Clint Eastwood filmography

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An older man is at the center of the image smiling and looking off to the right of the image. He is wearing a white jacket, and a tan shirt and tie. The number 61 can be seen behind him on a background wall.
Eastwood at the 61st Annual Cannes Film Festival (2008)

Clint Eastwood is an American film actor, director, producer, and composer. He has appeared in over 60 films. After beginning his acting career exclusively with small uncredited film roles and television appearances, his career has spanned more than 60 years. Eastwood has acted in multiple television series, most notably the eight-season series Rawhide (1959–1965). Although he appeared in several earlier films, his breakout film role was as the Man with No Name in the Sergio Leone-directed Dollars Trilogy: A Fistful of Dollars (1964), For a Few Dollars More (1965), and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966). In 1971, Eastwood made his directorial debut with Play Misty for Me. Also that year, he starred as San Francisco police inspector Harry Callahan in the eponymous Dirty Harry. The film was immensely popular, spawning four more films: Magnum Force (1973), The Enforcer (1976), Sudden Impact (1983), and The Dead Pool (1988).

In 1973, Eastwood starred in another western, High Plains Drifter. Three years later, he starred as Confederate guerilla and outlaw Josey Wales in The Outlaw Josey Wales. Although it received largely negative reviews and was a departure from his typical genres, Eastwood starred opposite an orangutan in the action-comedy Every Which Way but Loose (1978). The film was a financial success, his highest-grossing film at that time, and spawned a sequel, Any Which Way You Can (1980).[1] In 1979, Eastwood starred in the Don Siegel-directed Escape from Alcatraz, starring as prisoner Frank Morris.

Eastwood's debut as a producer began in 1982 with two films, Firefox and Honkytonk Man. In 1985, Eastwood directed Pale Rider, which was the highest-grossing western of the 1980s.[2] Eastwood also has contributed music to his films, either through performing or composing. He lent his voice to a song in Paint Your Wagon, co-starring Lee Marvin, who also sings. He received the Academy Award for Best Director and Best Picture for his 1993 western Unforgiven.[3] In 2003, Eastwood directed an ensemble cast, including Sean Penn, Kevin Bacon, Tim Robbins, and Laurence Fishburne, in Mystic River. For their performances, Penn and Robbins respectively won Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor, making Mystic River the first film to win both categories since Ben Hur in 1959.[4] The following year, Eastwood once again won the Academy Awards for Best Picture and Director, this time for Million Dollar Baby (2004).[5] In 2006, he directed the companion war films Flags of Our Fathers and Letters from Iwo Jima, which depict the Battle of Iwo Jima from the American and Japanese perspective, respectively. In 2008, Eastwood directed and starred as protagonist Walt Kowalski in Gran Torino.

In 1996, Eastwood was a recipient of the AFI Life Achievement Award.[6] In 2006, he received the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film from the BAFTA.[7] A 2009 recipient, he was awarded the National Medal of Arts in 2010, the highest such honor given by the United States government.[8]

Film[edit]

Acting roles[edit]

A man with a stern look, dressed as a Western cowboy, looks off to the right of the image.
Eastwood as the Man with No Name in A Fistful of Dollars (1964)
A man is seen dressed as a Western cowboy. He has his right hand by his mouth, and is looking straight ahead.
Eastwood in For a Few Dollars More as the Man with No Name (1965)
A man is seen in a kissing position with a woman. The man is wearing a black suit with a white shirt, while the woman is wearing a red dress.
Eastwood with actress Susan Clark in Coogan's Bluff (1968)
Two men are standing near a movie set. They are both in talkative, yet relaxing positions.
Eastwood on the set of Breezy with actor William Holden (1973)
Two men are standing near a movie set. The one on the left of the image has a stern look, and the one on the right has glasses covering his eyes.
Eastwood during the filming of The Eiger Sanction (1975)
A man and a woman sit on a motorcycle. The man has glasses over his eyes, while the woman looks to the right of the image.
Eastwood with actress Sondra Locke in The Gauntlet (1977)
A man is seen looking into the viewfinder of a Panavision camera.
Eastwood on the set of The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976)
An older man in a white suit is smiling towards the left of the image. He has a black bowtie.
Eastwood at the 46th Cannes Film Festival (1993)
An older man in a gray suit looks towards the left of the image.
Eastwood at the premiere for J. Edgar in Washington D.C. (2011)
A younger man can be seen smiling towards the right of the image for a publicity photo.
Eastwood in a 1960s publicity photo
Table displaying Clint Eastwood's acting roles
Year Title Role Notes Ref.
1955 Revenge of the Creature Lab technician Jennings Uncredited [9]
Francis in the Navy Jonesy [10]
Lady Godiva of Coventry First Saxon Uncredited [11]
Tarantula! Jet squadron leader Uncredited [12]
1956 Never Say Goodbye Will Uncredited [13]
Star in the Dust Tom Uncredited [14]
Away All Boats Navy medic Uncredited [15]
The First Traveling Saleslady Lt. Jack Rice [16]
1957 Escapade in Japan Dumbo pilot Uncredited [17]
1958 Lafayette Escadrille George Moseley [18]
Ambush at Cimarron Pass Keith Williams [19]
1964 A Fistful of Dollars Man with No Name [20]
1965 For a Few Dollars More Man with No Name [21]
1966 The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Man with No Name [22]
1967 The Witches Carlo/Charlie[a] [23]
1968 Hang 'Em High Jed Cooper [24]
Coogan's Bluff Walt Coogan [25]
Where Eagles Dare Lt. Schaffer [26]
1969 Paint Your Wagon Pardner [27]
1970 Two Mules for Sister Sara Hogan [28]
Kelly's Heroes Pvt. Kelly [29]
1971 The Beguiled John McBurney [30]
Play Misty for Me David Garver Directorial debut [31]
Dirty Harry Harry Callahan [32]
1972 Joe Kidd Joe Kidd [33]
1973 High Plains Drifter The Stranger [34]
Breezy Man in crowd on pier Uncredited cameo role [35]
Magnum Force Harry Callahan [36]
1974 Thunderbolt and Lightfoot John 'Thunderbolt' Doherty [37]
1975 The Eiger Sanction Jonathan Hemlock [38]
1976 The Outlaw Josey Wales Josey Wales [39]
The Enforcer Harry Callahan [40]
1977 The Gauntlet Ben Shockley [41]
1978 Every Which Way but Loose Philo Beddoe [42]
1979 Escape from Alcatraz Frank Morris [43]
1980 Bronco Billy Bronco Billy McCoy [44]
Any Which Way You Can Philo Beddoe [45]
1982 Firefox Mitchell Gant [46]
Honkytonk Man Red Stovall [47]
1983 Sudden Impact Harry Callahan [48]
1984 Tightrope Wes Block [49]
City Heat Lt. Speer [50]
1985 Pale Rider Preacher [51]
1986 Heartbreak Ridge Gunnery Sgt. Thomas 'Gunny' Highway [52]
1988 The Dead Pool Harry Callahan [53]
1989 Pink Cadillac Tommy Nowak [54]
Gary Cooper: American Life, American Legend Host Documentary film [55]
1990 White Hunter Black Heart John Wilson [56]
The Rookie Nick Pulovski [57]
1992 Unforgiven William 'Will' Munny [58]
1993 In the Line of Fire Secret Service Agent Frank Horrigan [59]
A Perfect World Texas Ranger Red Garnett [60]
1995 The Bridges of Madison County Robert Kincaid [61]
Casper Himself Uncredited cameo role [62]
1997 Absolute Power Luther Whitney [63]
1999 True Crime Steve Everett [64]
2000 Space Cowboys Frank Corvin [65]
2002 Blood Work Terry McCaleb [66]
2004 Million Dollar Baby Frankie Dunn [67]
2008 Gran Torino Walt Kowalski [68]
2011 Kurosawa's Way Himself Documentary film [69]
2012 Trouble with the Curve Gus Lobel [70]
2014 American Sniper Church goer Uncredited cameo role [71]
2017 Sad Hill Unearthed Himself Documentary film [72]
2018 The Mule Earl Stone [73]
2021 Cry Macho Mike Milo [74]

Films directed or produced[edit]

Table displaying films directed and/or produced by Clint Eastwood
Year Film Functioned as Notes Ref.
Director Producer
1971 Play Misty for Me Yes No [75]
1973 High Plains Drifter Yes No [76]
Breezy Yes No [77]
1975 The Eiger Sanction Yes No [78]
1976 The Outlaw Josey Wales Yes No [79]
1977 The Gauntlet Yes No [80]
1980 Bronco Billy Yes No [81]
1982 Firefox Yes Yes [82]
Honkytonk Man Yes Yes [83]
1983 Sudden Impact Yes Yes [84]
1984 Tightrope Uncredited Yes [85]
1985 Pale Rider Yes Yes [86]
1986 Heartbreak Ridge Yes Yes [87]
1988 Bird Yes Yes [88]
Thelonious Monk: Straight, No Chaser No Yes Executive producer [89]
1990 White Hunter Black Heart Yes Yes [90]
The Rookie Yes No [91]
1992 Unforgiven Yes Yes [92]
1993 A Perfect World Yes No [93]
1995 The Bridges of Madison County Yes Yes [94]
The Stars Fell on Henrietta No Yes [95]
1997 Absolute Power Yes Yes [96]
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil Yes Yes [97]
1999 True Crime Yes Yes [98]
2000 Space Cowboys Yes Yes [99]
2002 Blood Work Yes Yes [100]
2003 Mystic River Yes Yes [101]
2004 Million Dollar Baby Yes Yes [102]
2005 Budd Boetticher: A Man Can Do[b] No Yes Executive producer [104]
2006 Flags of Our Fathers Yes Yes [105]
Letters from Iwo Jima Yes Yes [106]
2008 Changeling Yes Yes [107]
Gran Torino Yes Yes [108]
2009 Invictus Yes Yes [109]
2010 Hereafter Yes Yes [110]
Dave Brubeck: In His Own Sweet Way No Yes Executive producer [111]
2011 J. Edgar Yes Yes [112]
2012 Trouble with the Curve No Yes [113]
2014 Jersey Boys Yes Yes [114]
American Sniper Yes Yes [115]
2016 Sully Yes Yes [116]
2017 Indian Horse No Yes Executive producer [117]
2018 The 15:17 to Paris Yes Yes [118]
The Mule Yes Yes [119]
2019 Richard Jewell Yes Yes [120]
2021 Cry Macho Yes Yes [121]

Song credits[edit]

Table displaying Clint Eastwood's song credits
Year Film Functioned as Song title(s) Ref.
Singer Composer Lyricist
1969 Paint Your Wagon Yes No No "I Still See Elisa", "I Talk to the Trees", "Gold Fever", & "Best Things"[c] [122]
1980 Bronco Billy Yes No No "Bar Room Buddies"[d] [123]
Any Which Way You Can Yes No No "Beers to You"[e] [124]
1982 Honkytonk Man Yes No No "When I Sing About You", "No Sweeter Cheater Than You", & "In the Jailhouse Now"[f] [125]
1984 City Heat Yes No No "Montage Blues"[g] [126]
1986 Heartbreak Ridge No No Yes "How Much I Care"[h] [127]
1993 A Perfect World No Yes No "Big Fran's Baby" [128]
1995 The Bridges of Madison County No Yes No "Doe Eyes" [129]
1997 Absolute Power No Yes No "Power Waltz" & "Kate's Theme" [130]
1999 True Crime No No Yes "Why Should I Care"[i] [131]
2006 Flags of Our Fathers No No Yes "The Photograph", "Wounded Marines", "Armada Arrives", "Goodbye Ira", "Inland Battle", "Flag Raising", "The Medals", "Platoon Swims", "Flags Theme", "End Titles Guitar", & "End Titles" [132]
2007 Grace Is Gone No No Yes "Grace Is Gone" [133]
2008 Gran Torino Yes No Yes "Gran Torino"[j] [134]

Score credits[edit]

Table displaying Clint Eastwood's score credits
Year Title Notes Ref.
2003 Mystic River [135]
2004 Million Dollar Baby [136]
2006 Flags of Our Fathers Kyle Eastwood and Michael Stevens also composed alongside Eastwood, but were uncredited. [137]
2007 Grace Is Gone [138]
2008 Changeling [139]
2010 Hereafter [140]
2011 J. Edgar [141]

Television[edit]

A man and a woman stand near each other, both wearing Western cowboy outfits. They are both smiling, as they stand in what appears to a movie set.
Eastwood with Nina Foch on the set of Rawhide (1959)

In the early stages of his acting career, Eastwood played several small roles in episodes for several television shows. This list includes appearances in various episodes of fictional shows, and excludes appearances as himself on talk shows, interview shows, ceremonies, and other related media.

Acting roles[edit]

Table displaying Clint Eastwood's action roles on television
Year Title Role Notes Ref.
1955 Allen in Movieland Orderly TV film [142]
Highway Patrol Joe Keeley Episode: "Motorcycle A" [143]
1956 Death Valley Days John Lucas 2 episodes [144]
TV Reader's Digest Lt. Wilson Episode: "Cochise, Greatest of the Apaches" [145]
1957 The West Point Story Cadet Bob Salter Episode: "White Fury" [146]
1958 Navy Log Burns Episode: "The Lonely Watch" [147]
1959 Maverick Red Hardigan Episode: "Duel at Sundown" [148]
Alfred Hitchcock Presents Newsman Episode: "Human Interest Story" [149]
1959–1965 Rawhide Rowdy Yates 217 episodes [150]
1962 Mister Ed Himself Episode: "Clint Eastwood Meets Mister Ed" [151]
1991 Here's Looking at You, Warner Bros. Host / Narrator TV film documentary [152]

Shows directed or produced[edit]

Table displaying television programs directed by Clint Eastwood
Year Title Director Executive
producer
Notes Ref.
1985 Amazing Stories Yes No Episode: "Vanessa in the Garden" [153]
2003 The Blues Yes No Episode: "Piano Blues" [154]
2009 Johnny Mercer: The Dream's On Me No Yes [155]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The character was renamed Charlie in the film's English rerelease.
  2. ^ An alternate and shorter version of the film was released under the title Budd Boetticher: An American Original.[103]
  3. ^ Eastwood sung "Best Things" with Lee Marvin and Ray Walston.
  4. ^ With Merle Haggard.
  5. ^ With Ray Charles.
  6. ^ Eastwood sung "In the Jailhouse Now" with John Anderson, David Frizzell, and Marty Robbins.
  7. ^ With Mike Lang and Pete Jolly.
  8. ^ Co-written with Sammy Cahn.
  9. ^ Co-written with Carole Bayer Sager and Linda Thompson.
  10. ^ Credited for writing but uncredited for singing.

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

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Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]