAZY BARB’S BOOKSTORE
3127 S. Wayne
SECOND STREET MARKET
4090 Second
UNION 76
35512 Michigan
WYANDOTTE
7-11
Northline & 12th
Biddle & Chestnut
SHELL GAS
Oak & Fort
STARR'S PARTY STORE
Eureka & 23rd
TARGET LIQUOR
Biddle & Clark
Detroit/Do wtnriver
A PUBLICATION SY STRIKING DETROIT NEW$PAPE» WORKERS


MARCH 31, 1996
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 11
Outsourcing, wages are key UAW issues
MM*
MR
Journal photo by PATRICIA BECK
From left, with satin jacket, Jeff Washington, UAW Local 900; Bob King, UAW Region 1A director; Oten Wyatt, UAW Local 157.
Bargaining
strategies
UAW delegates gather in
Detroit on Monday to plan bar
gaining strategies for the next
three years. Priorities include:
Outsourcing: The UAW
believes it lost the Caterpillar
strike in part because too much
work had been sent to outside
companies in prior years. To pre
vent that at Detroit automakers,
it will press for a greater say in
investment decisions and tighter
minimum requirements on total
jobs. The companies will press for
flatter wages in parts factories.
Work time: The UAW will try
to follow German autoworkers
toward the 35-hour work week, in
part to create more jobs.
Pensions: Autoworkers can
retire after 30 years of service.
Many don’t, in part because
they’re afraid that inflation will
erofle living standards. Many
autoworkers, then, want cost-of-
living adjustments on future pen
sions.
Wages: For the last decade,
three-year UAW-Big Three con
tracts provided a base wage
increase of three percent, plus two
lump-sum payments equal to
three percent of base wages.
Nobody has talked much about
changing this formula now. The
AFL-CIO’s new slogan, however,
is “America Needs a Raise.”
Health care: Labor and man
agement in Detroit hoped
President Bill Clinton’s health
care plan would help cut costs.
They can’t look to Washington for
help now, but they know that
health care cuts would cause an
uproar among rank-and-file work
ers. The upshot: Look for stronger
collaborative efforts to pressure
doctors, hospitals and other
providers to cut waste.
-John Lippert
By John Lippert
Journal Labor Writer
With apologies to Charles Dickens,
we’ll call this “A Tale of Two Brake
Plants.”
In Dayton, Ohio, when General
Motors ordered anti-lock brakes for
future models from a low-wage com
pany in South Carolina, the UAW
went on strike. It shut down two
dozen GM assembly plants in three
countries. It relented after GM agreed
to preserve hundreds of UAW jobs.
Doug Fraser, the union’s retired presi
dent, said that inside Big Three facto
ries, “the UAW is more powerful today
than it’s ever been in history, because
we maintain the power to shut down
plants.”
In Ypsilanti, Motor Wheel Corp. said
it would close a brake factory after
210 UAW workers refused to cut
hourly pay from $16 to $5. The plant
makes disc brakes and brake drums
for Chrysler and Ford. In recent years,
machinery has been pulled out and
shifted to a new, non-union facility in
Homer, Mich., and to a new factory in
Monterrey, Mexico.
The company is planning a new fac
tory in Tennessee or Kentucky. It
helped the Monterrey plant win a cov
eted “ISO 9000” rating for tough qual-
ity-control methods. It refused to pro
vide similar help to the Ypsilanti
plant, which will die without the new
rating.
Bob King, director of UAW Region
1A, says the union is “adamantly
opposed” to the Motor Wheel closing.
He’s worried that concessions there
would undercut UAW wage scales at
unionized suppliers like Kelsey-Hayes
and Allied Signal, and in Big Three
plants themselves. Besides, he says,
“Chrysler and Ford have a real moral
obligation to the workers at Motor
Wheel, which has been producing
high-quality parts for them for years
and years.”
As 2,000 UAW delegates gather in
Detroit on Monday to plan bargaining
strategies for the next three years,
their main concern will be fighting
outsourcing, or the movement of Big
Three jobs to outside companies.
Most observers expect the UAW to
open talks at Chrysler, which has
promised huge investments recently
in UAW plants in Detroit and in
Kokomo, Ind. “The game will really
get going,” according to Harley
Shaiken, a University of California
labor expert, if the union asks GM to
sign a Chrysler-style contract.
To block more outsourcing, the UAW
may press for tighter constraints on
the total number of jobs. It may ask
the automakers to restrict anti-union
activities among suppliers by, among
other things, requiring them to recog
nize a union whenever a majority of
workers sign membership cards. In
return, the automakers would
demand concessions, possibly includ
ing flatter wage growth inside their
own parts plants.
Other issues this fall will include
cost-of-living adjustments on pen
sions, shorter work weeks and tighter
controls on health costs. The UAW will
try to work more closely with the
Canadian Auto Workers and the
International Union of Electrical
Workers, two unions which also repre
sent Big Three workers.
Ultimately, the UAWs biggest chal
lenge lies not at Big Three bargaining
tables, but in the hearts and minds of
Americans for whom unions are
increasingly irrelevant. The union has
organized only a handful of the hun
dreds of auto assembly and parts
plants which German and Japanese
automakers have opened from south
ern Ohio to Alabama. It’s failed for
decades to win support for Democratic
presidential candidates in blue-collar
strongholds like Taylor, Mich.
The most dramatic evidence that
the UAW is willing to confront these
challenges lies in the area of union
reform.
Stephen Yokich, the UAW leader,
helped elect John Sweeney as presi
dent of the AFL-CIO. Under Sweeney,
the federation is intensifying organiz
ing drives, forging tighter links with
overseas workers and spending heavi
ly to help Democrats recapture the
U.S. House of Representatives.
Yokich is an architect of “Big Metal,”
the merger between the UAW, the
Steelworkers and the Machinists. By
the year 2000, “Big Metal” will include
two million members and will resem
ble IG Metall, the powerful union of
German metalworkers.
UAW leaders believe they lost the
Caterpillar strike last year because
they had allowed the company, during
a period of labor-management detente
in the late 1980s, to shift critical com
ponent jobs to outside factories. One of
those is an Illinois factory where
workers belonging to the Machinists
union kept working during the UAW
strike.
The formation of “Big Metal,” pre
sumably, would prevent a repeat of
such debacles.


yTP^pirryr—^
k
«.■«•***! S> i "h,
GM’s new minivans promise to be more ‘carlike’
You won’t see the new Opel Sintra
minivan in American showrooms, but
its kissing cousins will show up some
time this fall.
The new General Motors Corp.
minivans for the U.S. market — the
Chevrolet Venture, Pontiac Trans
Sport and Oldsmobile Silhouette —
will debut on Wednesday at the New
York Auto Show.
GM has kept the wraps tightly on
the 1997 successor to its plastic bod
ied minivans. While it acknowledges
“some differences” between the Sintra
and the U.S. models, they’re all built
on the same platform from the same
production line in Doraville, Ga.
Based on the family relationship of
the German Opel model, introduced at
the Geneva auto show in early March,
the long-awaited GM minivans will
be:
■ Strong and steely. A galvanized steel
body on the new U van will replace
the plastic shell of the earlier version.
While a rampaging shopping cart
wouldn’t dent the plastic, a boon for
owners, GM always had trouble mak
ing a profit using the composite mate
rial because of the expense.
■ More like a car in look and feel. The
Sintra, already previewed by GM’s
Opel subsidiary in Germany, shows a
softened, more carlike profile, with
none of those red rocket taillights
blazing down the road. In the U.S.
models, a more distinct separation
between engine and passenger com
partments should mean a less clois
tered feel and easier access to the
engine compartment for repairs. The
vans also will have more of a “carlike
feel” and handling.
■ Wide open. The No. 1 U.S. automak
er learned from others’ mistakes and
designed in a sliding fourth passenger
door in addition to a rear lift-gate.
GM has a lucrative market to tap
with this new entry. Last year it built
about 110,000 of the old version vans.
With the Opel version estimated to
account for about 50,000, GM is
expected to build as many as 200,000
of the new vans a year, according to
the Pennsylvania research firm
Autofacts International.
GM’s previous minivan was intro
duced as a 1990 model. During the
1995 model year, the three versions
had combined sales of 96,585, or 13.5
percent of the total 716,200 for the
front-wheel-drive US. minivan mar
ket.
- Martha Hindes
Barter broker puts
businesses in touch
a::;-;::;:?
... x* m
III 111
8
i tiiiaiiMH §
mmmm,
mm.
MARCH 31, 1996
By Greg Bowens
Journal Staff Writer
Native Detroiter David P. Turner is a
deal maker. Nearly every day, Turner
links small- and medium-sized Detroit
businesses with each other through his
eight-month-old company, Barter Detroit.
■ Need a men’s suit for an important
meeting but are low on cash? Check out
Hot Sam’s Clothier downtown.
■ How about a back adjustment before
that meeting? See Dr. Glass at Glass
Chiropractic Health Plaza on Eight Mile
Road.
■ The new suit needs cleaning? Try
Harbortown Cleaners.
Business owners pay a onetime fee of
$100 to join a network of about 100 busi
nesses that exchange services in lieu of
cash. The seller charges the barter cus
tomer in barter dollars equal to the cash
value. Then the seller uses barter credits
at another establishment in the network.
“The idea is to be able to save that cash
so you can take it and spend it someplace
else,” said Turner, who’s 31 and the
youngest of six siblings. “We are not talk
ing about using the barter system as a
substitute for cash but as a supplement.
This gives the small-business person
another way to conserve cash by switching
from their cash ledgers to their barter
ledger.”
Barter Detroit profits from a 10 percent
cash commission on the value of each
transaction. Turner said most deals are
now running under $500 each, but have
gone as high as $1,200. Barter Detroit is
averaging about $10,000 a month in trade
volume.
Turner, a 1982 graduate of Detroit’s
Cass Technical High School, said he
expects his company to reach $150,000 in
trade volume by the end of its first year.
* Turner worked for a while for J.C.
Penney in Texas, then joined a bartering
company as a sales representative. “I
thought it was something I could do short
term until I found a real job,” he says. It
fit him - he liked building relationships
and connecting people - so he moved to
Kentucky, and opened a franchised barter
business. But he missed Detroit, and so
last year he returned home.
Nationally, bartering is big business.
The Alexandria, Va.-based International
Reciprocal Trade Association reports that
commercial bartering accounted for some
$8.5 billion in sales transactions last year
and is expected to keep growing at a rate
of almost 11 percent a year.
A word of caution: Federal tax regula
tions classify bartering as cash transac
tions. Companies are required to report
bartered goods and services on their
taxes.
Still, Barter Detroit is starting to
attract some big names. River Place Inn,
Detroit Grand Prix, Wayne State
University Theater Group and the City of
Detroit Recreation Department have
done business through the barter net
work.
Sherman Sharp, owner of the Harle
quin Cafe, said being a member has
helped him.
“The exposure I get is almost as impor
tant as the money I save by trading,” he
said.
Barter Detroit's phone number is 313-
965-3072. It’s located at 243 W. Congress,
Suite 350, in Detroit.
PAGE 12
Journal photo by DAYMON J. HARTLEY
David Turner aims to help firms “save that cash” by swapping goods and services.


MARCH 31, 1996
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 13
When you overpay taxes, you undercut yourself
I hate income tax refunds.
No, the newspaper strike has
n’t made me lose my interest in
income. Money is still life’s
lubricant.
Indeed, it’s because I know the
importance of money that I hate
income tax refunds.
Large refunds are loans. In this
case, you are loaning your money to
the government.
When you receive
a large tax
refund, you are
merely getting
your own money
back. You gave
Washington too
much money in
the first place
and it is merely returning the loan.
Worse yet, Washington is return
ing the loan without paying any
interest.
Why let the government do that? It
doesn’t work the other way around. If
you owe taxes and don’t pay them by
April 15, the government will charge
you interest on the money until you
pay.
Plus penalties. Hefty penalties.
There’s a penalty for filing late (5
percent a month up to a maximum of
25 percent of the tax due). There’s a
penalty for filing on time but not pay
ing the full tax due (0.5 percent per
month to a maximum of 25 percent).
File a frivolous return and you
could be slapped with a $500 penalty.
File a fraudulent return and you
could be slapped with a penalty equal
to 75 percent of the underpayment
(plus fraudulent returns make IRS
agents very
cranky). Fail to
include every
body’s Social
Security numbers
and you could
pay a $50 penal
ty. Fail to provide
a tax shelter
number (if your
return includes those things) and you
could face a $250 penalty.
You can see it gets kind of ugly.
They can charge you all this money,
but you can’t charge them a dime for
holding your money all year.
So if you’re due a big refund this
year, consider taking some steps now
to reduce it next year.
How big is big? Well, consider that
the average refund is slightly less
than $1,400, compared to $1,200 in
1994.
Suppose you took that $1,200 last
year and invested $100 a month into
an average stock fund, say the
Vanguard Index 500 (800-851-4999),
which mimics the S&P 500. Last
year, the S&P 500 returned 37.6 per
cent, and your $1,200 would have
grown to $1,429.
That’s $229 for taking 30 seconds
out of every month and mailing $100
to the fund. (That’s $2,290 an hour, if
you figure your efforts as an hourly
wage. Not bad work, if you can get it.)
If you’re getting a large refund, go
to your payroll department and dis
cuss altering your W-4 form. That’s
the paper that tells your employer
how much to withhold from your pay
check and send to the IRS for taxes.
By increasing the number of
allowances you claim, your employer
will pass more of your money to you
in your paycheck.
How much should you increase the
W-4 by? If you’re in the 15 percent
tax bracket, each allowance increases
your annual take-home pay by about
$380. If you’re in the 28 percent
bracket, the increase is about $710
for each allowance. Each allowance
equals about $790 for those in the 31
percent tax bracket, $920 for those in
the 36 percent bracket.
If, for example, you’re in the 28 per
cent bracket, and you’re getting the
average $1,400 refund, increase your
withholding allowances by two, pro
vided your tax situation doesn’t
change.
For many people, however, a large
refund is a forced savings. It’s the
refunds that pay for this year’s vaca
tion. Or cut down those credit card
balances. Or buy that new washing
machine, TV or dishwasher.
Some thoughts, then, about what to
do with your increased take-home
pay:
■ Increase your 401(k) contributions.
■ Put the money into an IRA. The
contribution might reduce your taxes.
And the earnings grow tax-deferred.
■ Tell payroll to buy you U.S. Savings
Bonds each month. You won’t be
tempted to spend the money, plus
you’ll earn interest.
■ Instruct a bank to automatically
take the amount of your increased
weekly earnings from your checking
account and put the money into a
savings account.
This way, you’ll still be able to buy
that TV or go on that vacation. Plus
with the interest you’ll earn in the
account, you can afford an extra or
two.
Stephen
Advokat
Personal finance
A salute to 3 women who make a difference
March has all but slipped
away, but before it does,
I want to share three
success stories for this
last day of Women’s History Month.
These women do not show up in
many history books - yet. Their
names aren’t shared with students
- yet. Their accomplishments are
many, yet their work and aspira
tions continue.
These women - Millie Jeffrey,
Barbara Kasoff and Heidi Kunz -
and many like them are making
women’s history today through their
careers and their causes. They are
some of today’s women of achieve
ment who one day will make history
books.
At 83, Millie Jeffrey hasn’t slowed
down much from her myriad
involvements with labor, feminist
and community organizations and
issues. She still spends much time
at Wayne State University, though
she retired from the Board of
Governors in 1989; she still volun
teers for groups as diverse as the
Michigan Women’s Foundation and
the National Women’s Political
Caucus, which she helped found.
Her energy and enthusiasm are still
as clear as her sparkling blue eyes.
Jeffrey retired from the United
Auto Workers in 1978, but she stays
active in labor groups, including
Readers United, which supports
Vickie
Elmer
striking newspaper workers.
Much of her work focuses on gains
for women. In an interview with the
Journal last fall, she said women
have made significant progress in
many areas, but added:
“I want to know how and where
we can elect the first woman presi
dent of America.” Jeffrey will proba
bly serve on her election committee.
Barbara Kasoff is a numbers
woman, plus a woman who quietly
connects people, especially other
women in business. She’s president
of Livonia-based Voice-Tel of
Michigan, which provides voice mes
saging services to hundreds of busi
nesses and individuals. Her second
business, Voice Response Corp., col
lects, compiles and analyzes infor
mation for corporate clients.
Her companies are successful, yet
it’s her sharing of herself, her time
and her expertise that sets her
apart. She encourages women in
business. Last year, Kasoff was
named Michigan’s Women’s Business
Advocate by the Small Business
Administration. Kasoff is active in
the National Association of Women
Business Owners, where she works
to bring recognition and connections
to other women nationally (and
occasionally herself).
Her dangling earrings and casual
yet chic clothes contrast with her
methodical business brain and
amazing ability to recall hundreds
of Voice-Tel phone numbers for
women business owners around the
country.
Heidi Kunz has the sort of high-
profile position that could make her
a one-dimensional woman. As chief
financial officer for ITT Industries
and previously treasurer of General
Motors Corp., she controls more
cash flow than Niagara carries
water.
But Kunz also is the mother of
two children, 9-year Andrew and 6-
year-old Stacy. She calls them “the
other half of my life” and carves out
weekends and most evenings for
them.
Disciplined and organized, the 41-
year-old says she had no mentors in
her meteoric rise in GM’s treasurer’s
office. Earlier this year, ITT
Industries snatched her for one of
its senior executive positions.
Someday, I suspect, Kunz will serve
as a mentor from the CEO’s seat -
perhaps as the first female CEO of
an auto company.
Kunz, Kasoff and Jeffrey come
Heidi
KUIIZ, chief
financial officer for
ITT Industries, has
CEO potential.
Barbara
KaSOff, president
of Voice-Tel, was
picked as
Michigan Women’s
Business Advocate.
Millie
Jeffrey retired
from the UAW in
1978 and is still
active in labor
groups.
from three different career tracks
and have championed different
causes. But they share a belief in
women and what women can do.
They are challenging convention.
They courageously attack discrimi
nation. They show others how
women can succeed without aban
doning their feminine feelings and
approaches.


PAGE 14
MARCH 31, 1996 Publisher: William M. Brown
Co-editors: Susan Watson, Norman Sinclair
Managing Editor: Robin Mather
Published by Detroit Sunday Journal Inc.
3100 E. Jefferson
Detroit, Mich. 48207
1-313-567-9818
The Detroit Journal appears daily on the World Wide
Web at http://www.rust.net/~workers/strike.html
Member National Newspaper Association
Fact and fantasy
on Lafayette Boulevard
Indeed mommy, ] (Oh. So what’s .
the 'mad cow’ (Ffettg Buchanan _..L
is in America. up to no w • t@g . t
Third party’s time is coming
Occasionally, managers of
Detroit’s two daily newspa
pers venture cautiously into
public to repeat a well-
scripted company line on the current
newspaper strike.
Several of their points need cor
recting since these officials are not -
and have not been - telling the whole
story.
First, they say that the current
strike is a battle for control of the
company. If this is true, then they
must have been
negligent in their
duties to lose con
trol of the compa
ny in the first
place. Is that
what they’re say
ing? Uh, well, no.
Make no mistake
about it, folks:
The newspapers
control their
purse strings and
always have.
Unions don’t set
wages and bene
fits in a vacuum.
They also end
lessly repeat the canard that the
unions were guilty of featherbedding,
as if this practice was somehow
forced on them. In reality, they hap
pily agreed in 1992 to the contract
they now decry. Back then, they
laughed openly about how cheap they
had gotten the unions for - no raises
for three years.
This supposedly awful contract
also enabled them to make $56 mil
lion in 1994. They would have made
close to $100 million last year - had
they not forced a strike on their
workers.
Next, they say they are now getting
by just fine with fewer workers. In
truth, they need fewer workers
because they have-fewer ads, fewer
pages and a lot fewer subscribers,
since one-third of their readers have
rejected their tactics and stopped
buying them.
Next, they clumsily play the race
card, warbling that they have a much
more diverse workforce now. In reali
ty, they’ve confined that diversity
mainly to lower-paying jobs and don’t
tell you their news staffs are much
less diverse than they were before
the strike.
In an interesting concept of loyalty,
they also maintain they intend to
stand behind the people who have
come to Detroit in the last eight
months to replace your friends and
neighbors, instead of standing be
hind those who made their joint oper
ating agreement work and sacrificed
for years to get these two newspapers
into the black.
They also piously bleat that their
strike is not a ploy to close one paper.
Not much comfort since both compa
nies once said they’d never consider a
JOA in Detroit.
They conve
niently overlook
the violence com
mitted by their
paramilitary
security force and
their “hired” sub
urban police offi
cers. And they
sure haven’t said
much about the
Macomb County
prosecutor find
ing that the
newspapers like
ly set fire to one
of their own
delivery trucks last September to get
dramatic film footage to use against
the unions.
Sorry, News and Free Press, but
you have long since lost your moral
high ground to complain about strike
violence.
But one thing they say is true:
Things can’t go back to the way they
were before the strike. The Free
Press will never again be the Morn
ing Friendly, and the strike has
proved that you certainly cannot
Read All About It in the Detroit
News.
Things certainly are different now.
Hundreds of thousands of readers
have learned they can do without the
News and the Free Press. More than
50,000 people have signs on their
lawns saying they don’t want either
paper. And scores of civic and reli
gious leaders are being arrested
weekly for peacefully sitting in front
of the papers’ Lafayette Boulevard
offices to protest the Detroit News
papers’ stand.
For most businesses, this would be
a public relations nightmare.
For Detroit’s two daily newspapers,
it’s just the way they ignore reality to
do business these days.
So Sen. Bob Dole is now the
anointed choice of the Repub
lican Party, House Speaker
Newt Gingrich has agreed to
work with Dole to provide a unified
Republican message, Pat Buchanan
appears to be sliding slowly out of
sight and all is well.
Not quite.
Certainly it is in Dole’s and his
party’s best interest to act as if
Humpty-Dumpty has put himself
back together again. There he is on
that wall, telling everyone to not
mind the cracks, the rather large bits
of shell scattered on the ground or the
yolk running down his face. Humpty
isA-OK.
Not quite.
Although Buchanan’s candidacy
has now become, essentially, an inter
esting part of history, it will, in the
context of other disruptive forces on
the political landscape, have quite an
impact on the future. The same can be
said of Steve Forbes. The point is not
that these men eventually lost to a
party machine that was against them
from the start. Barring a truly revolu
tionary upsurge from Republican vot
ers, a victory against the anointed
was virtually an impossibility. The
machine is still strong and mighty -
but not like it used to be.
The same can be said for the
Democrats. Regardless of President
Bill Clinton’s huge campaign treasure
chest and his uncontested lock on the
nomination, the Democratic Party
can hardly be considered a unified
bunch. As has been noted by more
than one political analyst, it is a rag
tag collection of special-interest
groups that only happen to fall
beneath the Democratic umbrella
because the current political system
allows them nowhere else to go
unless they want to risk the
Independent route.
The current level of dissatisfaction
in the United States, with everything
from the job situation to government
to race relations to immigration to
(put your gripe here), makes it quite
likely that there will be a relatively
strong third party created within the
next decade or so that will be able to
present a true challenge to the main
stream parties. Both Republican and
Democratic candidates have tried
their best to cozy up to that dissatis
faction by claiming they are on the
outside, too, but that lie isn’t going to
be strong enough to hold up for long.
The one thing that may complicate
the formation of any major third
party is, ironically, the very reason
why both the Democratic and Repub
lican parties are beginning to frac
ture: stuck-on-one-issue subgroups.
The anti-abortionists, the pro-abor
tionists, the anti-free-traders, the
anti-immigrationists, the anti-gun
crowd, the save-our-weapons crowd,
and the family values/Christian
Coalition group are just a few.
These groups tend to be composed
of individuals who care passionately
about their one issue but not about
others. It will be difficult to round all
these very passionate, very disaffect
ed groups into a cohesive unit unless
they all learn to give and take.
If that ever happens, and if a can
didate arises who knows how to ap
peal to these groups as a whole, then
American politics will never be the
same - and that may not be so bad.
The Free Press
will never again
be the Morning
Friendly, and the
strike has proven
that you certainly
cannot Read All
About It in the
Detroit News.


MARCH 31, 1996
PAGE 15
Slashing state’s Adult Ed could be self-defeating
By Jim Anker
In his recent budget proposal to the
legislature, Gov. John Engler recom
mended the virtual elimination of
Adult Education in local public
schools. He advocates terminating
funding for students at age 20. If a
student hasn’t graduated by then, he
or she would receive only “training”
for jobs through the JOBS Commis
sion or would be expected to pay for
future education - even if he or she
had dropped out and had not previ
ously utilized the funds established
for that purpose.
I believe that this proposal, if
adopted, would have serious long-
range social policy implications for
Michigan. This recommendation
comes despite the fact that, in
Michigan alone, there are more than a
million adults over the age of 25 with
out a diploma.
One of the programs that most busi
ness, government and education lead
ers agree on the need for is “School-to-
Work.” One of the first and most sig
nificant School-to-Work programs in
the state is in jeopardy. Adult educa
tion is now and has been actively
involved in preparing the adult mem
bers of our community for entry and
participation in the workplace.
How have we done? I can report that
an average of 14,000 adults receive
their diplomas each year through
state adult education programs. These
adults, if they are representative of
national statistics developed by the
National Alliance of Business, will
each earn $325,000 more in their life
time as a result.
On top of this, 62% of children whose
parents did not
complete high
school, will live
in poverty. Ac
cording to the
National Cen
ter for Chil
dren in Pover
ty, this figure
falls to 19% if
just one parent
receives a di
ploma and to
almost 4% if both have graduated.
In addition, over 80% of prisoners
are high school dropouts. According to
the Mackinaw Center for Public Policy,
the annual cost of maintaining a pris
oner is between $25,000 and $35,000
and is the fastest growing component
of state spending.
They also state that the average
school could educate five to seven stu
dents for the cost of maintaining one
prisoner. (Even a greater number of
adult students would benefit from this
level of support.) Or consider the cost
of maintaining participants in social
service programs, most of whom are
non-graduates. In 1993-94 adult edu
cation was responsible for the removal
The most important
long-term, educational
intervention “program”
for a child is a
well-educated, financially
secure parent.
of 6,044 clients from the social service
rolls.
It is clear there are not only bene
fits in providing and encouraging non
graduate adults to succeed education
ally, there are substantial costs in not
doing so. As a
consideration
for any School-
to-Work pro
gram, creden
tials, including
diplomas, are
important.
Still, the
best news is
that allowing
adults to earn
diplomas is
only part of what is accomplished with
the dollars allocated for adult educa
tion. Immigrants are taught to speak
and read English, thereby enabling
them to apply and be considered for
employment; functionally illiterate
community members are taught basic
reading, writing and math and are
thereby able to obtain or retain some
form of employment.
The most important long-term, edu
cational intervention “program” for a
child is a well educated, financially
secure parent. I believe that adult
education currently provides and
delivers this “program” for thousands
of children in Michigan. Ask the thou
sands of participants and graduates in
the programs throughout the state not
only how they and their families have
benefited, but what would they be
doing if adult education were not
available.
It seems clear that the state has
received long-term benefits in return
for its investment in adult education
programs.
Will we now as a state undertake
the short-sighted action of disman
tling a successful system that meets
the needs of the citizens?
This system is currently in place in
virtually every community in the
state under the direct control of local
ly elected boards of education. It pro
vides citizens not only an opportunity
to acquire job skills but it also pro
vides opportunities for residents and
employees to learn to speak English,
read, write and compute, obtain a high
school diploma, and help their chil
dren.
Education for adults currently
accounts for less than 1.8% of the total
education budget in Michigan. Will we
adopt some substitute program with a
questionable track record, little estab
lished structure and questionable
vision? These are the serious social
policy questions that must be consid
ered.
Jim Anker is director of adult edu
cation for Hazel Park Community
Schools.
Residency requirements for city workers is negotiable
I am a Southgate firefighter, union
member and union supporter. My
union has supported your cause from
the beginning. We stood up against
the use of our department to control
and injure your members. We have
put a supporting advertisement in
your newspaper and we do not pur
chase either local papers or USA
Today.
I thought your cause was for fair
treatment and workers rights.
Evidently this cause is just for your
members and no others. I get this
opinion from your March 3 editorial
on residency requirements. This arti
cle is not only anti-worker rights but
tried to make this issue a racial one.
This is an open and shut case. It is
the writing of our constitutional
rights. Residency rules unfairly
impact family, wives and children’s
rights. Limits our housing decisions
and schooling decisions. We can go to
private school (expensive), charter
schools (anti-union) or public schools
(union) but no choice on which one.
Cities are trying to say residency is
important and they need it but it can
be negotiated. All this means is the
worker should give up something to
get nonresidency. Do some investigat
ing and see what the workers in nou
s' r; i c c £.»: 3 n lA
- • • * ♦J'i' j k t > - i n 6 2
letters
residency cities had to give up for this
right. You may be surprised.
As far as response times for emer
gencies: This is a smoke screen.
Someone could be down the street and
not show up. Community involvement
comes from within not from your place
of residency. We will be reading to see
what your real feelings on fair treat
ment of workers rights really are.
Richard Schulz
Southgate
Unbalanced trade costs jobs
I am not a Pat Buchanan fan. But I
do disagree on your editorial bashing
Buchanan’s view on foreign trade and-
corporation greed. As for the vast
amount of economist espousing free
trade, let’s change the wording to “fair
trade” and see where we go.
Have any of these people been in a
store or mall lately? They might find
that 85 percent of the goods sold are
either Chinese, Japanese or other
Asian and European products. Do you
believe you would find even 2 percent
American made products on the
shelves of Asian or European stores?
The results of the unbalanced trade
is loss of decent living wages.
The hiring practices of the retail
corporations have resulted in a vast
number of persons working part-time
at barely above minimum wage with
no benefits.
Indeed, your investigative reporters
might find that the work force of
stores like Meyer’s, Kmart, Wal-Mart,
etc. are made up of up to 85 percent
part-time labor.
The result of the low pay part-time
labor force is this: They go on welfare
and food stamps, etc. This erodes our
base economy and targets the middle
class.
Don John
Allen Park
Thank you all!
Gang violence is a problem that
effects everyone. That is why everyone
needs to thank all of the teenagers
who are not a part of a gang. The
police, the adults out there volunteer
ing for programs that help youth, and
everyone else who is trying to stop the
problem of gang violence.
Thank you for trying to make a dif
ference. Thank you for not being a
part of the problem but for being part
of the solution. Thank you! It really.
means a lot that someone cares. So
please keep up the excellent work.
Sarah M. Tuscany, age 14
Ypsilanti
DeRamus story praised
Thank you for Betty DeRamus’ arti
cle, “Four women of strength.” This
type of article is inspirational. Young
people need role models. Unfor
tunately, too many brave women have
been ignored in history. All of us need
to read about them, especially young
girls.
Nadene Mitcham
Westland '
Write us at the Journal
The Detroit Sunday Journal wel
comes letters to the editor. They
must be signed with the author’s
name, address and telephone num
ber for verification but will be pub
lished with author’s name and city
only. Shorter letters are more like
ly to be published than longer let
ters. Send letters and opinion
pieces to The Detroit Sunday
Journal, 3100 E. Jefferson, Detroit
MI 48207.


PAGE 16
Tough attorney tackles censorship
digest
Biracial infant
won’t be exhumed
THOMASVILLE, Ga. - The body of
a girl who lived 19 hours will remain
in an all-white cemetery even though
church elders wanted her exhumed
because her father was black.
Whitney Johnson’s maternal grand
mother, a church member, said dea
cons from the Barnetts Creek Baptist
Church had called her asking that the
tiny corpse be moved because they did
not allow “half-breeds” to be buried in
their cemetery.
Publicity and a state attorney gen
eral’s opinion that their effort was
unconstitutional changed the deacons’
minds.
Protection for the projects
WASHINGTON - President Clinton
has signed a “one strike and you’re
out” executive order that is to be used
to evict drug dealers and gang mem
bers from public housing.
Clinton said Thursday that the
Department of Housing and Urban
Development will issue national
guidelines on ridding “the projects” of
criminals and setting penalties for
housing authorities who do not follow
the new rules.
Doctor sex abuse cases rise
WASHINGTON - Sexual miscon
duct is the fastest growing category of
disciplinary actions against doctors.
The percentage of cases involving
sex offenses doubled from 2.5 to 5 per
cent in four years, the watchdog group
Public Citizen reported last week.
Sudanese soldiers massacred
CAIRO - Some 1,500 soldiers were
killed in an ambush by anti-govern
ment forces in southern Sudan last
week, a state-run Egyptian newspa
per reported.
A 13-year-old war between the
Muslim-led military government and
the mainly Christian and animist
rebels has killed 1.2 million.
The quick and the wet
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - Humans
could walk on water if only they could
reach the pace of 67 mph, Harvard
researchers say.
The scientists came up with that
figure by studying basilisks, also
called Jesus Christ lizards. They skit
ter along the surface of a river for up
to 30 feet by smacking the water to
create an air pocket, then pulling their
feet out before it collapses.
United Press International
By Michael Betzold
Journal Staff Writer
Keeping cyberspace uncensored and
television unrated are missions that
don’t faze Nadine Strossen.
After all, the first woman to lead the
American Civil Liberties Union has
battled Catharine MacKinnon, the
tough anti-pornography crusader and
University of Michigan law professor.
So President Bill Clinton, the U.S.
Congress and their controversial new
telecommunications law don’t intimi
date her.
As ACLU president, Strossen is
leading the charge against legislation
Clinton signed in February which
seeks to outlaw “indecent” and “offen
sive” material on-line, force TV net
works to offer the V-chip home block
ing system, and allow more media
monopolies. These developments all
would damage the First Amendment
and freedom of expression, Strossen
believes.
“No government committee or in
dustry bureaucrat can possibly substi
tute for parental judgment,” Strossen
said during a recent visit to Detroit.
Recruiting plaintiffs on-line, the
ACLU and 19 other groups sued to
block the communications act as
unconstitutional. On Feb. 15, a federal
judge in Philadelphia granted a tem
porary restraining order against the
By Mark Langford
United Press International
LOCKHART, Texas - Every week
day morning, 55 men punch a clock at
U.S. Technologies Inc. and set to work
on electrical components that are sold
to corporate giants such as IBM and
Motorola. Down the hall at Chatleff
Controls Inc., 40 men are making con
trol valves for air conditioners; and at
Optiplex of Texas, 26 men produce
eyeglass lenses that are sold in
Florida and Puerto Rico.
The workplaces look just like small
factories in any American city. But
there is an important difference - all
three are inside a prison, and all the
workers are doing time.
The Lockhart Correctional Facility
in central Texas represents what its
supporters call a new wave in prison
work programs. The inmates keep 20
percent of what they earn and return
the rest to the state while learning
new skills. But labor unions don’t see
it that way. To them, the Lockhart
bill’s provision outlawing “indecent”
expressions in cyberspace. But Judge
Ronald Buckwalter refused to block
parts of the law banning “patently
offensive” expressions and any men
tion of abortion techniques. The ruling
puzzled lawyers; the law makes no
facility is using slave labor to steal
needed jobs from the higher-paying
private sector.
“Without question, it has taken
jobs,” said Joe Gunn, president of the
Texas AFL-CIO. “We’re talking about
a captive workforce. A slave is a cap
tive worker.”
Yet if Texas Rep. Ray Allen, R-
Grand Prairie, has his way, Lockhart
is just the first of several private pris
ons that will be turned into factories.
He claims the Lockhart program does
n’t take jobs from Americans but is
instead in competition “against people
in Taiwan, Puerto Rico, the
Philippines ... if we don’t find a way
to keep these entry-level jobs in Texas,
even if they are in prison, we are going
to lose them to offshore competition.”
The jobs are “not slave labor,” Allen
insists.
Gunn claims U.S. Technologies
closed its Austin plant and laid off
workers, then moved to Lockhart to
employ prisoners.
clear distinction between “indecent”
and “offensive” speech. And the cyber
space ban on abortion instruction is
an extension of the rarely enforced
See ATTORNEY, PAGE 7
Allen says the firm had gone bank
rupt, and relocating in the prison
saved the business. Chatleff Controls,
Allen contends, brought jobs into the
country when it closed a maquiladora
plant in Mexico and decided to use
prison labor instead. Raymond
Henderson, president of Chatleff
Controls, claims unemployment levels
in the Lockhart region are so low that
free people without jobs are those who
“simply don’t want to work.”
With prison laborers, “absenteeism
obviously is very low,” says William
Meehan, president of U.S. Tech
nologies, who adds that he hopes to
expand the number of prison employ
ees at his firm alone to 210 by year’s
end.
The prison has 500 inmates, and
while Warden Gary Gant also dis
putes the charges of slave labor, he
notes that the state is doing very well
off the program. So far, he says, it has
recouped $1.3 million from the
inmates’ wages.
Private companies run prison factories
Photo by JOANNE SAVIO / Special to the Journal
“No government committee or industry bureaucrat can possibly substitute for parental
judgment,” says Nadine Strossen, ACLU president.


MARCH 31, 1996
PAGE 17
Fools rush in
for a wild, weird week
It must be April Fool’s Week:
Chris Noth (“Law & Order”) and
Kirstie Alley return to prime
time; Milton Berle goes one-on-
one with “The Nanny” (8 p.m. Monday,
CBS); Loni Anderson and Jason
Priestley’s sister, Justine, drop into
“Melrose Place” (8 p.m. Monday, FOX);
“As the World Turns” has a 40th birth
day party (2 p.m. Tuesday, CBS);
somebody lets Bryant Gumbel into the
Vatican on “Today” (7 a.m. Thursday,
NBC), and Isiah Thomas guest-stars
on “Due South” (8 p.m. Friday, CBS).
Hey, you can’t make this stuff up.
But when did the Psychic Friends
Network take over TV?
■ NHL Hockey: St. Louis Blues at
Detroit Red Wings, 3 today, Fox
(Channel 2 in Detroit) - The “NHL on
FOX” telecasts
return in
Hockeytown, con
tinuing through
out the Stanley
Cup playoffs. This
means you get the
double thrill of
seeing Sergei
Fedorov AND a glowing blue puck.
■ Mr. and Mrs. Loving, 8 tonight,
Showtime - Timothy Hutton, in the
midst of another career reconstruc
tion, and lovely budding star Lela
Rochon of “Waiting to Exhale” play
opposites who attracted in a new
made-for-cable movie. Based on the
true story of a 1960s Southern couple
whose illegal interracial marriage in
their home state became the impetus
for a landmark Supreme Court deci
sion, the film features notable perfor
mances from Corey Parker and Ruby
Dee, as well as a score by Branford
Marsalis.
■Abducted: A Father’s Love, 9
tonight, NBC (Channel 4 in Detroit) -
Benjamin Bratt isn’t bad, but I miss
Chris Noth as resident smart-aleck
cop Mike Logan on NBC’s “Law &
Order” - and I’m not alone, as Noth is
more popular than ever in the role
with reruns airing nightly on A&E. So
it’s great to see him back before us in
a more tender and challenging role,
playing a divorced dad who takes the
law - and his baby daughter - into his
own hands when he suspects his ex-
wife is abusing her. Natalie Cole,
Stephanie Kramer (“Hunter”) and
Peter MacNicol (“Chicago Hope”) also
star.
■ Radiant City, 9 tonight, ABC
(Channel 7 in Detroit) - Looking
more than a little like a sultry young
Liz Taylor, ex-“Cheers” sexpot Kirstie
Alley leaves a memorable impression
as Gloria Goodman, a determined,
dream-laden New York housewife in
passionate pursuit of the American
Dream. The TV movie’s title refers to
the low-income housing project
Gloria is bent on leaving with her
family, no matter what the cost.
■ Home & Family, 1 p.m. Monday,
the Family Channel - Christina
Ferrare is the wife of Tony
Thomopoulos, the Family Channel’s
top programming honcho. But that
doesn’t mean she’s not the ideal
choice to host this live, two-hour,
interactive weekday talk show that
promises to
0 ff er « a new
Jim T,
daytime tele-
MCFARLIN
Among the
Highlights premiere’s
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmsvmmmmms opening seg
ments is a
feature on quintuplets.
■ The NCAA Men’s Basketball
Championship, 9 p.m. Monday, CBS
(Channel 62 in Detroit) - In the
words of that great American poet,
Donna Summer, “Let’s dance the last
dance to-niiiight..
■ Major League Baseball: Detroit
Tigers at Minnesota Twins, 4 p.m.
Monday, Channel 50 - Is all now for
given between baseball and its fans?
The answer begins to reveal itself
Monday, as first-year manager Buddy
Bell’s new-look Bengals and the
Twins open their 1996 seasons at the
Metrodome. George Kell, A1 Kaline
and Jim Price man the mikes.
■ Kindred: The Embraced, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Fox - Is there any new
series that Aaron Spelling isn’t pro
ducing? At least nobody can say this
one doesn’t have bite: Vampires are
prowling the bay in modern-day San
Francisco, and a fearless police detec
tive (C. Thomas Howell) is out to
arrest their bloodthirsty ways. After a
90-minute debut that introduces
more than a dozen characters, a regu-
lation-issue one-hour episode airs at
9 p.m. Wednesday.
■ Never Give Up: The Jimmy V
Story, 9 p.m. Tuesday, CBS - With
Fox Television
You’ll meet Mark Frankel, center, and C. Thomas Howell, right, in the Tuesday debut of
“Kindred: The Embraced,” but you’ll have to tune in Wednesday at 9 for Kelly Rutherford.
questionable scheduling - the day
after the NCAA basketball finals -
CBS gives us Anthony LaPaglia in
TV-movie form as Jimmy Valvano,
the flamboyant, charismatic young
coach who led North Carolina State
to an improbable college hoop cham
pionship in 1983 before lacing up to
fight his greatest battle against can
cer.
■ The 10th Annual Soul Train
Music Awards, 11 p. m v Saturday,
Channel 62 - You can bet your last
money it’ll all be a stone gas, honey,
as Detroit’s own Anita Baker and
rapper-tumed-sitcom-star LL Cool J
co-host this two-hour, syndicated Don
Cornelius brainchild, which will fea
ture a career-achievement salute to
Patti LaBelle and the group Boyz II
Men receiving the Sammy Davis Jr.
Award as Entertainers of the Year.


r s. • r « i i i r i’ # l w I I
SUNDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON 11 “ PAGE 18 MARCH 31,1996 |
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Good Morning America
Matlock “The Mark" BE
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ESPN
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Inside PGA
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Sportscenter
Reporters
Sportsweekly
NASCAR
Auto Racing: NASCAR Winston Cup -- Food City 500. (Live) 3E iTennis
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Wild Animal
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“Jack Reed: Badge"
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Toon Club
Anti-Gravity
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CNet
In Space
Mysteries
Inside Space (R)
Starman "The Return"
U.F.O.
Movie: ★Vi “Syngenor" ( 1990, Horror) Starr Andreeff.
TBS
Scooby Doo
Planet
Flintstones
Garfield
Fam. Mat.
Movie: ★★★’/ 2 “The Birds" (1963, Suspense) Rod Taylor.
Movie: ★★★ “The Savage Sees” (1976) Ben Johnson.
Movie: ★★★ “The Love Bug" (1969) Dean Jones.
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Bugs
Scooby Dooby Doo
Gilligan
In the Heat of the Night
Lazarus Man (In Stereo)
Movie: ★★ “The Blue Lagoon" ( 1980) Brooke Shields.
Movie: ★Vi "Return to the Blue Lagoon" (1991 )
Movie: “Paradise"( 1982) 1
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Prob. Child
Turtles
Sonic
Highlander
WildCATS | Exosquad
Fighter
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WWF Wrestling
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Movie: ★★’/i “MajorLeague" ( 1989) Tom Berenger. 3E |Movie: ★★Vi “The Babe” (1992) 3E
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Movie: ★★ "Berry Gordy’s The Last Dragon" (1985) 3E
Movie: ★★* "Rasputin" ( 1996, Drama) Alan Rickman.
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Movie: ★★ "Merlin" (1993) Nadia Cameron. ‘PG-13’ IMovie: “Miracle on 34th Street" ( 1994)
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Bowling
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Busy World
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Movie: ★★ "North" (m A) Elijah Wood.
Movie: ★★★ “The Turning Point” (1977) Anne Bancroft.
Movie: "Ring of the Musketeers" ( 1994)
Movie: ★★V '2 “Stargate" (1994) Kurt Russell. ‘PG-13’
Movie: "Micki & Maude"
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(7:15) Movie: “InArmy"
Movie: ★★★ "To Sir With Love" (1967)
Movie: ★★Vi "Angels in the Outfield" (1994) ‘PG’ 3E
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Movie: *Vi “A Low Down Dirty Shame"
Movie: “Four Weddings and a Funeral" |
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(3:00) NHL Hockey: St.
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Wings. (In StereoLive) 3E
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Top Cops
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Miracles and Visions:
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3E
Simpsons
"Bart on the
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Highlander: The Series
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Lonesome Dove: The
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(2:30) PGA Golf: The
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Movie: “Abducted: A Father’s Love" (1996, Drama)
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Sports Final
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“Martin Mull Live! From
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Auto Racing: FIA Formula One -- Brazilian Grand Prix.
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Movie: ★'/ 2 “Return to the Blue Lagoon" 1
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USA
(3:30| Movie
Movie: ★★★’/ 2 “Field of Dreams" ( 1989, Fantasy) Kevin Costner. A
voice urges a farmer to build a ballpark on his property. (In Stereo) IE
Murder, She Wrote “Lone
Witness" (In Stereo) 30
Renegade “The Posse" (In
Stereo) 30
Silk Stalkings Holly takes
to the stage to find a killer.
Silk Stalkings ''Jasmine”
(R) (In Stereo) BE
Highlander: The Series
“The Gathering" OS)
Paid
Program
Paid
Program
DlSli
(4:00) Movie
American
Teacher
Avonlea "A Time to Every
Purpose" (R) (In Stereo) 3E
Movie: ★★ "The Ugly Dachshund" ( 1966, Comedy) A
Great Dane believes that he’s part of a dachshund litter.
Conversation With Carol
Starring Carol Burnett BE
Movie: ★★★ “The Front Page" (197 4) Jack Lemmon. A
reporter tackles a spectacular story on his final day.
Scenic Wonders of
America
Movie: ★★★★ “Spartacus"
(1960) Kirk Douglas. 3E
HBO
(3:30) Movie
Movie: ★★★ “Maverick" (1994, Western) Mel Gibson. A conniving
cardsharp and a sharp-witted lady match wits. (In Stereo) ‘PG’ BE
Movie: ★Vi “Exit to Eden" (1994) Dana Delany. A
photographer is tracked to an island of sexual fantasies.
Movie: ★★★ “Rasputin" (1996) Alan Rickman. Russia’s
royal family falls prey to an ambitious holy man. 8E
Dennis
Miller (R) BE
Tracey
Takes On...
Movie: ★★★ "Trading
Places" (m3) 'R'SE
PASS
Bowling
Hoops USA |
This Is the PGA Tour |Major League Baseball Preview |Surfing: Pro Tour
Press Box | Italian Soccer Highlights
| English Soccer
Press Box
SHO
(4:00) Movie: ★★★ “Micki
4 Maude" (1984) 'PG-13'
Movie: "North" (1994) A boy embarks on
a trans-world quest for new parents. ‘PG’
Chris Cross
"All’s Fair”
Movie: "Mr. and Mrs. Loving" ( 1996,
Drama) Timothy Hutton, Lela Rochon.
Real Mr &
Mrs
Outer
Limits (R)
Movie: ★★ "Night of the Demons" ( 1988,
Horror) Mimi Kinkade. (In Stereo) ‘R’
Movie: **Vi "Retribution" (1987) Dennis Lipscomb. An
artist's failed suicide leaves him vulnerable to a demon.
TMC
(3:35) Movie
Movie: ★★★ “To Sir With Love"( 1967, Drama) An
idealistic teacher takes on some tough London youths.
Movie: ★★Vi “Mother, Jugs & Speed"
(1976, Comedy-Drama) Bill Cosby. ‘PG’
Movie: **Vi 2 “Angels in the Outfield"
(1994, Fantasy) Danny Glover. ‘PG’ 3E
Movie: ★★ “In the Army Now"( 1994,
Comedy) Pauly Shore. (In Stereo) ‘PG’ 30
Movie: ★★Vi “The Puppet Masters’^ 1994) A sleepy
Midwestern town is taken over by parasitic aliens. ‘R’ 3E
“An injustice for one is an
injustice for all”
AMERICAN POSTAL
WORKERS UNION
MIAMI LOCAL-AFL-CIO
Supports the striking
newspaper workers
and the Detroit Sunday Journal


MONDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON PAGE 19 APRIL 1,1996
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0
1 .3:30
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4:00
i 4:30
FOX
O
Eyewitness Morning
Geraldo
Mark Walberg (R)
George & Alana (R)
News
Court TV
Carnie (R) (In Stereo)
Geraldo
Mark Walberg (R)
Ricki Lake
NBC
o
(7:00) Today (In Slereo) 33
Maury Povich (R) 33
Jerry Springer (R)
Jenny Jones 33
News
Jeopardy!
Days of Our Lives ®
Another World ®
Sally
Montel Williams ®
ABC
o
Good Morning America
Regis & Kathie
Donahue (In Slereo) 33
Rolonda (R)
News
The City ®
All My Children ®
One Life to Live ®
General Hospital ®
Oprah Winfrey ®
CBC
o
(7:00) CBC Morning News
Wht-Earth |Playground
Theodore |Mr. Dressup
Sesame Street
Midday®
Kerr’s |High Road
Neighbours
Coronation
Urban P.
Degrassi
The Bill
WB
©
Woody
Bananas
E.N.G "A Briel Madness"
In the Heat of the Night
Northern Exposure 33
Beverly Hills, 90210®
Magnum, P.l. “On the Fly”
Blinky Bill
Sailor Moon
Aladdin ®
Animaniacs
Troopers
Gargoyles |
UPN
SD
Menace
Pet Shop
Cubhouse |Dinosaurs
Blossom 33
Jeffersons
Good Times
Sanford
Griffith
I Love Lucy
Golden |EmptyNest
Flintstones
Goof Troop
Taz-Mania
Eeklstravag
Major League Baseball
PBS
©
Barney
Station
Sesame Street 33
Barney
Mr Rogers
Storytime
Reading
Lamb Chop
Puzzle
Sesame Street ®
Barney
Reading
Puzzle
C. Sandiego
Bill Nye |Wishbone
CBS
GB
(7:00) This Morning ®
Night Heat
Guiding Light (In Stereo)
Price Is Right 33
Shop-Drop
Young and the Restless | Bold & B.
As the World Turns®
Cur. Affair
Rescue 911
Day & Date
A&E
Remington Steele
Columbo "Now You See Him” 1 New Mike Hammer
Quincy | Equalizer | Columbo "Death Lends a Hand" |Columbo "Dead Weight”
AMC
(7:00) Movie: "Mr. Music"
Movie: "The Road to Morocco" (1942)
Movie: *** "The Saga of Hemp Brown"
Movie: * * ★ V 2 "The Shrike" (1955) iMovie: ** Vi "Rhubarb" (1951, Comedy)
Movie: *** "Bang the Drum Slowly"( 1973) ‘PG'
BET
Life
Paid Prog.
Screen
Roc ®
Benson
All Night
Video Vibrations
Video Soul Top 20
In Your Ear
Rap City
DISC
Paid Prog.
Paid Prog.
Next Step
Next Step
Home
Start
Housesmart! (R)
Graham K. | Cuisine
Great Chefs iHome [start [Easy
Home |Graham K.
Cuisine
Great Chefs |
ESPN
Sportscenter (Ft)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Major League Baseball: New York Yankees at Cleveland Indians. (Live) ®
Major League Baseball ®
FAM
Family Challenge
Waltons "The Shivaree"
700 Club I FIT TV
Rescue 911 (In Stereo)®
Home & Family (Series Premiere) (In Stereo) | Highway to Heaven ®
Punky B. | "Annie"
LIFE
Baby
YourBaby
Sisters "A House Divided"
Our Home
Gourmet
Biggers and Summers
Living
Our Home
Handmade
Designing
**V 2 "Victims for Victims: The Theresa Saldana Story"
Spenser: For Hire ®
NICK
Looney
Gum by
Rugrats33 |Busy World
Rupert
Muppets
Allegra
Gullah
Little Bear
Busy World
Eureeka
Gullah
Gumby
Tintin
Looney |Beetlejuice
Muppets [Chipmunks
SCIFI
Animation
Animation
Lost in Space
Beauty and the Beast
Dark Shw.
Dark Shw.
Magician (Part 1 of 2)
Hitchcock
Masters of Fantasy (R) ®
Bradbury
Galactica 1980
Incredible Hulk
TBS
Gilligan
Bewitched
Boss?
Griffith
Little House
Matlock "The Formula” 33
Griffith
OpenDay
Major League Baseball: San Francisco Giants at Atlanta Braves. (Live) ®
Scooby
Brady
TLC
Little Star
Kitty Cats
Bookmice
Iris the Prof.
Chicken
Rorys Pice
Little Star | Kitty Cats
Gardening
Homebods
Crafts & Co. |Caprials
Kitchen |Peasant
Crafts & Co. [Gardening
Homebods
Home Pro |
TNT
(7:30) Scooby Dooby Doo
Bugs
Flintstones
Gilligan
Gilligan
Knots Landing
Starsky and Hutch
Charlie's Angels
CHiPs "K-9-1"
Wild, Wild West
Movie: "Marlowe" (1969)
USA
Fighter
Dragon
Movie: ** "How 1 Got Into College"( 1989, Comedy)
Movie: *** "Say Anything... "(1989) John Cusack.
Live With the People’s Court
Live With Love Connection
MacGyver (In Stereo) ®
DISN
Pooh
Care Bears
Gummi B. IPooh Cmr.
Dumbo lllmbrella
My Little 1 Ducktales |Chip-Dale
Tale Spin®
Movie:*** "TheBorrowers" (1973)
Pooh |C. Brown
Quack
Kids Incorp. |MMC (Ft)®
HBO
(6:45) Movie
Movie: *** "A Private Matter"( 1992) ®
Movie: -*** V 2 "Forrest Gump” (1994) Tom Hanks. 'PG-13' 33
Composers' Specials ® |Movie: ** "A Chorus Line"( 1985) Michael Douglas. ®
Kids in Hall
"George Bal.’s Nutcracker"
PASS
Scoreboard Central |ltalian Soccer Highlights
FIT TV |Workout jPrimeCuts jOlympic Odyssey |Golf(R) |HockeyWk.
Page One
Kid Club (R) [journal
SHO
Degrassi J. I Movie: "Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit”
Extras
Movie: **'A "S/arga/e”(1994) Kurt Russell. 'PG-13' |Movie: **'/ 2 "Houseguest"( 1994) Sinbad. 'PG' 33 |Movie: ***’/2 “The Bear”(1989) 'PG' 33
"Getting Even With Dad"
TMC
Movie: ***’/? "Romeo and Juliet" (1968) Leonard Whiting. 'PG' 33
Movie: "Panic in Needle Park" (1971)
Movie: ** "Mixed Nuts" (1994) Steve Martin. ‘PG-13’
Movie: **'/2 "The Seventh Coin"( 1993)
Movie: ** "The Ref" ( 1994, Comedy) 'R'|
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
©
FOX
News
News
Real Stories
of Highway
Patrol
America’s
Most
Wanted
Extra (In
Stereo) 33
Melrose Place "What
Comes Up Must Come
Down" (In Stereo) 33
Ned and
Stacey “The'
End?"®
Partners
“Will You
Marry Me?”
News
Cheers
"Crash of
the Titans”
Night Court
"Giving
Thanks"
Extra (In
Stereo) ®
Top Cops
(In Stereo)
Real Stories
of Highway
Patrol
Hitchhiker
“O.D.
Feelin'"
O
NBC
News
News
NBC Nightly
News 33
Wheel of
Fortune 33
Jeopardy!
33
Fresh
Prince of
Bel-Air 33
Brotherly
Love (In
Stereo) ®
Movie: *** "UntamedHeart" ( 1993, Drama) Christian
Slater, Marisa Tomei, Rosie Perez. A waitress and a
shy busboy begin an unlikely romance. (In Stereo) ®
News
Tonight Show (In Stereo)
®
Jenny Jones Viewers date
sexy former guests. ®
Emergency
Call (In
Stereo) ®
o
ABC
News
News
ABC World
News
Tonight 33
Entertain
ment
Tonight 33
Second Noah "The Big
Chief" (In Stereo) SI
High Incident "Women
and Children First" (In
Stereo) ®
Murder One Cross’
behavior becomes erratic
both on and off the stand.
News
Nightline ®
Inside
Edition ®
American
Journal ®
Gordon Elliott Let down
by a loved one.
o
CBC
What on
Earth
News
CBC News
More to the
Story
Fresh
Fields
Movie: **'/? "Million Dollar Babies" (1994, Drama) |
Based on the true story of the Dionne quintuplets. 33
National/CBC News ®
News
The Bill
Bread and Roses (Part 1
of 4)
(Off Air)
©
WB
Family
Matters ®
Mama's
Family
Different
World 33
Family
Matters 33
Cops (In
Stereo) 33
LAPD (R) (In
Stereo) 33
Movie: *** "Reversal of Fortune"{ 1990) Glenn Close.
Based on the story of the Claus von Bulow murder trial.
Baywatch “Short-Sighted"
(In Stereo) ®
Dear John
(In Stereo)
Home
Videos
Cops (In
Stereo) ®
Doogie
Howser
Perfect
Strangers
Movie: -k'/i
"Bloodsport ”
©
UPN
(4:00) Major League Baseball: Detroit Tigers at
Minnesota Twins. (Live)
Home
Improve.
Home
Improve.
Star Trek: Voyager "Cold
Fire" (R) (In Stereo) 33
Nowhere Man “The Alpha
Spike” (R) (In Stereo) ®
News
Fresh
Prince
Married...
With
Star Trek: The Next
Generation (In Stereo) ®
Coach "One
of the Guys"
Murphy
Brown ®
©
PBS
Business
Page
GED
"Writing IX”
Newshour With Jim
Lehrer 33
Business
Report
Color of
Money
Live From Lincoln Center “New York Philharmonic:
Masur, Brendel & Beethoven" (In Stereo)
La Stupenda: A Portrait
of Dame Joan Sutherland
Being v
Served
Mulberry
Charlie Rose (In Stereo)
Live From Lincoln
Center: Masur, Brendel
©
CBS
Tempestt
Seinfeld (In
Stereo) 33
CBS News
Hard Copy
33
Current
Affair 33
Nanny (In
Stereo) 33
Almost
Perfect ®
College Basketball: NCAA Tournament Championship
- Teams to Be Announced. (Live) ®
Late Show Musician Mark
Knopfler. (In Stereo) ®
Hard Copy
®
Late Late Show (R) (In
Stereo) ®
Richard Bey |
A&E
Remington Steele "Steele
in the Running”
Quincy "Mode of Death"
Equalizer "Eighteen With
a Bullet"
Biography “Stooges: The
Men Behind the Mayhem”
Poirot "The Adventure of
Johnnie Waverly"
Miss Marple "The Body in
the Library" (Part 3 of 3)
Law & Order "Point of
View"
Biography "Stooges: The
Men Behind the Mayhem"
Poirot "The Adventure of I
Johnnie Waverly”
AMC
Diamonds on the Silver
Screen (R)
Movie: *** "This Happy Feeling" (1958,
Comedy) Debbie Reynolds, Curt Jurgens.
Movie: *** "The Rat Race"(i960) Tony Curtis.
Sparks fly when a musician and a dancer fall in love.
Movie: *** "Tammy and the Bachelor"
(1957, Comedy) Debbie Reynolds.
Movie: *** "This Happy Feeling" ( 1958,
Comedy) Debbie Reynolds, Curt Jurgens.
Movie: *** "The Rat Race" (1960,
Comedy) Tony Curtis, Debbie Reynolds. 1
BET
(4:30) Rap City IScreen
All Night
Benson
Roc® |Comicview
Video Soul
Benson
Roc ®
Screen
Jazz Central |Comicview {
DISC
Popular Mechanics (R)
Wings "Soviet Rotors" (R)
Beyond
2000
Next Step
(R)
Wild Discovery "Dragons
of Komodo”
Animal Thoughts
P.T. Barnum -- America's
Greatest Showman (R)
Next Step
(R)
Beyond
2000
Wild Discovery "Dragons
of Komodo" (R)
Animal Thoughts (R)
ESPN
(4:00) Major League Baseball: Boston Red Sox at
Texas Rangers. From Ihe Ballpark in Arlington, Texas.
Sportscenter: Final Four
Edition. Sports news.
Sportscenter: Champ.
Prev.
Figure Skating: World Championships - Men's &
Ladies' Finals. From Edmonton, Alta.
Baseball
Tonight
Sportscenter: Final Four
Edition. Sports news. ®
Baseball
Tonight
Swimming and Diving:
NCAA Champ.
FAM
(4:30) Movie: **'/? "Annie" (1982) The Broadway
smash about Ihe adventures of an orphan girl.
Jesus of Nazareth Jesus a
as his teachings become po
ssembleshis 12 disciples
pular in Galilee. (R) ®
Rescue 911 (In Stereo)®
700 Club
Three Stooges
Bonanza: The Lost
Episodes “Queen High"
Paid
Program
Paid
Program
LIFE
Cagney & Lacey"The
Rapist"
Supermar
ket Sweep
Designing
Women 33
Commish "Johnny Club"
(In Stereo) 33
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Stereo)
Movie: +** "Defending Your Life" (1991, Comedy) Albert Brooks. A
heavenly panel reviews a deceased yuppie's humdrum history.
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Stereo)
Late Date
Nurses
Thirtysome-
thing ®
NICK
Tiny Toon
Adventures
Looney
Tunes
Clarissa
Explains
Rugrats (In
Stereo) 33
Doug (In
Stereo)
Tiny Toon
Adventures
Munsters
I Dream of
Jeannie
1 Love Lucy
®
Bewitched
Mary Tyler
Moore ®
Taxi (Part 1
of 2)
Welcome
Back
Dick Van
Dyke
Bob
Newhart
Lucy Show
Munsters
Mary Tyler
Moore ®
SCIFI
Bionic Woman "Jaime
and the King"
Six Million Dollar Man
"To Catch the Eagle"
Twilight
Zone 33
Monsters
Quantum Leap “A Song
for the Soul-April 7,1963"
Movie: *** “Sssssss”(1973) Strother Martin. A snake
expert sells his experimental failures to a circus.
Twilight
Zone®
Monsters
Quantum Leap “Ghost
Ship-August 13,1956"®
Movie: *** "Sssssss"
(1973) Strother Martin.
TBS
Saved by
the Bell ®
Saved by
the Bell 33
Family
Matters 33
Family
Matters 33
Home
Videos
Home
Videos
Matlock “The Defendant”
(In Stereo) ®
Movie: **'/2 "Matlock: The Outcast" (1992, Mystery)
Ben investigates a farmhand's mysterious death.
Movie: ** "Perry Mason: The Case of the Avenging
/4ce”(1988, Mystery) Raymond Burr, Barbara Hale.
National Geographic
Explorer (R) ®
TLC
Furniture to
Go (R)
Renovation
Guide (R)
Hometiine
(R)
Hometime
(R)
Empire Conquered (R)
Archaeol
ogy (R) ®
History-
Points
Hanging Coffins (R)
Ancient
Warriors (R)
Mystic
Lands(R)
Archaeol
ogy (R) ®
History-
Points
Hanging Coffins (R)
Ancient
Warriors (R)
Mystic
Lands (R) |
TNT
(4:00) Movie: ***
"Marlowe" ( 1969, Mystery)
In the Heat of the Night
"A Love Lost” (In Slereo)
In the Heat of the Night
"Maybelle Returns" 33
Thunder in Paradise "Eye
for an Eye" (In Stereo) ®
WCW Monday Nitro (Live)
®
Movie: * "Warriors of the Apocalypse" (1986) Futuristic
nomads search lor the secret of immortality.
WCW Monday Nitro (R)
®
Movie: * "Warriors of the 1
Apocalypse" (1986)
USA
Highlander: The Series
"The Gathering" ®
Renegade "Once Burned,
Twice Chey" (In Stereo) 33
Wings (In
Slereo) 33
Wings (In
Stereo) 33
Murder, She Wrote (Part 1
of 2)®
WWF: Monday Night Raw
Weekly World News (In
! Stereo)
Silk Stalkings "Love
Never Dies" (In Stereo) ®
Highlander: The Series
“Family Tree" (In Stereo)
C-Net
Central (R)
Paid
[Program
DISN
Darkwing
Duck OS
Tale Spin 33
Ducktales
33
IChip’n’
Dale
Almost
Home 33
Spellbinder
33
Avonlea "Homecoming"
(R) (In Stereo) ®
Movie: "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" (1969)
The 19th-century outlaw pair flees to South America. ®
Movie: *** "Rally ’Round the Flag, Boys!" (1958) A
small town is thrown into an uproar by a secret project.
Gene Kelly... An
American in Pasadena
HBO
(4:00) Movie
Movie: ** "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation"
(1989, Comedy) Chevy Chase. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' 33
Tracey
Takes On...
Movie: ***'/2 "Forrest Gump" (1994, Comedy-Drama) Tom Hanks.
A slow-witted Southerner experiences 30 years of history. 'PG-13' ®
Kids in the
Hall
Real Sex 11 (R) (In
Stereo) ®
Movie: ** “Just Cause” (1995, Drama)
Sean Connery. (In Stereo) ‘R’ ®
Dream On
(In Stereo)
PASS
Race-Northville Downs
iLiveonPASS High School Wrestling
Olympic Odyssey (R)
Press Box
This Is the PGA Tour
NBA Action
Rugby in America |Press Box
Paid Prog.
SHO
(4:00) Movie: ** "Gelling
Even With Dad" (1994)®
Movie: ** "Sister Act 2: Back in the
Habit" (1993) Whoopi Goldberg. 'PG' 33
Extras:
Goldbrg
Movie: ★★V 2 "Houseguest”( 1994) Sinbad. A con artist
finds refuge in the home of a suburban family. 'PG' ®
Movie: "Mr. and Mrs. Loving" {]9%,
Drama) Timothy Hutton. (In Stereo)
Real Mr &
Mrs
Movie: *’/? "Dream Lover" (1994,
Drama) James Spader. (In Stereo) 'R‘
"Dona Flor-2
Husbands"
TMC
Movie: ***'/2 "Romeo and Juliet" (1968, Drama) Leonard Whiting.
Franco Zeffirelli’s adaptation of Shakespeare's tragedy. 'PG' ®
Movie: ** "The Christmas That Almost
Wasn 7" (1966) Rossano Brazzi. 'G'
Movie: *** “The Santa Clause" (1994,
Comedy) Tim Allen. (In Stereo) 'PG'
Movie: ** "Mixed Nuts" (1994, Comedy)
Steve Martin. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' ®
Movie: ** "The Ref” (1994) Denis Leary. A thief
comes to regret taking a bickering couple hostage. 'R' |
A strong union in a
changing world fight
ing for justice, dignity
and progress, sup
ports striking news
paper workers.
Membership, Leadership and
Retirees of UAW Local €00
in the public service
LOCAL 1346
Warren Consolidated Schools
Send our support to
Striking Newspaper Workers y
BOND-BILT . . . BUILDS 'EM BETTER • DON’T MOVE — IMPROVE •
• Additions • Dormers •
WE ALSO DO:
• Free planning
& design service
• Bathrooms
• Rec Rooms • Insured
• State licensed • Much More
Roofing • Windows • Siding
•Free estimates 26393 DEQUINDRE RD.
• Decks MADISON HEIGHTS
• Kitchens
• Garages
( 810 ) 542-5300
We Accept Mastercard/Visa


TUESDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON
PAGE 20
APRIL 2, 1996
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1:30
2:00
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
FOX
0
Eyewitness Morning
Geraldo
Mark Walberg (R)
George & Alana (R)
News
Court TV
Carnie (R) (In Stereo)
Geraldo
Mark Walberg (R)
Ricki Lake
NBC
O
(7:00) Today (In Stereo) SB
Maury Povich SB
Jerry Springer (R)
Jenny Jones SB
News
Jeopardy!
Days of Our Lives SB
Another World SB
Sally (R)
Montel Williams SB
ABC
o
Good Morning America
Regis & Kathie
Donahue (In Stereo) SB
Rolonda (R)
News
The City SB
All My Children SB
One Life to Live SB
General Hospital SB
Oprah Winfrey SI
CBC
o
(7:00) CBC Morning News
Wht-Earth | Playground
Theodore |Mr. Dressup
Sesame Street
Midday BB
Ciao Italia | Fair City
Neighbours
Coronation
Urban P.
Degrassi
The Bill
WB
©
Woody
Bananas
E.N.G
In the Heat of the Night
Northern Exposure "Pilot"
Beverly Hills, 90210 SB
Magnum, P.l. "Solo Flight"
Blinky Bill
Sailor Moon
Aladdin SB
Animaniacs
Troopers
Gargoyles
UPN
©
Menace
Pet Shop
Cubhouse |Dinosaurs
Blossom SB
Jeffersons
Good Times
Sanford
Griffith
I Love Lucy
Golden |EmptyNest
Flintstones
Goof Troop
Taz-Mania
Eeklstravag
Batman
Rangers
PBS
©
Barney
Station
Sesame Street SB
Barney
Mr Rogers
Storytime
Reading
Lamb Chop
Puzzle
Sesame Street SB
Barney
Reading
Puzzle
C. Sandiego
Bill Nye
Wishbone
CBS
©
(7:00) This Morning SB
Night Heat
Guiding Light (In Stereo)
Price Is Right SB
Shop-Drop
Young and the Restless | Bold & B.
As the World Turns SB
Cur. Affair
Rescue 911
Day & Date
A&E
Remington Steele 1 Columbo "Death Lends a Hand" IColumbo "Dead Weight” iQuincy "Mode of Death" 1 Equalizer
McMillan and Wife
Banacek
AMC
(7:30) Movie: "A Foreign Allair" ( 1948)
Movie: **'/\ "Seven Sinners" ( 1940)
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LOCAL #636
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WEDNESDAY EVENING
WEDNESDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON PAGE 21 APRIL 3,1996
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Journal ®
Gordon Elliott Women
issue ultimatums.
o
CBC
What on
Earth
Mews
CBC News
Adrienne Clarkson
Presents (R) El
Ruth Rendell Mysteries Wexlord investigates when a
body is lound buried in the woods.
National/CBC News ®
News
The Bill
Bread and Roses (Part 3
of 4)
(Off Air)
0)
WB
Family
Matters ®
Mama’s
Family
Different
World ®
Family
Matters 89
Cops (In
Stereo) BO
LAPD (R) (In
Slereo) ®
Sister,
Sister (R) ®
Parent
'Hood (R) ®
Wayans
Bros. (R) ®
Unhappily
Ever After
Baywatch "Coronado del
Soul" ®
Dear John
(In Stereo)
Home
Videos
Cops (In
Stereo) ®
Doogie
Howser
Perfect
Strangers
Movie:
"Superman"
©
UPN
Fresh
Prince
Step by
Step O
Simpsons
(In Stereo)
Roseanne
(In Stereo)
Home
Improve.
Home
Improve.
Sentinel "Killers" (In
Stereo) ®
Swift Justice "Supernote"
(In Stereo) ®
News
NHL Hockey: Detroit Red Wings at Los Angeles Kings. From the
Great Western Forum. (Live)
Coach (In
Stereo) ®
Murphy
Brown ®
©
PBS
Firing Line:
Cybersmut?
GED “Math
1"
Newshour With Jim
Lehrer ®
Business
Report
Magic
Mirrors
Scientific-American
Frontiers (In Stereo) ®
Great Performances “La Cenerentola" Cecilia Bartoli stars in Rossini's two-act
comic opera based on Cinderella. (In Stereo)
Charlie Rose (In Stereo)
Great Performances "La I
Cenerentola" (In Stereo) [
©
CBS
Tempestt
Seinfeld
“The Ticket"
CBS News
Hard Copy
Current
Affair ®
Dave’s
World ®
My Guys ®
Movie: "Summer of Fear" ( 1996) Gregory Harrison. A
young stranger invades the life of a vacationing family.
Late Show (In Stereo) ®
Current
Affair ®
Late Late Show Opera
singer Denyce Graves. ®
Richard Bey |
A&E
Remington Steele "Steele
Alive and Kicking"
Quincy "Nowhere to Run”
Equalizer “Splinters"
Biography "Charlton
Heston" (R)
American Justice "Mob
Rais" (R)
20th Century (R)
Law & Order "The
Working Stiff”
Biography “Charlton
Heston" (R)
American Justice "Mob
Rats" (R)
AMC
(4:00) Movie
Burns and Allen Shorts
Movie: ★★ V 2 "One-Eyed Jacks" ( 1961, Western) Marlon Brando, Karl
Malden. An escaped convict seeks revenge on a faithless friend.
Movie: *** "Guys and Dolls" ( 1955, Musical) Marlon Brando, Jean
Simmons. A gambler bets he can woo a Salvation Army missionary.
Movie: 2 "One-Eyed
Jac/fs”(1961, Western)
BET
(4:30) Rap City IScreen
Sanford
Benson
Roc® |Comicview
Video Soul
Benson
Roc ®
Screen, | Jazz Central
Comicview
DISC
Popular Mechanics (R)
Wings “Guardians of the
Night" (R)
Beyond
2000
Next Step
(R)
Wild Discovery "Dawn of
the Dragons" (R)
Invention
The Vespa.
Next Step
P.T. Barnum - America’s
Greatest Showman (R)
Next Step
(R)
Beyond
2000
Wild Discovery “Dawn of
the Dragons" (R)
Invention •
The Vespa.
Next Step
(R)
ESPN
NBA
Fantastic
NBA Inside
Stuff
Up Close
Sportscenter
Major League Baseball: San Francisco Giants at Atlanta Braves. From Atlanta-
Fulton County Stadium. (Live) ffl
Major League Baseball: Milwaukee Brewers at California Angels. From Anaheim
Stadium. (Live) ®
Sports
center
FAM
Family Challenge (In
Stereo)
Ringling Bros, and
Barnum & Bailey Circus
Jesus of Nazareth Jesus is arrested and crucified; his lomb is later
lound to be empty. (Part 4 of 4)
Rescue 911
(In Stereo)
700 Club
Three Stooges
Bonanza: The Lost
Episodes “Mark of Guilt”
Paid
Program
Paid
Program
LIFE
Cagney & Lacey“The
Cost ol Living"
Supermar
ket Sweep
Designing
Women 89
Commish "The Trial" (In
Stereo) 39
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Slereo)
Movie: *** "Unspeakable Acts" (1990) Jill Clayburgh.
A day-care operator is suspected of child abuse.
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Stereo)
Unsolved
Mysteries
Late Date
Nurses
Thirtysome-
thing ®
NICK
Tiny Toon
Adventures
Looney
Tunes
Clarissa
Explains
Rugrats (In
Stereo)®
Doug (In
Stereo)
Tiny Toon
Adventures
Munsters
1 Dream ol
Jeannie
I Love Lucy
“Oil Wells"
Bewitched
Mary Tyler
Moore ®
Taxi
Welcome
Back
Dick Van
Dyke
Bob
Newhart
Lucy Show
Munsters
Mary Tyler
Moore ®
SCIFI
Bionic Woman "The Dijon
Caper"
Six Million Dollar Man
"Sharks" (Part 1 of 2)
Twilight
Zone®
Monsters
“The Maker"
Quantum Leap “Moments
lo Live - May 4,1985"®
Movie: **Vi "Alligator" ( 1980, Horror) A monstrous
man-eating sewer alligator terrorizes Chicago.
Twilight
Zone®
Monsters
“The Maker"
Quantum Leap (In Slereo)
®
Movie: **'/? "Alligator"
(1980) Robert Forster.
TBS
Saved by
the Bell ®
Saved by
the Bell ®
Family
Matters ®
Family
Matters 09
Home
Videos
Home
Videos
NBA Basketball: Orlando Magic al New York Knicks. From Madison
Square Garden. (Live) ®
Movie: "Big Trouble in Little China" (1986) A macho
truck driver rescues a friend's kidnapped fiancee.
Movie: -k-kVi "The Best ol Times" ( 1986, 1
Comedy) Robin Williams, Kurt Russell. |
TLC
Furniture-
Mend
Renovation
Guide (R)
Hometime
(R)
Hometime
(R)
When Christianity Began
- the Struggle to Survive
Ultrasci
ence (R)
Scientific-
World
Wonders of
Weather (R)
Connec-
tions2 (R)
Science Frontiers "The
Art of Illusion"
Ultrasci
ence (R)
Scientific-
World
Wonders of
Weather (R)
Connec-
tions2 (R)
Science Frontiers "The
Art of Illusion" (R)
TNT
(4:00) Movie: *** "The
Wheeler Dealers" (1963)
In the Heat of the Night
“Good Cop, Bad Cop" ®
In the Heat of the Night
"Fool lor Love" (In Stereo)
Movie: *** "Solomon and Sheba" (1959, Drama) Yul Brynner, Gina
Lollobrigida. The Queen ol Sheba plots to destroy the ruler ol Israel.
Movie: *** V 2 "Samson and Delilah" (\949, Drama) Victor Mature.
Cecil B. DeMille's account of the strongman and his nemesis.
Movie: **'/2 "Jacob"
(1994) Matthew Modine. ®
USA
Highlander: The Series
“The Road Not Taken" SB
Renegade “Murderer’s
Row" SQ
Wings "Joe
Blows" SB
Wings "Joe
Blows" ®
Murder, She Wrote
“Murder in White” ®
Movie: "Bloodhounds" (1996) Corbin Bernsen. An
author and a detective doggedly trail an escaped killer.
Silk Stalkings "Freudian
Slip" (R) (In Stereo) ®
Highlander: The Series
"Innocent Man” (In Stereo)
Knight Rider "Goliath
Returns" (Part 2 of 2) ®
DISN
Darkwing
Duck®
Tale Spin®
Ducktales
®
Chip 'n'
Dale
Family
Circus
First Easter
Rabbit (R)
Easter Bunny Is Coming
to Town (R)
Movie: ***'/!z "Out of Africa" (1985, Drama) Meryl Streep. Based on Isak Dinesen’s
account of her plantation life. 'PG' (Adult situations, mild violence) ®
Hardy Boys
®
Zorro ®
Mickey
jMouse Club
Mickey
jMouse Club I
HBO
Figure
Skating
Movie: *** "1492: Conquest otParadise" ( 1992) Gerard Depardieu.
Based on Christopher Columbus’ discovery of the New World. 'PG-13'
Movie: **V 2 "Beverly Hills Cop ///"( 1994, Drama) Axel
Foley uncovers criminal activities at a theme park. 'R' ®
Best of Tracey Takes
On... (In Stereo) ®
Movie: ** "Silk Degrees" ( 1994,
Suspense) Marc Singer. (In Stereo) 'R’ ®
Movie: * * ’/j "One False Move "(1991, 1
Suspense) Bill Paxton. (In Stereo) 'R' ® |
PASS
Races-Hazel Park iLive on PASS Tigers |NBA Basketball: Charlotte Hornets at Detroit Pistons. (Live)
Press Box I Press Box
Sportswriters on TV
|NBA Basketball: Charlotte Hornets at Detroit Pistons. |
SHO
(4:00) Movie
iMovie: *** "Silverado"( 1985, Western) Kevin Kline. The paths ol
lour cowboys converge en route to a showdown. (In Stereo) 'PG-13'
I Movie: *** "It Could Happen to You"
(1994) Nicolas Cage. (In Stereo) ‘PG’ ®
Movie: ** "The Road to Wellville"( 1994, Salire) Anthony Hopkins. A
turn-of-the-century doctor practices unusual medicine. 'R' ®
Movie: "Undertow" ( 1996, Drama) A
drifter and a woman fear lor their lives.
"Damien:
Omen II" 'R'
TMC
(3:50) Movie
Movie: * * Vi "The Bachelor Party"
(1957, Drama) Don Murray.
Movie: ** "Short Circuit 2"(1988) Fisher Slevens. A
robot helps his co-creator break into the toy business.
Movie: *'/2 "RoboCop 3" (1993, Science
Fiction) Robert John Burke. 'PG-13' ®
Movie: *'/2 "Cyborg Cop //"(1994) David Bradley. A
maverick cop lakes on a power-hungry cyborg. 'R'
Movie: **’/j "Dark Angel:
The Ascent" ( 1994) 'R'®
"The Dogs
of War" ‘ R’
MANCINI, SCHREUDER,
KLINE, and CONRAD, P.C.
For 23 Years, Attorneys Representing
Injured Workers and Their Families
We Support Your Right To Strike
For Dignity and Justice
28225 Mound Rd., Warren, MI
(810) 751-3900


THURSDAY EVENING
t.hursday morning/afternoon
page;??
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Jerry Springer (R)
Jenny Jones BE
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Another World BE
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Montel Williams BE
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The City BE
All My Children BE
One Life to Live BE
General Hospital BE
Oprah Winfrey BE
JSC
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Northern Exposure BE
Beverly Hills, 90210 BE
Magnum, P.l. "Laura”
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Sailor Moon
Aladdin BE
Animaniacs
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Pet Shop
Cubhouse |Dinosaurs
Blossom BE
Jeffersons
Good Times
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Barney
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Night Heat
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Shop-Drop
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Cur. Affair
Rescue 911
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Remington Steele
McCloud "Park Avenue Pirates"
|New Mike Hammer |Quincy "Nowhere to Run" [Equalizer "Splinters"
McMillan and Wife "The Game of Survival"
New Mike Hammer
AMC
(7:30) Movie: "Kid Frm Tx"
Movie: *** “Murder, Inc." (1960)
Movie: *** “Knock on IVood”(1954) Danny Kaye. |Movie: *** "Tower of London" (1939) Movie: "Canyon Passage” (1946) Dana Andrews. “There’s No Business"
BET
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Benson
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Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Tennis: Family Circle Cup -- Early Rounds. (Live)
Racehorse
Sports
Sr. PGA
Inside PGA
Senior PGA Golf: The Tradition -- First Round. (Live)
FAM
Family Challenge
Waltons “The Conflict"
700 Club
FIT TV
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Home & Family (In Stereo)
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Baby
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Our Home Gourmet Biggers and Summers
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Handmade Designing Movie: ★★V 2 "The River Rat" (1984, Drama)
Looney |Beetlejuice~
Spenser: For Hire BE
Muppets [Chipmunks
NICK
Looney
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RugratsBE |Busy World
Rupert Muppets
Allegra Gullah
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Animation
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Beauty and the Beast
Dark Shw. Dark Shw.
Magician
Hitchcock Darkside Gallery Bradbury
Galactica 1980
Incredible Hulk
TBS
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Bewitched
Boss?
Griffith
Little House
Matlock "The Strangler"
Little Star | Kitty Cats
Perry Mason
Movie: ★★V 2 "The Best of Times" (1986, Comedy)
Garfield Flintstones
Scooby Brady
TLC
Little Star Kitty Cats
Bookmice
Iris the Prof.
Chicken
Rorys Pice
Gardening [Homebods
Crafts & Co. Caprials Kitchen Peasant
Crafts & Co. Gardening
Homebods Home Pro
TNT
(7:30) Scooby Dooby Doo
Bugs
Flintstones
Gilligan Gilligan
Knots Landing
Starsky and Hutch
Charlie’s Angels
CHiPs
Wild, Wild West
“Bret Maverick"
USA
Fighter Dragon
Movie: ★★V 2 “Book of Love" ( 1991) Chris Young.
Dumbo [Umbrella
Movie: *** "Cry-Baby" ( 1990, Musical) Johnny Depp.
My Little Ducktales |Chip-Dale [Tale Spin 1]
Live With the People’s Court
Live With Love Connection
| Charlie bT
|Quack
MacGyver BE
Kids Incorp. |MMC (R)3E
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Movie: ** "Flight of the Intruder" ( 1991) Danny Glover.
Letting Go: A Hospice Journey (R) BE
| Workout - ^
Movie: *** "Judgment" (1990) 'PG-13'
“Breakin 1 2: Electric"
Movie: ★★Vi "Seven Minutes in Heaven" "Bad News Bears Break Tr."
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PASS
Scoreboard Central
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FIT TV
Prime Cuts | Drag Racing
SHO
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TMC
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Movie: ** “It Runs in the Family" (1994)
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5:00
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:00
7:30
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9:30
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FOX
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News
Real Stories
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America's
Most
Wanted
Extra (In
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Living
Single (In
Stereo) BE
Martin (In
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New York Undercover
"The Enforcers" (In Slereo)
BE
News
Cheers
"Cheers Has
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Night Court
Christine is
jailed.
Extra (In
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Top Cops
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Real Stories
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News
NBC Nightly
News BE
Wheel of
Fortune BE
Jeopardy!
BE
Friends (In
Stereo) BE
Boston
Common (In
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Seinfeld
“The Wig
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Caroline in
the City (In
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to run an overcrowded and
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Jenny Jones Great
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Emergency
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News
ABC World
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Tonight BE
Entertain
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Tonight BE
Before They Were Stars
Part IV (R) (In Stereo) BE
Movie: "Bermuda Triangle" (1996, Drama) Sam
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a tropical island. Premiere. (In Stereo) BE
News
Nightline BE
Inside
Edition BE
American
Journal BE
Gordon Elliott Flaunting a
happy marriage.
o
CBC
What on
Earth
News
CBC News
Health
Show BE
Man Alive
(R) BE
Nature of Things "The
Hidden World of the Bog"
North of 60 "The Weight"
(R) BE
National/CBC News BE
News
The Bill
Bread and Roses (Part 4
Of 4)
(Off Air)
©
WB
Family
Matters BE
Mama’s
Family
Different
World BE
Family
Matters BE
Cops (In
Stereo) SB
LAPD (R) (In
Stereo) BE
Movie: **'/? "Funny Farm" (1988, Comedy) A couple
leaves New York for the New England countryside.
Baywatch “Lifeguards
Can’t Jump" (In Stereo) BE
Dear John
(In Stereo)
Home
Videos
Cops (In
Stereo) BE
Doogie
Howser
Perfect
Strangers
Movie:
"Superman”
©
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Fresh
Prince
Step by
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Simpsons
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Roseanne
(In Stereo)
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Home
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"Friends" BE
Minor
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"Episode Four" (In Stereo)
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Generation "Justice" BE
Coach (In
Stereo) BE
Murphy
Brown BE
©
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Business
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Green
This Old
House BE
Mystery! "Inspector Morse
VI" "Fat Chance" (R) BE
Mystery! "Inspector Morse
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Being
Served
New Red
Green
Charlie Rose (In Stereo)
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Sports
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House BE
©
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Tempestt
Seinfeld (In
Stereo) BE
CBS News
Hard Copy
BE
Current
Affair BE
Murder, She Wrote
“Southern Double Cross”
Rescue 911 (In Slereo) BE
48 Hours (In Stereo) BE
Late Show (In Stereo) BE
Current
Affair BE
[Late Late Show (In
Stereo) BE
Richard Bey
(R)
A&E
Remington Steele "Bonds
of Steele”
Quincy “The Money
Plague”
Equalizer "Making of a
Martyr”
Biography “Moses and the Ten Commandments" The
life story of Moses, the reluctant prophet. (R)
Voyages "Ape Man: Story
of Human Evolution"
Law & Order "Asylum”
Biography "Moses and the Ten Commandments" The 1
life story of Moses, the reluctant prophet. (R)
AMC
(4:00) Movie: "There’s No
Business"
Movie: *** "The lV/ndoiv"(1949,
Suspense) Bobby Driscoll, Barbara Hale.
Jason
Robards
Movie: **'/2 "The Last Outpost” ( 1951,
Western) Ronald Reagan, Bill Willaims.
[Movie: ***'/2 "Once Upon a Time in the Wes/"(1969, Western) Henry Fonda,
Claudia Cardinale. A gunman attempts to control land in 19th-century Kansas. 'PG'
[Movie: **'/2 "The Last Outpost" (1951, 1
Western) Ronald Reagan, Bill Willaims. 1
BET
1(4:30) Rap City |Screen
All Night
Benson
Roc BE |Comicview
Video Soul
Benson
Roc BE
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Comicview
DISC
Popular Mechanics (R)
Wings "Straight Up" (R)
Beyond
2000
Next Step
(R)
Wild Discovery "Australia
- Predators of the North"
Movie
Magic (R)
|Know Zone I
(R)
Time Traveler “Howard
Hughes"
Next Step
(R)
Beyond
2000
Wild Discovery "Australia [
-- Predators of the North"
Movie
Magic (R)
Know Zone
(R)
ESPN
Senior PGA Golf: The .
Tradition-- First Round.
Up Close
Sportscenter
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Sportslight
Wooden
Awards
NHL Hockey: Toronto Maple Leals at St. Louis Blues. From Kiel Center. (Live) BE
Sportscenter BE
Baseball
Tonight
Inside the
PGA Tour
Inside Sr.
PGA
FAM
Family Challenge (In
Slereo)
Newhart BE
Evening
Shade BE
Waltons "The Ordeal"
(Part 1 of 2)
Highway to Heaven "Birds
ol a Feather" (In Stereo) BE
Rescue 911 (In Stereo) BE 1
700 Club
Three Stooges
Bonanza: The Lost
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Paid
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Deep”
Supermar
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Designing
Women BE
Commish "The Trial" (R)
(In Stereo) BE
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Stereo)
Movie: **'/j "The Kidnapping of Baby John Doe"
(1986, Drama) Jayne Eastwood, Geoffrey Bowes.
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Stereo)
Unsolved
Mysteries
Late Date
Nurses
Thirtysome-
thing “Pilot"
NICK
Tiny Toon
|Adventures
Looney
|Tunes
Clarissa
Explains
Rugrats (In
Stereo) BE
Doug (In
Stereo)
Tiny Toon
Adventures
Munsters
1 Dream of
Jeannie
I Love Lucy
BE
Bewitched I
Mary Tyler
Moore BE
|Taxi (Part 1
of 2)
Welcome
Back
Dick Van
Dyke
Bob
Newhart
Lucy Show
Munsters
Mary Tyler
Moore BE
SCIFI
Bionic Woman "The Night
Demon”
Six Million Dollar Man
"Sharks" (Part 2 of 2)
Twilight
Zone
Monsters
Quantum Leap "Stand Up
-April 30, 1959" BE
Movie: *'/? "Alligator II: The Mutation" (1991) Joseph
Bologna. A giant reptile lunches on lakeside residents.
Twilight
Zone El
Monsters
Quantum Leap “A Leap
for Lisa-June 25,1957"
Movie: *'/? "Alligator II:
The Mutation" (1991)
TBS
Saved by
the Bell BE
Saved by
the Bell BE
Family
Matters BE
Family
Matters BE
Home
Videos
Major League Baseball: San Francisco Giants al Atlanta Braves. From Atlanta-
Fulton County Stadium. (Live) BE
[Movie: *Vi "Assassination" (1987) Charles Bronson.
An agent uncovers a plot to assassinate the first lady.
Movie: **'/2 "Telefon" (1977, Suspense)!
Charles Bronson, Lee Remick.
TLC
Furniture-
Mend
Renovation
Guide (R)
Hometime
(Part 1 of 2)
Hometime
(Part 2 of 2)
When Christianity Began
- Ending the Teror (R)
This Century "Lighter
Than Air" (Part 1 of 2)
Eye on History
Neat Stuff
(R)
Amazing
America (R)
This Century "Lighter
Than Air" (R) (Part 1 of 2)
Eye on History (R)
Neat Stuff |
(R)
Amazing
America (R) 1
TNT
(4:00) Movie: ** "Bret
Maverick: The Lazy Ace"
In the Heat of the Night
"A Depraved Hearf'BE
In the Heat of the Night
(In Stereo) BE
Movie: **'/2 "Gray Lady Down"(1978, Suspense) Charlton Heston,
Stacy Keach. A nuclear sub is disabled after colliding with a freighter.
Movie: **'/2 "Skyjacked"(1972) Charlton Heston. A
vet hijacks a plane and demands to be taken to Russia.
Movie: * * Vi "Gray Lady Down" ( 1978, 1
Suspense) Charlton Heston.
USA
Highlander: The Series
"Innocent Man” (In Stereo)
Renegade "Murderer’s
Row” BE
Wings (In
Stereo) BE
Wings (In
Stereo) BE
Movie: **'/2 "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" |
(1971, Fantasy) Gene Wilder, Jack Albertson.
Highlander: The Series [
"The Warmonger" BE
Silk Stalkings “The
Scarlet Shadow" (R) BE
Highlander: The Series
“Free Fall" (In Stereo) BE
Forever Knight "Blind
Faith" (R) (In Stereo) BE 1
DISN
Darkwing
Duck®
Tale Spin BE J
Ducktales
BE
Chip ’n’
Dale
Baby-
Sitters Club
Ready or
Not BE
This Island Earth (R) (In 1
Stereo)
Movie: "The Milagro Beanfield War” (1988) Tensions [
arise between a Chicano larmer and land developers. 1
Movie: *** "The Grey Fox" ( 1982,
Western) Richard Farnsworth. 'PG'
Irish Music and
America... Migration
"Von Ryan's 1
Express" 1
HBO
(4:15) Movie: "Breakin' 2 :
Electric Boogaloo"( 1984)
Movie: ** "Flight of the Intruder" (1991) Danny Glover.
A flight team delies orders and bombs a strategic target.
Movie: *'/2 "A Passion to Kill” (1994,
Drama) Scott Bakula. (In Stereo) 'R'
Movie: *** "Afterburn"( 1992, Drama) Laura Dern. An 1
Air Force widow fights to clear her husband’s name. 'R'
Def Comedy I
All Star Jam
Movie: *** "Rasputin" (1996) Alan Rickman. Russia's 1
royal family falls prey to an ambitious holy man. BE 1
PASS
Championship Wrestling
Live on PASS |Red Wings |Powerboats
This Week in NASCAR |Drag Racing: NHRA
Press Box | Biking |Hockey
Motorsports Hour |Fame |Press Box
Paid Prog.
SHO
(3:30) Movie |
Extras:
Quiz Show
Movie: ** "Little Big League" (1994) A 12-year-old boy
becomes the Minnesota Twins’ new manager. 'PG' BE
Movie: * * "Sister Act 2 : Back in the
Habit" (1993) Whoopi Goldberg. 'PG' BE
Extras:
Goldbrg
Movie: **'/2 "FederalHill"( 1994,
Drama) Nicholas Turturro. ‘R’
Movie: "Under Lock and Key" (1995) An FBI agent’s
undercover assignment lands her behind bars. ’R’
Movie: *
"Arcade"' R'
TMC
Movie: **'/? "Murphy's Romance" (1985) A May-
December romance blooms in a small Arizona town.
Movie: **’/•? "When a Man Loves a Woman" ( 1994,
Drama) Andy Garcia, Meg Ryan. (In Stereo) 'R' BE
Movie: ***'/i "Women on the Verge ol
a Nervous Breakdown" (1988) 'R'
Movie:*** “Threesome" (1994,
Comedy) Lara Flynn Boyle. 'R' BE
Movie: *Vi? "Seventh Floor” (1994,
Suspense) Brooke Shields. (In Stereo) 'R'
Movie: "The
Granny" 'R'
Sunday Iol
ournal
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FRIDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON PAGE H ) : l> 11 I M e \; H ' f O m APR|L 5 1996 |
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FOX
O
Eyewitness Morning
Geraldo (R)
Mark Walberg (R)
George & Alana (R)
News
Court TV
Carnie (R) (In Stereo)
Geraldo (R)
Mark Walberg (R)
Ricki Lake
NBC
O
(7:00) Today (In Stereo) BE
Maury Povich (R) BE
Jerry Springer (R)
Jenny Jones (R) BE
News
Jeopardy!
Days of Our Lives BE
Another World BE
Sally (R)
Montel Williams BE
ABC
O
Good Morning America
Regis & Kathie
Donahue (In Stereo) BE
Rolonda (R)
News
The City BE
All My Children BE
One Life to Live BE
General Hospital BE
Oprah Winfrey BE
CBC
O
(7:00) CBC Morning News
Wht-Earth | Playground
Theodore |Mr. Dressup
Sesame Street
Midday BE
Gourmet |Emmerdale
Neighbours
Reflections
Urban P.
Degrassi
The Bill
WB
©
Woody
Bananas
E.N.G “Otherwise Inflicted"
In the Heat of the Night
Northern Exposure BE
Beverly Hills, 90210 BE
Magnum, P.l.
Blinky Bill
Sailor Moon
Aladdin BE
Animaniacs
Troopers
Gargoyles
UPN
QD
Menace
Pet Shop
Cubhouse | Dinosaurs
Blossom BE
Jeffersons
Good Times
Sanford
Griffith
I Love Lucy
Golden G. | Empty Nest
Flintstones
Goof Troop
Taz-Mania
Eeklstravag
Batman
Goosebmp
PBS
©
Barney
Station
Sesame Street BE
Barney
Mr Rogers
Storytime
Reading
Lamb Chop
Puzzle
Sesame Street BE
Barney
Reading
Puzzle
C. Sandiego
Bill Nye
Wishbone
CBS
©
(7:00) This Morning BE
Night Heat
Guiding Light (In Stereo)
Price Is Right BE
Shop-Drop
Young and the Restless {Bold & B.
As the World Turns BE
Cur. Affair
Rescue 911
Day & Date
A&E
Remington Steele |McMillan and Wife “The Game of Survival" |New Mike Hammer |Quincy |Equalizer
Columbo “Last Salute to the Commodore"
New Mike Hammer
AMC
(6:30) Movie
Movie: "Living It Up"( 1954)
Movie: ★★ "Step Down to Terror" {1958) |Movie: **V 2 "My Geisha" (1962) Shirley MacLaine. |Reflection
Movie: ***Vi “Hush... Hush, Sweet Charlotte" (1965)
“The World in His Arms"
BET
Breakthru
Paid Prog.
Business | Roc BE
Benson
Thea
Video Vibrations
Video Soul (R)
In Your Ear
Rap City
DISC
Paid Prog.
Paid Prog.
Cronkite Report
Home
Start
Housesmart! (R) |Graham K. |Cuisine
Great Chefs | Home | Start |Easy
Home |Graham K. jCuisine
Great Chefs
ESPN
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Sportscenter (R)
Tennis: Family Circle Cup - Quarterfinal. (Live)
Davis Cup Tennis: Quarterfinal Round
Senior PGA Golf: The Tradition - Second Round.
FAM
Family Challenge
Waltons “The Conflict"
700 Club FIT TV
Rescue 911 (In Stereo) BE
Home & Family (In Stereo)
Highway to Heaven BE
PunkyB. (Wild Animal
LIFE
Baby
YourBaby
Sisters "Judgement Day"
Our Home
Gourmet
Biggers and Summers
Living
Our Home
Handmade
Designing
Movie: ** "Oh God! You Devil" (1984) George Burns.
Spenser: For Hire BE
NICK
Looney
Gumby
Rugrats BE |Busy World
Rupert
Muppets
Allegra
Gullah
Beaver
Busy World
Eureeka
Gullah
Gumby
Tintin
Looney | Beetlejuice
Muppets |Chipmunks
SCIFI
Animation
Anti-Gravity
Lost in Space
Beauty and the Beast
Dark Shw.
Dark Shw.
Magician
Hitchcock
Darkside
Gallery
Bradbury
Galactica 1980
Incredible Hulk
TBS
Gilligan
Bewitched
Boss?
Griffith
Little House
Matlock "The Nightmare"
Perry Mason
Movie: * “The Ice Pirates"
1984) Robert Urich.
Garfield
Flintstones
Scooby
Brady
TLC
Little Star
Kitty Cats
Bookmice
Iris the Prof.
Chicken
Rorys Pice
Little Star ] Kitty Cats
Gardening |Homebods
Crafts & Co. ] Caprials
Kitchen | Peasant
Crafts & Co.
Gardening
Homebods
Home Pro
TNT
(7:30) Scooby Dooby Doo
Bugs
Flintstones
Gilligan
Gilligan
Knots Landing
Starsky and Hutch
Charlie’s Angels
CHiPs “Highway Robbery"
Wild, Wild West
Movie: ** “Up Periscope"
USA
Fighter
Dragon
Movie: ★* "Big Top Pee-wee"( 1988, Comedy)
Movie: "Once B/Wen” (1985) Lauren Hutton.
Live With the People’s Court
Live With Love Connection
MacGyver (In Stereo) BE
DISN
Pooh
Care Bears
Gummi B. iPoohCrnr.
Dumbo lUmbrella
My Little iDucktales
Chip-Dale
Tale Spin BE
Movie: ★★ "Woof!" (1989, Fantasy) ‘G‘
Pooh |C. Brown |Quack
Easter |Haggadah
HBO
Earth-Kids
Movie: *'/> "Showdown" ^993) 'PG-13'
Movie: ** "Alex"( 1993, Drama) Lauren Jackson. ‘NR’
DropZone
Movie: **% "Turk 182!" (1985) ‘PG-13’
Movie: ** “Lightning Jack" (1994) Paul Hogan. BE
Movie: "Silverado" (1985)
PASS
Scoreboard Central | English Soccer
FIT TV fWorkout IPrimeCuts
Rugby in America (R) ISkiing
Skiing |PlanetX(R)
Transworld Sport
Racing
Journal
SHO
Busy World iMovie: “Ava's Magical Adventure" (1994)
Movie: *★** "8 1/2" ( 1963, Fantasy) Marcello Mastroianni.
|Movie: *★ “Little Big League" (1994, Comedy) Luke Edwards. ‘PG’
Movie: *★'/ 2 “Lady in Cement"(\96&)
“Thunder"
TMC
|(7:20) Movie: "Legend" |Movie: ★*'/ 2 “Terminal Velocity" (1994) |Movie: *★* "Panic in Needle Part"(1971) Al Pacino.
|Movie: ** “Remote"(1993) 'PG'
|*** “The Oklahoma Kid"
Movie: ★★V 2 "Chain Lightning" (1950) BE
“Mr. Jones"
5:00
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FOX
News
News
Real Stories
of Highway
Patrol
America’s
Most
Wanted
Extra (In
Stereo) BE
Sliders "Time Again and
World" (In Stereo) BE
X-Files "Born Again" (R)
(In Stereo) BE
News
Cheers bam
returns to
the mound.
Night Court
Christine is
engaged.
Extra (In
Stereo) BE
Top Cops
(In Stereo)
Real Stories
of Highway
Patrol
Hitchhiker
"Dead Heat"
(In Stereo)
O
NBC
News
News
NBC Nightly
News BE
Wheel of
Fortune BE
Jeopardy!
BE
Unsolved Mysteries The
unexplained death of actor
George Reeves. (R) BE
Dateline (In Stereo) BE
Homicide: Life on the
Street "Full Moon" (In
Stereo) ©
News
Tonight Show (In Stereo)
BE
Jenny Jones Update on
former guests. (R) SB
Paid
Program
O
ABC
News
News
ABC World
News
Tonight BE
Entertain
ment
Tonight BE
Family
Matters (In
Stereo) BE
Muppets
Tonight! (In
Stereo) BE
Aliens in
the Family
(In Stereo)
Step by
Step "Don't
Ask" (R) BE
20/20 BE
News
Nightline BE
Inside
Edition BE
American
Journal BE
Gordon Elliott Mates take 1
polygraph tests. ‘
O
CBC
What on
Earth
Sketches of
Our Town
CBC News
On the
Road Again
Royal Air
Farce
Jest Pop.4
No Job for a
Lady
Rita and Friends (R) BE
National/CBC News BE
News
French
Fields
Movie: *** "Close My Eyes" (1991) Alan Rickman. A 1
woman's incestuous affair threatens her marriage.
©
WB
Family
Matters BE
Mama's
Family
Different
World BE
Family
Matters BE
Cops (In
Stereo) BE
LAPD (R) (In
Stereo) BE
Movie: **'/? "The Jewel of the M/e" (1985) A novelist
and an adventurer race to find a fabulous jewel.
Baywatch "Dead of
Summer" (In Slereo) BE
Dear John
(In Stereo)
Home
Videos
Cops (In
Stereo) BE
Doogie
|Howser
Perfect
Strangers
"I'm Gonna
Git"
©
UPN
Fresh
Prince
Step by
Step BE
Simpsons
(In Stereo)
Roseanne
"Mall Story"
Home
Improve.
NBA Basketball: Detroit Pistons at Philadelphia 76ers. From the
Spectrum. (Live)
News
Fresh
Prince
Married...
With
Star Trek: Deep Space
Nine "Rejoined" (R) BE
Coach BE
Murphy
Brown SB
©
PBS
Health
Matters (R)
GED "Math
II"
Newshour With Jim
Lehrer BE
Business
Report
Black
Journal
Washington
Week
Wall Street
Week®
Back to Back
Off the McLaughlin
Record Group
Being
Served
Chef!
"Personnel"
Club
Connect BE
In the Mix
Ed Wood: Look Back in I
1 Angora
©
CBS
Tempestt
Seinfeld (In
Stereo) BE
CBS News
Hard Copy
BE
Current
Affair®
Due South (In Stereo) BE
Diagnosis Murder “The
Murder Trade" (In Stereo)
Nash Bridges "High
Impact” (In Stereo) BE
Late Show (In Stereo) BE
Current
Affair BE
Late Late Show (In
Stereo) BE
Richarc^eyj
CABLE CHANNELS
A&E
Remington Steele "The
Steele That Wouldn’t Die"
Quincy "For the Benefit of
My Patients"
Equalizer "The Sins of Our
Fathers"
Biography: Paul Newman-
Charming Rebel
Movie: *** "Rio Bravo" ( 1959, Western) John Wayne, Dean Martin, Ricky Nelson.'
A powerful rancher seeks his brother's release from prison.
Biography: Paul Newman-
Charming Rebel
Movie: *** "Rio Bravo"
(1959) John Wayne.
AMC
(4:15) Movie: *** "The
World in His Arms" (1952)
Movie: *** "Captain Horatio Hornblower" (1951) A
British seaman risks lives to save England’s harbors.
Movie: * * * 'h "Come Back, Little
Sheba" (1952, Drama) Shirley Booth.
Movie
Changed
Movie: **★'/2 "Made lor Each Other"
(1939, Drama) Carole Lombard.
Movie: *** "The World in His Arms"( 1952), Ann Blyth
A seal poacher steals the heart of a Russian countess.
"Captain-
Horn."
BET
Rap City [Teen Summit
Thea
Benson
Roc El |Comicview~ Video Soul Top 20
Benson
News (R) Midnight Love
Comicview
DISC
Popular Mechanics (R)
Wings "Harrier" (R)
ESPN
Senior PGA Golf: The
Tradition -- Second Round.
FAM
Family Challenge (In
Stereo)
LIFE
Cagney & Lacey "Favors"
Beyond
2000
Next Step
(R)
Up Close Sporlscenter
Newhart I
Supermar-
ket Sweep
Wild Discovery "Islands of
the Iguana" (R)
Beyond 2000
Wings “Thunder From the
Sea"(R)
Next Step
(R)
Beyond
2000
Evening
Shade BE
Designing
Women SB
NHL Hockey: Philadelphia Flyers at New York Rangers. From Madison Square
Garden. (Live) SB
Waltons "The Ordeal"
(Part 2 of 2)
Commish "Cry Wolle" (In
Stereo) El
Highway to Heaven "The
Smile in the Third Row" 23
Intimate Portrait "The
Virgin Mary" (R)
Rescue 911 (In Stereo) S3
Wild Discovery "Islands of
the Iguana" (R)
Baseball
Tonight
Sportscenter BE
Baseball
Tonight
Speedweek
700 Club
Three Stooges
Bonanza: The Lost
Episodes
Movie: ★* V 2 "Mary of Nazareth" (1995, Drama) A
dramatized account of the life of Jesus Christ's mother.
Unsolved Mysteries (In
Stereo)
Unsolved
Mysteries
Late Date
Beyond 2000
Superbouts: Marvin
Hagler vs. John Mugabi
Paid
Program
Nurses
Paid
Program
Girls' Night
Out (R) W
NICK
Tiny Toon
Adventures
Looney
Tunes
Clarissa
Explains
Rugrats (In
Stereo) SB
SCIFI
Bionic Woman “Iron Ships
and Dead Men”
Six Million Dollar Man
"Deadly Countdown"
Doug (In
Stereo)
Twilight
Zone I®
Tiny Toon
Adventures
Munsters
I Dream of
Jeannie
I Love Lucy
Bewitched
(Part lot 2)
C-Net
Central
Night Stalker "Chopper"
Fantastic Journey
"Atlantium" (Part 2 of 2)
Mary Tyler
Moore SB
Sci-Fi Buzz
Taxi (Part 2
of 2)
Welcome
Back
Inside
Space SB
Twilight
Zone®
Dick Van
Dyke
Bob
Newhart
Lucy Show
Munsters
Mary Tyler
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C-Net
Central (R)
Night Stalker "Chopper"
Fantastic Journey
"Atlantium" (Part 2 of 2)
TBS
Saved by
the Bell OH
Saved by
the Bell SB
Family
Matters SB
Family
Matters I
Home
Videos
Major League Baseball: St. Louis Cardinals at Atlanta Braves. From Atlanta-Fulton
County Stadium. (Live) SB
Movie: *** "Urban Cowboy" (1980, Drama) John Travolta, Debra Winger, Scott
Glenn. A Texas oil worker looks for love at a popular honky-tonk. Time Approximate.
“Return-
Macon"
TLC
Furniture to
Go (R)
Renovation
Guide (R)
Hometime
Flooring. (R)
Hometime
(Part 2 of 2)
Images of Jesus (R)
TNT
(4:00) Movie: ** "Up
Periscope" (1959)
In the Heat of the Night
"Your Own Kind" SB
In the Heat of the Night
"Moseley’s Lot" (In Stereo)
Jesus and His Times (R)
Jesus and His Times (R)
Jesus and His Times (R)
NBA Basketball: Chicago Bulls at Charlotte Hornets. From the
Charlotte Coliseum. (Live) SB
Inside the
NBA
Jesus and His Times (R)
Jesus and His Times (R)
Movie: **'/j "Vigilante Force"( 1976, Adventure) Two
brothers face off in a corrupt California boomtown.
Jesus and His Times (R)
Movie: ** "Forced
Vengeance" (1982)
USA
Highlander: The Series
"Free Fall" (In Stereo) BE
Renegade "Carrick
O'Quinn" (In Stereo) BE
Wings (In
Stereo) SB
DISN
You're a Good Man,
Charlie Brown (R)
Movie: *** "Snoopy, Come Home"
(1972) Voices of Chad Webber. 'G'
Wings "The
Faygitive" 88
Murder, She Wrote
"Murder on the 30th Floor"
Movie: *** "A Boy Named Charlie
Brown" ( 1969) Voices ol Peter Robbins.
HBO
(4:00) Movie: ***
"Silverado" (1985) 'PG-13'
PASS
Races-Haze! Park
Movie: *'/? "Showdown" ( 1993) Billy Blanks. An ex-
police officer must fight a vengeful gang leader. 'PG-13'
Live on PASS |High School Wrestling ~
SHO
(4:30) Movie: "Thunder
and Lightning" (1977) 'PG'
Movie: "Mother, Jugs & Speed” (1976) Employees of
an ambulance service try to avert bankruptcy. 'PG'
Movie: **★'/» "Rosemary's Baby" (1968, Horror) Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes,
Ruth Gordon. A woman fears a coven has designs on her unborn child. SB
Movie: **** "Sparfacus"(I960, Drama) Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier. A former
Roman slave rallies his oppressed countrymen. (In Stereo) 'PG-13' SB
Movie: ** "DeadBadge"(1994, Drama)
Brian Wimmer. (In Stereo) 'R'
High School Wrestling |PageOne~
TMC
(4:45) Movie: ** "Mr. Jones" ( 1993,
Drama) Richard Gere. (In Stereo) 'R' E]
Movie: *** "While You Were Sleeping"
(1995, Comedy) Sandra Bullock. 'PG' BE
Movie: *** "Looking lor Mr. Goodbar" (1977, Drama) Diane Keaton.
A promiscuous schoolteacher has numerous one-night stands. 'R'
Movie: "Terminal Justice" (1995) Lorenzo Lamas. A
security guard is reunited with a drug-running nemesis.
Dennis
Miller (R) SB
Movie: ** "Children ol the Corn II: The Final Sacrifice"
(1992, Horror) Terence Knox, Paul Scherrer.
Bruce Springsteen and the E Street
Band: Blood Brothers (R) E]
Bruce
Springsteen
Movie: *'/? "Army of One' "(1993) Dolph Lundgren. A
trucker is framed lor the murder of a police officer. 'NR'
Hockey Wk.
Extras:
Bullock
Press Box
Outer
Limits SB
Movie: **'/2 "Terminal Velocity" (1994,
Adventure) Charlie Sheen. 'PG-13' SB
NHL Hockey: Detroit Red Wings at Mighty Ducks ol Anaheim. (Live) [NHL Hockey
Movie: *★ "Deadly Rivals" ( 1992) An unsuspecting
physicist runs afoul of spies and mobsters. 'R'
Movie: ★★V? "Navy SEALS" ( 1990) Charlie Sheen. An
elite fighting force tracks Middle Eastern terrorists. 'R'
Movie: ** "Surf Nazis
Must Die" (1987) 'R'
"Marshal
Law" (1996)
Movie: * "Enemy Gold" (1994, Drama)
Bruce Penhall, Mark Barriere. 'R'
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SATURDAY MORNING/AFTERNOON PAGE 24 APRIL 6,1996
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0
| Eyewitness Weekend
Creepy
Tenko
Jetsons
Flintstones
Dreams
Sw. Valley | Beyond
Paid Prog.
U.S. Customs: Classified |Flipper “Surf Gang” (R)
High Tide "Bikini Patrol" 1
NBC
O
| (7:00) Today (In Stereo) ©
NewsbeatTday
Saved-Bell
Hang Time
Saved-Bell
Gladiators
Inside Stuff
World of Nature: Gorilla
Paid Prog.
Paid Prog. |Tennis: Family Circle Cup -- Semifinal.
U.S. Olympic Trials (Live) |
ABC
o
Pooh
Free Willy
Bump
Fudge E
Hypernauts
Reboot E
Bugs & T.
Bugs & T.
Mess
Weekend
Women’s Basketball: College All-Stars vs. USA |PBA Bowling: Pennsylvania Open. E
Wide World I
CBC
o
Little Bear
Sesame Street
Penner’s
Cents
From Hip
Gardener
Cottage
Busy
Spilled Milk
Personal [Disability
TBA |To Be Announced jNational Geographic (R)
Skiing
WB
©
Sylvstr
Animaniacs
Animaniacs
PinkyBrain
Freakazoid!
Erthwrm
Nancy Drew
Hardy Boys
Movie: *** "Innerspace"( 1987) Dennis Quaid.
Movie: *** "One Good Cop" ( 1991) Michael Keaton.
Outer Limits (In Stereo) E
UPN
©
Sandiego
Casper E
Rangers
Rider
Spider-Man
X-Men E
TickE
Life-Louie
Movie: *** "Ghostbusters"( 1984) Bill Murray.
Movie: ** "Beanstalk"(1994, Fantasy)
Simpsons
Major League Baseball
PBS
©
Disc. Mich
Magazine
Wood Dr.
Hometime
Old House
Workshop
Michigan
Boat Shop
Sportsman
Great Lakes
Sewing
Sewing
Gourmet |Cucina
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5:00
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8:00
8:30
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o
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Movie: "Brothers of the Frontier" (1996, Adventure)
Joey Lawrence. Pioneer brothers face a perilous search
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Movie: ** "Victim of Love” (1991, Drama) Pierce
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With “
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(R)E
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George Gershwin Remembered An account of the life
of American music legend George Gershwin.
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Movie: *** "Bend of the River" ( 1952,
Western) James Stewart.
Movie: ***V 2 “The Hustler" (1961, Drama) Paul Newman, Piper
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Movie: "Charro!"( 1969) A gang frames a
former member for the theft of a cannon.
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outlaw leads settlers through the wilds of Oregon.
Movie: "The Hustler" (1961) A pool shark!
takes on the legendary Minnesota Fats. 1
BET
BET Shop
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Justice Files “Unlikely
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<R)
Wings "Wings Over
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Wings “Wings Over the
Pacific" (R)
ESPN '
Senior PGA Golf: The Tradition -- Third Round. From Scottsdale,
Ariz. (Live)
Sports-
center
Major League Soccer: D.C. United at San Jose Clash.
From Spartan Stadium. (Live)
Extreme
Bloopers
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Tonight
Sportscenter E
Baseball
Tonight
Motorcycle Racing: AMA I
Supercross Series.
iDong A
Marathon
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McGregor Saga (R)E
Christy "Pilot" (In Stereo)
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Dream West Fremont fights for the American control of
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Movie: ** "Branmgan" (1975, Mystery) John Wayne, Judy Geeson.
A Chicago Doliceman tracks a fleeing fuaitive to London.
Three
Stooges
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LIFE
(4:00) Movie: ** "Hard
Promises" (1991)
Movie: *** "Daddy" { 1987, Drama) Dermot Mulroney.
A high-school student learns he will soon be a father.
Movie: **'/} “The Man in the Moon"( 1991, Drama) An
adolescent girl experiences the panqs of first love.
Commish "The Set-Up"
(In Stereo) E
Carol Burnett
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NICK
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Lost
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Are You
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E
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Hour
Dick Van
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Bob
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Runner" (1992) E
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Max Headroom "The
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attraction holds grisly death for four teen-agers.
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(4:05) Movie: ** "She's
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Movie: ***Vi "The Sand Pebbles" (1966, Adventure) Steve McQueen, Richard Crenna, Richard I
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Movie: ** "Road House" ( 1989, Drama) Patrick Swayze, Kelly
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Movie: *** “The Lords of Discipline"
(1983, Drama) David Keith.
USA
(2:30) Movie
Movie: *** "Cape Fear” (1991, Suspense) Robert De Niro. An ex
convict takes revenge on the lawyer who betrayed him. (In Stereo) E
Pacific Blue "Takedown"
(In Stereo) E
Weird
Science E
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“Pig Amok"
Movie: ** “Sunstroke" ^992) Jane Seymour. A
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DISN
Movie: “ The Little Riders" (1996, Drama) Paul Scofield.
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Making-
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Movie: **V 2 “Any Which Way You Can" (1980) Bare
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Movie: *** "The Front Page"( 1974,
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Conversation With Carol I
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Movie: “The I
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IHL Hockey: Los Angeles at Orlando | College Baseball: Miami at Florida State. (Live) I Press Box I English Soccer
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Movie: "The Bear"( 1989) An orphaned
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Red Shoe
Diaries
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THE OFFICIAL 1996
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Southfield, MI 48034 (810) 354-9650


PAGE 25
Alan Alda, below center, is a big fan of
David 0. Russell, left, whose new film
“Flirting With Disaster” also stars Lily
Tomlin and Glenn Fitzgerald.
Quirky
works
‘Flirting With Disaster ’ exposes
filmmaker’s offbeat humor
By William Hanson
Journal Movie Writer
LOS ANGELES - Filmmaker
David O. Russell can get an actor to
do the damdest things. Just ask Alan
Alda, one of several big-name actors
who jumped at the chance to work for
the upstart writer-director in his
wonderfully funny new film, “Flirting
With Disaster.”
“In a case like this, or in a Woody
Allen movie, you know that you’re
helping somebody who really
deserves to make movies,” AJda says.
“You want to be part of it.”
So the 60-year-old star, best known
for his roles as a sensitive, evolved
male, gladly took on the role of
■ “Flirting” review, Page 29
Richard Schlicting,
an aging hippie who
lives in the desert
with his wife (Lily
Tomlin), dabbling in
science, art, drugs and
tantric sex.
The film - which is
partially set in Michigan
and also stars Ben Stiller,
Patricia Arquette, Mary Tyler Moore
and George Segal - is the exceeding
ly funny story of a young man who
goes on a wild cross-country search
for his birth parents (Alda and
Tomlin). This shakes up his relation
ship with his adoptive parents and
his wife. The message here is that
the grass most certainly isn’t always
greener on the other side, and that
people who go looking for their roots
Miramax Films
director he was,” Alda says, “and I
thought this script in those hands
was really going to be an interesting
picture ”
Alda says it’s not just adopted kids
who seek out their parents.
“This search for who we are by try
ing to find out who they were is
something that we all go through,” he
explains. “We can’t imagine them
young. We don’t know who they were
when they were young. We don’t
know all the things that have been
hidden from our view over the years
that have made them who they are.”
Russell’s quirky sort of comedy is
See ‘FLIRTING,’ Page 28
sometimes dig up some ugly truths.
“The script was so good,” Alda says.
“It wasn’t just funny; it was funny in
this off-center way that really looked
fresh.”
After reading it, Alda headed to the
video store to pick up a copy of
“Spanking the Monkey” Russell’s
acclaimed independent feature he
made for $80,000 in 1994.
“I could see what a really talented
A natural addition
Zoos gallery is a walk on the wild side
By Marsha Miro
Journal Art Critic
In the old days, a zoo was where
you went to gawk at the animals.
Today we still gawk, but the role of
the zoo has shifted considerably.
Now zoos around the country focus
on the conservation of species, endan
gered and otherwise, as well as on
the interrelationship between
humans and nature.
The Detroit Zoo has embraced* that
mission with the recently opened
Wildlife Interpretive Gallery (WIG)
in the old Bird House near the zoo
entrance. With its theater, coral reef
aquarium and video, art and science
exhibits, WIG uses all sorts of tactics
to involve and build a bond between
visitors and wildlife.
It’s an innovative ensemble of art,
architecture, science, engineering and
nature that proves how much can be
gained by these interrelationships.
And then, to illustrate the point,
WIG leads visitors to an attached
greenhouse, where they can dip into
an actual habitat for butterflies and
birds before moving out to the larger
animal world in the rest of the zoo.
WIG was the idea of zoo director
Ron Kagan, who worked with the
Detroit museum architectural firm
John Hilberry & Associates Inc. on
the building design. Then Gerry
Craig, former director of the Detroit
Artists Market, was hired to initiate
and direct programs.
See ZOO, Page 26
"ni'*—"""!
Journal photo by GEORGE WALDMAN
There's art in the Detroit Zoo’s old Bird House, as well as a theater, coral reef aquarium
and science exhibits.
f «'» I I „ | i x || * j 1 f t , , j x *.


PAGE 26 MARCH 31, 1996
Bistro Allegro! has a change in attitude
Journal photo by JOHN COLLIER
The restaurant at Saginaw and Pike in Pontiac has been renamed Bistro Allegro!
Allegro!, the restaurant on
the comer of Saginaw and
Pike streets in downtown
Pontiac, has changed its
name. It’s now Bistro Allegro! - and
though I wish they’d dropped that
pesky exclamation point, I like the
sound of the new menu. It does have
carry-overs,
including one of
my favorites, a
variation on the
Nicoise salad
using salmon
instead of tuna.
Why the name
change? Well, it
seems that the Mediterranean desig
nation that seemed so trendy when
the place opened last year didn’t real
ly generate much enthusiasm, says
manager Theo Oresky. The restaurant
decided to go for “a bistro attitude,”
which Oresky defines as casual, mid
priced and fun. The broader-based
menu has more recognizable dishes,
though “not boring food,” Oresky has
tens to add.
Other changes include removal of
the huge, camival-like papier-mache
figures that loomed over the scene -
they didn’t exactly trigger thoughts of
an intimate dining experience - the
addition of candles to the tables, more
emphasis on wine and such bistrolike
dishes as shrimp and Brie tartlet,
roasted chicken and veal chop with
garlic whipped potatoes.
More news from Bistro Allegro!:
Sunday jazz brunches kick off on
Easter, next Sunday, an addition to
the schedule of lunch Monday-Friday
and dinner Tuesday-Saturday. Brunch
will be ordered from the menu rather
than served buffet-style, and it will
run most of the day, from noon until
8, with live music from 1 to 5.
■ Bill Osborn, chef at Tom’s Oyster
Bar in Grosse Pointe Park, is always
on the lookout for new fish. Well,
maybe not new species, but fish that
are new to local palates. His latest
discovery, hog grouper, a native of the
Keys and
Bahamas, has
been winning
friends despite the
fact that Osborn
didn’t pretty up its
name, as Tom
Brandel admits he
suggested.
■ It might seem like a small thing,
but the fact that on Monday the
Whitney will begin serving lunch,
after dropping it for lack of interest a
couple of years ago, is significant. It’s
another signpost on the road to
Detroit’s slowly developing revival.
The vintage mansion on Woodward
at Canfield will offer its lunch menu
from 11 to 2 Monday-Friday, certainly
an indication that business is picking
up along the Woodward corridor.
Not that many of us will be drop
ping by for an $8.95 club sandwich or
a $4.95 bowl of chili very often, but
it’s nice to know that when Uncle A1
comes in from Cleveland and takes us
to lunch, we’ll be able to show off the
lavish restaurant, the kind of place
few, if any, towns other than ours can
boast.
In addition to sandwiches and
soups, the menu includes seared
salmon with coconut orange sauce
($14.95), pecan-crusted whitefish
($13.95) and grilled filet mignon
($19.95), as well as notable desserts
such as the chocolate ugly cake, the
all-time favorite with the Whitney
crowd.
Tidbits
Intermezzo, the Italian restaurant
in a handsomely rehabbed loft on
Harmonie Park, continues to pack
them in on Friday and Saturday
nights. The big-city setting, the
crowd-pleasing Italian menu, the con
vivial bar seem to have caught the
fancy of a lot of locals who probably
hadn’t been to Harmonie Park since
the days of the Adler-Schnee bou
tique. ...Has anybody noticed that La
Luna Grancaffe, the cafe in the heart
of Birmingham’s North Woodward,
quietly shuttered some weeks back?
... Andiamo Lakefront Bistro, the
reborn Lido on the Lake, will unveil
its new look and new menu on April
19. Chef Jeff Kay promises everything
from fresh fish to St. Louis spareribs
at the spot at 24026 Jefferson Ave. in
St. Clair Shores.... The lucky mem
bers of Meadowbrook Country Club
in Northville should be flocking into
the dining room. Master chef Ed
Janos just took over the kitchen....
Mark April 29 on your calendar.
That’s the date of the Rhapsody
restaurant’s benefit for Habitat for
Humanity and the Leukemia Society.
The proprietors serve a wonderful
Hungarian dinner, with drinks and
entertainment, and give every penny
of the $35 tickets to the causes. Call
313-283-9622 for further details.
Molly
Abraham
Restaurants
is a natural addition
The main floor of the rotunda is made of
marble inlaid from a nautilus shell.
■-.v.... . . . , . f.Hj
Zoo gallery
ZOO, from page 25
They’ve left the glass-domed struc
ture of the Bird House - which was
built in 1926 - intact. The Pewabic
tile peacocks are still on the outside,
for instance. But much of the build
ing has been restored and renovated,
some of it with the help of Harold
Gray, who began building such domes
more than 60 years ago.
Now there’s a glass ceiling between
the dome and the building which acts
as a vapor barrier so the climate can
be controlled.
The interior is completely different.
The rotunda under the dome is now
ringed by a mezzanine where the
aquarium, art gallery and balcony of
the theater are located. The gallery
displays African and Asian sculpture
as well as contemporary paintings
and drawings with animals as the
central theme. It’s an authentic way
to show how other cultures, as well
as ours, have related to wildlife.
The main floor of the rotunda has
walls sheathed in limestone embed
ded with fossils you can touch and
see. The floor itself is made of differ
ent color marble inlaid to form a spi-
raling nautilus shell. With the dome
opening to the sky and air, the walls
reflecting part of the earth and the
shell motif representing water, the
building design brings together sym
bols of life’s basic elements.
Add in the rich green of the seats
and curtains in the small theater,
and allusions to nature are complete.
The theater is charmingly intimate,
just right for families to see films,
plays and puppet shows.
Solid glass doors open off the
rotunda to the indoor butterfly gar
den and aviary. Gardens have been
designed to nurture this exotic life, so
stepping inside is like moving into
the tropics. Sculptor David Barr
designed a simple and handsome
granite fountain, so the sound of
water circulating is soothing back
ground noise for the colorful butter
flies as they emerge from their
cocoons to flit about during their
short lives.
In all, WIG makes for a smart and
consciousness-raising first stop for a
visit that, in turn, makes the Detroit
Zoo much more than a collection of
animals.
The Detroit Zoo, at 8450 W. Ten
Mile Road, Royal Oak, is open 10-4
today and 10-5 daily beginning
Monday. Call 810-398-0900.
Journal photo by GEORGE WALDMAN


MARCH 31, 1996
PAGE 27
going out
A taste of bunny
By Liz Stevens
Journal Staff Writer
o John Thompson, the
Easter Bunny never looks
so appealing as when the
cuddly little guy is, well,
roasting over the coals.
Thompson, owner of
Honest?John’s in Detroit, hosts his
sixth annual Bunny Barbecue on
April 7 in celebration of the Easter
holiday and as a fund-raiser for
the Church of the Messiah’s Youth
Athletic Program. Thompson has
procured 500 pounds of raw rabbit,
which his staff will parboil, steam
and toss on the grill next Sunday.
Side dishes and desserts from the
Roostertail, Sindbad’s and the
Whitney will complement the
menu.
“You tell people it’s bunny, and
they think it’s chicken,” Thompson
laughs. “They don’t believe you.”
Crowds from 100 to 300 have
shown up for the festivities in past
years, raising between $5,000 and
$9,000 annually for neighborhood
churches and organizations. This
year, the Honest?John’s staff,
bedecked in bunny ears, will serve
from noon to 10 p.m. Partaking
costs $5 a plate. “What better way
to take care of the old Easter
Bunny?” Thompson quips.
Honest?John’s is located at 416
Field, just off Jefferson. Call 313-
824-1243.
Words: Poetry and spoken word perfor
mances have found many homes in Detroit,
with a slew of regular readings. The
Heidelberg Project, 3860 Heidelberg St. in
Detroit, hosts the First Monday Whole Art
Series - an outlet for the spoken and writ
ten word and images - at 7 p.m. on the first
Monday of each month. Issa performs this
Monday... On Easter Sunday, Marsah
Carruther presents “Rebirth: The Spiritual
Quest” at the Unitarian Universalist
Church, 4605 Cass, as part of the Vespers
Series — poetry, jazz and percussion events
on the first Sunday of every month... The
Cass Cafe’s “Horizons in Poetry” series fea
tures Wayne State University student
Kalimah Johnson, whose theme will be
“Nappy Headed Black Girl,” at 5 p.m. April
14. The cafe is located at 4620 Cass and
hosts the Horizons series on the second
Sunday of every month... For information
about any of the above programs, call Ron
Allen at 313-831-8976.
Music this week: Del Amitri, 7:30
p.m. Thursday, $12.50, at Industry, 810-334-
1999... Radiohead, 8 p.m. Friday, $10, at
Sanctum, 810-338-1139... Brazeal Dennard
Chorale, parts 2 and 3 of Handel’s
“Messiah,” 4 p.m. today, $15, Christ Church,
Detroit, 313-331-0378... Jon Kimura Parker,
recital and conversation with the Canadian
pianist, Chamber Music Society of Detroit,
7:30 tonight, Orchestra Hall, $5-$31, 313-
833-3700... Marcus Belgrave, Teddy Harris,
Don Mayberry, George Davidson with vocal
ist Ange Smith, 8 p.m. Wednesday, $12, 313-
961-1714... Primus, 7 p.m. Saturday, $17.50,
at the State Theatre, 313-961-5450... Julio
Iglesias, 8 p.m. Wednesday, $15-$50; Gladys
Knight, Thursday-April 7, $10-$37.50, at
the Fox Theatre, 313-433-1515... New Bomb
Turks, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, $7; Jawbreaker,
7:30 p.m. Thursday, $6; Love and Rockets, 6
p.m. Friday, $15; Almighty Lumberjacks of
Death, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, $7, at St.
Andrews Hall, 313-961-MELT... Joe Sample,
8 p.m. Wednesday, $25, Royal Oak Music
Theatre... Dambuilders, 6 p.m. Friday, $7;
Meices, 8 p.m. Saturday, $7, at the Shelter,
313-963-7237... Kenny Wayne Shepherd, 8
tonight, $10; Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown, 8
p.m. Tuesday, $12.50; Combustible Edison, 8
p.m. Thursday, $8; October Project, 9 p.m.
Saturday, $10, at the 7th House, 810-335-
8100... Scrawl, 9:30 p.m. Thursday, $6, at the
Blind Pig, Ann Arbor, 313-996-8555... Live
jazz, Friday-Saturday, at Cafe Mahogany,
313-235-2233... Open jam jazz session, 8
p.m.-2 a.m., Sundays, Blue Moon, 3965
Woodward, 313-831-8071... Detroit Blues
Band, Friday; Bill Wharton & the
Ingredients, Saturday, at the Soup Kitchen,
Detroit, 313-259-0898.
Film: “Ma Saison Preferee” (1993, France),
Friday-next Sunday, $5.50; Monday series
presents “Augustin” (1995, France), 7 p.m.,
$5.50, at the Detroit Film Theatre, 313-833-
2323... “Easter Parade,” with guest organists,
at the Redford Theatre, Friday-Saturday,
$2.50, 313-537-2560.
Art: “Pictorialism Into Modernism: The
Clarence H. White School of Photography”
features works of White and 57 of his stu
dents at the early 20th-century school,
through May 26; “Treasures of Venice:
Paintings from the Museum of Fine Arts,
Budapest,” through May 12; Detroit Public
Schools Student Exhibition, through April
28, at the Detroit Institute of Arts, 313-833-
7900; for information on education programs,
313-833-4249... “Images of Vanishing
Nature,” 30 wildlife artists, through April 21,
Detroit Zoo Wildlife Interpretive Gallery,
Royal Oak, 810-398-0903... Art celebrating
the automobile, through September, Detroit
Public Library, 313-833-1456... “Design 100:
Selections From the American Center for
Design,” through May 3, at the Centre
Galleries, Detroit, 313-874-1955... Glass
Objects Show, through April, at Urban
Architecture, Pontiac, 810-745-8900...
“Human Technology,” through April 20 at
Revolution: A Gallery Project, Femdale, 810-
541-3444... “Out of the Archives” and “Humor
and War,” commentary on world peace and
war, through April 27, Swords Into
Plowshares, Detroit, 313-965-5422... Marilyn
Schechter, recent works, Tuesday through
April 27, Start Gallery, Birmingham, 810-
644-2991... “Art of the Multiple,” Wednesday
through April 24, Eastern Michigan
University Ford Gallery, Ypsilanti, 313-487-
0465...
Theater/Comedy/Dance: “Beauty
and the Beast,” through April 28, Masonic
Temple, 313-832-2232... “Shear Madness,”
through April 28, Gem Theatre, 313-963-
9800... “Oleanna,” through May 5, Detroit
Repertory Theatre, 313-868-1347... “Riffs,”
through May 4, Attic Theatre, 313-963-
9339... “Stars of the Bolshoi Ballet,” 1 and 5
p.m. today, Fox Theatre, 810-433-1515...
“Shadowlands,” through April 7, Meadow
Brook Theatre, Rochester, 810-377-3300...
“Computer Chips and Salsa,” the new revue
from Detroit Second City, Wednesday-
Sunday, 313-965-2222... “A Midsummer
Night’s Dream,” through April 21, Boarshead
Theater, Lansing, 517-484-7805... “Max the
Moose Wakes Up Spring,” 2 p.m. today,
Youtheater at the Music Hall, 313-963-
2366... ‘Tom Sawyer,” kids’ musical, through
May 19, Historic Players Club, Detroit, 810-
662-8118... “The Capitol Steps April Fool’s
Edition” will air 6:30 p.m. Monday, WDET-
FM (101.9).
Please send “Going Out” items to The
Detroit Sunday Journal, 3100 E. Jefferson,
Detroit 48207.
T
At 18, Shepherd is an
old hand at the blues
By Susan Whitall
Journal Music Writer
Can an 18-year-old with blond,
cherubic looks sing the blues? Should
a cherubic 18-year-old sing the blues?
Why would an 18-year-old want to
sing the blues?
Maybe Kenny Wayne Shepherd,
barely out of high school, has come
along just to shatter a few of our
favorite blues cliches.
Such as the belief that the blues-
man has to be older than the hills to
sing the blues. Or if you’re going to
be a young one, at least don’t look
like a pin-up in Sassy magazine.
To be fair, there are precedents for
Shepherd; when
he was 18, Gregg
Allman exuded
the same wide-
eyed innocence,
but was well on
his way to erupt
ing with that big,
sorrowful blues
voice.
Shepherd, who
performs at
Pontiac’s 7 th
House tonight, is
a self-taught
blues guitarist out of Shreveport, La.
His debut album, “Ledbetter
Heights,” the No. 1 blues album in
the country, shows him to be a confi
dent, swaggering blues player in the
Texas tradition; the first cut, “Bom
With a Broken Heart,” is the sort of
swinging shuffle that brings to mind
Stevie Ray Vaughan.
And the guitarist will tell you right
away that Vaughan is his idol. But he
reveres many other blues greats.
Most of them happen to be dead
guys.
“Stevie Ray obviously was probably
the biggest influence on me,” says
Shepherd. “But also Albert King and
Albert Collins, Muddy Waters and
Howlin’ Wolf, John Lee Hooker -
those are the guys I listen to all the
time.
“There aren’t too many guys out
there now doing it the way I think it
should be done. Chris Duarte maybe.”
Like Vaughan, Shepherd is self-
taught; he was exposed to music
through his father, Ken Sr., a long
time deejay down in Shreveport
whose extensive blues record collec
tion inspired his son. When Shepherd
wanted to learn a song, he’d just play
the album or CD over and over again.
Shepherd Sr. took his 7-year-old to
a Stevie Ray Vaughan concert, and
set young Kenny up on a speaker to
watch. Six months later, the boy had
his own cheap guitar. Today he is a
supple, confident player on his
Vaughan-like ’61 Strat, and is a
breezy hand on National steel as
well.
At 13 Shepherd joined Bryan Lee’s
New Orleans-based blues band, and
started racking up experience. Then
as now, he was too young to walk in
the front door of many clubs he
played.
“Yeah, a lot of places it’s 21 and
up,” he sighs. “Not a lot have given
me trouble .about playing there,
although some of them freak out. I
don’t know what the big deal is. As
long as I don’t drink, it’s not a prob
lem.”
Now Shepherd has his own band,
and after being signed to Irving
AzofFs Giant
Records (now
Revolution) at 16,
he spent two
years honing his
craft before
recording
“Ledbetter
Heights.”
The young
axman resists
the notion that
all, or even most,
teen-agers are
strictly fans of
alternative music.
“Blues-based music is making a
huge comeback,” he says. “You hear it
on commercials, talk shows, stuff like
that. A lot of people are getting into
it. I just got a letter from a fan club,
from an 11-year-old girl, asking me
not to sell beer at my next show so
she can come.”
He laughs. “I get kids like that, and
all the way up to grandparents’ age.”
As for his own lyrics, what about
these bad women using and abusing
him? Taking everything he owns,
stomping on his heart? Somehow this
world-weary, gruff voice comes out of
his teen body, singing lines like this:
“I tried, yes I tried and you took
everything I owned, I tried, yes I
tried, and you took everything I
owned, oh little girl I wonder, was
your love to me just on loan?”
Where’s that coming from?
Shepherd laughs. “I’ve had a few
experiences with women. I’m 18
years old! I mean, I’ve had my share
of experiences in my 18 years; I’ve
been exposed to things that normal
people haven’t been exposed to. I’m
mature beyond my age, people think.
There are a lot of explanations why.”
He’s right of course. What else do
18-year-olds think about than the
opposite sex? And who better to docu
ment romantic angst?
“My music is good and I write my
music,” Shepherd says. “And all the
things that I write about are my
experiences.”
Revolution
Kenny Wayne Shepherd challenges the
stereotypes about blues singers.


PAGE 28
mm
MARCH 31, 1996
Director Russell specializes in the offbeat
FLIRTING,’ from Page 25
difficult to put on paper, says Alda,
who wrote and directed such films as
“The Four Seasons” and “Betsy’s
Wedding.” It’s even harder to capture
it on film, he says.
“You have to be lucky and skillful
to make it happen on the screen.”
Particularly with a budget of under
$7 million, which is what Russell was
allocated for “Flirting.”
Alda says he has little in common
with the drugged-out Richard
Schlicting. “I like it when the things
the character does are so far from
what I would do,” he says.
Flirting with oatmeal
Days later and thousands of miles
away, filmmaker Russell is in
Dearborn picking away at a break
fast of oatmeal and fresh fruit. He’s
on tour to promote “Flirting.”
Between nibbles of his breakfast and
sips of chamomile tea, the 37-year-old
writer-director talks about actors, his
preoccupation with sexual matters,
his comedic gifts and cereal.
“I’ve been a huge cereal fan all my
life,” Russell says. Which is one of the
reasons he set part of “Flirting” in
Michigan. The prospect of helicopter
ing over the Kellogg’s complex in
Battle Creek for footage was irre
sistible.
Russell says he is equally fond of
Alda, and getting him to do the film
was a real coup. “He’s kind of the Ms.
Magazine poster boy from the ’70s,”
Russell says. “So who better to pre
sent as this desert artist father?”
Russell grew up in Larchmont, out
side New York City. He won critical
acclaim for his deft handling of an
incest theme in “Spanking the
Monkey,” the dark and funny drama
that brought him the Audience
Award for Best Picture at 1994’s
Sundance Film Festival.
horoscope
Aries (March 21 - April 20)
There is a chance you will receive a
raise, bonus or promotion. Clear commu
nication with loved ones is needed at
home.
Taurus (April 21 - May 20)
You will have spurts of energy that will
help you to accomplish a great deal. Your
focus should be on creative efforts.
Gemini (May 21 - June 20)
Stop deceiving yourself and those
around you. Difficulties in a relationship
can be overcome, but you may need an
objective observer’s point of view.
Cancer (June 21 - July 20)
Your independent and creative nature
may set you on a new course for adven
ture. There is no telling where these artis
tic endeavors may take you.
Leo (July 21 - Aug. 21)
Inner turmoil has you wrestling with
some difficult choices. Take a good look at
the big picture.
Virgo (Aug. 22 - Sept. 22)
Concentrate on the things you most
need to accomplish. Sit down and make a
list of priorities to help decide what is
most important.
Libra (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22)
It isn’t easy to go through changes, but
it’s always necessary. Responsibilities will
increase, and you will learn a great deal.
Scorpio (Oct. 23 - Nov. 22)
Pride may get in the way of an impor
tant relationship. Is it really worth the loss
it may cause? Get away from the situation
and think.
Sagittarius (Nov. 23 - Dec. 20)
This is a wonderful time for creative
expression. An opportunity will arise that
could change your lifestyle.
Capricorn (Dec. 21 - Jan. 19)
It may not seem likely, but you will solve
an important dilemma very soon. It may
be difficult to control your emotions.
Aquarius (Jan. 20 • Feb. 18)
Your hard work will pay off in a big way.
Oversensitivity and impulsiveness could
cause trouble in a relationship.
Pisces (Feb. 19 - March 20)
Taking risks is not one of your favorite
things to do, but that is not a bad thing. It
is important to make decisions based on
fact. -
Sundqy
MOVIE GUIDE
Wyandotte Theater (313) 283-8844
102 Elm Street
Evening admission 99$ with this Detroit Sunday
Journal listing.
“BLACK SHEEP’’ (PG-13)
5:10 p.m.,7:10 p.m. everyday
“JUMANJI” (PG-13)
5 p.m.,7 p.m., 9 p.m. everyday
“GRUMPIER OLD MEN” (PG-13)
9:10 p.m. everyday
“IT TAKES TWO’’
Special matinee 2 p.m.
Saturday, March 30, April 6
Miller, Cohen,
Martens, Ice &
Geary, RC.
Attorneys and Counselors
at Law
Representing
Unions &
Working People
for Four Decades
Personal Injuries
Workers’ Compensation
Employee Rights
Employment Discrimination
1400
k:
1400 NORTH PARK PLAZA BUILDING
17117 WEST 9 MILE ROAD
SOUTHFIELD, MICHIGAN 48075
( 810 ) 559-2110
“I’m preoccupied with sex,” he says
candidly, and he lists early works of
Roman Polanski and Mike Nichols as
major influences. “I sort of take those
uncomfortable, embarrassing desires
and expand them.”
He swallows another bite of oat
meal and beats an interviewer to the
next question.
“Why am I preoccupied with sex?
You really want me to answer that?
OK. Part of that is just my biological
makeup. My parents are warm-blood-
ed people. My mother’s Italian and
my father’s Russian, and they’re just
kind of warm-blooded, sexual people.
“Also, it’s sounds wacky, but I have
a lot of Scorpio in my astrological
chart. You’re gonna make me sound
like a total flake.”
Sex, rather than drugs or alcohol,
was Russell’s way of coping with life’s
ups and downs, he says. It’s also been
fertile ground for his wickedly good
sense of humor. He says he is driven
to confront sexual issues as openly
and as honestly as he can - and
while not setting out to offend, if he
does, well, that’s OK.
He recalls a scene in “Flirting” in
which a bisexual character makes a
move on Arquette while she’s nursing
her baby.
“I love the idea that he hit on a
woman while she’s breast-feeding,”
Russell explains. He and his wife,
writer-producer Janet Grillo, had a
son of their own two years ago, and
Russell says men tend to treat their
wives differently when there’s a baby
around.
In many a husband’s eye, “they
become these kind of milk-machine
functional women. They’ve ceased to
be babes for the time being. But to
other men, they’re still babes - and
they actually have their breasts out
in public.” Which can lead to some
awkward banter, Russell says.
“That’s what intrigues me about
unconscious sexual energy. It’s
always there and it’s always under
these ostensible means of civil dis
course.”
Taking a shine to Schlicting
Meanwhile, back in Hollywood, the
Ms. Magazine poster boy sips an
Evian and pours cold water on
prospects of being the film flavor of
the week.
Alda says the fact that “Flirting
With Disaster” is off to a good start
with reviewers and has the potential
for big box office numbers doesn’t
excite him.
“The commercial part of it just
makes it easier or harder to do it
again the next time.”
If the movie really takes off,
though, might fans stop calling out
“Hawkeye” when they spot Alda at
airports and refer to him by the scat
ological mispronunciation of
Schlicting that’s used in the fillm?
“That hadn’t occurred to me,” Alda
says after roaring with laughter.
“That would be great! Can’t wait for
the first time that happens. It could
get to be a running gag.”
Oscar winners, weiners
By Robert Musial
Journal Staff Writer
Detroit, we have a problem . . .
When it came to picking Oscar
winners, too many of you fell flat in
the mud for that pig “Babe” or had
stars in your eyes for “Apollo 13.”
But Dave Suveges didn’t. He
ignored those movies to get all
seven categories correct in the first
Detroit Sunday Journal Readers’
Oscar Contest.
That means he takes home a
movie lover’s dream - an unlimited
year’s pass for two good at any
AMC theater.
The pass, worth at least
$4,197.50 if Suveges takes a friend
to the flicks every night, will come
in handy - he’s a student at Henry
Ford Community College.
“I’m very happy about it and sur
prised. I’ve never won a contest
before,” said Suveges, 24, of Allen
Park. “Now I have something to tell
my friends and family!”
Suveges saw several of the nomi
nees this year and relied on “gut
instinct” to pick the others, includ
ing our weird tie-breaker, Best
Animated Short Film.
Behind him, eight of the other
841 entries picked six of seven
winners correctly. Schoolteacher
Morag Paluszewski of Detroit
came in second, winning the Oskar
food processor, a free pass for two
for any AMC movie and a movie
souvenir.
Librarian Gary Kupper of
Algonac took third, earning a
selection of Oscar Mayer food
coupons, a bacon keeper and a
weinermobile whistle.
Also earning free passes for two
to any AMC movie were the other
six of seven winners, who all
missed a major category: Gail
McLeod, Eastpointe; Linda
Riffenburg, Clawson; Carolyn
Holmes, Detroit; Billie Janer,
Dearborn Heights; Michelle Putze,
Madison Heights and Jim
Johnson, Clinton Township.


MARCH 31, 1996
PAGE 29
movie reviews
O see it now
^ wait for the video
|fTl read a book instead
recent openings
“Diabolique” O Director Jeremiah
Chechik comes up with a reasonably
good update of the 1955 French
thriller “Les Diaboliques.” Chechik’s
version is moody and slow-building,
paying homage to the original and not
straying too far from the beaten path.
R. - 'William Hanson
“Girl 6” O Spike Lee delves into the
weird subculture of phone sex and cre
ates a sympathetic portrait of a
woman (Theresa Randle) on the edge.
R. - John Gallagher
“Race the Sun” O A kind of “Bad
News Bears” about science, this is
corny, predictable and at times overly
cute. But nothing succeeds in the
movies like young misfits on a mis
sion, and this sugary good drama is no
exception. PG. - W.H.
“The Star Maker” O Sicilian film
maker Giuseppe Tornatore follows his
wonderful “Cinema Paradiso” with
another gem about the movie business,
a salute to the power of film that
should make believers of us all.
R. - W.H.
“Little Indian, Big City” O This
French import - about a superficial
Parisian broker who learns what’s
important in life from the son he never
knew he had - may be the sleeper
family hit of the year. PG. -J.G.
still showing
“The American President” O PG-
13. -J.G.
“Angels and Insects” - Matt
Black
“Babe” O G. - W.H.
“Beautiful Girls” HI R. - W.H.
“The Birdcage” O R. - M.B.
“Broken Arrow” I R. - W.H
“Dead Man Walking” OR - W.H.
“Don’t Be a Menace to South
Central While Drinking Your
Juice in the Hood” (not reviewed)
R.
“Down Periscope” § PG-13. -J.G.
“Executive Decision” O R .-J.G.
“Fargo” OR. - J.G.
“From Dusk Till Dawn” £0 R.
-J.G.
“Happy Gilmore” § PG-13. -J.G.
“Hellraiser IV: Bloodline” (not
reviewed) R.
just opened
A touching look at race relations
“A Family Thing’' O
By William Hanson
Journal Staff Writer
Racial expectations. That’s the
dicey subject matter this down-to-
earth and charming drama takes
on.
Unfolding gradually as a
Southern spring, Richard Pearce’s
“A Family Thing” is the story of an
Arkansas tractor salesman who
finds out late in life that he’s not
the lily-white yokel he happily
thought he was. Turns out that Earl
Pilcher’s real mother was a black
woman raped by his white father.
Bubba’s got a brand-new bag.
After recovering from the jolt,
Pilcher (Robert Duvall) jumps in his
pickup and heads to Chicago to find
the roots he never knew he had. The
Windy City is where Earl’s half
brother, Ray Murdock (James Earl
Jones), lives with his aunt and son.
Pilcher tracks down his kin and
stays with them for several days.
The two men get to know one
another and expose some of the silly
ideas each has about race, culture
and family.
But it’s Irma P. Hall, as Murdock’s
wise and funny Aunt T., who steals
this show. She lights up the screen
in every scene she’s in and adds a
dash of vinegar to the script, which
gets slightly corny at times.
Written by Billy Bob Thornton
(yep, that’s his name) and Tom
Epperson, “A Family Thing” doesn’t
sugarcoat race relations. Nor does it
suggest the sky is falling in on
American society. Because it’s not
preachy and has a sense of humor
about cultural conflict, it offers
audiences a refreshing view of
black-white relationships. At a
recent sneak preview in Oakland
County, the racially mixed theater
crowd cheered enthusiastically as
the closing credits rolled. PG-13.
“Flirting With Disaster” OBen
Stiller digs up all sorts of trouble
and a whole lot of laughs when he
sets off on a cross-country search for
his birth parents in this intelligent
and irreverent comedy from writer-
director David O. Russell. Raised by
loving but slightly wacko adoptive
parents (George Segal and Mary
Tyler Moore), Stiller can’t rest until
he finds his biological mom and pop.
Eventually he does, but Alan Alda
and Lily Tomlin, scruffy survivors of
the summer of love, don’t exactly
match the familial images of
grandeur he had in mind. The
drugged-out duo provide Stiller and
wife (Patricia Arquette) only
headaches.
Made for under $7 million, this is
easily one of the funniest films of
the last several years. Russell, who
wrote and directed the acclaimed
“Spanking the Monkey,” is a gifted
filmmaker who knows how to push
actors to their limits. He has quite a
knack for writing sexual humor.
Jokes that might otherwise seem
lewd, in Russell’s hands, are
humane and harmless. See Mary
Tyler Moore’s screwball yet tasteful
scene involving fellatio, and tell me
this filmmaker’s not good. R. - W.H.
“Oliver & Company” O This ani-
malized treatment of the “Oliver
Twist” story - Oliver, voiced by Joey
Lawrence, is a kitten befriended by
street mutts - originally came out in
1988 and heralded the end of
Disney’s fallow mid-’80s period and
the arrival of a renaissance that hit
stride with “The Little Mermaid.”
“Oliver” isn’t a classic; the animation
in particular is a little stiff. But the
story is tight and energetic G.
- Gary Graff
“Sgt. Bilko” § Steve Martin nearly
pulls one out for the Gipper here. He
is so good in the role that Phil
Silvers made famous in the 1950s
television series that one is tempted
to recommend this film. Martin has
much of Silvers’ timing and move
ment down pat. It’s a treat to watch
this performance, obviously intended
to pay tribute to the late TV star.
But besides Martin, there’s nothing
going on. This is by-the-numbers
military shtick we’ve seen so many
times before in “Stripes,” “Hogan’s
Heroes” and “M*A*S*H.” Conspicu
ously missing is anything resem
bling a story. Even nostalgia-crazed
baby boomers demand more from
their movies than that. PG. - W.H.
“Faithful” C3 This film begins with
hit man Chazz Palminteri traipsing
across the lawn of Cher’s estate, let
ting himself in, tying her up and
announcing he’s going to kill her on
behalf of her husband, who decided
20 years of marriage is enough. But
it’s no “Fargo” or “Red Rock West.”
In fact, it’s more tied up - and tied
down - than Cher’s character ever
is. Before long, it becomes apparent
that Palminteri and Cher are going
to fall for each other, that the film is
going to turn into a talkfest and
that “Faithful” is headed down the
tubes while they yammer away with
timeouts for the gunman to check in
with his shrink by phone. Put this
one on your must-miss list. R.
(Opens Wednesday) - Matt Black
“Kicking and Screaming” O
Director Noah Baumbach’s “Kicking
and Screaming” is one of the few
comedies that not only gets the
twenty-something scene right, but
is sweet, funny and original about
it. Wrapping fear in one-liners, it’s
about four guys so paralyzed by
post-graduation blockage they can’t
bring themselves to stop pretending
they’re still students. They only
seem inept; they’re really just
frightened, hiding behind style.
What makes it funnier is that the
women in the film - Olivia d’Abo,
Parker Posey, Cara Buono - are
anywhere from a step to a continent
ahead of them. Few comedies about
young people trying to escape their
gravitational fields manage to be
both witty and wistful. This is one
that does. R. - M.B.
“Primal Fear” o This is one of a
new breed of intelligent thrillers, in
a class with “Seven” and “Copycat”
as it introduces satisfying twists to
the genre. It starts with a nasty
murder; Chicago’s archbishop is
slaughtered in his residence. One of
the film’s targets, aside from the
murderer, is the huge ego of the hot-
dog defense attorney played by
Richard Gere in one of his best roles
in years. There are also standout
performances from Alfre Woodard
as a no-nonsense judge and Andre
Braugher as a streetwise lawyer;
Edward Norton, as the wonderfully
mercurial defendant, delivers the
kind of performance that ties a
rocket to a young actor’s career. R.
(Opens Wednesday.) - M.B.
“Homeward Bound II: Lost in
San Francisco” (not reviewed) G.
“If Lucy Fell” E3 R. - Molly
Abraham
“Jumanji”0 PG. - W.H.
“Leaving Las Vegas” OR- W.H.
“Mr. Holland’s Opus” O PG. - J.G.
“Muppet Treasure Island” O G. -
W.H.
“The Postman (II Postino)” O PG.
- Gary Graff
“Rumble in the Bronx” O R- -
Matt Black
“Sabrina” O PG. - W.H.
“Sense and Sensibility” O PG. - J.G.
“Tom and Huck” § PG. - Wendy
Warren Keebler
“12 Monkeys”0 'R.-J.G.
“Up Close and Personal” § PG-13. -
W.H.
“Waiting to Exhale” OR - M.B.


PAGE 30
ilijl
MARCH 31, 1996
A tender spring sprout is a pillar of strength
On Tuesday, I plucked and ate
a chive newly sprouted in
my garden while snowflakes
sifted slowly onto my shoul
ders and iced my head as if with
frosting. Chewing ruminatively, I
thought of willow trees.
It has been a long and exhausting
winter, as hard a winter for me as
any I can recollect. Perhaps it has
been so for you, too, or perhaps not. If
you’re anything like me, your memo
ries of seasons and their severity
have as much to do with intangibles
like mood and temper as they do with
wind chills and snow depths.
But the chives are up anew, a glori
ously deep green tuffet of them, and
all at once or so it would seem. I
didn’t see them last week, when I
went ’round the corner by the kitchen
to harry the dog into the house. The
Robin
Mather
Food
chives came, as my mother would say,
quoting from some old nursery
rhyme, “from out of the nowhere/ into
the here.”
Last year, it was unseasonably
warm when I caught the first glimpse
of chives in the little herb patch. I
remember that I wore shorts and a T-
shirt as I squatted to study them,
and I remember that the sun felt
warm against that tight spot across
my shoulders.
I remember something else about
last year: I was lucky enough to be in
the right spot at the right time, and
to watch a chive being bom. It’s the
only way I can think of it: that supple
moment when the newly sprung
green sliver slowly straightened sky
ward, a haiku of hope.
Now that was something.
And even as it snowed this time, as
I saluted the chives’, and thus
spring’s, arrival, I realized that I will
remember this season’s advent as
vividly as I remember last year’s.
Dame Winter’s teeth are dulled
now, and she can no longer wound us.
The best she can do is mutter to her
self, that blustering old braggart, as
she creeps slowly away. While she
may spit in our direction a time or
two yet, still she has lost her vigor.
But I am strong: I have outlasted
her, and all the worries and woes she
threw this year. She did not break
me; I am bloodied but unbowed.
Like that silken tender newborn
chive last spring, I have bent to the
miserable weathers, but passed
through their worst to reach again
toward the sky.
Like the willow, which withstands a
wind that would topple a sturdier
oak, I have survived to see another
spring. There is joy in that, in know
ing that you have not been beaten.
There is pride, too, and a renewal of
courage.
And in that small chive, tender yet
sharp with the allium family’s fire, I
tasted the promise of new begin
nings.
They go well with soft-scrambled
eggs, new chives, snipped in at the
very end of cooking.
I shall eat some soon, and savor
spring at last, at long, long last.
Hometown pop puts
sweetness in ham
By Jeanne Sama
Journal Staff Writer
If it’s your turn to do the big Easter
family dinner, don’t panic!
Here are two glazes that will jazz
up your traditional holiday ham. As a
bonus, one can also be used as a top
ping for a quick and easy dessert.
Developing the recipes was both
fun and a challenge, with many tests
using the ginger-flavored Sensation
soft drink from Faygo - Detroit’s
hometown pop producer - as a flavor
ing.
My one concern in using diet Faygo
is that the sweetener aspartame
(known as Nutrasweet) is not heat
stable. Fears that the pop might turn
bitter when heated were happily
unfounded; it lost some but not all of
its sweetening power and did not
become bitter.
Besides taste, there’s a good reason
to baste and glaze a ham: the old
European technique helps seal mois
ture within the meat. During roast
ing, some of the sweetness is lost so
honey is added. And to keep the fla
vors heightened with a classic combi
nation yet a familiar taste, a dollop of
mustard helps.
The Sensational Roasted Garlic
Ham Glaze recipe is a great example
of the newly chic East-West fusion of
ingredients and techniques. The
strong ginger flavor of Sensation is
mixed with roasted garlic for a mel
low flavor and made even more
smooth and creamy by the addition of
sour cream.
In the diet version I wanted to do
something with a fruit base, because
ginger goes so well with fruits.
Pineapple, because it is so compatible
with ham, is a natural. Alternatives
are cherry and apricot, but almost
any fruit will work. The chives cut
some of the sweetness without mask
ing the fruit flavor.
Each of these recipes may be made
using diet or regular pop.
Jeanne Sarna is a certified home
economist
Sensational Roasted
Garlic Ham Glaze
2 cups Faygo Sensation, divid
ed
2 to 3 cloves garlic, peeled and
ends removed
1-1/2 tablespoons dry mustard
1 teaspoon dried thyme
Black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons honey
4- to 8-pound ham (fresh or pre
cooked)
3 tablespoons cornstarch
1 cup sour cream
Preheat oven to 325 degrees. In a
roasting pan, mix 1-1/2 cups Faygo
Sensation, garlic cloves, dry mustard,
thyme, pepper and honey. Place ham
fat side up or cut side down in roast
ing pan. Bake uncovered 20 minutes
per pound for precooked ham, 35
minutes per pound for fresh ham.
Baste every 20 minutes. Internal
temperature for precooked ham
should be 140 degrees (160 degrees
for fresh ham). Remove ham from
oven. Place ham, covered, on serving
platter for 15 minutes before slicing.
Meanwhile, mix in a saucepan
the remaining half cup of pop with
cornstarch until lump-free. With a
fork, press and mash the garlic
cloves, which will be very soft. Add
basting liquid to Sensation and heat
over medium heat until it comes to a
boil, thickens and turns clear.
Remove from heat and whisk in sour
cream. When serving, pour glaze over
ham or serve on the side. Makes
2-1/4 cups of glaze. Recipe may be
doubled for larger hams.
Variation: Use Diet Sensation and
low-fat sour cream for a more health
ful version.
Sensational Pineapple
Glaze or Topping (fat free)
10 to 12 ounces pineapple pre
serves
1/3 cup cornstarch
2 cups Faygo Diet Sensation
1/2 cup pineapple tidbits, well-
drained
1 tablespoon chopped chives,
optional
In a saucepan, mix preserves and
cornstarch until lump-free. Whisk in
pop; when well-blended, add fruit.
Bring to a boil over medium heat,
stirring frequently. Mixture will
thicken and turn glossy. Add chives if
desired. To glaze ham, pour over ham
just before serving or serve on the
side. Makes about 2-1/2 cups.
Variations: Substitute cherry or
apricot preserves for pineapple pre
serves and dried cherries or chopped
dried apricots for pineapple tidbits.
To use as a topping, omit chives and
pour over ice cream, frozen yogurt,
pancakes, waffles or pound cake.
ROGER HICKS/ Detroit Journal


MARCH 31, 1996
I
PAGE 31
Sunny weather for Chuck, Frank and Suzy
WDIV’S Chuck Gaidica did his
folksy weather thing on NBC-TV
last weekend, subbing for the guy
who was subbing weekdays for the
Peacock’s famed Willard Scott.
Those who caught Gaidica say he
was a breath of fresh air. Is he
preparing to go Big Apple Big
Time? After all, he’s booked for
more NBC weather weekends in
New York next month and it’s no
secret that Scott is easing toward
the retirement door. With a howl of
laughter, Chuck dismissed depart
ing ’DIV: “I still have about a year
left on my contract. This NBC
weekend gig is just a nice little
perk.”
Post-cuddle alert
Speaking of Gaidica, he now says
maybe he and wife, Susan, won’t
name their fifth child after pal
Dick Purtan after all. Seems
Gaidica sent a fax on the
Mustachioed One’s last day at
WKQI-FM saying he’d name his
child Dick if it’s a boy - but it was
all in jest. “I was half-joking and
half not and everyone took me seri
ously,” moans Gaidica. Truth is the
infanticipating couple isn’t sure
what to call their new addition due
in July. “We’ve tossed around Riley
and Joshua if it’s a boy,” he says.
“Don’t know what we’ll call a girl.”
He didn’t choke
WJR’s Frank Beckmann is our
big hero this week. Down in Florida
covering the Tigers, he made a big
play in a Vero Beach restaurant
Between:
Lines
Diane Hofsess and Carol Teegardin
when an elderly woman near him
and radio partner Lary Sorensen
began choking and turning blue.
Leaping into action, Beckmann
tried the Heimlich maneuver and
then reached in and dislodged the
object blocking her breath, saving
her. “I spent the rest of the night
watching Lary eat his dinner,” says
Beckmann. “I couldn’t eat after
that.”
Political rumblings
Michigan Republican party chair
Suzy Heintz, who also pops up as
a chief hob-nobber at Macomb
County political soirees, will soon
announce she’s running for
Congress in the upcoming
Republican primary She’s the only
female expressing interest thus far
in the race against Dave Bonior,
aside from Nancy Nevers, wife of
Larry Nevers, who is mulling over a
run of her own.
More network fodder
Here’s a big one about Big TV.
Media insiders whisper that CBS is
aiming to sell Channel 62 and buy
Chuck Gaidica was a breath of fresh air
in New York.
back Channel 2. “I’ve heard there
might be a swap,” says our top tube
source. ‘The rumor is that CBS
isn’t going to do a newscast at 62 -
not now, not ever. They apparently
don’t want to pump money into the
station because they’re selling it.” A
Channel 62 spokestype deems this
“an urban myth.” We’ll see.
Yucks for bucks
“All sacred cows will be gored.”
That’s what WXYT-AM weekend
personality Bill Thomas promises
for “Lawyers, Guns and Money: An
Evening of Political Comedy” which
he’ll stage in five Michigan cities in
early May. Joining him will be local
political satirist Mark Sweetman
and Chicago-based “Libertian come
dian” Tim Slagle. Thomas promises
equal opportunity ribbing for all
parties and political personalities.
“There’s a real market for people
who want to go out and see some
political humor,” he says. The show
kicks off May 6 at Mark Ridley’s
Comedy Castle in Royal Oak and
moves to Grand Rapids, Lansing,
Ann Arbor and Flint.
Alda news that fits
Buttonholed by our own William
Hanson in Hollywood (see story on
Page 25), Alan Alda served up
these thoughts on working in
America today. “It’s unbelievable
what we’re going through,” Alda
says. “All these companies are mak
ing big profits and firing people.
AT&T went from ‘reach out and
touch someone’ to ‘reach out and
(expletive deleted) someone.’ I’m a
member of five unions,” he says,
“and I believe in solidarity. I’m
against featherbedding and fat-cat-
ting that’s gone on in some places,
but there’s a role for unions.”
Something fowl?
Is Detroit Noosepapers mouth
piece Tim Kelleher moonlighting?
According to the credits at the end
of the hit movie “Birdcage,” someone
with that name plays a waiter in a
cafe. Well, at least it’s an honest liv
ing ...
We should try to see the dark in a different light
Not long ago my 5-year-old
went through a few weeks
of being afraid of the dark.
Not the dark in her room,
though, because thanks to some
doltish bureaucrat, strobes on a state
police radio tower light up her nights
like a disco. Her problem, now extin
guished, was dim stairs and comers.
I could sympathize, because when I
was very young, wan starlight filter
ing through the pines outside my
window made the surrounding deeps
seem even more gloomy, ominous and
filled with goblins.
Now I love the dark, but I realize
that darkness and beneficence are
not synonymous. When George
Harrison, the former Beatle, wrote
his wonderful song “Beware of
Darkness,” he was dazzled by
Eastern religion, and darkness for
him meant evil influences. Indeed,
most of us well know that now the
dark and a cruel darkness are inter
woven, that evil is rampant in the
Beaufort
Cranford
night. Daniel Weiss, in his book
“100% American,” reports that nearly
60 percent of us feel our neighbor
hoods are risky after dark.
Certainly, when the sun goes down
too many metro Detroit streets
belong only to the brave, the fool
hardy, the derelict and the damned.
But while that covers a lot of people,
most of us don’t fit in those cate
gories. So at night we avoid the shad
owy streets.
It’s too bad we’ve let the darkness
get away from us, too bad nighttime
has become a frightening time. Too
bad we have to light up the world
like Coney Island to feel comfortable
in it: ' S
I have a friend who lives in a rural
area in which the darkness is still
friendly. The stars are brilliant over
head. Owls hoot and insects buzz;
secret things rustle in the shrubbery.
But for some reason just as secret,
the house across the road has a sodi
um lamp the size of Arcturus in its
yard, throwing great gashes of light
into the darkness. Obviously, its own
ers have never learned the beauty of
stars or the comforts of a dark night.
Sadly, more people are like that
than aren’t. They light up the night
for acres, driving darkness from their
own yards and their neighbors’.
Hazardous urban sidewalks may
require lots of illumination, but good
neighbors should keep their lights to
themselves.
(That goes for Target stores, too,
and state police radio towers.)
Most excess lighting seems
designed for security from nasty
things in the dark - raccoons, goblins,
breakers and enterers. But if you’re
home with lights on, that’s usually
enough to keep intruders away. And
if nobody’s home, screaming bright
ness outside just assists intrusion. It
makes no sense, especially when such
reasonable and economical alterna
tives as motion-sensitive lights are
available.
It’s undeniable, of course, that the
dark has become a hiding place for
evil, specifically crime. A savage sort
of spiritual darkness takes advantage
of the night, and it is that lurking,
growing wickedness that all people of
good will must strive to overcome.
The night holds as much loveliness,
and perhaps more solace, as does
daylight, and we should be outraged
at the evil that would take it from us.
We have a right to the night, to the
sight of stars, to the blooms of
evening primrose, the calls of owls -
for though we may well beware of
darkness, we should never have to be
afraid of the dark.


P AGE 32
RATES
1 Week $ 1 40 per word.
2 Weeks: *2 40 per word.
3 Weeks: $ 3 30 per word.
4 Weeks: $ 4 00 per word.
(10 WORD MINIMUM)
PUBLIC NOTICE
The County of Wayne has prepared a draft of its 1996-97 One Year Action Plan of the
Consolidated Plan (CP) which directs the County in its use of funds from the U.S. Department
of Housing and Urban Development for the Program Year beginning July 1, 1996 through
June 30, 1997. These funds include an anticipated $3,522,600 from the Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program, $55,000 reprogrammed from prior CDBG pro
jects, $216,000 estimated from CDBG program income, an anticipated $1,380,354 from the
HOME Program and an Emergency Shelter Grant allocation estimated at $144,000. Due to
the current fiscal situation in Washington, HUD has partially allocated a total of $2,364,000 for
CDBG, ESG and HOME. Depending upon Congressional action, reductions or increases of
the activities listed below may prove necessary.
The One Year Action Plan describes the County’s strategy for addressing the second year of
the 1995 -1999 OP. Included in the strategy are the resources, geographical locations and
anticipated outcomes of the programs and activities proposed. Also included are strategies for
lead-based paint hazard reduction, reduction of barriers to affordable housing, anti-poverty
programs and the institutional structure
ANNUAL PLAN SUMMARY
The Annual Plan proposes to utilize funds as follows:
PROGRAM
FUNDING/RESOURCES
(anticipated)
PROPOSED
ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Project Saved
Wayne County-$250,000
51 Participating CBOs,150
affordable housing units
Section 8 Existing
House Certificate
HUD Section 8 Program
-$671,015
84 Families
HOME Program
HUD HOME Funds - $1,380,354
Match Contributions -$310,579
First-Time
Homebuyer
HUD HOME Funds -
$100,000
20 Units
Fixer-Upper
Homebuyer
HUD HOME FUNDS -
$635,263
53 Units
Innovative Affordable
Housing Initiatives
HUD HOME Funds -
$300,000
To be determined.
CHDO Set-Aside
HUD HOME Funds - $207,053
11 Units
Wayne County
Family Center
HUD ESG-$144,000
Other Sources - $181,878
195 Families
CDBG
HUD CDBG Funds -
$3,522,600
Revolving P.l. Funds -
$216,000
Activities listed below in
participating consortium
communities.*
$641,000 is allocated
from above
CDBG funds for housing
rehab projects.
100 Single Family Units
Lead Based Paint
Hazard reduction
HUD - $4.6 million if grant
request is successful.
600 Units
A detailed description of the proposed use of funds can be found in the draft One Year Action Plan.
*The 30 participating CDBG consortium communities are: Allen Park, Belleville, Brownstown
Twp., Ecorse, Flat Rock, Garden City, Gibraltar, Grosse lie Twp., Grosse Pointe, Grosse Pointe
Farms, Grosse Pointe Park, Grosse Pointe Woods, Harper Woods, Huron Twp., Melvindale,
Northville, Northville Twp., Plymouth Twp., River Rouge, Riverview, Rockwood, Romulus,
Southgate, Sumpter Twp., Trenton, Van Buren Twp., Wayne, Woodhaven and Wyandotte.
PROJECTED USE OF FUNDS
1996 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM
National O b jecti v es
In keeping with the broad national objectives of the Block Grant program, all projects funded
with these monies must meet one of the following criteria:
1. Principally benefit low- and moderate-income persons.
2. Assist in the prevention or elimination of slums or blight.
3. Address a need which has a particular urgency.
Proposed Statement of Objectives
In keeping with the above stated national and the local objectives described in the
Consolidated Plan, the County of Wayne, through its participating communities, has identified
the following list of proposed projects to be submitted to the Department of HUD as part of its
1996 Block Grant Application.
Activities/Locations 1S96 Proposed Funding National Objectives
Clearance Activities $104,600 1,2
Code Enforcement 20,000 2
Fire Protection Facilities and Equipment 71,751 1
Neighborhood Facilities 36,832 1
Historic Preservation 30,000 2
Parks, Playgrounds, Other Recreational Facilities.. 96,450 1
Planning Activities 114,100 N/A
Public Facilities 10,000 1
Public Services 469,617 1
Public Services - County wide' 88,000 1
Rehabilitation of Private Property - County wide.... 425,000 1
Rehabilitation of Private Property 87,717 1
Removal of Architectural Barriers 832.997 1
Senior Citizen Centers/Facilities 130,500 1
Street Improvements 336,972 1,2
Water and Sewer Facilities 342,420 1
General Administration - County 405,099 N/A
General Administration - Communities 206,731 N/A
' Allocations for County-wide FY 96 Total $3,808,786
non-profit organizations not yet Program Income (Revolving) 216,000
de,erm,ned Grand Total 4,024,786
Consistent with the above noted Proposed Statement of Objectives and Projected Use of
Funds, the County of Wayne does not plan or anticipate that person(s) will be involuntarily and
permanently displaced as a result of activities undertaken in whole or in part with Community
Development Block Grant funds. However, in the event person(s) are involuntarily and per
manently displaced as a result of the County's activities, the County will provide assistance to
those persons consistant with the requirements of the Uniform Relocation Assistance and
Real Property Acquisition Act of 1970 as amended.
The draft One Year Action Plan is available for review at each city hall of the 30 jurisdictions
listed above and the following locations:
Detroit Public Library - Main Branch 5201 Woodward Ave.,
Downtown Branch 121 Gratiot, Municipal Reference 1004 City-County Bldg.,
Ecorse Public Library 4184 W. Jefferson Ave., Hamtramck Public Library 2360 Caniff,
McGregor Public Library 12244 Woodward, Highland Park,
Melvindale Public Library 18650 Allen Road, River Rouge Public Library 221 Burke,
Romulus Public Library 11121 Wayne Road,
Wayne-Westland Library 35000 Sims Avenue
Bacon Memorial Library 45 Vinewood, Wyandotte
WRITTEN COMMENTS regarding the CP will be received through April 30, 1996 until 5:00
p.m. at the: WAYNE COUNTY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION, L-13 WAYNE
COUNTY BUILDING, 600 RANDOLPH STREET, DETROIT, Ml 48226.
Individuals with disabilities who require special accommodations, auxiliary aids or services to
respond to this notice should contact (313) 224-5027 or for hearing or speech impaired per
sons using TDDs or similar devices, contact the Michigan Relay Center toll free at 1-800-649-
3777 to communicate directly with the Community Development Division. Reasonable
advance notice is required.
Edward H. McNamara, Wayne County Executive
Publish: March 31, 1996
,4 >
Memorial
Bernice Franklin, born Nov. 7,1919,
died March 23, 1996. She leaves a
daughter, Bridgette McPherson
(Leon) and three grandchildren,
Franklin, Joshua and Bria. Services
from McFall Brothers Funeral Home,
9419 Dexter, Detroit. Funeral was
Friday, March 29, from New St. Paul
Tabernacle COGIC, 15380 Fenkeli.
She was buried at Woodlawn
Cemetery on Woodward in Detroit.
William R. Grisham, Sr. of Taylor,
69, died March 25, 1996. Services
were Thursday, March 28, 1996 at
the Taylor Chapel of the Howe-
Peterson Funeral Home. Beloved
husband of Marilyn. Dearest father
of: Bonnie Boyer (Ronald), Janet
Culver, William Jr. (Sharon) and Kim
Cady. Dear son of Dortha and dear
brother of Robert. Also survived by
12 grandchildren and one great
grandchild.
In memory of
SOPHIE REUTHER
A founding member of UAW -
New Directions, Region 1-A.
(810) 231-4336
In memory of
CECIL SHANNON
One of the founding members
of the Detroit News printers union.
The Michaels Families
Announcements
Place your reunion ad here. $1.00
per word per week. Journal Ads
get noticed. Call (313) 567-9818.
Becky Smelker - Please call Joe
Johnson at (313) 563-1417,
anytime. Love! Joe
BE PART OF
A Trade Union delegation to Cuba
4/24 - 5/2 or 4/20 - 5/4/96
Call (313) 836-3752 for appt/info.
U.S. Cuba Labor Relations Exchange
BRAVO!!!
A THUNDEROUS APPLAUSE
To all the great bands and musicians *
who contributed their remarkable
talents to our benefit for the
striking newspaper workers.
To: Funky Blues-Man ROBERT GROSSMAN,
The Harmonious SKELETON CREW,
The Rockin' ROBB ROY,
The Soothing PAMELA RANSFORD,
and The Joyous STEWART FRANKE
and The hard Working PROJECT 29.
Our thanks and appreciation isn’t enough to
repay you for supporting our cause. All of you
deserve a high place on the music charts!
Thank You!!!
DETROIT BLUES MAGAZINE
in newsstands in Detroit and Ann Arbor
April 1st
Call (313) 872-BLUE(S)
Elect NICK SIEFERT
Convention Delegate, Ironworkers,
Local 25
MAGGIE CLAIRE RAPAI
welcome to the world!
Born Thursday, March 14, in
Newton, Mass. She weighed 7 lb. 4 oz.
You’ve got great parents and
dozens of honorary aunts and
uncles here in Detroit.
MARINE CORPS LEAGUE
Downriver
Daily Lunch - Friday-Fish Fry
Public welcome - (313) 282-0233
1323 Eureka, Wyandotte.
“ PAT PARCELL 7
tV for PRESIDENT tV
BOILERMAKERS #169
UAW Local 599 - Support and Elect
Freddie Willbanks, Skilled Trades
Shop Committee; Bernie D. Bullard
I, Jamie Curtis and Joe Herrmann,
Alternate Skilled Trades Shop
Committee. May 8,1996. f ‘ '
Birthday Greetings
Happy Birthday Charles—
March 30,1947 was a real special
day. We got you. - Militant, Ballistic
and Mad Mary
(Happy Birthday!) Don Daniels,
A.K.A. Crash
FLORENCE LONERGAN
78 Years Young/
Happy Birthday Mom/Grandma/
Love, Tom, Irene, Eddie, Vince
MARILYN, Happy Birthday to you!
Hope it’s a good one! Love, Sam,
Linda, Joslyn and Jenna
Happy Birthday to my younger broth
er, Bob Ourlian. Keep up the good
work I love you - Carol
Happy Birthday CHUCK PORTER -
Are Militant Millie and Gutsy Gus a
good or bad influence? Keep them in
line. Enjoy! - Mad Mary.
KARYN SUZANNE SKENDER
is 21 today!!
Happy Birthday to a wonderful
daughter and sister.
Love, Mom, Dad and Jacklyn Ann
Antiques/Crafts
AIRPLANE RIDES
Bring this ad for 1 Discovery Flight
for $25. KITZE Aviation, 8550 N.
Lilley, Canton. (313) 459-6627. Ask
for Scott Burns.
BOOKS
Just returned from West Coast buy
ing trip. Come see 50,000 used &
rare books! King Books North,
22524 Woodward, S. of 9 Mile.
Entertainment
STARDUST DJs
Karaoke, laser lights, compact
discs. All occasions. (810) 791-6164
CARESS ENTERTAINMENT
East and West Side
half hour rates - one hour rates
DISCREET
Hours: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
MONDAY thru SATURDAY
(810) 468-0036
Health
CHILDBIRTH can be painless
and joyful. The REAL LAMAZE.
Call (313) 345-9850
NEW METABOLISM BREAKTHROUGH
Lose 8 to 100 lbs.
Start now and see quick results.
Increased Energy, No Hunger
PLUS Lose Fat, Inches and
Keep It Off. Call (313) 417-5944
STOP THE KILLER!!
Remove arterial plaque, cholesterol
and heavy metal from your body
through natural elimination. No more
painful and expensive intravenous
chelation! ORAL CHELATION -
SIMPLE AS TAKING A PILL! IMPERA
TIVE for those who have had BY
PASS SURGERY! Endorsed by lead
ing Medical and Homeopathic
Doctors. Call (810) 731-4398
STOP SMOKING FAST!
Acupuncture Institute of Michigan
(313) 420-2400
Help Wanted
Rebuilding Communities
Project Manager
Bachelors degree or equivalent, 3-5
yrs. exp. in community-based plan
ning/organizing. Familiar w/community
development/city government policy
practices/asset based planning. Mail
resume by 4/8/96 to WCDC: 11148
Harper, Detroit, Ml 48213 or Fax (313)
571-7307.
r, c\ .focX i>
We Are Hiring!
APPOINTMENT setters needed. Up to
$8.00 per hr. plus cash bonuses. Part-
time, around your schedule. Mornings
and afternoons available. Livonia area.
Call today. (313) 513-8405
BARMAID/WAITRESS - NIGHTS
Across from Tiger Stadium. New
business. (313) 843-1513
CARE TAKER WANTED. 19 unit
apts. good maintenance skills
needed. Call (810) 481-4311
CEMENT person needed. Exper
ienced. Part-time, maybe full-time.
Experience in setup and finishing. Call
Vince at (810) 465-5172
CLINICAL COORDINATOR -
Respiratory Care
Wayne County Community College
has an opening for a Clinical
Coordinator - Respiratory Care in our
Allied Health Program. Position is
responsible for coordinating the labo
ratory and clinical experiences of stu
dents in the program. This position
also is responsible for the laborato
ries, assists in clinical placements,
budget management, and student
recruitment. Requirements include a
Bachelor of Science in the subject
area, Allied Health, Health Sciences,
or related area; Masters of Science
preferred, three years practitioner
experience within the past five years,
one year of which must be in critical
care OR three years recent educa
tional or administrative experience
within the past five years or any com
bination thereof. All licenses in the
subject area must be held and be cur
rent. Excellent fringe benefits. Reply to:
Wayne County Community College
Human Resources
801 West Fort
Detroit, Ml 48226
DRIVERS
No experience necessary. Free
Tractor training. Work as a 48 state
O.T.R. driver for Mayflower Elec.
Exp. and student drivers welcome.
See Clem, Mon.-Fri., 9am-5pm or
Sat. 10-3 at:
Taylor Inn
20777 Eureka, Ste. 122, Taylor
(313) 283-2200, Ext. 122
The Renaissance Mgt. Co.
GET FIRED UP!
If you continue doing what you’re
doing, where will you be 5 years
from now? Detroit area company
expanding. Must have great people
skills and self-motivated. 10 immedi
ate openings, no experience neces
sary. Call (810) 778-1925
HOSPITAL LIAISON
Bachelors degree in a human ser
vices field. State of Michigan
Certification, current drivers license
required. No experience necessary.
• 23 vacation days
• No weekends
• Monday-Friday, 8:30-5 p.m.
• Plus many other benefits
Please call (313) 961-3796 or
send resume to:
New Center Community
Mental Health Services
Human Resource Manager
2051 W. Grand Blvd.,
Detroit, Ml 48208.
LIVE-IN - HONEST DEDICATED
CARETAKER for stroke victim. Send
references and application to: 2041
Keppen, Lincoln Park, Ml 48146.
MACHINE TOOL CONTROLS
• Field Pipe Fitters/Electricians
• PLC Start-Up/Debug
(810) 756-0101 or fax (810) 756-1616
PLUMBERS - RESIDENTIAL
Licensed or 3 years minimum expe
rience required. Union benefits. Call
Plumbers Local 98 for details. (313)
368-1500.
MARCH 31, 1996
CALL
( 313 ) 567-9818
& CHARGE IT!
PLUMBERS - Wanted in North
Carolina. Start immediately. Call
1 (919) 954-7010. Gary.
Akron based REPORTER needed
for Crain Communications weekly
publication covering the waste and
recycling industries. Must have pre
vious daily newspaper experience.
Full benefits, including profit sharing
and bonus. Send cover letter to:
Allan Gerlat, Editor, Waste News
1725 Merriaman Rd., Suite 300
Akron, OH 44313
EOE/M/F/D/V
R.N./LEGAL ASSISTANT
Downtown Detroit plaintiff law firm
seeks R.N./Legal Assistant with
experience in medical malpractice for
flexible part-time position. Duties
include review and summarization of
medical records, research and client
interviews. Computer skills preferred.
Salary commensurate with experi
ence. Send resume to Office
Administrator, Goodman, Eden,
Millender, Bedrosia.i, 3000 Cadillac
Tower, Detroit, Michigan 48226.
SEE THE WORLD
International company seeks positive
minded ambitious person for key
positions only. Travel for fun. Training
available. Potential 5K per month.
Appt. only. (810) 423-4666 ext. 12
Help Wanted - Sales / Marketing
EXPANDING INTERNET MAGA
ZINE needs salespeople, writers.
Income earned through commission.
Self-motivated individuals to work in
S.E. Michigan. No start-up costs.
Call (616) 832-4419
WORK FROM HOME
Earn $500-$1500 per month
10-15 Hours per week
Call: (810) 691-0071
Legal
Diana R. Kessler
Attorney at Law (810) 354-0350
24901 Northwestern Hwy., Ste. 3505
Southfield 48075
Specializing in domestic relations only.
ARRESTED
for Drugs or Stealing?
CCW? Assault?
Probation Violations?
contact Martin J. Mattes, Attorney
Wayne: (313) 222-7692
Macomb: (810) 447-2268
Oakland (810) 433-2190
24 Hours B 1
Bankruptcy, Divorce, Drunk/Criminal
Defense. Mitchell Dittman, Attorney
(810) 335-5915 10% Discount
Divorce? No kids, property?
Do it yourself, save time, money.
100% legal. Forms & instructions.
Send S.A.S.E. & $15.00 to:
Easy Out, P.O. Box 85095
Westland, Ml 48185
Ellis Boal
925 Ford Building, Detroit
(313) 962-2770
Attorneys - Injury Claims - Criminal
and Divorce. Reasonable rates. Free
consultations and home visits.
GATES & GATES
(810) 543-5990
USlf’CONSUMER PROTECTION
Have you been lied to or over
charged? Do you have security
deposit claims? Have you had
medical or dental expenses
from food? Hair ruined by
a beauty shop?
Contact Martin J. Mattes, Attorney
(313)222-7692 ®
JANE GILLIS, ATTORNEY
Handles cases in the area of crimi
nal and family law. Wayne County.
(313) 885-8526.


MARCH 31, 1996
RATES
1 Week $ 1 40 per word.
2 Weeks: $ 2 40 per word.
3 Weeks: $ 3 30 per word.
4 Weeks: $ 4°o per word.
(10 WORD MINIMUM)
FABRIZIO & FABRIZIO, ATTORNEYS
Divorce, traffic, bankruptcy
and personal injury.
(810) 689-1180.
Laurel Stuart-Fink
Experienced divorce and family law
attorney. (810) 626-5450.
SHEILA M. JOHNSON,
Experienced and caring attorney.
Specializing in medical malpractice,
automobile negligence and
other personal injuries.
(810) 540-4700
PAUL H. STEVENSON
Attorney at Law.
Criminal Defense, Personal Injury.
4632 2nd Ave. Call (313) 833-6868.
KURT THORNBLADH, attorney.
Bankruptcy, Insurance Claims,
Tax Problems. 1575 E. Lafayette,
Suite 201. (313) 446-9988.
Misc. for Sale •
Cemetery lots. Cadillac Memorial
West. 2 lots sell for $1000 ea. Will
take $1400 for both. (517) 733-2421
CEREAL- $1 a box! COFFEE, $1 a
can! For more information Call (810)
356-1467.
FURNITURE - Sectional, glass
tables, sewing machine, TV-19"
color, electric fireplace and organ.
Negotiable. (810) 826-9529
MOVING SALE
Solid oak dining room table with 4
padded chairs. Mediterranian bed
set w/ queen size waveless mat
tress. Other misc. items also.
Macomb Twp. (810) 566-8753
PIANO - Beautiful pecan wood.
Lowery upright. $1200 (313) 525-5359
PLYWOOD - Board upgrade 1/2”
thick. $9.00 each (313) 273-4699.
GOLD DUST RESALE
Coins, stamps, comics, records,
VCR repair, Mon.-Fri. 10-6.15296 E.
8 Mile Rd., Detroit
PAGE 33
Classifieds
CALL
( 313 ) 567-9818
& CHARGE IT!
TENOR SAXOPHONE, King, with
case. Excellent condition $600.
(810) 737-4511
WASHERS and DRYERS - Gas or
electric, coin operated, for rentals,
homes, apts. or flats. Exc. cond.
$175 each or $325 pair. Call Bob
(810) 977-8027.
WATERBED - King size, w/head-
board and shelves. Good condition.
$100. (810) 566-7869.
Misc. Wanted
BUY or SELL
Older Ham and Short Wave
radio equipment.
THE RADIO FINDER
Contact Joel Thurtell at
Telephone/Fax (313) 454-1890
PICTURE POSTCARDS
Collections - Always wanted.
Paying best prices.
Michael Price, (517) 764-4517
STERLING GOLD & GIFTS
(810) 783-2223
Buying & Selling
Diamonds • Jewelry • Watches
Gold • Silver • Platinum & Coins
♦ Oil Paintings • Stained Glass •
Sports Cards • Dolls • Promotional
Model Cars • Old Toys
FREE - Stained glass angel
with $15 sale or purchase.
Offer ends May 4,1996.
Chippewa Valley Shopping Plaza
21366 HallRd. (M-59),
between Lakeside & I-94
SHARE A HOUSE in Royal Oak -
Looking for a responsible non
smoking male or female to share
1,700 sq. ft. Colonial home with
hardwood floors and fireplace.
Located in downtown Royal Oak.
(810) 398-8417.
WANTED - Boilers or boiler sec
tions. New or used. (313) 273-4699.
CLEANING SERVICE to clean my
wall-to-wall carpets in my small
home. 5 rooms. East area. Please
leave a message. (313) 881-2382
■■■
Riding Mower Wanted
Striking family needs working
mower. (810) 373-3905
Misc. Wanted - Computers
STRIKING NEWSPAPER workers
need donations of computers
and printers. Call Wylie or Tom, (313)
567-9818.
Mixed Messages
IRISH EYES are smiling on you,
keep up your spirits.
The Active and Retired members of
U.A.W. Local 160 recognize the
hardships the striking newspaper
workers are enduring. This is due
to the Anti-labor actions of the
Detroit scab newspaper manage
ment. We commit our ongoing sup
port until justice is served.
SENIORS WAKE UP! ~
Stop buying the Detroit News,
Free Press and USA Today!
Support striking workers, buy a sub
scription to The Sunday Journal!
Contributions to the Detroit Sunday
Journal appreciated.
PASELLAS - Onaway, Mich
Dan, Karen, Local 17 IBEW, so glad
April is here. Spring has sprung!
Sam and Linda
Lawn signs are being stolen again!
Write “property of’ with your address
on both sides of your signs. If possi
ble get license and I.D. of perps -
call police to prosecute.
THANKS! To Mom, Michelle and
Rich for helping with the Sunday
Journal and for everything else.
LOVE!! Ben and Debby.
154 arrested so far - and that’s only
the beginning. Thank you for all your
support!
Continued thanks to the Detroit
Edison St. Clair power plant workers
for your continued support. Hank -
Local 372
JOHN DEEREN U.A.W. Local #163
retiree supports the strikers and the
Sunday Journal from East Tawas.
Maureen! Watch out for them B&B’s,
stingers and opas!
Darlin’ -
Seeking the “beast.” I moved east.
In a wink,
I found and moved the link.
Attention Newspaper Striking
Families: spouses helping spouses
- strikers helping strikers. We meet
on Thursdays. Please call for time &
place (313) 965-1478 W.I.L.D.
ATTENTION STRIKERS:
We the members of
U.A.W. Local #247
support you and your struggle against
corporate greed. When the going gets
tough, the tough get going! Your
struggle is an inspiration to all of
organized labor. The right to collec
tive bargaining is as important as our
right to exist as free people in this
country. Your fight is our fight. Keep
up the excellent work in The Journal!
To the witch on Auburn - Feed me!
, The Worm
. God Bless the Strikers! - John Farmer,
Retired U.A.W. Erin Go Bragh!
To all my Union Brothers & Sisters:
Practice what you preach! Stop
reading the scab papers at work.
- Spider, Local 735
Rudy Bemick
Retired member of the Mailers,
Local #2040. Happy 87th Birthday/ - Tom
U.A.W. LOCAL 985
Supports the newspaper strikers
in their quest for a fair and decent
contract! Carl Bantau, President.
Al Przydzial, Vice-President.
The Retirees of
U.A.W. LOCAL 735
Support the Newspaper Strikers
Until Justice is Served.
Irving and Dena Greenberg support
The Journal and the strikers!
Good luck.
MARY BALL - Even with one wing
clipped, you fly higher, faster, farther
than any other woman! Get well soon!
We appreciate your bravery in
suffering arrest on March 21.
Ed Burke, Joseph Dzielinski,
David Elsila, Doug Fraser,
Michael Funke, Kris Hamel,
Bob King, Pat Murphy, Susan Newell,
John Nolan, Dick Olson, Brenda Paton,
Shirley Poling, Paul Policicchio,
Frederic Probst, Ed Ptasnik,
Jim Rehberg, Tony Rothschild,
Mike Zeilinski, John Zettner.
Detroit Sunday Journal
morning newsroom staff
Pam - Smile, they have to face God
someday and their money can’t buy
that!!! Love you lots, your sis Teri.
U.A.W. Local 2093
The power of UNION
is found in WE, not ME.
We support the newspaper workers
in their quest for a fair and equitable
contract. - Three Rivers
American Axle and Mfg. Facility
Beauregard eats pepperoni pizza at
TONY’S in Hazel Park!
Mobil Station (Michigan at Outer
Drive) Thank you for your support!
We salute the Jerry Tamm family for
all their support. - W.I.L.D.
THE MEMBERSHIP OF UAW LOCAL
#572 will continue t» support the strik
ing workers of The Detroit Newspaper
Organization until the anti-labor man
agement realizes their mistake and
returns economic justice to the work
place. Even after losing $46 million in
the fourth quarter of 1995 the pig
headed management continues to
bring hardship to the families of strik
ing workers in order to break the
union. Stand tall and don’t back down.
SOLIDARITY FOREVER!
John - Sorry about missing our last
session. The “surprise” has been a
little pain. - Marge
I SUPPORT THE STRIKERS - And
all the union officials. John Sultana,
U.A.W. #163.
Tom Moricz and Larry Marsh, U.A.W.
Local 163, District 8 Committee Men
support the strikers and The Sunday
Journal!
WASHTENAW LIVINGSTON EDU-
CATION ASSOCIATION supports
striking workers in their struggle
for a contract.
Glenn, Norman left a message at the
Thunderbird South. Something
about “... meet you at the COPA!!!"
- 3900 Team
SAGINAW COUNTY DEMOCRATS
support Detroit Newspaper strikers
and support The Sunday Journal!
Amalgamated Transit Union
Local 1564
Representing members at: Smart
Public Transit Workers Servicar of
Michigan, The Detroit and Canada
Tunnel. Our membership supports
the striking newspaper workers!
Please patronize
TONY’S PIZZA in Hazel Park!
He supports the Detroit Newspaper
strikers! (810)414-6670
The UAW Membership and staff of
The Dearborn Engine and
Fuel Tank Plant support our striking
newspaper workers! Solidarity forever!
FREE LAWN SIGNS DELIVERED!
Downriver area. Call (313) 284-1804
KIM-
I’m sorry we couldn’t work things out.
I’ll always have a place in my heart
for you. David
Public employees represented by
Michigan AFSCME
Council 25, AFL-CIO,
continue to support the striking
workers. We wish the Detroit
Journal every success. Officers,
Executive Board and Staff of
Council 25. Flora Walker, President,
Larry Roehrig, Secretary-Treasurer
HOME AND BUSINESS
Call 567-9818 to PLACE YOUR AD!
Accounting/Taxes
GERALD M. BASKERVILLE & CO.
Family operated since 1940.
Accounting & Income Tax prep, for
Detroit and suburbs. I-75 access.
(313) 842-3870
TAXES: H&R Block-trained striker
charges one-half Block’s rates.
Deeper discounts for strikers.
Stephen Advokat, (810) 354-2359.
Maintenance & Repair
Residential / Commercial
A-1 Painting - Quality work - rea
sonable rates. Free estimates. Mark
(313) 531-7824.
AEGIS JANITORIAL-
Commercial or residential cleaning.
Bonded and insured.
(810)405-6109
CABINETRY - Total custom furnish
ings. Vanities, countertops, entertain
ment centers. We create any custom
furnishings. (810) 541-5146
VINCE FURNARI CEMENT
Licensed contractor. Member of
Local #13. Driveways, patios, porch
es, etc. Call for free estimate. (810)
465-5172
CAPITOL ELECTRICAL All types
electrical wiring, 24 hours a day.
Free estimates. Licensed and
insured. (810) 790-4851.
HOME REPAIR OR IMPROVEMENTS
Floors, Plumbing, Drywall, etc
Discounts to all strikers.
Home (810) 471-6181
or (313) 441-2775
Beeper (810) 450-8028
BEARY HOUSECLEANING
$10 discount for strikers for 1st
housecleaning. Reasonable, depend
able lowest rate available.
References. (810) 790-2016
LAWN SERVICE
Serving South Macomb area.
KLOS-KUT (810) 756-5822
U.A.W. member
LAWN CUTTING - WEEKLY
Emerald Green Lawn and
Landscape Maintenance.
Serving Western Wayne County.
(313) 513-7811
IMPRESSIVE PAINTING
Reasonable prices. All types of paint-
ing. Call 1-800-730-8607, anytime.
STRIKELINE PAINTING - Wall
repair, washing, paper removal.
Great rates. (313) 937-3609.
INTERIOR PAINTING - Wallpaper
hanging and stripping. Free esti-
mates. (313) 584-4639.
BUD’S PAINTING - Interior and
exterior. (810) 977-2941.
PLUMBING by KEN
Electric sewer & drain cleaning
repairs, toilet, hot water tanks,
faucets, etc. FREE ESTIMATES.
(810) 774-7510
QUALITY
INTERIOR PAINTING
Affordable, reliable. References.
Call Darline (810) 754-8893
Maintenance & Repair-Auto
DENT ELIMINATOR - Don’t get
stung on your lease! Take dents out
of your car without disturbing factory
finish. Most minor dents (hail, shop
ping carts) removed! Mobile service
available. (810) 583-1120 or beeper
(810) 485-0828
MIKE’S CARB SHOP
By Appointment only. (313) 842-8858
DOMESTIC CARS & LIGHT TRUCKS
Photographic/Video Services
Professional Photography
Specializing in Weddings and
Portraits. Studio available. Union
member. Bernard, (313) 885-8928.
ATTENTION!
BRIDES & GROOMS TO BE
Videographer specializing in wed
dings since 1985. More Video. Call
(810) 979-2919.
Miscellaneous Services
Andy’s Electric Trains - Old toy
trains restored, repaired, bought,
and sold. Parts available. Lionel-
American Flyer-Marx-HO. Andrew
J. Kach, (810) 227-4077.
ANGEL’S FLORIST & CRAFTS
13536 Northline, Southgate. Fresh
cut flowers available for all occa
sions and a multitude of crafts for
your next party. Call 283-3677.
QUALITY DAY CARE
Licensed Harper Woods home,
taking children ages 2 and up.
M-F, 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Certified in
C.P.R., First Aid. References and
reasonable rates. Call Rose, (313)
839-3893.
LICENSED DAY CARE - Two
openings, 1 to 5 years old., loving
environment, pre-school activities,
references, meals. Warren area.
Laurie, (810) 558-5525.
HAROLD’S PRINTING SERVICE -
Business cards, flyers, envelopes,
letterheads, brochures. Detroit, Ml
(313) 493-0177.
HOME REPAIR or improvements.
Cabinet refacing, floors, plumbing,
countertops, etc. (313) 441-2775.
MASSEUR
Complete massage. 7 day service.
24/hr. (313) 881-6460
POOL TABLES - Need new cloth
or your table moved? Call (810)
473-8209
STRIKER seeks ironing to be
done in my home. East side. $1.25
each. Pickup and delivery available.
(313) 823-5434.
ROOFING REMOVAL - And prepa
ration,, Call for free estimate, ask for
Bob, (810) 772-4956.
SEWING MACHINE SERVICE
Tune-up special in your home
$9.95. All makes, all ages, all
parts stocked. 38 years experience.
Call (313) 885-7437
WONDERLAND TATOO
David Simon and Mario Barth.
(810) 774-8288
PENTJAK - SILAT
Indonesian Martial Arts. Serious Self
Defense. Group or Private Classes.
(313) 382-7016.
WEDDING INVITATIONS
Accessories. All items discounted.
Sample albums delivered. Call
Agnes, (810) 588-3764.
WORD PROCESSING
Flyers, Brochures, Business and
Academic Reports. (810) 726-9260.
Phone Services
SOMEONE MAY
“NEED” YOU!!
Place your Service
in the Sunday Journal
Service Directory.
Call
( 313 ) 567-9818
ARE YOU READY
* * * FOR LOVE? * * <
CALL NOW!!!
1-900-990-3737, Ext. 3409
$2.99 Per Minute.
Must Be 18 Yrs.
Serv-U (619) 645-8434
NO HOLDS BARRED/
on the “HOTTEST” Gab Line
in the U.S.A.
CALL NOW!!
1-900-745-0687, ext. 1876
$2.99/MIN. Adults Over 18
J.R.G. Catl/Wrn, Ml
Sweet, Hot, Seductive,
SEXY BABES
Waiting Just for Your Call
24 hrs. a day!
1-900-484-0023, Ext. 1877
$3.99/min. Adults Over 18 Yrs.
J.R.G. Call/Warren. Ml
BUYING!
SELLING!
Sunday Journal
classified ads
work for you!
Call (313) 567-9818
Psychics
HAVE A PERSONAL
PSYCHIC READING
Send $10 AND S.A.E., your
birthday & questions to: RUZIC, P.O.
Box 7126 Dearborn, Ml 48121


PAGE 34
RATES
1 Week * 1^0 per word.
2 Weeks: $ 2 4 ° per word.
3 Weeks: $ 3 30 per word.
4 Weeks: *4 00 per word.
(10 WORD MINIMUM)
BARBER SCHOOL 4th and 5th
GRADERS, and Christina Murriel:
Thanks for your visit and your interest
in a real newspaper. - The staff of
The Detroit Sunday Journal.
A salute to the men of Ironworkers
Local #25 who stood tall and did the
right thing Tuesday morning at the
Detroit News building downtown.
May your example inspire others as
much as it impressed those of us
who witnessed your integrity. In sol
idarity, Striking Newspaper Workers
FREEBIES! Show your support for
striking news-paper employees with a
FREE lawn sign. Call (810) 354-2359
Steve and Jennifer Marks - Thanks for
your support. Rhea, Richard and Roger.
It takes more than an ill-tempered
wind to keep a good woman down.
Get well soon, Mary Ball. You are
my hero. Love, Susan Watson.
SOUTHFIELDERS! Show your sup-
port for striking newspaper employ
ees with a free lawn sign. Call (810)
354-2359
U.A.W. MEMBERS -1 challenge you
to support the Sunday Journal. Buy
an ad like this. Solidarity forever - .
Phil Gilliam, U.A.W. Local 898
STRIKERS: Keep the faith and don’t
give up! - A Flint UAW member.
To Debbie and Zolt. Thanks for
your support and Adray ad. Love
Gay and Tom.
What a beautiful Friday morning at
the News Building in downtown
Detroit! Solidarity is getting to be
contagious around here! A tip of the
hard hat to the brothers of Local
#324, International Union of
Operating Engineers, who respect
ed the picket line. - Standing strong,
the striking newspaper employees.
John & Marge: Mike has been a “real
pain” as a sitter. I’ve returned the
favor. - Iguana
GROSSE POINTERS:
Help support the striking newspaper
workers! Call our hotline
at (313) 222-7654 for information
and yard signs.
Opportunities
A-1 established Moving & Storage
business since 1927. Military
approved warehouse/garage/offices.
14,000 sq. ft. Includes all storage
lots. Domestic/overseas carriers.
Michigan all-point permit. Walk-in
opportunity for broker. For prospec-
tus call (313) 892-3930.
CHANCE of a lifetime! Be able
to afford your dreams. Growing
telecommunications company offers
career w/huge money making poten
tial. Full or part-time. Call for infor
mation. Excel independent repre
sentative. (810) 435-0933
Commercial Cleaning Accts.
\ Be Your Own Boss
\7 $500-$10,000/mo Guar.
Contracts in your area!
Training, equipment incl.
Work part/full time, flexible hrs.
Guar. Financing: $1300 down
CleanNet U.S.A. (810) 680-6750
Concession Trailer. 14’aluminum. NEW.
Complete set-up for pizza, subs & pop.
Best offer. (810) 656-8668
EARN CASH TODAY !!
And help save a llife. No work
required. Earn up to $261 per month
by donating life saving plasma.
Enjoy our calm pleasant atmosphere
while being served by our trained
professional medical staff. NABI
BIOMEDICAL DOWNRIVER, 15100
Northline Rd., Suite 179, Southgate,
Ml. 48195. In the DCC Building.
(313) 281-3723.
DETROIT SU
MARCH 31, 1996
Homebased Business Opportunity
- Achieve financial independence
and be your own boss. Proven com
pany opening up mid-west. Call
Richard, NOW. (313) 584-7525.
PRINTING - TWO PERSON UNION
TRADE SHOP-Established accounts.
50% of corporation. $15,000.
Layout experience helpful. Call (313)
861-2815.
Pets
COCKATIEL BIRDS - Hand fed
babies. Many colors. Also breeding
pairs. (810) 398-4991, ask for
Elizabeth.
GERMAN SHEPHERD pupl
Premium breeding, both parents
OFA and UAW Local 36 Certified.
Proudly guaranteed. (810) 363-8336
LAB (AKC) PUPPIES & adults.
Wormed, 1st shots. $100 and up.
(810) 792-3015
LAB - Male, 16 months old. Free
to good home. All shots. Call (313)
261-5737.
PUPPIES - AKC. Shar Pei,
Pekinese, Pugs and English
Pointers. (313) 941-0535.
SHEBA INU - Female, red sesame,
14 weeks. A.K.C. registered. Vet
checked. (313) 285-5359.
PREMIER PET SITTERS, INC.
8 years in business
Bonded • Insured • References
Vacations • Housesit • Dogwalks
(810) 680-0733
(Oakland County Area)
10% OFF rate
if you mention this ad!
Shelty puppy wanted for a loving
striker family, mid April. Please call
(313) 592-0034
Real Estate
Apartments and Houses for Rent
One Bedroom Apartment - Clean.
11424 Nardin Park. $230 plus
security deposit. No pets. (313) 272-
4491
Flat for rent - Corktown, 2 bedroom
upper. No pets, no smoking.
Professional/student. $375 includes
heat (313) 266-5351
House near Hamtramck - Clean,
safe neighborhood. $480 + security
deposit. (313) 859-0769
Homes for Sale
BEAUTIFUL VIEW of Detroit River
from a spacious 2-bedrrom, 2-bath
co/op/Town House. For additional
information call (313) 822-3665.
Clinton Twp. W. of Garfield, N. of 18
Mile. 41864 Mary Kay. Great room,
brick ranch, 1575 sq. ft. 3 br. w/4th in
finished bsmt. 1 1/2 bath, 2 car
attached garage. Central air. Many
extras. $143,500 negotiable. (810)
228-7570. Open Sun. 12-4. Closed
Easter Sunday.
CLINTON TOWNSHIP - 4 bedroom
tri-level, 1,800 sq. ft., 2 full ceramic
baths, natural fireplace, family room,
w/lots of updates. Extra-wide drive
way for boat or R.V. $117,300. ERA
Classics, D 459, (810) 293-6800.
Journal Classified Ads Work!
Get the job done.
Call (313) 567-9818
Money to Lend/Mortgages
FINANCE
Your home, car, boat - almost anything
Interest Free
We show you how!
No charges - No Obligations
(313) 426-6929
HEARTHSIDE
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
LOOK
We can Help!
DEBT CONSOLIDATION
CREDIT PROBLEMS
IRS LIENS JUDGEMENTS
Purchase or Refinance
Low Rates
No Application Fee!
One (1) Day Approval
AFFORDABLE Payments
Call: (810) 774-2234
STOP
• ^ | FORECLOSURES!!!
IRAI The Only Thing You
Jy Can Lose is
^ W Your Home IF
■ ■ You Don’t Call!
Evans & Evans Mortgage
Services
(313) 945-9655
GET A RAISE EVERY MONTH
Do you seriously want to change your
future? Earn $5-10,000 per mo. in 6-8
months? Not a get-rich-quick scheme
- You will have to invest some time
and money. The rewards are endless!
The more you put in, the more you’ll
get out. Work at home, part or full time.
Get healthy and wealthy at the same
time - we’ll help.
GIVE YOURSELF A CHANCE!
Call today!
(810) 968-1440
Homeowners were you Denied?
Poor credit, Back taxes; Debt consol
idation; Foreclosures; Bankruptcy.
CALL 1-(800)-470-2094
Mobile Homes
80’ SKYLINE 14’x70’. All appliances,
new carpet. 3 months PAID lot rent!
$12,500 Negotiable. (810) 598-4737.
Resorts
Planning your Summer Vacation?
Rifle Lake Haven Resort has 8
cottages on Rifle Lake. Call (517) 473-
2342 for reservations and information.
Share Living Quarters
SHARE A HOUSE in Royal Oak -
Looking for a responsible non-smok
ing male or female to share 1,700 sq.
ft. Colonial home with hardwood
floors and fireplace. Located in down
town Royal Oak. (810) 398-8417.
Space / Real Estate for Rent
HALL
FOR RENT
U.A.W. #247 - 15 & Van,Dyke area.
(810) 264-2945
R.V. Park Lot, Houghton Lake,
Michigan. Day, week or month. Call
(810) 731-4631
CALL
( 313 ) 567-9818
& CHARGE IT!
OFFICE BUILDING
(Owner Assisted Financing)
Near Southfield & 10 Mile Rds.
2000 sq. ft., 14 parking spaces.
Newly remodeled $129K.
(810) 559-7080
Real Estate Agent
LOOKING TO BUY
OR SELL A HOME?
Use a union brother, also a striking
employee specializing in Oakland
and Macomb counties and East Side
Detroit. Call Bob DeMoss, (810)
979-1600.
Used Autos
Used Autos - Chrysler
1991 EAGLE Talon. New clutch &
tires. Loaded! $3000 or best offer.
(313) 259-1471 or (313) 831-7267
‘April Love Songs” by Merl Reagle
TS
3 / 31/96

-tl-
68 Planet orbiters
69 DJ’s transition
70 Where The Late
Shift debuted
71 Lovable Bert
75 %: abbr.
76 Poker bet
78 Mucky environs
80 N.Y. transit
until ’55
82 Camp David
Accords subject
83 Like your blood
after a breath
84 Poi and glue
(coincidence?)
86 Liquid
hydrogen, e.g.
87 Barbra’s/l Star
Is Born costar
88 Watched the
baby
93 Forcibly
remove, as a car
96 Fabric-dyeing
method
98 Mastroianni
film about
eating, La
Grande
ACROSS
1 Hitching places
6 “Assumption of
the Virgin”
painter
12 “ in Love
with Amy”
16 1968 Sergio
Mendes hit?
19 1956 Frankie
Lymon hit?
21 Elicits no
laughter
22 Clich6d
23 Waters south of
Vancouver
Island, the Juan
de Strait
24 Knocks off
25 Raleigh’s rival
27 It means “inner”
29 Arthur the ace
31 Tee neighbor
32 FDR’s promise
35 Misadds, e.g.
37 Cope Book aunt
40 Bordeaux buddy
41 Breastbones
44 Vingt-
(21, in French)
46 Set for
(prepare to snare)
50 Camera part
52 15 Down tune of
1959?
55 Gold bar
57 Anyway, it’s
original
58 Gulf N of
Somalia
59 See 17 Down
60 Levi’s mother
62 Singing Swedes
64 Sleuth’s shout
66 Tuck’s partner
67 Oft-recorded
Bloom-Mercer
favorite?
71 Chop
72 Basket points -
73 Table d’_
74 “Queen of
Country”
75 Examines,
dog-style
77 Warning
79 Comprehend
81 Scheduled
85 1967 Aretha
Franklin hit?
89 Empire State
stadium
90 Rendezvous
91 Babbitt’s Dept.:
abbr.
92 Dq an usher’s job
94 Ambulance stops,
briefly
95 Newton-John hit,
“Let There”
97 Race car driver
Teo
nothing
(plows ahead)
15 Down’s
long-time label
104 Jai
99
101
106 Anthem start
109 Pen
110 “Or my hat!”
113 Where the
Ucayali flows
115 Showdown time
118 Change for a fin
119 1959 Ricky
Nelson hit?
123 1962 Robert
Goulet hit?
124 W. Ger. joined it
in ’55
125 They grow in
velvety clusters
126 They’ll be
weaving soon
DOWN
1 Gym class, for
short
2 The mother of
all diets.
3 TV reception -
woe
4 “Yippie-
ay!”
5 Emporium
6 Spanish uncle
7 “Maybe the
best...”
8 Bean curd
9 “ dark ...”
(line from “If
You Could Read
My Mind”)
10 Travel guide
11 Puck-nacious
org.
12 Gasped words
13 Khartoum’s river
14 It still gets you
“no cigar”
15 “The King”
16 Get into of
things
17 “Bat” Guano in
Dr. Strangelove
18 Downy duck
19 Magi
20 Navy rank: abbr.
21 Mt. McKinley’s
park
26 Strikes, in
bowling
28 Like a Gallaudet 100 Introductions
student 101 Tombstone
30 Fans of Julio abbr.
Egg-lay-sius? 102 Cut-up
33 glance 103 Maui howdy
34 The Rockettes, 105 Part of a renter’s
for one address: abbr.
36 Get used (to) all 107 Root beer brand,
over again A
38 Spray defense 108 Sing for Heidi
39 Plato and pals 1H PartofQ.E.D.
42 Palais occupant 112 Sax type
43 Reason for a 114 Oldies by Olds
toddler’s cranki-116 Faux butter
ness, often 117 Mountain for
45 Of an arm bone Moses
47 Arrested 120 Actor-director
48 Right away, in Robbins
memos 121 Who-you-are
49 Going-steady cards: abbr.
symbol 122 First chimp in
51 Belief that only space, 1961
the self exists
53 Some primates Solution on page 35
54 Czar’s decree
56 Bo’s rating
61 A tough
follow
63 Land of noncon
formity?
65 Comes like a
comet
67 “Out of the
question!”’
*** To order any of
Merl's award-winning
crossword collections,
send $10.50 per book
(checks only, payable
to "The PuzzleWorks”)
to: Crosswords, P.O.
Box 15066-D, Tampa
FL 33684-5066. Please
specify Vol. 1,2,3 or 4.


MARCH 31,1996
RATES
1 Week $ 1 40 per word.
2 Weeks: s 2 4 ° per word.
3 Weeks: *3 30 per word.
4 Weeks: $ 4°° per word.
(10 WORD MINIMUM)
ETROIT SU
PAGE 35
CALL
(313)567-9818
& CHARGE IT!
1991 EAGLE Talon - All wheel
drive, turbo, automatic. Excellent
cond. Low mileage. $9100. (810)
960-4525.
1995 NEON - 4-dr.-Sport. Red,
driven by non-smoker, $9750. Call
(810) 558-8600
Used Autos - Ford
1994 FORD Crown Victoria. Auto,
a/c, cloth seats, full power, cruise,
29,000 miles. $16,000/best offer.
(313) 730-1636
1990 T-BlRD - Loaded with extras.
47,500 mi. $9000. Call after 4 p.m..
(313) 462-1056.
1985 T-BIRD - Runs great. Fresh
paint. Loaded. $2400. Call (313)
562-1445.
Used Autos - GM
1993 CHEVROLET Corsica - 4 dr.
Auto, excellent condition. White.
$8100. (810) 960-4525
1992 SATURN - 4 dr. Fully loaded.
Exc. condition. Standard shift.
$7800. (313) 422-2679
1991 BUICK Regal Ltd. - 4 dr.
Leather, new brakes & tires. 84,000
mi. $7295 or best offer. Call (313)
455-0079
Used Autos - “Import”
1992 TOYOTA Tercel - 4-spd„
cassette, rustproofed. Meticulously
maintained. Exc. condition! $6700/
best offer. (313) 837-0369.
“Auto-Motive”
Dealer SPECIALS...
! ! ! INTRODUCING ! ! !
STONEAGE
the New
SUPERIOR
and
FREE
way to shop for a used car
In Detroit
Call i-sio-ss^noo
www.stoneage.com
SEE
COLOR
PICTURES
STONEAGE
Place an ad to sell a car for only
$9.95 until you sell it!
Get a FREE window sticker
To Sell your car
Journal ads work.
(313) 567-9818
‘Birmingham
ChrysCer {VCymoutd
’92 CADILLAC Sedan Deville
Black, leather, 1-owner, clean,
’92 PONTIACRrebird
Low miles, full power, T-tops
$10,995
’87 CADILLAC Eldorado
Carriage roof, full power, clean
$5995
’93 PONTIAC Grand Am
Clean, 31,000 miles
$10,450
’93 CHEVY Lumina Z-34
23,000 miles, loaded, mint
$12,950
(810)643-7000
Susan
Watson -
only in
the journal
Keal Estate m
BH^BH
BBfflBB
M ( 111! I V { H t £ LTII
OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE
20K sq. ft. Can be divided. Class A
Downtown Detroit.
BAR FOR SALE
Business only, assume lease $1,400 per
month. Downtown Detroit, Harmonie
Park area. L/C available.
RESTAURANT FOR SALE
E. Jefferson. Business, equipment,
license. 1.2M Gross Sales. Asking
$975,000. Terms available.
LIQUOR STORE FOR SALE
Business only. $1.3 million year gross.
High traffic area. Detroit. $250K price.
EXCLUSIVE REALTY 331-7653
ASK FOR COLONEL HARVEY
EXCEPTIONAL
OFFICE OPPORTUNITIES
for SALE or LEASE
The most distinguished office building
opportunities for sale or lease in Detroit!
•1301 E. Jefferson
•455 W. Fort
•3100 E. Jefferson
•511 E. Lamed
•220 W. Congress
• 151W. Fort
rxdusivc
REALTY
331 -SOLD
YOUR full-service Commercial
Real Estate firm in Detroit
%
IRISH HILLS REALTY
517 - 467-2002
517 - 467-3003
IMMACULATE HOME in the village of Onsted.
1200 sq. ft. 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, full basement,
deck, attached garage. Village sewer and water.
$119,500.
GREAT ORIGINAL COTTAGE with good view of
Vineyard Lake. Short walk to sandy beach. Large
trees, weekend retreat. Gas arill, range, refrigera
tor, microwave & furniture all for $56,900.
SlJND^ JRNAL
House
For
Sale
Special
15 wonls for $15
Call (313)567-9818
Ask for Classifieds (ext 16 or 17)
Huntington Ford
’91 PROBE
LX, V-6, AC
’89 PROBE
LX, Auto, Clean
'91 GRAND AM LE
2 Dr., Auto/AC
’93 INTREPID
Loaded
’91 EXPLORER XLT
4 Dr. $8995
’91 ESCORT GT
31.000 Miles, Auto/Air
’92 CROWN VICTORIA LX
36.000 Miles, Loaded
'91 COROLLA
4 Dr., 47,000 Miles. Bright Red
’93 TEMPO
Auto, 23,000 Miles
’93 SATURN LS
2 Dr., 16,000 Mi, Leath., Sunroof
’92 SABLE LS
32.000 Miles, Loaded
’93 MUSTANG LX
Convertible, V-8/Auto
’90 JEEP CHEROKEE
4x4, Auto
’92 CAVELIER
2 Dr., Mgr. Special
90 BONNEVILLE LE
56.000 Miles, Clean
See these cars and more
on the INTERNET
www.stonage.com/huntington
( 810 ) 852-0400
CR£.SIW.OQlf
DODGE
’96 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT,
Club Cab 5000 mi
* 20,995
’95 DODGE SPIRIT 4 dr,
V6, auto, a/c...
* 12,495
’92 DODGE DAKOTA PI U LE,
auto, a/c, cassette, 34,000 mi...
* 11,695
’90 T-BIRD Anniversary SC
super clean...
*9995
’89 MERCURY Cougar LS,
Like new, new car trade...
*3995
( 313 ) 421-5700
Winners
DODGE
1990 DAKOTA
Automatic, V-6,
A/C, low miles
$7,988
1995 LEBARON XL
Convertible, loaded, low miles
red or white.
$15,655
1995 DAKOTA SPORT
5- speed, V-8, low miles
$11,988
1994 GRAND CARAVAN SE
White or green, loaded.
$13,988
1994 B-250 HIGH TOP
Conversion van
Leather, TV, Loaded
$15,655
675-4700
ROSENRU
RUT0 GROUP.
’95 DODGE RAM
4x4 SLT Laramie, low miles,
black w/all chrome - loaded.
$ 21,230
’94 TERCEL
Auto, red, 30k, cute litttle ride.
Priced to sell!
$9212
’92 EAGLE TALON
#1371. Super clean-
this ones for YOU!
$9998
’93 SATURN SC2
White, auto fac. roof. ONE owner',
Fine car. DRIVE me!
$ 12,972
’92 ACCORD LX
#401531T, loaded, local car,
this one is loaded!
$8998
(313) 565-5108
Used Trucks/Vans
Used Trucks/Vans - Chrysler
1994 DODGE B250 Conversion Van.
Full size, V-6,24,000 miles. Like new,
exc. cond. $13,400. (810) 772-4378
1990 PLYMOUTH Grand Voyager
LE - V-6, Loaded, 79,000 miles.
Good condtion. $6500. Call (810)
398-4678.
Used Trucks/Vans - Ford
1994 FORD F-150 XLT Lariot
Supercab. 5.0L V8, auto, trailer tow
ing pkg., LOADED, Captains chairs,
22,000 miles $15,800/best offer.
(810) 286-8436
Used Auto
(“Collector”)
1964 PONTIAC Grand Prix. Show
quality, 72,000 original miles. $7000.
(313)255-4847
Transportation Specials
1987 PLYMOUTH Horizon. 5-speed,
runs good. Rear wipers & defrost.
$800 (313) 522-4113
1984 PONTIAC 6000 STE - Loaded,
a/c, alarm. Newer motor. Driven by
non-smoker. Detroit (west). $1450.
(313) 273-1622
Transportation Needed
Cheap wheels needed. “Legs are
tired”. Call John or Ken, Livonia.
(313) 425-5323
Winter Recreation Vehicles
1979 YAMAHA 440 - Exciter. Good
condition. Runs good. $700/
best offer. (810) 795-2767. Call
before 2 p.m.
Watercraft
1986 SEARAY 270 Sundance - 10
ft. beam. Twin V-6. Excellent condi
tion. $32,000 or best offer. Call Paul,
days (810) 352-6100 or nights (519)
737-6841.
1979 SILVERTON 31’ Convertible.
Twin 360s, dual stations, excellent
condition. $35,000 or best offer.
(313) 383-9238
Boat Maintence/Storage
BOAT DETAILING - Bottom refinish
ing, polishing, sealing and waxing.
Hand wash. Joe - (313) 417-3389.
Pager, (313) 385-8190.
Too Late to Classify
...but not too late to buy, sell, or find/
LOVERS
Which of the twelve signs is your
perfect lover and best partner
Let Your Horoscope Tell You!!
Send 97<t, your birthdate and a self
addressed stamped envelop to:
Perfect Partners
23197 Hawthorne St., Suite 313
Famnington, Ml 48336
HOUSE FOR RENT - With option to
buy. 3 bedroom brick. Call (810)
851-4401, ext. 852.
Jim McFarlin
gets with the program
only in
the journal
iS
c
o
o
CO

s
c
CO
v
>
o
a
<
QliAiInlnti
on I cTRinM
nma BBBCTBHEHfflnanacnCT
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fr
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3/31/96
© 1996 by M. Reagle


PAGE 36
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
MARCH 31, 1996
An injury
TO ONE IS
AN INJURY
TO ALL!
The members &L officers of the
Transportation Communications
Union stand with striking newspaper
workers in Detroit.
In Solidarity;
Robert A. Scardelletti
International President
AUTO SERV
CE & PERFORMANCE CENTER
SHOW
US YOUR UNION
CARD AND
RECIEVE 5% OFF
(Not on Advertized
specials)
V Shuttle Service Available
V Towing Service Available
V Night drop off Service
Available
*FREE
TOWING TO OUR
SHOP WITHIN 5
MILE RADIUS
’Call store for details
ALL MAJOR & MINOR REPAIRS
HOURS: Mon. thur Fri. 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m -Sat. 7:30 to 3 p.m.-CLOSED SUNDAY
7454 Triangle Dr. Sterling Hgts.
t-y-i 726-6900 fc-d
Mobil® OIL,
LUBE, FILTER
$ 11
95
CALL
FOR APPT.
Up to 5 qts. of 10-30W Mobil Motor Oil,
Lube Chassis
PLUS FREE 10 POINT SAFETY CHECK
Plus $1.50 for Hazardous Waste Disposal
Must Present Coupon At Time Of Write-Up
W//COUPON MOST CARS EXPIRES 5/2/96
Hall Road
Triangle
Riverland Dr.
wmmmrnmmm
0
crarkviccd
EVEN MORE
’96 NEON SEDAN
• Automatic
• Air Conditioning
•AM/FM Stereo
• Floor Mats
• Rear Defroster
*10,997
’96 CARAVAN
*16,947
•V/6
•Automatic Trans.
• Luggage Rack
> Dual Air Bags
• 7 passenger
• AM/FM Cassette
’96 DAKOTA SPORT
*12,699
•5 Speed* V/6
• Air Conditioning
• 5x7 Mirrors
• 22 Gal. Fuel Tank
• Tilt Steering Wheel
• Anti-spin Deferential
• 3.9 Gear Ratio
• AM/FM Cassette
> Chrome Wheels
’96 RAM 1500 SLT
’96 DODGE AVENGER COUPE
Air Conditioning • Power Locks
Floor Mats • Dual Power Mirrors
AM/FM Cassette • Power Windows
Speed Control • Dual Air Bags
$ 13,736
2 Tone Paint • V/8
Automatic Trans.
Sliding Rear Window
P245/75R16 A/5 OWL Tires
Full Size Spare
Power Mirrors, Windows, Locks
Cast Aluminum Wheels • Cruise
AM/FM Stereo Cassette • Tint
*17,902
USED CARS
’96 NEON
Auto, A/C, miles
under 9000 ..
*10,988
’96 2500 RAM CONVERSION VAN
2 Tone Paint • V/8
Automatic Trans.
Sliding Rear Window
P245/75R16 A/5 OWL Tires
Full Size Spare
Power Mirrors, Windows, Locks
Cast Aluminum Wheels • Cruise
AM/FM Stereo Cassette • Tint
*Sale ends April 8
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* Plus tax. title, license, destination charges, all incentives to dealer.
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March 19, 1996
Detroit Sunday Journal
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Detroit, MI 48207
It's been a pleasure to deal with you
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Executive Director
We wish to send along our sincere thanks to the Sunday Journal
and all your readers! We've been very pleased with the generous
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MARCH 31, 1996
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 37
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PAGE 38
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
MARCH 31, 1996
Big Ten’s impact small at tournament time
So, we went into another NCAA
Final Four weekend minus a
single Big Ten basketball team.
This might be the time to seri
ously consider a Big Ten tournament,
in that it’s looking like the only way
the conference can expect to crown a
postseason champion.
No survivors in the National
Invitation Tournament, either, which is
plumb embarrassing for a conference
backed up against as many population
centers and basketball talent hatch
eries as Big Ten universities.
Did we hear the word “coaching” as a
problem here?
Yes we did. It will continue to be
mentioned as long as Gene Keady and
Purdue remain the most consistent bet
to win the league championship. All
because Keady for years has been
regarded as the best general and tacti
cian in the conference.
He’s the one coach who strains the
most intensity and potential out of his
players because he’s such a precise
director, a consummate teacher of play
ers and their roles.
Bobby Knight’s problem at Indiana
Lynn
Henning
is that times have caught up with him.
No longer do kids feel as if they must
suffer his brand of stress in order to
succeed and get the proper things from
college and basketball.
Steve Fisher deals with a far differ
ent circumstance. He gets the players
but is now staring down criticisms that
his stars don’t improve once they get to
Ann Arbor.
Not fair, really, in that it seems as if
the mean age of most Fisher teams
since 1991 has been about 16. But the
last two seasons have been disturbing
- weird chemistry, dark stretches filled
with too many losses. This is the kind
of stuff a coach needs to turn around
rapidly, as in next season, or the Final
Four visits and national championship
threaten to be part of an under-fire
coach’s scrapbook.
Michigan State’s Tom Izzo is in
something of the same soup at a much
earlier stage in his career. He’s on trial,
which isn’t fair only a year into the job,
except Izzo came in as an untried head
coach who got the MSU job out of loy
alty. Not an overly long honeymoon
there for a young guy who wasn’t going
to be handed the same lifetime con
tract Jud Heathcote basically received.
Izzo’s triumph, of course, was in last
week landing point guard Mateen
Cleaves of Flint Northern. In Cleaves,
Izzo gets the kind of star around whom
he can add supporting talent and show
his potential as both a recruiter and
blench coach.
It still translates into a lot of pres
sure to produce in a short time, but for
Izzo it’s the only option. Notice what
Illinois did last week in filling Lou
Henson’s job. They bypassed the loyal,
sentimental favorite, assistant Jimmy
Collins, and instead went out and got
Florida’s Lon Krueger.
In other words, the Illini made the
most of their reputation as a powerful
school in a powerful conference. They
launched a national search and came
up with an accomplished, highly
regarded young head coach.
They went after big game, and see if
it doesn’t translate into Illinois emerg
ing as a more consistent conference
power, one that might even hang
around more deeply into the NCAA
Tournament.
Big Ten schools should not be disap
pearing in the first weekend of March
Madness. Major Midwest universities,
sitting amid big cities and awash in
fine facilities and rich tradition, should
not have the trouble Big Ten schools
have been experiencing in putting top-
drawer basketball talent on the floor.
No one’s arguing that it isn’t nice,
here and there, to see a Mississippi
State cracking the Final Four. Or to
have marveled at the way a New
England school such as Massachusetts
has risen so dramatically.
But the Big Ten should also insist on
stepping up. Final Four trips are
always hard to land, but this is a con
ference that has no excuse for missing
so many NCAA regionals.
Krueger has to be licking his chops.
There’s a lot of underachievement out
there.
Maltby’s orders:
Shake things up
When Kirk Maltby arrived in Detroit
after being acquired from the
Edmonton Oilers for defenseman Dan
McGillis at the trading deadline, the
coaching staff sat him down and told him what was
expected.
What he heard wasn’t a surprise.
Not a big scorer, Maltby will be counted on to play
a physical game. In his first two-and-a-half NHL
seasons, Maltby, a 23-year-old right wing, has 21
goals, 38 points and 184 penalty minutes in 165
games.
Paul
Harris
“He’s a competi
tive guy,” said
Keith Primeau,
who appreciates
another physical
player to share
that load. “I
remember when I
played against him
in Edmonton. He made contact and wasn’t afraid to
go into the corner first.”
Maltby is listed at 6 feet and 180 pounds but
looks bigger.
On his first shift as a Wing, which came in last
Monday night’s 5-1 victory over Anaheim at Joe
Louis Arena, Maltby and linemates Primeau and
Stu Grimson created scoring chances and a ruckus
in the Duck zone with their physical play. They also
touched off a pushing and shoving match between
the two teams, which resulted in the Wings’ Marc
Bergevin getting into a fight \vith Anaheim’s David
Karpa.
Maltby’s not the big name many Wings fans were
clamoring for the team to obtain, but he’s another
rugged player who knows his role and won’t affect
the chemistry of the team.
“I think that grinding and hitting and stirring
things up are the best parts of my game,” said
Maltby. “And I’ll get my chances if I keep doing
that.”
One of the reasons Maltby is willing to play what-
Journal photo by REBECCA COOK
Kirk Maltby’s grinding, scrappy play is the reason the
Red Wings got him from Edmonton in last week’s trade.
ever role Detroit wants is because this will be his
first trip to the playoffs. The Oilers never made it to
the postseason in his first two seasons and are cur
rently battling for the final spot.
“To go from a team that was six or seven points
from a playoff spot to one of the best teams in the
league and that has a chance to win the Stanley
Cup is something else,” said Maltby, a native of
Guelph, Ontario, who also played with Owen Sound
in the Ontario Hockey League.
“I played against Kirk in junior,” said Darren
McCarty, who played with Belleville in the OHL.
“He’s the kind of guy who can put the puck in the
net, but he’s a hardworking guy and a grinder.”
As everybody knows, the Wings will need all of
those they can get come playoff time.
Tigers could hit the C-note
ADAMS from Page 40
Smith wasn’t satisfied with the Tigers farm system:
Two former No. 1 picks, infielder Matt Brunson and
pitcher Cade Gaspar, were traded.
The encouraging thing is that Smith isn’t going to
rush these players. They all got tryouts last
September in an open audition, and none were ready.
The discouraging thing is the players who will be at
Tiger Stadium this summer.
In the summer of 1975, Willie Horton had a won
derful season. He had 25 home runs, 92 RBI, a .275
batting average and no protection in the lineup. Cecil
Fielder is this year’s version of Horton, but at least he
has Travis Fryman and Chad Curtis to help him out.
As for the rest, second baseman Mark Lewis and
left fielder Melvin Nieves were once highly regarded
by their parent organizations, Cleveland and Atlanta.
The Tigers are the third team for each one, and there
are reasons for that. For Lewis, it’s a shaky glove. For
Nieves, it’s a low-average (.205 with 14 homers), high-
strikeout (88 in 234 at-bats) history. Then there’s
Brian Williams, another former Padre. He had a 6.00
ERA in 44 games last season. He’s the new closer.
Of the holdover homegrown youngsters, Bobby
Higginson adds hustle, power and a strong arm in
right field, but he still needs some seasoning. Chris
Gomez lost his starting shortstop job to Trammell
after committing 10 errors in 20 spring games. Not a
good sign for a team in the midst of a youth move
ment.
The team’s best pitcher is probably second-year
right-hander Felipe Lira, but there’s so little else that
perennial retread Scott Aldred is in the rotation. He’s
joined by Greg Gohr, a sore-armed former No. 1 pick
the Tigers have been waiting to develop for years.
If Smith stays patient and gets through this year,
the talent waiting in the minors might ripen. Pitchers
Justin Thompson and Mike Drumright could get
shots before the season is over, as well as newly-
acquired catcher Raul Casanova. As for Clark, Lima,
Nevin and Nitkowski, they shouldn’t be discouraged.
Chances are they’ll be back.


MARCH 31, 1996
THE DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 39
EASTERN
Central
CONFERENCE
W L Pet.
GB
x-Chicago
Indiana
Cleveland
DETROIT
Atlanta
Charlotte
Milwaukee
Toronto
Atlantic
61
43
40
39
39
35
21
18
W
8
28
30
30
31
34
49
52
L
.884
.606
.571
.565
.557
.507
.296
.257
Pet.
19
21X
22
m
26
40/
m
GB
x-Orlando
53
18
.746

New York
41
28
.594
11
Miami
36
34
.514
1614
Washington
32
39
.451
21
New Jersey
28
42
.400
241*
Boston
28
43
.394
25
Philadelphia
14
57
.197
39
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest
W
L
Pet.
GB
x-San Antonio
52
18
.743

x-Utah
50
20
.714
2
Houston
42
28
.600
10
Denver
29
41
.414
23
Minnesota
24
46
.343
28
Dallas
22
49
.310
301*
Vancouver
11
58
.155
40'/
Pacific
W
L
Pet.
GB
x-Seattle
55
15
.786

L.A. Lakers
44
25
.638
m
Phoenix
36
34
.514
19
Portland
34
35
.493
20X
Sacramento
30
38
.441
24
Golden State
31
40
.437
24 'A
LA. Clippers
26
44
.371
29
JJJjb'
5H[
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central
w
L
T
PtS.
x-DETROIT
57
12
5
119
x-Chicago
37
25
12
86
St. Louis
31
30
14
76
Toronto
30
34
12
72
Winnipeg
32
37
5
69
Dallas
24
37
13
61
Pacific
W
L
T
Pts.
x-Colorado
43
23
10
96
Calgary
31
32
11
73
Vancouver
29
32
15
73
Ahaheim
29
38
7
65
Edmonton
28
38
8
64
Los Angeles
21
38
17
59
San Jose
18
50
7
43
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Northeast
W
L
T
Pts.
x-Pittsburgh
45
25
4
94
Montreal
38
29
8
84
Boston
35
30
9
79
Hartford
30
34
9
69
Buffalo
28
39
7
63
Ottawa
15
55
4
34
Atlantic
W
L
T
Pts.
Philadelphia
39
22
13
91
N.Y. Rangers
38
21
14
90
Florida
38
27
9
85
Washington
36
29
10
82
New Jersey
34
28
12
80
Tampa Bay
33
29
11
77
N.Y. Islanders 20 45
x-clinched playoff berth
8
48
■ NBA and NHL standings do not include
Saturday’s results.
Correction
The date of Magic
Johnson’s Roundball
Classic, a high school
all-star basketball
game, was reported
incorrectly in last
week’s Detroit Sunday
Journal. The game will
be played Sunday,
April 14 at The Palace
in Auburn Hills. If you
hnvp ntiARfinnft rwm-
lJUS-Vt? will
ments or opinions, call
1-313-567-9818.
couch potato time
SUNDAY
Noon. NBA, New York at
Orlando, Channel 4. Magic’s
Anthony Bowie is out of time
outs.
12:30 p.m. Auto racing,
NASCAR Food City 500,
ESPN. At least this sponsor’s
name is pretty good.
2 p.m. Auto racing,
IndyCar Grand Prix of Aust
ralia, Channel 7. G’day for a
race, mate.
2:30 p.m. Golf, Players
Championship, final round,
Channel 4. Biggest tourna
ment to date on PGA Tour.
2:30 p.m. Basketball,
McDonald’s High School All-
American Game, Channel 62.
Michigan State recruit Ma-
teen Cleaves and Pershing’s
Winfred Walton will play.
3 p.m. NHL, St. Louis at
Detroit, Channel 2. Wings
won’t look for a tie this time.
4 p.m. Golf, Dinah Shore
Classic, final round, Channel
7. First LPGA major.
4 p.m. Tennis, Lipton Cha
mpionships, ESPN. Men’s
final.
6:30 p.m. College basket
ball, NCAA Women’s Tour
nament, championship game,
ESPN. It’s the title game.
Why not?
9 p.m. Baseball, Chicago
White Sox at Seattle, ESPN.
It might be March, but it’s
still Opening Night.
1 a.m. Auto racing,
Formula One Grand Prix of
Brazil, ESPN. Too late for a
taped race.
MONDAY
1 p.m. Baseball, New York
Yankees at Cleveland, ESPN.
Good Opening Day attrac
tion.
1 p.m. Baseball, San
Francisco at Atlanta, TBS.
First of many Braves games
on TV.
2:15 p.m. Baseball, San
Diego at Chicago Cubs, WGN.
Welcome back, Harry Caray.
4 p.m. Baseball, Detroit at
Minnesota, Channel 50.
George, A1 and a bunch of
nobodies on the field.
4 p.m. Baseball, Boston at
Texas, ESPN. Look for Roger
Clemens here.
9 p.m. College basketball,
NCAA Tournament, champi
onship game, Channel 62. An
anti-climax after UMass-
Kentucky? Maybe not.
TUESDAY
7:30 p.m. NHL, New
Jersey at New York Rangers,
ESPN. Old playoff rivals.
8 p.m. Baseball, Detroit at
Minnesota, Channel 50. With
these teams’ pitchers, game
could take a while.
8 p.m. NBA, Los Angeles
Lakers at Charlotte, TNT.
With Magic back, Lakers get
a lot of air time.
10 p.m. Baseball, Chicago
White Sox at Seattle, WGN.
For Sox, another season of
playing second fiddle to Cubs
on WGN.
10:30 p.m. NHL, Detroit
at San Jose, PASS. No need
for Wings to worry about
playoff date with Sharks this
season.
WEDNESDAY
2:15 p.m. Baseball, San
Diego at Chicago Cubs, WGN.
Holy cow!
7:30 p.m. Baseball, San
Francisco at Atlanta, ESPN.
Return of the champions.
7:30 p.m. NBA Charlotte
at Detroit, PASS. Hornets
fighting for playoffs; Pistons
preparing for them.
8 p.m. NBA, Orlando at
New York, TBS. Maybe John
Starks could punch Anthony
Bowie.
10:30 p.m. NHL, Detroit
at Los Angeles, Channel 50.
No Gretzky, no hope for
Kings.
THURSDAY
11 a.m. Women’s tennis,
Family Circle Cup, ESPN.
2:15 p.m. Baseball, Los
Angeles at Chicago Cubs,
WGN.
3 p.m. Golf, The Tradition,
first round, ESPN. A major
for seniors.
7:30 p.m. Baseball, San
Francisco at Atlanta, TBS.
8:30 p.m. NHL, Toronto at
St. Louis, ESPN. TTiese teams
might still be dealing if trade
deadline hadn’t passed.
8:30 p.m. NBA, Miami at
Chicago, WGN. Bulls’ quest
for 70 continues.
FRIDAY
11 a.m. Women’s tennis,
Family Circle Cup, ESPN.
1 p.m. Tennis, Davis Cup,
United States vs. Czech
Republic, ESPN. Singles
matches.
3 p.m. Golf, The Tradition,
second round, ESPN.
3:15 p.m. Baseball, Los
Angeles at Chicago Cubs,
WGN.
7:30 p.m. NBA, Detroit at
Philadelphia, Channel 50. A
small speed bump along
Pistons’ playoff road.
7:30 p.m. NHL,
Philadelphia at New York
Rangers, ESPN. These teams
might meet in playoffs.
7:30 p.m. Baseball, St.
Louis at Atlanta, TBS.
8 p.m. NBA, Chicago at
Charlotte, TNT. Hornets need
it, but that doesn’t matter.
10 p.m. Baseball, Chicago
White Sox at California,
WGN.
10:30 p.m. NHL, Detroit
at Anaheim, PASS. Duck
soup.
SATURDAY
Noon. Tennis, Davis Cup,
United States vs. Czech
Republic, ESPN. Doubles
match.
1 p.m. Women’s basket
ball, College All-Stars vs.
USA national team, Channel
7. Tune-up for Atlanta.
3 p.m. Bowling, PBA
Pennsylvania Open, Channel
7. Fans don’t change from
these lanes.
3 p.m. Golf, BellSouth
Classic, third round, Channel
62. At one time, this was the
Atlanta Classic.
4 p.m. Olympics, U.S.
Boxing Trials, Channel 4.
Punching for gold.
4 p.m. Baseball, Detroit at
Oakland, Channel 50.
5 p.m. Golf, The Tradition,
third round, ESPN.
7 p.m. Baseball, St. Louis
at Atlanta, TBS.
7:30 p.m. NHL, St. Louis
at Toronto, Channel 9. Call
these veteran teams.
10:30 p.m. NHL, Vancou
ver at Los Angeles, Channel
9. Everybody crowns these
Kings.

m
I
jjfS^
St.L.
3:00
Ch. 2
S.J.
10:30
PASS
L.A.
10:30
Ch. 50
Ana.
10:30
PASS
(|||)
Milw.
8:30
No TV
Char.
7:30
PASS
Phila.
7:30
Ch. 50
is
Minn.
4:05
Ch. 50
Minn.
8:05
Ch. 50
Minn.
1:15
No TV
Oak.
4:05
No TV
Oak.
10:05
No TV
Oak.
4:05
Ch. 50
Home games shaded.
Real heroes don’t swing bats, score goals
DYMSKI, From Page 40
Today, my hero is more likely to be a
father in the stands instead of a 50-
goal scorer.
Today, like many days since July 13,
my heroes are men and women whose
lives have been in turmoil because of
the strike against the Detroit
Newspaper Agency.
My hero is the uncle of one striking
worker who with each visit brings a
bag of groceries.
My hero is the father-in-law of anoth
er striker who leaves a check on the
kitchen table each Monday morning.
My hero is the mother of another
striking worker, whose son would
rather leave the state to find another
job than cross a picket line.
You know, it is easy to be a good hus
band or a good son when life is sweet,
bountiful.
When the paychecks roll in and your
health is good and your wife still loves
you and the dog still licks your hand,
how hard can it be?
And so my heroes are the spouses
who have stuck by us in this struggle.
The men and women whose love has
grown stronger, deeper.
If we are to understand and appreci
ate people for what they stand for, we
must see how the act in times of crisis.
Somewhere out on the West Coast,
where he now lives, Chris Gillespie still
has a soft spot in his heart for The
Mick. Chris Gillespie must have felt a
sense of pride, when before he died The
Mick admitted his failures, his weak
nesses.
Perhaps The Mick finally realized
that real heroes have fears, tears and
flaws.
Perhaps The Mick finally realized
that it is how people react to those
flaws that makes them heroes.
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Joe
Adams
Gary
Dymski
DETROIT SUNDAY JOURNAL
PAGE 40
MARCH 31, 1996
Lost summer?
Try 100 defeats
Journal photo by REBECCA COOK
Cecil Fielder has lost weight since last season, but the Tigers are hoping he'llbe a heavy
hitter once again in the middle of their lineup. The Tigers open in Minnesota on Monday.
The heroes of adulthood aren’t found in sporting life
Youth movement long overdue, but season
could be a repeat of1975 debacle for Tigers
on a brick or concrete wall? You pitched until some
thing went dead your arm or the rubber ball.
Whenever it had to do with imitating a major-lea-
guer, Chris Gillespie was Mickey Mantle, No. 7.
That Mantle was hobbled by wounded knees, old
age and what we later learned to be alcoholism
never mattered to Chris Gillespie.
It was that way with heroes in our neighborhood.
You had a hero, he was yours forever. You stuck
with him, whether he went down swinging or
cleared the short porch in right with a fly ball.
A hero was someone you trus J 1 , believed,
befriended. On his great plays you soared. On his
bad days you suffered. It was as if part of you were
on that field, running with him, urging him.
No matter what, this was your man, your hero.
You believed in what he did and how he did it.
So in whom do we believe as adults? Newt? The
Donald? Rush or Oprah? A sad lot, isn’t it?
Do any of us still blindly idolize A1 Kaline or
Gordie Howe or Dave Bing or Lem Barney for their
athletic grace and fury?
Forgive me for preaching, but when we grow older
and wiser, that childlike passion we had for our
heroes should be transferred to ideals and issues.
How many of us believe in an issue, a principle
with the same fervor we believed in our boyhood
heroes?
We might put money in an envelope on Sundays
or sign up at work for a United Way contribution,
but that isn’t nearly enough.
When you look at some of the real heroes of our
time you find a little person took a stand. Against
the odds. Against popular opinion. They risked their
future, in some cases, their very lives.
Parks. Mandela. Chavez. Walesa.
In comparison, Orr, Yzerman, Cash, Colavito don’t
move me very much any more.
Please see DYMSKI, Page 39
With Opening Day Monday
in Minneapolis, the ques
tion isn’t whether or not
the Tigers will finish last,
it’s whether they’ll lose fewer than 100
games.
The verdict here is no. The century
mark looks approachable for a team
that self-destructed in the second half
of last season, then made minimal
improvements during the offseason.
On the one hand, it’s good to see the
Tigers give up any pretense of being a
contender and plunge into a youth
movement. But there’s a great chance
here history could repeat itself. What
kind of history? Try 1975.
That season was the first in the
Tigers’ youth movement of the ‘70s. It
yielded a 59-103 record, including a
19-game losing streak. The team’s ace
pitchers were Ray Bare and Vern
Ruhle, and it was banking on a farm
system that was producing prospects
after a dry spell during the team’s
glory years of the late 1960s and early
‘70s.
The only problem was that the
prospects were named Danny Meyer,
Leon Roberts and Jack Pierce. They
were soon gone to other ports of call to
finish off their journeyman careers.
Meyer and Roberts each lasted a
decade in the majors, but they weren’t
players to build a team around.
The Class of 1975 proved to be a
false crop. The team struggled until
the cornerstone players of the ‘80s -
Jack Morris, Kirk Gibson, Lou
Whitaker, Alan Trammell, Dan Petry -
showed up a couple of years later.
It looks as if new Tigers general
manager Randy Smith has already
come to the conclusion that this Tigers
team could fit the false-crop descrip
tion. Witness the recent trade of Sean
Bergman to San Diego and the release
of John Doherty. Look around and
notice that Jose Lima, Tony Clark and
C.J. Nitkowski are at Triple-A Toledo,
and Phil Nevin is in Jacksonville,
learning how to be a catcher at the
Double-A level. One indication that
Please see ADAMS, Page 38
Chris Gillespie had to have The Mick, had to
be The Mick.
“If I can’t get Mantle, I won’t play. If I
can’t be Mantle, I won’t play.”
Since it seemed we always needed him to make
the teams
or some
game come
out even,
Chris
Gillespie
frequently
got his
wish.
Maybe it
was trading baseball cards. Maybe it was picking
jersey numbers for our summer baseball team. Or it
could have been that game we called strikeout in
our neighborhood. You remember the game where
you fired a rubber ball into a square scratched out