Bristol Post - 2021-09-17
Bristol Post 2021-09-17

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Bristol Post

2021-09-17

17. Sep 2021
English
152 Pages

okd fashion | film | recipes | bookS issue 482 staying in & going out FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Peter Also inside Psychedelic furs, simon amstell & a midsummer night’s dream plus your 7-day tv listings perfect Peter andre chats to us as he gets ready to perform in Grease at the bristol hippodrome

01st Oct Sidmouth - 5 days £455.00pp 22nd Oct Autumn Colours - 2 days £199.00pp 25th Oct South Downs - 5 days £459.00pp 13th Nov Thursford - 3 days £380.00pp includes visits to Torquay, Donkey Sanctuary, Teignmouth and Weymouth. Visit Batsford Arboretum & Coughton Court. Staying in Chichester, visit Bluebell Railway, High Tea Spinnaker Tower & St Mary’s House. Tickets to the Christmas Spectacular, Norfolk Broads Cruise. 29th Nov Festive St Anne’s - 5 days £435.00pp 05th Dec Chatsworth at Christmas - 2 days £225.00pp 11th Dec Christmas at Windsor Castle - 2 days £199.00pp 23rd Dec Christmas in Norfolk - 5 days £729.00pp Christmas themed events, Blackpool Tower Tea dance, Ribble Valley Tour & Chester. Entrance to Chatsworth house, visit Stratford-Upon-Avon. Entrance to castle + free day London. Staying in Kings Lynn. Trip to Pantomime, scenic tour & festive foods & entertainment. 04th Feb Mystery Tour - 4 days £345.00pp 05th Mar Mountbatten Festival of Music - 2 days £255.00pp 07th Mar Cornwall All inclusive - 5 days £495.00pp 28th Mar Sidmouth - 5 days £470.00pp includes entertainment & excursions. The rest is a mystery. Festival at the Albert Hall + free day in London. Staying in Newquay - Visit Eden Project, Padstow, St ives , Entertainment, Pack lunches + Free bar in evening. Trips include Torquay, Donkey Sanctuary, Exeter & Bickleigh Mill.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 3 hellothere INSIDE. 8 4 Big Interview We meet the team behind Brown Rock Market Garden, who supply organic veg to a host of Bristol shops TO ADVERTISE Tracie Simms tracie.simms@reachplc.com 01179343165 ON THE COVER Peter Perfect Peter Andre in Grease - see pages 10&11 Photography: Sean Ebsworth Barnes CONTRIBUTORS Natalie Banyard, Mark Taylor, Tim Foster, Jeffrey Davies, Chris Rundle, Bee Bailey, and Rob Campbell Food & dRINK Jamie Oliver shares recipes from his new cookbook for meals made for get-togethers 12 what’s On The Psychedelic Furs are back - Mark Taylor looks ahead to their Bristol gig 24 books Actor David Harewood talks about psychosis, racism and how American TV saved him Corrections & Complaints If we have published anything that is factually inaccurate please contact the editor, Bill Martin, via email bill.martin@reachplc.com or write to The Editor, Bristol Post, 1 Temple Way, Bristol, BS2 0BY. Once verified, we will correct it as soon as possible. The Bristol Post newspaper is published by Local World a subsidiary company of Reach PLC, which is a member of IPSO, the Independent Press Standards Organisation. We adhere to the Editors’ Code of Practice as enforced by IPSO, who are contactable for advice at IPSO, GateHouse, 1 Farringdon Street, London EC4M 7LG. Website http://www. ipso.co.uk, telephone 0300 123 2220, email advice@ipso.co.uk If you have a complaint concerning a potential breach of the Code of Practice, we will deal with your complaint directly or IPSO can refer your complaint to us. Please go to http://www.@reachplc.com/ howtocomplain where you can view our Complaints Policy and Procedure. A ‘How to Complain’ pack is also available by writing to the Legal and Compliance Department, Reach PLC,One Canada Square, Canary Wharf,London E14 5AP. 30 tv highlights Bake Off is back on our screens this week - Prue Leith and Paul Hollywood give us the lowdown IN YOUR AREA Get everything you need to know about where you live with our app or via InYourArea.co.uk

4 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Big Feature Seasons to be cheerful On a one-acre plot in North Somerset, Brown Rock Market Garden grows East Friesian palm kale, ananas noire, turnips and tomatoes. BEE BAILEYchats about pollinators, pesticides and lunch WHEN Ria Marshall and Anna Barrett stop for lunch in the middle of their working day, there are no sandwiches with curled up edges, or plastic boxes filled with last night’s leftovers, and definitely nothing grabbed from the supermarket on the way in - it’s a freshly prepped salad or something inspired by Japanese cooking, some succulent tomatoes straight off the vine, leaves that have been picked in the last few minutes, beans that are popped straight out of the pod in to the pan. Lunch when you’re growing your own seasonal veg in a market garden is something to look forward to all morning. “We eat lunch together on the farm every day we’re working here,” says Anna, from Brown Rock Market Garden. “One of us just takes half an hour to rustle something up and we eat whatever is in season, whatever’s fresh. Most of the time we are totally spoilt for choice. “At the moment we’ve got some lovely tomatoes; you slice them and have some olive oil and some salt and fresh basil from the polytunnels, and have some bread and you’re away. It’s very simple food but very delicious.” Ria, 31, started Brown Rock Market Garden in Tickenham, North Somerset in 2019, running it on her own for the first season. Anna, 37, joined two seasons ago and it’s now run equally between them. The friends met through mutual acquaintances in the horticulture world, having both changed course from other careers, Ria from working as a special effects prosthetic artist in film and TV, Anna as a lighting designer in theatre. Anna still enjoys doing some freelance work in the industry, but felt disconnected when working long hours in dark theatres with nothing but a single spotlight shining. Now she embraces being out in all weathers on the farm. “I wanted to be much more in connection with the outdoors and the weather and nature and do something that was quite physical as well as mentally challenging,” she says. “I was indoors an awful lot. You go into a room and turn the lights off, and then you put a light on and sit in that room with just one light on for the whole day. With growing work, I find I’ve got much more of a sense of the natural rhythm of the seasons.” It’s around May that things start getting exciting, when the new crops start coming through and lunch is all Anna Barrett enjoys the physical hard work and tranquility at Brown Rock Market Garden in Tickenham Picture: copyright Paul Blakemore, Instagram @blikmo about the first taste of something neither of them have eaten since last year. “We both eat seasonally because we know what food that’s in season tastes like – it’s a bit of a curse, you can’t really eat stuff out of season once you’ve had it,” Anna says. “The first tomatoes are a real thing. They’re super sweet, juicy, and fresh and absolutely epitomise the time of year. “With some crops like chard or radishes, you plant them and you get a crop off of them quite quickly. Whereas with tomatoes, you put these thing things in the ground and then you wait, and wait, and wait, and they grow, and grow, and grow, then they make some little flowers, then they make the fruit, the fruit gets bigger and it has to get ripe and then you finally get to eat it. That is why it’s so special. “When you haven’t tasted it since last year, you can remember where you were when you had the first tomato on previous years. It’s a really nice marker of passing time.” With just under an acre of rented land, this all-woman team produces a tasty crop of vegetables to organic standards, planting four or five different things in the beds over the course of a year, working exclusively with hand tools, and to the natural rhythm of the seasons, with no pesticides, extra heat or artificial light. By choosing to stay small scale, they can work the way they want to. Every bit of soil is dug by hand, every seed is planted by hand, every weed pulled up by hand, and every piece of food harvested by hand. With no need to leave room for tractors and machinery between the beds, Anna says they can also cram more produce into the space. That, in turn, gives them the luxury of having a wildflower grass meadow strip along the edge of the veg plot where pollinators thrive. “It’s a great place for all the beneficial insects to live, which means you’ve got pest control for the things that would eat your veg – ground beetles eat slug eggs; crickets are hosts for parasitic wasps which will predate on aphids,” Anna says. “A lot of places just maximise productivity so would have another row of cabbages there, but we’re such small scale that it’s really important to us to look after the eco system so it can help us look after our crops. “We’ve seen grass snakes, toads, voles, there are often birds of prey wheeling around in the summer – it’s alive with wildlife. You’re often just out picking vegetables and it’s buzzing. It’s pretty idyllic really, quite an amazing spot.” As well as being beautiful, the site, which overlooks the start of the Somerset Levels, has alluvial soil, rich and free draining, that has drawn other market garden growers to the area in the past. “It’s nice to work,” Anna says of the soil. “It’s what old school farmers call boys’ soil because it’s supposed to be so easy to farm on that even a boy could do it. We call it smug soil.” Maintaining good soil health is key for Ria and Anna, something that helps their pledge to make everything ecologically grown. For Anna, the proactive decision to work in a way that predates the invention of pesticides is significant. “It feels like there’s a huge amount of chemicals and external input in what we call modern agriculture, though that has only really been the way we’ve done it since post-Second

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 5 Big Feature From left: Chard ’Rhubarb’ and ‘canary’, squash ‘Delicata’, parsley ‘Italian giant’, tomato ‘San Marzano’, courgette ‘Goldy’, cucumber ‘Akito’, beetroot boro, onion ’Long Red Florence’, runner bean ‘Helda’, sweet pepper ‘Long Red Marconi’, kale ‘Dazzling Blue’, spring onion ‘Ishikura’ grown at Brown Rock Market Garden Picture: copyright Rhiannon Marshall @brown.rock.market.garden I wanted to be much more in connection with the outdoors and the weather and nature and do something that was quite physical as well as mentally challenging Anna Barrett, on switching careers to work Brown Rock Market Garden World War when pesticides and fertilisers were created, because they had a lot of chemicals left over from making munitions in the war. The more degraded the soil gets, the more fertiliser you need to put on, so it’s a never-ending cycle. “I love food and I’m a big fan of nature so it makes lots of sense to farm organically.” With an eye on maintaining consistency and quality throughout the season Brown Rock Market Garden has a select number of about 15 lines, including salad which has 30 different varieties within it. Their produce supplies shops and restaurants in the Bristol and North Somerset area, catering to the needs of chefs by growing unusual veg and leaving tops on crops. “We’ve got four different types of tomatoes at the moment, like tomatillos – Mexican green tomatoes that come in a papery case. They are delicious. They taste very sharp, almost zingy, a limey tomato,” Anna says. “We’ve got different types of kale: one really tall, it’s about six foot now; East Friesian curly kale that looks like a palm tree. Then we have lots of successional sowings of different things, which is when you have something like eight different sowings so you’ve got a steady stream of something. We’ve got spring onions, fennel, earlier in the year we Ria Marshall, left with Houdini the chicken, and Anna Barrett, right, run Brown Rock Market Garden on a plot overlooking the start of the Somerset Levels in Tickenham Picture: copyright Paul Blakemore, Instagram @blikmo had lots of radish and little gem lettuce heads. “We’ve got a lovely salad mix which changes weekly. In autumn you’ll have spicy mustards, in the spring, endives, and in the winter chicories, which are a bit more bitter and also delicious. They are amazing colours, bright pinks, and reds and stripy. “And then you have all sorts of fancy bits, pea shoots, perennial salad like salad burnet, which tastes a bit cucumber-y and has a lovely frilly-shaped leaf. There’s buckshorn plantain, we do things like beetroot and chard leaf and kale leaf but we sow them close together and that makes really small, quite tender leaves. “There’s agretti, it’s a bit like an Italian samphire. We sell those to chefs and put the tips of it in the salad mix. It’s hard to come by and I think chefs always like something that is unusual and looks good on the plate. It is quite succulent… a bit like eating a houseplant! It’s got that crunchy, succulent texture to it which it maintains when it’s cooked,” she says. “Chefs love the fennel. We sell it with the tops on so you get two crops for the price of one; you can use it for flavouring in dishes and then you’ve got the bulb at the bottom. We sell our beetroots bunched with the tops on and you can just use the tops as you would use chard. “It’s interesting having conversations with the chefs and the people who run veg shops, who are all very much on board with what we do. We can make sure things are packaged in the way they want. There’s beauty in that detail.” While Brown Rock Market Garden is thriving on a relatively small plot, the ethos is big – encouraging people to buy as much local produce as possible. “We don’t want people to be trying to buy our food from far away,” Anna says. “It’s about supporting local producers. “We’re not going to feed the world. We’ve chosen to stay this scale and do things at this scale because it suits us and it allows us to take good care of what we have. It’s definitely important that there are other scales of growers out there, mid-scale and large-scale growers are super important – we are just trying to do our little bit.” ■■Follow Brown Rock Market Garden @brown.rock.market. garden on Instagram. ■■The produce can be found in shops including Hugo’s Greengrocer Deli on Bedminster Parade and North Street, Bristol; and The Public Market food store and deli in Easton, Bristol.

6 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 opinion VOICES OF THE WEST COUNTRY ROB CAMPBELL A few older folk tell me they are now a little more inclined to catch a train into town and scoot to appointments Riding an electric scooter need not be a political statement, but it sometimes feels that way in an era where everyone is apparently divided into two camps. One camp is leftie or woke or whatever the label is this week, and the other right-wing and reactionary and the rest. An item appeared in the news last week about a group of Bristol City councillors demanding an end to the trial of e-scooters, warning of chaos on the roads and risk of accidents. Guess which party hates the scooters? The Greens, Lib Dems, Labour? The anarchists, revolutionary communists, tree-huggers or the monster raving loony party faction? It is instead, and utterly predictably the Conservatives, but they do have a point about the roads in Bristol and Bath. On my visits to those cities, I have to battle for space on roads clogged with people weaving in and out, some so recklessly that they must presumably be drunk or drugged. Parking is so bad that pedestrians frequently have to walk in the road. That’s just the cars. The scooters, which were introduced across the area as a trial, cause their own problems too. It’s the people, though, who worry me. It feels as if you can divide the anti and pro scooter folk along ideological lines with such depressing predictability that every other view they hold would fall into place. Scooterists are also Remainers, cyclists, happy about same-sex marriage, pro-immigration, and they applauded the toppling of Colston’s statue while eating an organic bean-burger. They also want everyone to go to university and do media studies. They like wearing masks, too. Their opponents are just as easy to define, wanting mostly to bring back everything. The empire, hanging, racist jokes, proper food, proper wars, women who do ironing, smoking in pubs, ties for chaps, no more masks and The Black and White Minstrel Show. They would turn the trendier universities in to re-education camps for people who drink oat milk and convert their playing fields into golf courses. It looks like ‘culture wars’, that American disease that we caught during Brexit, with scooters just being another weapon in that tedious division of our nation in to two mutually suspicious tribes. The truth about anything is, of course, more complicated than that. Take those scooters: there are real doubts about whether they are directly replacing car journeys and are, instead, making people less fit because they use them instead of walking or cycling. But even that seems perhaps a little short-sighted. Anecdotally, because there seems little longer-term research so far, it seems possible that having a scooter handy could delay - perhaps permanently - a decision to buy a car. In my own un-scientific survey, young people have told me that the availability of everything from scooters to cycle lanes means they cannot see the point in having four wheels to move around at 10mph on city streets with nowhere to park. A few older folk, too, tell me they are now just a little more inclined to catch a train into town and scoot to their appointments, rather than join the hordes of angry people on the M32. In each case that’s one less lump of metal threatening the lives of the rest of us. Scooters are also fun and we have had precious little of that these past 18 months of pandemic, but fun can’t be counted. The best news of all, though, from people who actually do proper research, is that the polarisation of us into those tribes more widely might not be quite as bad as it looks. There’s a wonderful organisation out there called More In Common which, among other things, studies the links that bind us together. They have, for example, a recent podcast called We Are Not As Divided As We Think. They look at evidence, rather than just shouting on social media. They found recently that “most people believe cultural change is a central part of the British story, and something that they embrace…there is a particular ‘British way’ of doing change, that allows space for people to ask questions, to voice their opinions, and to learn from their mistakes. People are deeply concerned that the way politicians and campaigners are inflaming culture wars is undermining that British approach to change.” Goodness me. There are dangers in all this polarisation, far more serious than some clogged pavements and broken ankles from the scooter wave, but it seems we don’t really hate each other so much after all. Somewhere out there is a Tory riding a scooter en route to a Black Lives Matter protest, and a vegetarian driving a massive car to a golf course while laughing at Jim Davidson jokes. Or maybe not quite, but it’s a nice thought.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 7 Food & Drink CHRIS RUNDLE The house move did not go down well with the grape vines, says chris rundle guinea fowl with black grapes (Serves 4) INGREDIENTS One guinea fowl, quartered; three tablespoons brandy; 50g butter; dash of olive oil; one large (about 400g) bunch black grapes; 75g raisins soaked overnight in four tablespoons of port; sea salt; freshly ground black pepper 3. Arrange the raisins and grapes around them, cover and cook for an hour, remove the lid and return to the oven for 15 minutes at 180C gas mark 4 before serving. METHOD 1. Heat the oven to 190C gas mark 5. Season the guinea fowl joints well. Using a large casserole with a tight-fitting lid heat the butter and oil until sizzling, add the joints and cook singly until browned all over. 2. Place all the joints in the pan, pour in the brandy and flame. Soak the raisins chicken and grape tagine (Serves 4) INGREDIENTS Four free-range chicken legs; large bunch (about 400g) black grapes; 50g raisins; two onions; three garlic cloves; four branches flat-leaved parsley; 10 branches coriander; teaspoon each ground ginger and turmeric; two pinches saffron; 20g butter; two tablespoons olive oil; sea salt; freshly ground black pepper 4. Add the grapes and cook for a further 20 minutes, check the seasoning and serve topped with chopped parsley and coriander. My friend Tony was thin to the point that if he ate a grape you’d think he’d developed a hernia. Not that he would find as much as a single specimen in the garden this year, sadly. It’s the vine, you see. We brought it with us when we moved; a veteran of some seven seasons which had been providing us with a moderate crop of juicy black grapes every autumn – as long as we got to them before the blackbirds did. The blackbirds which, naturally, barely gave the food we had put out for them on the bird table as much as a glance as they flew past it on the way to perform their predations. We were very keen to bring it with us so I asked Keith, who gave us a hand in the garden now and then, how we should go about it. Dig it up while it’s dormant and put it in a big tub and then get it into the ground as soon as you get to the new place, he said. Then, he said, walking around the vine and observing it closely, one of two things will happen. I awaited the delivery of the next, succinct nugget of horticultural wisdom distilled from his years of experience. Yeah, he said. Either it will be OK - or it will die. He didn’t say anything about sulking. And sulking is definitely what the vine has been doing since we got here. We found a nice, sheltered spot with a southerly aspect to plant it. We prepared the soil well and made sure it was draining properly so the vine didn’t have to sit around with wet roots. We eased it in, replaced the soil around it, watered it and provided it with a couple of strong canes for support. And that vine just sulked. It visibly sulked. Clearly it was upset because we hadn’t asked its opinion about moving house and particularly about whether it minded being dug up, shoved into a pot, taken on a rattling journey with all the other garden pots and finally deposited in totally unfamiliar surroundings. There may have been other issues. Perhaps it didn’t like the neighbours. Perhaps their dog was too noisy. Perhaps it didn’t like having to look at a washing line two or three yards away. Perhaps it was just homesick and missing the company of the Grapes are great in savory dishes, as Chris’ recipes show this week raspberries that used to grow next to it. Anyway, it was weeks into the spring (and almost at the point where we had given up hope and concluded that Keith’s more pessimistic option had come true) when it finally decided to wake up, put out a bud or two and reluctantly (and you could almost hear it huffing and puffing about it) start to produce some branches. But fruit? Not a chance. Not this year. Not after all we have put it through. Its outrage may have dissipated by next year but in the meantime I shall have to step round to the greengrocer for a supply of grapes to use in some unlikely, but delicious pairings. The first for guinea fowl, one of two poultry breeds named after its place of origin. In this case the area formerly known as the Guinea Coast in Africa. The other is the turkey, but that of course is a misnomer. The birds originally came from the New World: Turkey was merely the last port of call before London for the spice ships bringing them here. METHOD 1. Peel and chop the onions and garlic, chop the herbs and wash the grapes. 2. Heat the butter and oil in a large casserole with a closefitting lid and sweat the onions until translucent. 3. Season the chicken well and brown for two minutes. Sprinkle in the saffron, turmeric and ginger and cook for a further five minutes, turning frequently. Add the garlic, herbs and raisins and season well then pour in 300ml of water, bring up to a boil, cover and simmer very gently for 30 minutes, adding a little more water if necessary. grape and apple pickle Not a long-keeping condiment but quick and easy to prepare and great with cold meat and pâté INGREDIENTS 500g green grapes; one large eating apple; 150g sultanas; 150g trimmed spring onions; 100g golden caster sugar; 200ml cider vinegar; 50g piece ginger root METHOD 1. Wash the grapes, halve and remove the pips. Finely chop the Season the chicken legs onions, peel the ginger and cut into fine juliennes. Peel, quarter and de-core the apple and cut into small dice. 2. Place the vinegar and sugar in a pan and bring to the boil then add the remaining ingredients. Return to the lowest possible simmer and cook very gently for 30 minutes, stirring now and then. 3. Allow to cool in the pan and decant into a sterilised jar for storage.

8 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Food & Drink RAISE A GLASS WITH JANE CLARE What a few days. I’ve been hot (phew, a September sun), I’ve been rained on (lots and lots). Who knows what the weather gods will be throwing around by the time you’re reading this. But those few days have also been perfect. I’ve been “out out” – not in a posh frock and lipstick sense – but in a wine sense. I’ve met real wine people at live tasting events. Bordeaux Day was a joy, and for the first time, I had the chance to taste the wines in the latest Bordeaux Hot 50. I brought you one of them just a couple of weeks ago: Château Pey de Faure 2019 (£12.99, online at Averys). I’ve now met its wine friends, all of them highlighting the modern approach adopted by Bordeaux winemakers – whether through their techniques or sustainable practices. The Hot 50 wines are under £25 and chosen to be approachable and appealing. If you’re nervous about trying new wines they’re a great place to start exploring the diversity of the region. Here are three: A sparkling, a white and a red. I love a drop of fizz and Premius Crémant de Bordeaux Brut (£RRP £10-£12, Slurp) is gorgeous. The grapes sémillon, muscadelle and cabernet sauvignon have been cajoled into creating a wine with aromas of fresh and baked apples, toasty bread and baking spice. It is fresh, characterful and zesty. One of my favourite whites of the day was Château Argadens 2019 (£12.50, tanners-wines.co.uk). It’s vegan, and the vineyards are managed in a way which increases biodiversity and decreases any negative environmental impact. It is also very enjoyable. The white is a blend of sauvignon blanc (which takes the lead role in this palate performance) and sémillon. The aromas just keep on giving; tangy citrus, especially grapefruit. A savoury edge adds depth and interest. The flavours zing and twist and delight. As for the red, there were many to choose from, but for this missive I’ve opted for Roc de Lussac 2019 (£7.75, Sainsbury’s). The wine is from the Saint-Emilion appellation where the fruitily plummy merlot grape dominates. Cabernet sauvignon and cabernet franc are the blending partners in this wine which speaks of red and black fruits, and spice. Tannins play their part in an undemanding way. ■■The Bordeaux Hot 50 list is online at bordeaux.com/gb/selection ■■Jane is a member of the Circle of Wine Writers. Find her on social media and online as One Foot in the Grapes. Jamie Oliver is an absolute machine. The celebrity chef – no longer ‘naked’, but very much clothed and still campaigning for us all to cook (stress-free) from scratch at home – is back with a new recipe collection, Together. While not all five of his children are featured on the cover (three are, we get the sense the teenagers have bowed out this time around), this book is all about feeding the people you love. With most people now vaccinated and social restrictions lifted, Jamie is betting people will be eager to host dinner parties, brunches and holiday gatherings. His 25th cookbook shows readers how to throw a big party in true Oliver fashion – without too much fuss, so the cook can have fun, too. The emphasis is on sharing delicious meals together rather than spending all your time stressed in the kitchen and it is packed full of tasty, comforting dishes that require minimum preparation. Jamie says: “Together is a real homage to the great home feast, something I have really missed sharing with friends and family over the past year. “So many people find real joy in a shared meal, have rediscovered a love of cooking or perhaps even given it a go for the first time. “I wanted the recipes to feel like a culinary light at the end of the tunnel, where food can be enjoyed and savoured. “This is about giving you an excuse to get the people you love around the table again.” As is usually the case nowadays, the cookbook is tied to a new television series. In each episode of Channel 4’s Jamie Oliver: Together, the chef will take us through the recipes step by step, making them for his Ingredients: 1tbsp quinoa; 1tbsp frozen edamame beans; 100g crunchy veg, such as cucumber, sugar snap peas, mangetout, carrots; 2 level tsps white miso paste; 2tsps rice wine vinegar; 1 fresh chilli; 1cm piece of ginger; 1 lime; 2tsps sesame oil; 2tsps low-salt soy sauce; 2tsps sesame seeds; 200g super-fresh chunky tuna steak, from sustainable sources Optional: 2 sprigs of shiso, mint or basil GET AHEAD: You can prep all this on the day, if you prefer. Method: 1. Cook the quinoa in plenty of water according to the packet instructions, adding the edamame for the last 2 minutes, then drain and cool. Take time to prep your crunchy veg – it’s nice to have a mixture, so use up any veg from the fridge – and finely slice everything as delicately as you can. 2. Muddle the miso into the rice vinegar, then scrunch with the prepped It’s (dinner) party time! Dedicated to NHS staff, the impact of the pandemic is a thread that Jamie picks up on throughout. In the first episode the chef prepares a feast for people doing volfamily and friends, so we can make them for ours. Whether it’s hosting a beautiful curry night, summery feast, or a celebration meal, Jamie’s got you covered. Jamie Oliver in an image from his new book Together Jamie Oliver’s new recipe book, Together, is a homage to the great home feast. The chef reveals why it’s the perfect time to entertain once again veg, quinoa and edamame – flavours will develop and deepen overnight. 3. To make a dressing, deseed and finely chop the chilli and place in a clean jam jar. Peel and finely grate in ginger, squeeze in lime juice, then add sesame oil and soy and pop the lid on. 4. Toast the sesame seeds in a non-stick frying pan on a high heat until lightly golden, tossing regularly, then remove. Sear the tuna for just 20 seconds on each side and edge, turning with tongs. Leave to cool. Cover and refrigerate the veg and tuna overnight. TO SERVE: If you’ve prepped ahead, get everything out of the fridge 15 minutes before serving. Finely slice the tuna and arrange around a platter. Pile the dressed veg in the centre, shake up the dressing and spoon over the tuna. Finish with the herb leaves (if using), and toasted sesame seeds. ■■ENERGY 253kcal; FAT 12.7g; SAT FAT 2.5g; PROTEIN 17.7g; CARBS 7.6g; SUGARS 2.6g; SALT 1.2g; FIBRE 1.8g Together is a real homage to the great home feast, something I have really missed sharing with friends and family over the past year. Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver on his new TV series and book untary work through the pandemic, from helping at food banks and vaccination centres to sewing PPE. The centrepiece of the meal is salmon decorated and flavoured with rosemary, chillies, capers and anchovies, served with a lemony potato salad and extra sweet oregano and garlic roasted tomatoes. Jamie also serves up cheesy puffs as canapés, strawberry and prosecco cocktails, and a summer pudding made with strawberries, cucumber and Pimm’s. And he’s right, it’s very lovely to be able to sit down, chat and eat together again. ■■Together by Jamie Oliver is published by Penguin Random House (c) Jamie Oliver Enterprises Limited (2021 Together), priced £26. Photography by David Loftus. Available now ■■Jamie Oliver: Together is on Mondays, Channel 4, at 8pm JAMIE OLIVER’S ELEGANT TUNA CARPACCIO, MISO VEG, CHILLI AND LIME DRESSING AND SESAME(Serves 2)

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 9 Food & Drink Jamie Oliver’s fragrant squash curry with chickpeas, ginger, spices and coconut milk (Serves 6 + 2 leftover portions) Ingredients: 1 butternut squash (1.2kg); Olive oil; 1 onion; 2 cloves of garlic; 4cm piece of ginger; 1tsp coriander seeds; 1tsp fenugreek seeds; 1tsp medium curry powder; 300g ripe cherry tomatoes; 2 tinned pineapple rings in juice; 1 x 400ml tin of light coconut milk; 1 x 400g tin of chickpeas Optional: 2 sprigs of coriander, to serve GET AHEAD: You can make this on the day, if you prefer. METHOD: 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Scrub the squash (there’s no need to peel it), carefully halve it lengthways and deseed, then chop into 2cm chunks. 2. Place in a roasting tray, toss with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and a pinch of sea salt and black pepper, then roast for one hour, or until soft and caramelized. 3. Meanwhile, peel and roughly chop the onion, peel the garlic and ginger, and dry fry in a non-stick frying pan on a medium-high heat with the coriander and fenugreek seeds and the curry powder, stirring until lightly charred all over. 4. Add the tomatoes and pineapple rings (reserving the juice), and cook for 10 minutes to soften and char, stirring regularly. 5. Tip it all into a blender, add the coconut milk and blitz until very smooth. Return to the pan, tip in the chickpeas, juice and all, and simmer gently until the sauce is thickened. 6. Stir in the roasted squash, then season the curry to perfection, tasting and tweaking, and loosening with the reserved pineapple juice. 7. Cool, cover and refrigerate overnight. TO SERVE: Preheat the oven to 150°C. Place the covered pan of curry in the oven until hot through – about an hour. Nice with picked coriander leaves. Jamie Oliver’s chocolate orange crÈme brÛlÉe (Serves 2 + 2 leftover puds) Ingredients: 100ml double cream; 300ml semi-skimmed milk; 100g dark chocolate (70%); 4 large free-range eggs; 80g golden caster sugar, plus extra for sprinkling; 1 orange; Seasonal berries, to serve GET AHEAD: Pour the cream and milk into a non-stick pan, snap in the chocolate, and place on a medium-low heat until chocolate has melted, whisking regularly. Remove from the heat and allow to cool slightly while you separate the eggs. Method: 1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk the yolks (freeze the whites to make meringues another day) with the sugar and the finely grated orange zest until pale and fluffy. Whisking constantly, gradually pour in the chocolate mixture until combined. Return to the pan and place over a low heat, then very gently bring to a simmer, whisking constantly for about 10 minutes, or until you have a custard-like consistency. 2. Divide between four small heatproof cups or two sharing bowls, then cool, cover and leave to set in the fridge overnight. TO SERVE: Sprinkle a little sugar over two of the puds, then melt it under a hot grill or using a blowtorch. Serve with orange segments, berries or cherries. The two extra puds will keep for up to 5 days in the fridge, if you can wait that long! ■■ENERGY 414kcal; FAT 27.1g; SAT FAT 13.7g; PROTEIN 8.9g; CARBS 39.8g; SUGARS 39.6g; SALT 0.2g; FIBRE 1g

10 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 What’s On It’s the one that you want, says NATALIE BANYARD. Don your leather jackets and head to the Bristol Hippodrome as mega-musical Grease hurtles into Bristol, starring Peter Andre, who tells us he’s excited to return to the stage It’s got groove, it’s got meaning After being put on hold last year because of coronavirus restrictions, Grease The Musical is back with a wop ba-ba lu-bop a wop bam boom! The world’s best-loved musical takes to the Bristol Hippodrome stage this month with all the sing-along songs, awesome choreography, terrific costumes, talented cast - and the small matter of Peter Andre complete with angel wings! After a whirlwind summer romance, leather-clad greaser Danny and girl-next-door Sandy are unexpectedly reunited when she transfers to Rydell High for senior year. Friendships and love matches are formed between the T-Birds and Pink Ladies - but can Danny and Sandy survive the trials and tribulations of teenage life and find true love once more? Directed by Nikolai Fosterre, ignite your passion and get ready for an explosion of summer loving. Pop icon and TV star Peter Andre will be joining Danny, Sandy, Rizzo, Kenickie, Frenchy, Doody, Marty, Sonny, Jan and Roger, as Teen Angel and Vince Fontaine. “The atmosphere is going to be, excuse the pun, electrifying,” says Peter. “I want to make up for lost time and make sure that every single show is going to be immense fun! “We’re going to be so grateful to be performing and I believe audiences are going to be so happy to be back in a theatre. I’m sure I can speak for anyone who is going back on stage after all this time in saying how exciting it’s going to be. And Grease is such a great show to put a smile on people’s faces.” Peter says he’s excited to be playing dual roles of Frenchy’s imaginary guardian angel (which he played in the 2019 tour) as well the slick, stylish and fast-paced disc jockey Vince Fontaine. “I may even be doing a third role,” laughs Peter, “namely a police officer, depending on whether or not I can get changed on time. The more characters the better for me. Each one of them has a different accent, so I get to do different dialects, and it’s good to be acting as well as singing. “With Vince Fontaine and Teen Angel, it’s a very quick change but I love the energy of that. There’s just one song, which I’m not in, during which I have time to get out of one outfit and into a completely different one, with the wig and everything. But it’s really good fun.” Grittier and more glamorous than ever, the show has a famous and phenomenal score, bursting with hits including Summer Nights, Greased Lightnin’, Hopelessly Devoted to You and You’re the One That I Want. “It’s a great score,” says Peter. “Even

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 11 What’s On Peter Andre (front centre) as Vince Fontaine. Photo: Sean Ebsworth Barnes “The new generation see the stage show and then go and watch the movie, whereas the old generation have seen the movie and now they want to go and watch the stage show. “There’s a glamour to the teenagers in Grease, though, and that’s another draw; it’s set in sunny America, whereas you might have grown up in wet and windy England.” Father-of-four Peter made his professional debut as a contestant on Australia’s New Faces when he was just 16. He shot to global fame in the ’90s with his hit songs including Mysterious Girl and Flava and became the sixth highest-selling artist in the UK. He has had numerous hit singles, two number one albums and toured all over the world, collecting a multitude of national and international awards along the way. With many television shows and appearances under his belt, and with his Celebrating 25 Years tour now completed, the rest of the year sees Peter turn all of his attention to Grease. Peter Andre. Photo: Ant Robling “I’m so grateful I’ve had this career and I never take it for granted,” he says. “I remember being on tour with Bobby Brown as the opening act in Australia and at the time he was the biggest R&B star. “There I was on stage with him and he was a megastar to me. I thought he’d be going for ever and I’d just have my five minutes of fame, so I look back and think ‘I would never in a million years have expected to have had all this’. “I feel very lucky and luck does play a big part in it, as does staying with the same people; I mean, I’ve been with my manager for 30 years now. I think loyalty and keeping friends in the industry are definitely part of it.” Grease hurtles into Bristol’s Hippodrome from September 21 to 25, and Peter says the city has a special place in his heart: “Bristol means a lot to me. My brother Andrew, who we’ve sadly lost now, used to live in nearby Weston-super-Mare and we spent a lot of time in Bristol. It’s one of my favourite cities in England. “I love the cafes and bars and restaurants and the way it’s set out, with all those hills.” So, get ready Bristol – Grease is back. Round up your T-Birds, pick up your Pink Ladies and re-discover why Grease really is the one that you want. ■■Grease The Musical is at The Bristol Hippodrome from September 21 to 25. For more information and to book, visit www.atgtickets. com/bristol Peter Andre as Teen Angel. Photo: Hugo Glendinning though my main song is Beauty School Drop-Out, I also get to sing Grease with the rest of the cast and that’s such a great, iconic song that really gets everyone going.” Spectacularly staged and bursting with energy, this show is a treat for all ages – fans of the iconic 1978 movie will be in their element and they can bring along their children (and in some cases, grandchildren) to introduce them to the joy that is Grease. Peter says: “Everybody loves it. For me, as a child, there were two movies I watched again and again - and those were Back to the Future and Grease. Everyone can relate to being a teenager, whether that’s from a nostalgic point of view or if you’re a teenager right now or going to be soon. “When I said to my kids Junior and Princess ‘Let’s watch the movie Grease, it’s brilliant’ before I went on stage with it they were like ‘No thanks, it’s not our type of thing’. Then they came to see me in the show one night and suddenly they were like ‘We love this, let’s watch the movie’. It’s come full circle. The cast of Grease. Photo: Sean Ebsworth Barnes

12 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 What’s On Return of the Furs BY MARK TAYLOR To celebrate the 40th anniversary of their classic second album, Talk Talk Talk, The Psychedelic Furs make a long-awaited return to Bristol on September 27. Best known for 1980s hits like Love My Way, The Ghost In You, Heaven and Pretty In Pink, the band, formed by Richard Butler in 1977, are touring the UK to promote their latest album, Made Of Rain, which is their second highest charting UK album in a career spanning six decades. Made Of Rain was produced by the band and Richard Fortus, while mixing duties were handled by Tim Palmer, who previously worked with David Bowie, U2 and Robert Plant. Formed in London in 1977, by Butler and his brother, Tim, The Psychedelic Furs have been based in the US for years. The band has continued to perform and play acclaimed shows at The Hollywood Bowl, All Points East, Hyde Park and Benicàssim, plus a celebrated run of UK shows including headlining Robert Smith’s Meltdown at the Royal Festival Hall. The Furs’ enduring influence continues to resonate with The Strokes, The Killers, Foo Fighters and even Bob Dylan tipping their hats to them. Joining them on tour will be Pauline Murray, who first came to prominence as the lead singer and bass guitarist of pioneering punk band Penetration in the late ’70s. ■■The Psychedelic Furs play Bristol 02 Academy on September 27. Tickets are available from www.academymusicgroup.com/ o2academybristol/ events/1316743/psychedelic-furstickets RWA Secret Postcard Auction - final montage Artistic secrets Original artworks from hundreds of leading artists are being sold online in the Royal West of England Academy (RWA) Secret Postcard Auction on Thursday, September 23, following huge success last year with £107,000 raised for the charity. Now a major event in the national art calendar, the Secret Postcard Auction offers collectors and first-time buyers the chance to buy unique works of art by leading figures from the art and cultural world, from as little as £40. With hundreds of small artworks to choose from, dozens of lucky buyers will be in with Lot 225 - Amanda the opportunity to snap up an original piece of art for a tiny fraction of its true value. The event will be held online again this year as the building is temporarily closed, as they work on a major £3.8 million heritage capital project. Despite the success of the physical event in the past, the team were blown away when the online auction achieved an incredible £107,000, during the height of the pandemic in 2020. The auction has always been a vital contributor to the RWA finances and features many world-renowned contemporary artists and talents better known in other fields. Lot 201 - Dachshund The target for 2021 is £40,000, which will enable the RWA to continue its acclaimed creative work across Bristol when it reopens in early 2022 - including free family activities in some of the city’s most deprived wards, as well as support for people with a range of physical and mental wellbeing challenges. Alison Bevan, RWA director, said: “The Secret Postcard Auction is always a vital contributor to our finances. Due to the impact of Covid-19, and our consequent closure for the Light and Inspiration project, it is doubly vital now. As an independent charity that is hugely reliant on visitors, event and Drawing School income (and for the staff and artists who rely on us) the auction is really essential for us to continue to deliver life-enhancing creativity to communities across Bristol and beyond. It has always been such a fun event and there is no reason that needs to change this year. Many artists have been incredibly generous in supporting us, and as always we have a huge array of artworks to suit every taste.” Audiences are encouraged to bid from the comfort of their own home this year, with bids closing between 9pm and 9.30pm on Thursday, September 23. The identities of which artists did which postcard will remain secret until the auction ends. Above: The Psychedelic Furs, photo by Reed Davis. Pictured: lead singer Richard Butler.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 13 What’s On Afrika Eye festival is returning to Bristol after a year off. Photo: Afrika Eye Met by moonlight Eyes open The South West’s biggest celebration of African cinema and culture is returning to Bristol, after Covid forced the cancellation of last year’s event. Afrika Eye will take place in a number of new venues for a full week of film, music and spoken word events. Highlights of the November festival will include the world premiere of Afrika Eye’s first documentary, and an intro to Moroccan ‘gnawa’ music featuring Robert Plant’s and Jah Wobble’s guitarist Justin Adams. Afrika Eye will be using several new venues in Bristol including The Cube, Easton Community Centre and The Old Picture House in Totterdown, as well as the Curzon cinema in Clevedon. One of the most eagerly anticipated events of the festival is the first public screening of Rooted in Bristol. The short film by Tay Aziz, which will be screened at the Watershed, celebrates Bristol allotment growers of African heritage who are using their plots to keep alive the African and Afro-Caribbean food traditions of their families. MARK TAYLOR takes a look at everything you can expect from this year’s Afrika Eye festival An opening night gig features guitarist Justin Adams and gimbri maestro Mohammed Errabbaa playing the gnawa sound of Morocco, and showcases new short films by Bristol-based filmmakers Michael Jenkins and Pierre Amiral. There will also be a pop-up tent where families and children will be able to enjoy a film and story-telling sessions with Kabbo Hue Ferdinand. Festival director Annie Menter says: “After Covid enforced the cancellation of last year’s festival, Afrika Eye is delighted to be bouncing back with a rich programme designed to engage, entertain and inspire, bringing us together as we explore global issues, including migration, music and politics, gender and climate emergency with Africa the focus. Lives lived and imagined, seen through the eyes of the filmmaker. “We are particularly thrilled to have renowned guitarist, Justin Adams and Mohammed Errabbaa bringing the compelling sounds of Moroccan ‘gnawa’ music to the Watershed cafe/bar on our opening night there.” Afrika Eye Film Festival was founded in 2005 by two Bristol-based film-makers: Zimbabwe-born Simon Bright and Ingrid Sinclair who lived and worked in southern Africa for nearly 20 years. The festival’s mission is to offer audiences of all ages and backgrounds opportunities to explore the richness of African creativity, culture and history, using film and arts to challenge the stereotypes, dispel the myths and uncover more about the ever-changing social and political landscape of the continent of Africa and diaspora. ■■Afrika Eye’s full 2021 programme is due to be published in late September. Keep up to date on Afrika Eye’s website A sprinkling of magic will fall over Tobacco Factory Theatres as Out of Chaos bring an enchanting two-person adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream to the stage, writes NATALIE BANYARD Rescheduled from July due to restrictions, the magic is finally happening at Tobacco Factory Theatres this month as a mesmerising reimagining of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream flies into the theatre. Love is confusing – especially when there’s magic involved and then a donkey shows up! Confused couples compete for the wrong person’s affection; competitive performers try to steal the show; combative fairies battle for supremacy - and two actors play them all. Following the international success of their hit two-actor Macbeth, Out of Chaos are back to reimagine another Shakespeare masterpiece in their own fast, furious and fantastically funny style. Hannah Barrie and Paul O’Mahony star in this innovative and immersive production, playing at Tobacco Factory Theatres from September 21 to 23. Out of Chaos has been touring the UK and internationally since 2008 with shows including Unmythable, Norsesome and Macbeth. The company’s work has won awards in four countries and its two-person Macbeth toured by Natalie Banyard Following his triumphant performance at Bristol Comedy Garden earlier this summer, the masterfully understated and brilliantly unique Simon Amstell heads back to the city with his new show. His first stand-up tour since the release of internationally acclaimed feature film Benjamin and Netflix Special Set Free, the neurotic, searingly honest and very funny comic now brings Spirit Hole to The Redgrave Theatre tomorrow (Saturday). Loosely based around his fear of growing older, Spirit Hole is a blissful, spiritual, sensational exploration of love, shame, mushrooms and more. Amstell, whose work on television has included presenting Popworld and Never Mind the Buzzcocks, is a stand-up who has made anxiety into an art form. Here, he will share his worries extensively in the UK and US. Out of Chaos is committed to making work which is exciting, challenging and generous, combining creative physical approaches and rigorous text work to investigate old stories and their enduring relevance to modern audiences. The audience is at the heart of the company’s work and are included in the action to create truly communal events with the power to move, entertain and enthral. Out of Chaos artistic director Paul O’Mahony says: “We’re thrilled to be opening our two-person A Midsummer Night’s Dream at Tobacco Factory Theatres. It marks the third consecutive tour that we’ve opened in Bristol - in 2019 we performed Unmythable at the Wardrobe Theatre, and earlier this year our unique telephone play Is Now A Good Time? started its tour at Tobacco Factory Theatres. “We’ve been waiting a long time to get back on stage - and we’re so excited to share our take on this classic play. Two actors are playing all the roles and we guarantee a joyful night out for audiences.” Don’t miss this spell-binding show with music, magic and laughter guaranteed. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is at Tobacco Factory Theatres from September 21 to 23. For more information and to book, visit tobaccofactorytheatres.com That’s the spirit and regrets about everything from hallucinogens, Hamilton and hair dye to climate change, children and sex clubs. If you yearn for a night of unprecedented joy and laughter, book now to avoid your own regrets! ■■Simon Amstell is at The Redgrave Theatre on September 18. For more information and to book, visit redgravetheatre.com Simon Amstell

14 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Your Garden plotlineswith tim foster Watch out - the badgers have been eating the corn, and the purple potatoes have gone rotten Tim has come up with a few ways to deter the badgers - but have they been successful? I thought it would be quite fun to look at how crops have gone this year, but maybe the word ‘gone’ is more appropriate than I’d care to dwell on. Our sweet corn, for example, has gone inside one or more badgers. I have personally encountered badgers only a handful of times and none of these have been catching them in the act of consuming our produce or using the fruit area as a latrine. My response would probably be the same no matter what: this is urban wildlife – wonderful. OK, so I may have uttered one or two choice words when I saw the flattened sweet corn, but I’d always be thrilled to have wild animals around especially when they’re so persecuted in the countryside nowadays. They are nocturnal animals, so carried out their raids while I was tucked up in bed. It wasn’t as if we had left the plants unprotected – we were well aware from previous years that our humbug-striped friends live not far away. So, we installed a fortress (is that a politically incorrect female fort?) consisting of a double layer of wire mesh. ‘Aha, you idiot,’ you say, ‘They’ll push underneath.’ Idiot, maybe, but also seasoned badger repeller: the mesh extended flat on the ground for about a foot and was pegged down. This was accompanied my own urine for which, to produce, I was forced to go on a high beer diet. Apparently, human male urine deters badgers and, what is more, the combination of this and fencing worked last year. What we didn’t account for were two things. One was the dry weather resulting in harder ground, therefore making it difficult for the badger family to find slugs and worms – they must have been a bit desperate. The Our sweet corn, for example, has gone inside one or more badgers. I have personally encountered badgers only a handful of times and none of these have been catching them in the act of consuming our produce or using the fruit area as a latrine. other issue was they used an aerial attack, not, as immediately springs to mind, a large black and white mammal parachuting in, but an avoidance of the smelly ground approach altogether by rearing up on hind legs and collapsing the mesh. Full marks for ingenuity, full stomachs of sweet corn. Just wait until next year – there’ll be sentries in the turrets at every corner. And that was just one crop. Here’s another. Purple potatoes. Now this is, I’m sorry to say, another sad story, but maybe we can learn from it: be very wary about unlabelled gifts. I was given some amazing dark purple seed potatoes by a friend who not only didn’t know what the variety was but didn’t know whether they were early, second early or maincrop potatoes. I can almost hear you slapping your forehead, saying ‘Duh’. But I was seduced by the colour – purple is good for you (apart from the berries of deadly nightshade and even then it isn’t the purple-ness which finishes you off). Most coloured fruit and vegetables are good for you – the pigments are antioxidants, meaning anti-cancer. And these spuds had the colour all the way through the flesh as well as the skin – fantastic. So, what went wrong? Pretty much No sweet corn or purple potaoes, right, for Tim this year everything. The tops died off early – early potatoes showing they’d had enough, or blight? Then the removal of the tubers was ten times harder… because of the colour: normal creamy white potatoes stand out in dark soil but not these things. Those discovered were rotten, had a little bit of rot or were fine but went rotten later. Rotten luck, I’m sure you’ll agree. Finally, the flavour of the surviving few wasn’t anything special, with the texture being quite dry. Now there is an excellent chance I’d done something seriously wrong in the growing but all of my other spuds were terrific, so I’m going to put the Great Purple Potato Disaster of ’21 in the file marked ‘Erase this from your memory’. ■■Tim Foster teaches horticulture at the University of Bristol Botanic Garden and is the author of Fruit For Life - www.eco-logicbooks.com and Good Earth Gardening – a friendly guide to growing vegetables organically - currently unavailable ■■timfostergardener@gmail.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 15 Your Garden Expert advice Brown shades for autumn Presenter Adam Frost looks at the value of ornamental grasses, structural seed heads and deep brown flower centres, with Hannah Stephenson Gardeners should be looking at all shades of brown to fill their outdoor space with interest through autumn, insists BBC Gardeners’ World presenter Adam Frost. “Brown has become the new black. Planting design is very much about asking a little bit more from our plants,” he said at the recent BBC Gardeners’ World Live show at the NEC, Birmingham. “We are all sucked in by flowers. Most of the time, if we go flower shopping, we should probably cut the flowers off and let the plants concentrate on getting their roots in the ground, but we never do that. “Rather than just being driven by that flower, we should be asking what this plant is going to be when it goes over. What’s it going to look like going into the winter months? A lot of plants will hold structure.” What must-have plants will brown well? “I love herbaceous perennials like asters and eupatorium, and grasses including some of the panicums, stipas and molinias are awesome. Grasses are great, because you can play with and manipulate light, so a lot of them are at their best in late summer going into autumn. Rudbeckias, echinaceas and heleniums will hold good structure and are great for wildlife. The deep brown flower centres will remain when the petals are spent and add structure and interest, plus, they’re fantastic for wildlife, he says. “Echinacea is good for bees, as is eupatorium. Some asters will go brown and hold a decent structure, although frikartii might collapse. “They will go brown, and if you underplant them with low grasses, you will get this wonderful hue of browns, bronzes, beiges and caramels right through the winter months. “I have used Eupatorium ‘Little Joe’ in gardens, which is in contrast to the many larger eupatoriums which are quite big. I also really love Echinacea pallida, because it’s slightly different – the flowers hang rather than stand tall. “There’s the little Aster [now called Eurybia] divaricata, which works on the edge of a woodland, and will carry on flowering from summer and keep going.” Don’t forget grasses “Panicums are good for creating a rich beige haze. There’s a lovely one I use called ‘Heavy Metal’. Calamagrostis is another ornamental grass that holds a decent structure. They all go brown.” Adam Frost, pictured below, says ‘brown has become the new black’ in the garden; clockwise from this picture, helenium seedheads; eupatorium in autumn; ornamental grass calamagrostis; the seedhead of Echinacea purpurea How should you combine them? “A lot of the plants I’ve mentioned would be interplanted in a late autumn planting scheme. Use different sizes and don’t be worried about repeat planting to achieve balance. “Look at flower shapes and how many different shapes you can add. Some of them will be daisylike, others are umbellifer types [where many tiny flowers are held on short flower stalks, such as cow parsley, angelica and astrantia]. “The more different flower shapes you have, the better, and the same goes for leaf shapes. If you do that, your garden becomes completely different.” How long do I leave the plant skeletons? “I’d leave it ’til the next February. Most cutting back in my garden goes on in February or early March, depending on the winter. Cut back the grasses when new grass is appearing in spring. “If you ask me what the garden will be in 30 years’ time, I think it will be mix of ornamentals planted within a wild landscape. We are not just gardening for beauty. We are gardening for habitat. “When people have a big clean-up and think they are putting their garden to bed for the winter, they’ll clear away leaves, cut everything back and tidy it all up. But by doing that, they are taking away wildlife housing. “If you leave it, you are leaving homes for insects, material to forage on and shelter. And if you leave enough old plant material, that will be used as nesting for birds the following year.” Use the light “As much as it’s lovely to have beautiful colour in autumn, it’s also important to understand where the best place for light is in late September and early October, and work out which places you are drawn to. Is there an area where the afternoon light will catch the back of a border, for instance?” Don’t be afraid of the shade “Certain plants will take a little shade. A lot of our real shade-loving plants tend to be at their best earlier on in the year, although there are shade-loving ferns, such as dryopteris (wood fern) which carry good autumn colour. “Climbing hydrangeas can take shady spots and are good when they lose their leaves, because you can leave the brown flowers on for structure.”

16 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Travel Landmark tea at top hotel mark taylor enjoys the lap of luxury on A hot a few days in london The London landmark afternoon tea served at The Kensington Arriving hot and sweaty after a long train journey, followed by a short but steamy trip on the packed tube, the greeting at The Kensington Hotel reception desk couldn’t have been more refreshing. Before we’d even had chance to catch our breath or wipe our brows, a genial concierge had whisked our bags away, and the receptionist was presenting us with a silver tray containing hand sanitiser, a warm face towel and an ice-cold carton of mineral water. Now, that’s what I call arriving in style. One thing I’ve noticed since returning to high-end London hotels after the pandemic is that each has its own Covid system. The more expensive places tend to do things a little differently and, although staff wear masks and keep their distance, The Kensington is pretty relaxed about it. Of course, all the proper regulations are still in place but they leave it to the guests to make their own judgments about things rather than ruin the moment with lurid signs and hazmat suits. Right in the heart of South Kensington, this opulent hotel is part of The Doyle Collection, a Dublin-based family-owned group that has hotels in Ireland, London and Washington DC. It also owns The Bristol Hotel in the city’s harbourside area, so it’s a brand a lot of Bristolians are familiar with. A large mansion with a grand stucco facade and more than 120 guest rooms, The Kensington has an immediately relaxed ambience from the minute you arrive and are welcomed by the immaculate door staff who welcome every guest as if they were returning regulars. Light, airy and laid-back, it’s an elegant modern hotel and service was faultless throughout our stay. Our stunning suite overlooked leafy Queen’s Gate but the triple-glazed windows meant that we didn’t hear any noise from the bustling street below. The suite we had was more like a large apartment with a lounge and small kitchen area (complete with Nespresso coffee machine) leading through to the huge bedroom, which then carried on to an equally big bathroom. It was beautifully furnished in a regal style with antique furniture, sumptuous sofas and armchairs, floor-to-ceiling drapes, crystal chandelier and striking artwork on the walls. The seriously comfortable king-size bed had a luxurious duck-down duvet and crisp, cool Egyptian cotton sheets. The bright and spacious marble-clad bathroom had a roll-top bath and separate shower with a waterfall head the size of a large frying pan. There was even a plentiful supply of posh Malin + Goetz bath and shower products to use and these were topped up during our stay, as was the complimentary bottles of mineral water. For added home comfort, the lounge had a state-of-the-art in-room entertainment system complete with 55-inch Smart TV with Chromecast (so you can stream Netflix, videos and music from your own device), and a Bose iPod docking station. There was also a TV in the bedroom and even a small one over the bath. It all makes the act of leaving the room very difficult indeed. Each room also has a card with a QR code that enables guests to access a digital print platform of newspapers and magazines. On the ground floor, the public areas are relaxed and comfortable with open fires, high Victorian ceilings and interconnecting drawing rooms. The stunning K-Bar combines modern style with classic detail, including sumptuous fabrics and contemporary artwork. This awardwinning cocktail bar oozes elegance and has the oak-panelled look and feel of a discreet and exclusive gentleman’s club, albeit one that welcomes everybody. The underlit lamps and velvety furnishings add a touch of extra glamour. The bar staff here serve a mix of creative contemporary cocktails and classics, plus an extensive wine list and seemingly endless choice of top-end spirits. I tried the French 75 - a blend of Tanqueray No. Ten gin, fresh lemon juice, sugar syrup and Perrier Jouët Champagne - and it was perfectly made. One of the most popular options for guests and non-residents is the traditional afternoon tea served in the restaurant. Presented on a London Eyeinspired tea stand, it’s a celebration of London’s iconic skyline and architecture with cakes and savouries representing the likes of The Gherkin (in the form of a white chocolate and dark chocolate ganache), The Shard (carrot cake with milk chocolate) and Big Ben (a lemon curd tart). The Kensington The Knightsbridge suite The teas are supplied by the award-winning Rare Tea Company founded by Henrietta Lovell, who buys direct from the farms and growers. As the name suggests, some of these teas are very rare indeed, with only a few kilos produced in some cases. The delicious single estate English Breakfast tea comes from the oldest tea estate in Malawi and the Japanese Genmaicha sencha tea, which is blended with toasted brown rice, was exceptional with its unique buttery popcorn flavour. In the stylish Town House restau- rant that evening, we enjoyed a delicious dinner from the modern British menu, including The Kensington classic prawn cocktail with Marie Rose sauce; chicken schnitzel with rocket, caper and lemon vinaigrette, and English strawberries with Jersey cream. The following morning, breakfast options included a traditional Full English (bacon, sausage, black pudding, mushroom, tomato and potato scone), and Chapel and Swan smoked salmon scrambled eggs, as well as healthier choices. Of course, you can work off any extra calories in the well-equipped gym in the basement or go for a run in nearby Kensington Gardens. And that’s the beauty of staying in such a well-positioned hotel. There are so many attractions on the doorstep and the West End is only minutes away. The Natural History Museum and Victoria and Albert Museum are a short walk from the hotel, as is the Royal Albert Hall, should your visit coincide with a concert. There are also numerous restaurants and pubs on the Old Brompton Road around the corner and Harrods and Harvey Nichols are close by, too. It feels like normality is now returning to London’s top hotels at long last. The Kensington was busy when we visited, with obvious signs that wealthy American tourists are coming back, which must be music to the ears of the capital’s hospitality industry. Long may that continue. ■■Rooms at The Kensington start at £375 per night and suites start at £585 per night. townhousekensington.com

Late summer is the perfect time to visit the Mediterranean holiday island now open to vaccinated UK travellers, says Sarah Marshall It’s not too late to see Sardinia Blue heaven: Sardinia’s crystal clear waters ESCAPE PLANS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 17 Travel ■■Visit Barbados from £1,049: Jet off on this seven-night holiday staying at the four-star Mango Bay Hotel in St James. Price includes return flights from London Heathrow Airport on September 28 and seven nights’ accommodation on an book visit awayholidays.co.uk or call 0208 705 0107. ■■Malta from £383pp: Jet out of Manchester on October 5 for seven-nights at the four-star Qawra Palace Hotel on the Qawra seafront. Includes breakfast. Book at awayholidays.co.uk or all-inclusive basis. To Barbados call 020 8705 0107. With turquoise waters comparable to Tahiti and fine sandy beaches to rival the Seychelles, Sardinia is a mosaic of so many paradise places. Yet its identity remains hidden to most. Cloaked in myths and legends, the island’s history far predates grand temples and citadels built by the Romans, while a thriving population of centenarians defies science with a diet of red wine and cheese. Once the heat has subsided and Italian holidaymakers have gone home, the Mediterranean island is a late summer delight. And now Italy has scrapped a five-day quarantine for vaccinated UK arrivals, requiring only a negative PCR or antigen test taken no more than 48 hours in advance, the last drops of sunshine are within easy reach. Here are a few of the island’s delights. The ruby coral Used to make jewellery, red coral has been prized for centuries and underpins the economy of Catalan town Alghero on the northwest coast. Only 25 licences are granted each year to specialised deep sea divers, who use an axe to excavate no more than 2.5kg of the brittle branches. During the late 1800s, hundreds of vessels arrived for the “red gold” rush, but now the only boats in Alghero’s harbour are tourist vessels ferrying visitors to marine caves like Neptune’s Grotto, an underground lake decorated with spikey stalactites. The sapphire waters The water lapping Sardinia’s shores is reliably clear and clean, providing excellent conditions The water lapping Sardinia’s shores is reliably clear and clean... Ruby coral jewellery A Sardinian watch tower Sardinia Radio Telescope for swimming, snorkelling and diving. Among the finest beaches are Stintino’s La Pelosa on the west coast and 9km-long La Poetto in the south. One of the most scenic spots is undoubtedly the Maddalena archipelago, sitting between the Strait of Bonifacio and Corsica. Take a boat trip to explore the protected pink sands of Budelli, coloured by tiny fragments of coral, and look out for wild boars swimming in pine-fringed bays. The bronze age settlements More than 7,000 conical watchtowers, known as nuraghe, have been unearthed across the island, built between the 18th and 15th centuries BCE. Found nowhere else on earth, little is known about the megalithic stone buildings – although many are still remarkably well preserved. The biggest settlement, awarded Unesco World Heritage status, can be found at Su Nuraxi di Barumini in the south. Walk between a geometric labyrinth of dry stone walls, ending up at a magnificent look-out tower. The silver skies Outside towns and cities, a lack of light pollution makes Sardinia an excellent place to study the night sky. An hour’s drive from Cagliari, the Sardinia Radio Telescope is the largest of its kind in Italy – although tours are currently suspended due to Covid. But you don’t need a scientific platform to view constellations. Not far from Alghero, in the northwest, the cliffs of Capo Caccia have become a popular place for hardcore star-gazers.

18 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Fashion Focus JOANNE Watkinson can your wardrobe sustain you? Becoming more sustainable is a responsibility that we all share. Sir David Attenborough made it very clear by telling us “what we do in the next 20 years will determine the future for all life on Earth”. It is an apocalyptic statement, that we must heed. Each of us can make small changes to the way we live in order to reduce our carbon footprint such as eating less meat, reducing our home energy consumption and water waste, and of course consuming fashion less ferociously. Lately, savvy influencers have switched their content and narrative to include the phrases repeatwear and recycle to appeal to those who care about climate change. If, like me, wearing your clothes on repeat is the norm this concept may amuse, but it’s refreshing compared to the influencers who wouldn’t be seen in the same garment twice. Some people have a tendency to stand on their soap box and preach this newly-found message causing us to feel guilty unnecessarily. “Shop your own wardrobe”, “Buy nothing for a year” are popular phrases with influencers. This vow is the perfect Q&A I’m a big fan of Q pastel colours but the shops never seem to have anything. I would like some pastel coloured knitwear for my work wardrobe. Pastels can be A tricky on some but they look amazing on others, lucky you! I love these knitted sweaters with their puff sleeves. Stella McCartney has long been a champion of sustainability, both in her fashion line and her own life option for influencers and fashion insiders who have spent the past decade being sent a steady supply of free clothes, but not everyone is in this position of privilege. A Bottega-touting influencer shopping from their own bulging wardrobe for a year isn’t too much of a stretch, but there are any number of reasons this might not be something you can do. You may have just had a baby/lost weight/gained weight, or you aren’t fortunate enough to have built up a wardrobe of useful clothes. Someone who has consumed fashion heavily deciding to stop is positive, however, it’s also a sign of extreme privilege and those who suggest you do it via their platforms should be transparent about how their circumstances might be very different to yours. They may take multiple long haul flights but there will be no mention of that. Another message I am seeing being pushed more frequently is “buy one thing a month” again, great, I’m here for considered purchases, buy what you love. But when that one thing a month is a Chanel bag, we’re not on the same page. Be sustainable in a way that works for you. Hunkin Abire top £75, wild-swans.com Joanne is a stylist with more than 20 years’ experience in the fashion industry. Email joannewatkinson@me.com. Follow her on Instagram @myfashiondirectory for style tips Fall into autumn The temperatures have got to drop some time, so get your wardrobe ready for the transition with these easy to wear pieces. by EMMA JOHNSON Sage sweater £29.99, chiffon flounce skirt £29.99, Lindex. Other items stylist’s own Frill sleeve midi dress £75, tote bag £65, leather sandals £95, & Other Stories Leaf stitch jumper £69.95, skirt £64.95, anle boots £69.95, Joules Blouse and skirt both £12.50, boots £26, Matalan

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 19 STYLE FILE ■■Want to choose more sustainable fashion without skimping on style? Look no further than Baukjen’s luxe transitional collection. Crafted from 85% responsibly sourced fabrics, the latest drop features gorgeous ditsy floral print dresses alongside wardrobe classics. You’ll wear these pieces again and again throughout the season. Dress £165, baukjen.co ■■We already love Dancing Leopard for its brightly coloured wrap dresses, slip dresses and palazzo pants. But did you know about its Halo Collection? Consciously crafted from sustainable fibres, think eco-friendly activewear, responsible swimwear and organic cotton staples, all in moodboosting colours and hand-drawn prints. Jaiden yoga unitard £75, Fashion Focus Samaya bomber jacket £75, dancingleopard.co.uk ■■How much cheerier will your back-towork experience be if you return to the office carrying this bag? The Cambridge Satchel Companyhas just launched its Little One, Pushlock (above) and Poppy Backpack designs in this sunny limited edition Bumblebee Matte colourway. Priced £100- £160, cambridgesatchel.com *All prices correct at time of going to press and while stocks last Left: Peacock paisley dress £50, belt £38, The Spy Who Loved Me boots £85. Right: Floral skirt £40, sweater £40, Make Your Move buckle boots £55, Joe Browns

20 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Step into new season in style Sparkle: A model at the Halpern autumn/winter 2021 show at London Fashion Week AW21 Style Guide Beauty buzz The latest products & glamour gossip Autumn/winter fashion will be all about maximalism. Katie Wright reveals five trends to try now With autumn on the horizon, it’s time to find out what’s in store on the fashion front next season. Looking at the catwalk collections, there’s a real sense of renewed optimism, as designers embraced punchy colours, strong silhouettes and a healthy dose of glitter with their autumn/winter offerings. As the world continues to open up once more, lockdown loungewear is making way for mood-boosting garments for day and night, with maximalism the overarching theme of AW21. In short, there’s a lot to look forward to. Here are five ways you can tap into the new season trends right now... Bright colours From to fuchsia to emerald, bubble-gum pink to lemon yellow, and aqua blue to tangerine orange – there was a kaleidoscope of colour on the AW21 runways, with Versace, Prada and Gucci leading the charge on the continent, while Roksanda, Halpern and Bora Aksu brought us brights at London Fashion Week. This trend is about a shock of head to toe colour, so pick your favourite saturated shade and wear it with pride. Winter florals Dark florals are often present on the autumn/winter catwalks, but this time around the petal prints seen at London Fashion Week favourites Erdem, Molly Goddard (left) and Yuhan Wang had a distinctly summery feel. A floral midi dress is a key transitional piece this season. Team yours with chunky angle boots now and slouchy over-theknees later. CRUSH Sequins and sparkle The epitome of joyful maximalism, this season’s partywear looks were a riot of sequins, diamante, beading and metallic fabrics, with standout looks including the golden gowns at Gucci and Alberta Ferretti, as well as the sequinned frocks at Halpern and Louis Vuitton. Come festive season, a River Island beige sequined oversized shirt, £50 glittery dress should be top of your shopping list, but for now, a sequinned shirt teamed with this season’s baggy jeans is a more laidback option. In the pink on the runway at Bora Aksu Monsoon Frida floral print dress green, £70 (belt, stylist’s own) Sonder Studio pink midi dhirt dress, £65 * Prices correct at time of going to print. While stocks last OF THE WEEK Dune Cassie pink snaffle trim sling backs, £90 Big bags Puffer coats Bundling up has never looked cooler, thanks to the voluminous quilted coats and cropped puffer jackets on show at Jason Wu, Isabel Marant, Mark Fast and Celine. Keep it classic in a neutral tone like camel or khaki, or take it to the max in a brilliantly bright hue. George at Asda green midweight quilted coat, £26 Is the micro purse trend officially over? According to Jil Sander, Marni and Art School (right), big bags are back. Now that more and more workers are returning to the office, a sizeable bag is needed for lugging laptops and other essentials. Take your cue from the catwalks and opt for a cooltoned tote. M&Co faux leather tote bag, £29 We love a slogan T-shirt and this one, £45, from Orwell + Austen (orwellausten.com) has got us thinking... (PS. It means ‘reality does not exist’) ■■If you look back fondly on the Nineties you will adore Peacci’s 90s Baby Nail Polishes, £10 each. They pay homage to everything from Sex And The City’s cosmopolitan cocktails, Posh Spice’s nude lippy and the red Baywatch swimsuit, to Britney Spears and Justin Timberlake’s legendary double denim. ■■Dull Faaces are the last thing any of us want, yet it’s also the name of a fab new multitasking product from skincare brand Faace. Perfect for mucking out plugged pores, the kaolin clay-based cleanser, £24, can be used as a quick daily face wash or left on for 10 minutes as a skinsmoothing mask. ■■Here’s a juicy little addition to your skincare regime, at a price that won’t leave your bank balance feeling squeezed. Revolution Skincare has just expanded its glowboosting Vitamin C range with a Brightening Power Eye Serum, £10, Vitamin C, Turmeric and Cranberry Seed Energising Mask, £8, and Brightening Hydro Gel Eye Patches, £15. Dull skin will drink it up. ■■MyBeautyBrand’s Perfect Pink Lip Oil, £19 is the creation of Princess Eugenie’s bridal make-up guru Hannah Martin, and what looks rather Legally Blonde from the outside turns out to be the prettiest, plumping gloss once it’s on the lips. Just try not to kiss too many frogs with it while searching for your prince, eh?

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 21 Beauty that will give you change from a fiver Affordable cosmetics and skincare have never been better, says Hannah Britt. She asks the experts how to stock up without splashing out The beauty industry has changed. Cheap is no longer a dirty word. Affordable cosmetics have never been better, and often have as much science behind them as their pricer counterparts. “There are now some fabulous brands which are really affordable and uncompromising on quality,” says make-up artist Christiane Dowling (christianedowling.com). “I’ve found hidden gems among brands like Kiko, NYX, Max Factor and Maybelline, which are a staple in my professional make-up kit.” “There are plenty of designer brands with brilliant products, but some can be quite overpriced,” says make-up artist Roseanna Velin (roseannavelin.com). “Premium brands also have premium packaging, which reflects in the price,” adds makeup artist Tamara Tott (tamaratott. com). “It’s all about being savvy. We live in an age where you don’t need to pay top dollar.” So what should you look for? “Think about the quality of pigment, the product finish and longevity,” says Roseanna. “Before purchasing, know what you want to achieve, whether it’s smoky eyes, dewy skin or longwearing lipstick. Don’t get distracted by branding and packaging,” says Roseanna. “Get to know the product inside the pot by testing it on the back of your hand.” “Notice the texture – is it silky, shiny, shimmery or matte? Does it glide on or take a bit of effort to blend? What is the pigment like – does it show up straight away or does it need to be built up? Beauty should be fun, so don’t take it too seriously,” says Christiane. “One of the best things about a budget product is that you can take a punt on it.” Here we share some of the best budget brands and our top buys. Make-up marvels ELF: Founded with the mission of making the best of beauty accessible to every eye, lip and face, Elf is a favourite of beauty editors for its high-performing products. Prices start from £3. ■■Try: Elf Flawless Brightening Concealer, £5, elfcosmetics.co.uk NYX: For great pigments at low prices, NYX is unbeatable. Its high-quality palettes and primers are a favourite with make-up artists and influencers alike. Prices start from £4. ■■TRY: NYX Born To Glow Illuminator, £4.50, Boots Skincare saviours THE ORDINARY: Want powerhouse ingredients for pennies? You can’t do better than The Ordinary, which aims to show consumers that a lower point is not reflective of efficacy. Its skincare starts from £2.75. ■■Try: The Ordinary Niacinamide 10% + Zinc 1%, £5, Boots LACURA: Known for its cut-price takes on popular and more expensive products, Aldi’s beauty brand sells out as soon as it hits stores. From 55p. ■■TRY: Lacura Miracle Cream, £3.99, Aldi Brilliant bodycare PS…: Prices start from a purse-friendly 50p for PS at Primark beauty products, which sees high-end ingredients contained in budget packaging. ■■Try: PS... Vitamin E Hand Cream, £2, Primark PALMER’S: Palmer’s wrote the book on no-frills skincare. From lip balm to body cream, products are reliable, get the job done and smell delicious too. Prices start from £2.50. ■■Try: Palmer’s Cocoa Butter Formula Body Lotion, £3.99, Boots Hot haircare TRESEMMÉ: Salon-worthy hair can be yours for as little as £2 thanks to Tresemmé, with nutrient-packed products you can trust to deliver stunning results. ■■TRY: Tresemmé Pro Collection Keratin Smooth Heat Protect Spray, £2, Boots BATISTE: Many dry shampoos come and go, but few will beat this bargain brand. A staple of festivals, school-runs and desk-todancefloor makeovers. Try the travel size for just £1.50. ■■TRY: Batiste Dry Shampoo, £3.25, Boots Nifty nail art RIMMEL: No make-up bag should be without Rimmel. This budget brand has products for as little as £2.99, which perform as well as their more expensive counterparts. ■■TRY: Rimmel 60 Seconds Super Shine Nail Polish in Caramel Cupcake, £3.49, Superdrug BARRY M: This fashionforward brand has prices from £2.49. The nail polishes are the heroes, with every colour imaginable. ■■TRY: Barry M Gelly Nail Paint in Lavender, £3.99, Superdrug WHat we’re loving this week: ■■Jo Malone, founder of Jo Loves, was the first to create an interpretation of a truffle note in perfumery. She’s just relaunched her Red Truffle 21 A Fragrance Parfum, from £75, which combines the note with fig, citrus and pine. It’s a rich, complex and modern scent. ■■Avon’s Anew Skin Reset Plumping Shots were a standout skincare launch of 2020. They feature a patented new ingredient A NEW LOOK FOR YOUR OLD KITCHEN THIS AUTUMN • Trusted reputation • Huge choice of doors, worktops appliances, sinks & taps • Free planning & design service • Door swaps to full kitchens – tailored to your needs www.dreamdoors.co.uk Beauty called Protinol that claims to restore seven years’ worth of collagen in seven days. Now they have put this technology into a serum. Anew Renewal Power Serum is out now, RRP £22, but on offer at £16 throughout September. ■■OPI is giving us some serious cool-girl vibes with its latest collection, which is inspired by the art scene of Downtown Los Angeles. Taking you on a tour of the area’s hippest hangouts, the new Nail Lacquer shades, £13.90 each, include pale lilac Graffiti Sweetie, Espresso Your Inner Self – inspired by the ultimate sightseeing essential, coffee – and the deep blue Isn’t It Grand Avenue – named after the street where you’ll find all the big art museums. 11/12 The Promenade, Gloucester Rd, Bristol BS7 8AL FAMILY RUN BUSINESS by just swapping the doors and worktops BEFORE ® THE UK’S #1 KITCHEN MAKEOVER EXPERTS D Call for a free estimate on: 0117 944 3223 AVERAGE SCORE 9.8/10

22 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Memory Lane Curtain Call with Jeffrey Davies Jeffrey Davies looks backs at some of his favourite interviewees from the last few decades. This week it’s singer Tony Bennett TONY Bennett has been hailed by some as the world’s greatest singer. His many records and albums have sold by the millions, his concerts have always been filled to capacity wherever he has performed in the world, and his television appearances have consistently attracted massive audiences. Tony Bennett’s back catalogue of classic songs include The Lady is a Tramp, The Shadow of Your Smile, The Way You Look Tonight, The Very Thought of You and his signature song, I Left My Heart in San Francisco. Born Anthony Dominick Benedetto in 1926, the multi award-winning internationally renowned Italian-American singer of jazz, traditional pop standards, big band and show tunes, has also (in recent years) been duetting on albums with Lady Gaga. A class act if ever there was Tony Bennett performing in 2007 one. A much-acclaimed visual artist too, the New York-born crooner’s paintings hang on the walls of several institutions in the US and in collectors’ and art enthusiasts’ homes and offices around the world. One of his paintings is called Sunday in Central Park, which is the view from the singer and artist’s window in Manhattan. In 2016 Tony Bennett was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, but it was only last month that he made the decision to retire from performing. I interviewed the charismatic and very welcoming legend, now 95, in I’ve had a lot of influences. The three biggest influences are Bing Crosby, Louis Armstrong and Frank Sinatra the ‘Star’ dressing room at the Capitol in Cardiff 50 years ago... Your concert was amazing, I remarked to a clearly jubilant Tony Bennett, who had just left the stage to a standing ovation, following a third well-deserved encore on this Welsh leg of his sold-out tour of Britain. “Thank you. I enjoyed myself. I think the audience did as well, if the applause is anything to go by,” the friendly star replied, clearly happy at his ‘wonderful’ reception in the Principality tonight. You are acknowledged today as the world’s greatest singer, I commented. What a compliment, even fellow Italian-American crooner Frank Sinatra, has himself said it. “Well I’m always kind of confused by that remark because there are so many wonderful singers in the world. Even an audience on a singalong all sound good to me,” the modest star replied. “When Sinatra did say this, it really did kind of change things around for me. He kind of put me into the position where I just took on a very positive stance. I started living up to what he said about me. It did help me improve as a singer, funnily enough - and as a person.” Tony has lived through a period of musical change through the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s. What has been the main influence in his maturation to international singing star status? “Well, making the decision to dedicate yourself to it. Once that happens the concentration takes over and you really get involved with it,” he said, summing it up simply. Most singing stars admit to having been influenced by other performers, either by their type of songs or the way they sing them. Does Tony? “Oh I’ve had a lot of influences. The three biggest influences are Bing Crosby, Louis Armstrong and Frank Sinatra,” he admitted, allowing me to come back to my question with a rather flippant rejoinder. You mean unlike some of the pop stars or groups that I’ve interviewed who claim their main influence was definitely drugs or our British beer! “Well it’s a different age group. My son’s in a rock ’n’ roll group and there’s no one else in the world except The Beatles for him. They’re the biggest thing in the musical world.” Sixties pop, and now the beginnings of ’70s glam-rock with the likes of Marc Bolan. What is Tony’s view of contemporary pop music culture? “Well, it’s pretty good. A couple of things I like. Some of The Beatles’ things. I also like Jimmy Webb - and Burt Bacharach,” he replied. “They’re all good.” I remarked that many older people think today’s ’60s and now ’70s pop Tony Bennett in 1960 (Photo by CA/Redferns, photo, below, by Frazer Harrison/ Getty Images) stars and their genre of pop and rock music has been a retrograde step too far. “The only thing I like that has really happened is they’ve made a lot of old people feel a lot younger, funnily enough!” he said with a laugh. Tony Bennett with Lady Gaga winning a Grammy in 2015 “The young ones felt older, a little, because they were allowed on stage. But the older ones, all of a sudden, had their hair style growing. They also had a lot of way-out psychedelic clothes. Normally, ten years ago, that would have never happened. There was a kind of emotional revolution as you would call it. But no, musically, it doesn’t compare to Cole Porter or Gershwin or people like that. I don’t think that music is as good,” he answered candidly. Currently, Tony Bennett is on a British tour. What has been the reaction from audiences up and down the country? Has it been what he had hoped for? “Oh, it’s beyond that. We’ve played to full houses everywhere. We’re very surprised at that because of all the political strife and strikes that are going on here right now. I had anticipated running into politics. But it didn’t happen. The audiences have been wonderful,” he said. Having performed before audiences all over the world, how does he rate his British fans. Or, as this evening, his Welsh fans? “Well they really appreciate music in Wales. I just love the people here and the way of life. Welsh people are generally interested in music. And I’m always impressed by this.” A musical nation. The Land of Song. With a reputation like that, are the people of Wales more critical of a visiting singing star than most other cultures? And does a performer have to work that much harder to win the people over in Wales than anywhere else in the world, I asked? “Yes, Wales is a musical nation, no doubt about that. Because of that I think you really do have to put on a good performance when you’re here,” he said entering into the spirit of my questioning, and adding that he always aims to perform to his very best no matter which country he is performing in. “I am Italian and the two best places in the world for singing are Italy and Wales,” the most engaging star stressed quite definitely, and with a twinkle in his eye. As I was leaving the venue, I noticed a large crowd of excited fans queueing in an orderly fashion at the stage door. They were waiting to get Tony Bennett’s much-coveted autograph. Being the star and gentleman that he is, he signed each autograph book in turn - and all with a most agreeable smile.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 23 We’re so excited to be going on the road... I’m going to lose it on stage The Script’s Danny O’Donoghue tells Marion McMullenemotions will be running high as the band starts touring again The Script Lead singer Danny O’Donoghue, can’t wait to perform for the fans again Music album of the week CERTIFIED LOVER BOY Drake HHHII Over the course of almost 90 minutes, the 34-year-old revisits his favourite subjects, including how he still doesn’t get enough respect despite his vast success. He samples the lyrics of The Beatles’ Michelle on first track Champagne Poetry, as if underlining how he belongs in A-list company, and talks about himself in the third person as he outlines his power and influence. There’s a vast array of producers and numerous guest appearances including Jay-Z and Lil Wayne. Drake is at the top of his game on tracks like Knife Talk, Fountains and No Friends In The Industry, but no-one is editing Drake at this stage of the game, and most of the time Certified Lover Boy is almost as good as he thinks it is. Singer-songwriter Danny O’Donoghue has had enough of staring at the walls at home and is ready to do what he does best ... entertain people with music. The Script’s frontman says performing in arenas again will be “super-emotional and supercharged” as people start to come together again. “It feels like being let off the leash and going a bit crazy, but we all deserve it. Whatever makes you feel happy go and do it,” says the singer. “I’ve been at home like everyone else during lockdowns and the whole world has experienced this. “People have been really tested and the entire world has faced this challenge. Now we have the new normal.” Danny says people have suffered the loss of family, loved ones and friends and it feels like the best way to honour their memories going forward is to live life to the full and make the most of every moment. “The first lockdown felt like a bit of an extended holiday where you could have a barbecue and enjoy a few drinks at home, but the second lockdown was extreme and there was a real sense of urgency. People were looking for answers. It was a crazy place to be.” Danny has also had to come to terms with losing his mother Ailish to a brain aneurysm on Valentine’s Day last year and poured his grief into the band’s last album Sunsets And Full Moons. He says martial arts and Thai boxing have also helped him get through a lot – “beating up the pads instead of beating up myself” – but says his beloved music industry has suffered badly. “We’ve lost so many professional people behind the scenes. “They are doing other jobs like Danny with guitarist Mark Sheehan and drummer and bassist Glen Power driving for Amazon and I really hope we can get them back.” Now he and bandmates, Glen Power and Mark Sheehan, are counting down the days to when they can tour again with European dates starting this month. New career-spanning greatest hits album Tales From The Script is also released on October 1 with tracks including Hall Of Fame (featuring will.i.am) and Top 10 hits The Man Who Can’t Be Moved, For The First Time and Superheroes. The album also includes landmark moments and staples of their live show including Breakeven, their debut single We Cry, and Rain. The album will be followed by live performances in the UK and Ireland next year with Ella Henderson as special guest and two homecoming performances at Dublin’s 3Arena. It all celebrates a musical career that has included five UK number one albums, six billion streams, and more than two million ticket sales. Danny admits greatest hits albums are getting rarer as a lot of bands now only survive for a few records before breaking up and are not around long enough to notch up enough bestselling tracks to bring out one. He says the band’s fans have also remained loyal over the years. “Like everyone, I’ve missed being with family and friends and playing for our fans. I want to give them a great night. They have given me a life, a roof over my head and clothes on my back.” Danny spent lockdown with his girlfriend and says relationships that were fractured have broken during the last year, while strong relationships have grown even stronger. “If you had a problem with yourself, you had to face yourself,” he points out. “If you had a problem with a relationship you had to face each other. If you had a strong relationship if became stronger and if it was broken it became fractured. What would have taken four years in relationship terms has taken just a year.” The band have been rehearsing every day and are looking forward to performing live again. Danny jokes he will be word perfect by then when it comes to lyrics, adding: “We’ve written a lot of songs about love and you sometimes go ‘which one is this’. It’s the second verses that can trip you up.” He says they also want to be positive for the future and bring that positivity to audiences. “The Tales From The Script album is a springboard to our next chapter, but it’s also our story so far,” says Danny. “We’re so excited to be taking it on the road. I know I’m gonna lose it on stage, night after night.” ■■For album and tour details go to thescript music.com

24 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Books My career has blossomed since talking about my mental health... Acclaimed actor David Harewood, star of Homeland and Supergirl, was just 23 and fresh out of Rada when he suffered a psychotic breakdown, during which he had to be physically detained by six police officers, sedated and then sectioned under the Mental Health Act. He had spent weeks walking all over London talking to strangers and blacking out, waking up in a different part of town hours later, with no idea what had happened in between. Recreational weed smoking only exacerbated the situation. Eventually, after an episode dominated by the booming voice of Martin Luther King in his head, several friends took him to hospital. “I was highly disturbed and I do remember being physically restrained and I was absolutely terrified. I’d lost my mind. The demons were coming to get me. But I was really lucky to come through it,” the actor says today. In 2019, David, now 55, appeared in the BBC documentary Psychosis and Me, in which he charted his ordeal, and has now followed this up with Maybe I Don’t Belong Here, his written account in which he describes how he has come to understand the extent to which his psychosis and subsequent treatment was rooted in race and racism. His Barbadian father, Romeo, had been sectioned when David was 15, and diagnosed with hypermania, and the book became a love letter to his father, he says. The actor, who has spent the best part of the last decade in the US and Canada because of better job opportunities, explains: “With the David suffered racial abuse as a young boy David Harewood talks to Hannah Stephenson about his psychotic breakdown, racism and why the US is a better place for a British black actor than the UK death of George Floyd, I started thinking about what the whole Black Lives Matter thing was trying to say. I’d seen the marches around the world and the outpouring of support and revulsion and started to notice that in England there was this hesitation to support, or instantly there was a rejection of Black Lives Matter, an instant (attitude) of, ‘Oh, that doesn’t happen here, that’s in America’. Actually that’s not true. “It made me think of how difficult my youth was growing up. This ‘denialism’ that we are so good at in England was a real spark for me to try to find a way of navigating into the argument, which wasn’t trying to shout at people.” David was born in Birmingham, the son of Barbadian parents who arrived in Britain in 1957 looking for a better life. From a young age he and his family were subjected to racist attacks, from a brick through the window to excrement through the letterbox. His parents warned the young David and his three siblings that there were certain white people who didn’t like them and were told to watch out for one another whenever they left the house. “I grew up watching Benny Hill, Tommy Cooper and Freddie Starr and loving it, and naively feeling that I am those people,” he recalls. Yet racism was on his doorstep, he observes. The “walk from home to school was terrifying as a kid” as he didn’t know if he was going to be attacked, have something thrown at him or receive racist abuse. He adds: “But when I got to school I could be a clown and the life and soul of the classroom. That’s what led to me being an entertainer.” When he was seven, he was playing alone in the street when an David and his wife, Kirsty older white man approached him full of hatred and anger and told him, in no uncertain terms, to get out of his country. Today, he reflects: “That was the start of this crack in my identity. “People say to me, ‘It’s in the past, forget about it’ but it’s who I am. That’s what led to my breakdown.” He was sectioned for five days in a psychiatric hospital before returning home, where his mental health dipped again and the hallucinations and delusions loomed large, which resulted in another short stay in a locked psychiatric unit until he was discharged with a supply of anti-psychotic drugs. Slowly he recovered, and as his mother gradually reduced his tablet intake he got back much of the energy he’d been lacking. David finally returned to London to pursue his acting career, largely in the theatre, later becoming the first black actor to play Othello at the National Theatre. But the TV roles he secured were minor, which frustrated him. Then, almost broke, he was offered the role of CIA counterterrorism director David Estes in the American espionage thriller Homeland alongside Damian Lewis. “After 30 years of struggling, I was down to my last 80 quid and was taken by the Americans and put in a really prominent position in a great TV show. It has turned my entire career and life around.” He says it’s easier for a black person to get meatier roles in the US than in Britain, despite the racism issues there. “The roles I had in the States don’t compare with the TV roles I’d had for the previous 10 years in England, when I just didn’t have central roles. It was really frustrating coming on and doing a couple of lines here and a couple of lines there. “There’s a fantastic young genera- tion of black British talent – John Boyega, Daniel Kaluuya, Michaela Coel – which is just storming the world, and that’s tremendously exciting. Most of them are making movies in America but I hope there’s an industry here that can cope.” Filming in LA, New York and Vancouver has meant long periods away from his family, wife Kirsty and their two teenage daughters, who have remained in London. “We decided early on that we didn’t want to raise our children in America and I’m quite glad about that. It’s an insane country right now and scary. I didn’t want to bring them up in that environment. “As my career has got busier it’s difficult, but we have FaceTime, so I can still see their faces.” He is recognised over here but people often mistake him for another famous actor, David says. “I’m constantly being confused with Idris Elba, which I always find hilarious. I remember a day when this guy came up to me and said, ‘I really like your work – when’s Luther back on?’” He reflects that racism is tackled more openly in the US than the UK. “I’m not saying America is the promised land in any way,” he notes. “Racism fear really upset me as a kid and I didn’t want to deal with it, whereas in America you David Harewood describes his new book as a love letter to his father, Romeo, who was sectioned when David was 15 have no choice. Parents will sit their children down and say, ‘These are the things you have to be careful of: the police, the authorities etc’. “You have to educate them to the threats they are likely to encounter. I was too busy dealing with it on my own.” “The scars of slavery and the struggle for black emancipation are much more prominent and understood, and are much more of an open wound in America. Over here, we don’t have the numbers to have these great civil rights movements.” He has been having therapy on and off since the age of 27, most recently when the documentary opened old wounds which he needed to deal with. Since the documentary, many have approached him to thank him for addressing the problem of mental health. “My career has actually blossomed since talking about it. We are on the cusp of a real revolution when it comes to bringing mental health to the fore. I can’t tell you the amount of tweets and messages I get saying thank you. But there’s still a long way to go to break the stigma.” ■■Maybe I don’t Belong Here by David Harewood is published by Bluebird, £20

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 25 Books REVIEWS fiction Freckles by Cecilia Ahern, HarperCollins, £16.99, ebook £10.99 HHHHI Cecilia Ahern – best known for her debut novel PS, I Love You – is back with her latest offering, Freckles. Misfit country girl Allegra ‘Freckles’ Bird moves to Dublin to achieve her dreams, but as reality sets in, she realises she isn’t exactly who she hoped she would become. A tense encounter with a stranger sets her on a journey to uncover the five people who have made her who she is, and in pursuit, she begins to uncover what truly defines her. This is fresh and timely, picking apart Allegra’s character thoughtfully without cliché or judgement. Asking boldly what and who make us who we are, Freckles teams wit and wisdom harmoniously – albeit wrapped in a slightly saccharine bow. pick of the week Snow Country by Sebastian Faulks, Hutchinson, £20, ebook £9.99 HHHHI Snow Country returns to the Schloss Seeblick sanatorium in Austria, loosely following Faulks’ 2005 novel Human Traces. The clinic is as much a personality as the two main characters, Anton and Lena – he a journalist, fortunate enough to travel before being plunged into the German trenches of the Western Front, and she an impoverished, uneducated child of a prostitute Beautiful World, Where Are You by Sally Rooney, Faber & Faber, £16.99, ebook £8.99 HHIII The cult of Sally Rooney is so strong – her work has been adapted into an awardwinning TV programme, and her style has inspired waves of new writers – it’s easy to forget the latest release is looking for somewhere, or someone, to call home. Through all the political turbulence, love and loss, Schloss Seeblick is a place of calm – both for the characters that end up there, and for us, through Faulks’ flawless prose. Snow Country’s pensive wandering expresses mental resilience and wistful yearning in a love story that struggles to bloom in the lugubrious period between two world wars. only her third book. Beautiful World, Where Are You is unmistakeably Sally Rooney: but magnified to an extent it almost seems like a parody. Alice – a famous writer who has moved to the seaside after a mental breakdown – and Eileen – her best friend living in Dublin with a nice but unfulfilling job – are the central characters, along with the two men in their lives: Felix and Simon. There’s not too much plot in the book – it’s more of a meditation on life when you’re in the tail end of your 20s, and every second chapter is a long email between the two women. This format hinders the flow of the book – it feels like pages of selfindulgent musings about life, sex, capitalism and more. It’s heavy-handed and has none of the emotional heart of Rooney’s previous books. Non-fiction The Transgender Issue: An Argument For Justice by Shon Faye, Allen Lane, £20, ebook £9.99 HHHHI Few books are as urgent as trans activist and journalist Shon Faye’s debut. She covers the dire situation facing the trans community today. The analysis is thorough and heartbreaking. It’s a highly fact-based book backed up with statistics and case studies, but Faye manages to write it in a hugely emotive and powerful way. Top Tens bestsellers 1. The Song Of Achilles: Madeline Miller 2. The Dark Remains: Ian Rankin & William McIlvanney 3. A Slow Fire Burning: Paula Hawkins 4. Magpie: Elizabeth Day 5. Snow Country: Sebastian Faulks 6. How To Kill Your Family: Bella Mackie 7. The Heron’s Cry: Ann Cleeves 8. The Women Of Troy: Pat Barker 9. Freckles: Cecelia Ahern 10. 1979: Val McDermid Chart courtesy of Waterstones ebooks 1. One August Night: Victoria Hislop 2. The Holiday: T.M. Logan 3. Find Them Dead: Peter James 4. Dark Sacred Night: Michael Connelly 5. All That Remains: Sue Black 6. The Road Trip: Beth O’Leary 7. The Whistler: John Grisham 8. The Last Letter from Your Lover: Jojo Moyes 9. The Only Plane in the Sky: Garrett M. Graff 10. Beautiful World, Where Are You: Sally Rooney Chart courtesy of the Kindle store at Amazon Monica Wills House Set in the heart of Bedminster, stylish one and two bedroom apartments offer all the advantages of independent living with a vibrant community scene. From the panoramic roof garden vistas, to delicious dining, discover why the St Monica Trust offers the very best in retirement living. To find out more please call 0117 919 4256 For available apartments please visit www.stmonicatrust.org.uk Registered Charity 202151

26 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Soaps WHO’S DADDY? THE After Rainie posts flyers saying Max is the father of Linda’s child, Mick decides it’s time to show her who she’s messing with EASTENDERS BBC1 Linda is determined that Mick will be her baby’s legal father once he signs the birth certificate, but Rainie has other ideas as she posts flyers claiming Max is the real dad. So, Mick decides to take matters into his own hands, leaving Rainie and Stuart shocked. Bobby, Dana, Waseem, Iqra and Kioni are also handing out flyers, but theirs are in support of the local mosque. They attract the attention of a group of aggressive men, who start throwing out racial slurs before assaulting Dana. Whitney’s latest gig Rainie finds herself in Mick’s crosshairs goes well until Rocky spots Sonia’s new love interest Ethan kissing another woman and punches him. What will this mean for Whitney’s career and Sonia’s budding romance? Also, Patrick gives his blessing to Isaac’s plan to move Lola in, but Sheree is less impressed as she tries to push ahead with her Trinidad plan. Meanwhile, Denise finds herself shocked when the headteacher tells her that Isaac still has a job there, before finding Sheree showing an estate agent around the house. Elsewhere, Martin drowns his sorrows and Kat encourages Janine to get an above-board job. TAKING THE MICK: Rainie’s flyers have Mick on the warpath HOME AND AWAY Channel 5 Martha suggests holding a fundraiser for mental health awareness and Ryder tries to persuade Bella to get involved but she’s not interested. Cash has a breakthrough in his attempts to woo Jasmine, after she tells Irene she’s agreed to a date with him, while poor Dean is knocked for six when Ziggy drops a bombshell about Tane, after chatting with Mackenzie. As Mia decides to go back to work, Ari frets that it’s still too soon. Mercedes is forced to face facts HOLLYOAKS Channel 4 Mia decides to go back to work Mercedes has been putting off telling Bobby about the end of her marriage in the hope the relationship can still be salvaged, but when Sylver returns home, he tells his stepson the truth. Meanwhile, after overhearing Yazz and Tom rowing about her presence, Cher claims that her dad has forgiven her and she’s moving back to The Dog. In reality, she has nowhere to go, and soon hits rock bottom. Emmerdale ITV Marlon and Chas are forced to close the Woolpack when the electric cuts out, but what they don’t know is that someone has deliberately severed the external mains cable. Charity later walks in on a hooded intruder making off with the contents of the pub till, but the thief leaves her unconscious in a pool of blood. She’s taken to the hospital, where Chas is distraught to hear her cousin is suffering from a bleed on Kim tries to get Paddy to dope her racehorse Charity is knocked out by the intruder the brain. Will Charity pull through? Meanwhile, Paddy is horrified at the idea of having Al as a co-owner of the Woolpack, and asks Kim to help get rid of him. She points out it’s actually in her best interests if Al is distracted from HOP and says the vet will have to sweeten the deal – by doping her racehorse. Also, Diane is horrified when she realises Gabby is planning to elope with Jamie, but what the would-be bride doesn’t know is that he’s busy trying to convince Dawn that they can runaway together. CORONATION STREET ITV Alya accepts Zeedan’s loan, but when he belatedly tries to play the protective big brother by having a go at Ryan for cheating on her, she points out that he wasn’t there when she and Yasmeen really needed him. It seems Zeedan could have an ulterior method for coming back now, as he is later found bleeding and battered in the ginnel. He initially hints to the police that Ryan was behind the attack, before coming clean to his family about being in serious trouble. Elsewhere, grieving Freda is hurt when Bernie claims that Aled will be ‘normal’ once he’s got his cochlear implant. She offers to take the youngster for a walk and then disappears with him, just as Gemma and Chesney are about to take their son for his operation. Norris manages to stir up trouble at his own funeral thanks to a final letter, a row between David and Daniel over the teacher’s supposed favouritism threatens to get out of hand, and Kelly is convinced her dad must be the anonymous donor who’s paid her legal fees. Zeedan is attacked Neighbours Channel 5 Toadie ends up kissing Rose The rumblings of dissent among the Lassiters’ staff at Harlow’s nepotistic appointment turn into a fullscale strike. Terese is grateful for Jesse’s support during the tense time, but a slip of the tongue leaves her working to smooth things over. There’s woe for Toadie, who vows to remain at Melanie’s side, only to lose his head with Rose. He comes clean about it, but it’s obvious he has no idea what he wants.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 27 EVERYBODY’S TALKING ABOut JAMIE HHHII Reviews by Damon Smith Life’s a drag, in the best possible sense, in Everybody’s Talking About Jamie, a defiantly feel-fabulous film version of the awardwinning coming-of-age musical. Theatre director Jonathan Butterell makes his feature film debut with a faithful stage-toscreen adaptation, expanding the rousing song and dance numbers beyond the classrooms and hallways of a secondary school in Sheffield to follow the out and proud 16-year-old hero as he chases a dream of attending the end-ofyear prom as his authentic self, in heels and a dress. Jenny Popplewell’s celebrated 2011 TV documentary Jamie: Drag Queen At 16 provides the narrative framework (footage of the real Jamie and his mother festoons the end credits) which Tom MacRae’s script embroiders with energetically choreographed dream sequences and wrenching ballads from the heart. “This story really happened... then we added the singing and dancing,” cheekily declares the film. Jamie New (Max Harwood) celebrates his 16th birthday with a gift of glittery red heels from his supportive mother, Margaret (Sarah Lancashire). Classmate Dean Paxton (Samuel Bottomley) bullies Jamie but he deflects barbs flanked by best friend Pritti Pasha (Lauren Patel) and SOURCES OF STRENGTH: Richard E Grant plays a local drag artist and Sarah Lancashire is Jamie’s mum A BIG NIGHT OUT Riotous musical follows teenager’s struggle to overcome homophobia and attend his prom as his true self The story is peppered with musical numbers escapes into song-and-dance fantasies. Careers adviser Miss Hedge (Sharon Horgan) laments Jamie’s life goal of performing on stage. Unfazed, the teenager recruits Hugo Battersby (Richard E Grant) aka drag doyenne Loco Chanelle as his mentor to step confidently into the spotlight. Jamie’s rise to stilettoed greatness is hampered by selfdoubt and shame, sown by his estranged homophobic father (Ralph Ineson). With music courtesy of Dan Gillespie Sells from rock group The Feeling, the songs resonate in widescreen including The Wall In My Head, Don’t Even Know It and He’s My Boy, a heartfelt ballad about a mother’s unconditional love, which Sarah Lancashire delivers with tears in her eyes. A new song, This Was Me, performed largely by Holly Johnson, lead singer of Frankie Goes To Hollywood, is a deeply moving memento mori to beautiful creatures lost to Aids. Powered by Harwood’s performance, Everybody’s Talking About Jamie is almost two hours of unabashed pure joy, which preaches acceptance and self-love with the same sequinned intensity as The Adventures Of Priscilla, Queen Of The Desert and Kinky Boots. There are dramatic lulls before Jamie’s big reveal as Mimi Me but Butterell understands how to get toes tapping. People will be talking, glowingly, about his Jamie. ■■In selected cinemas and on Amazon Prime Video now NEW STAR: Max Harwood shines as Jamie GUNPOWDER MILKSHAKE (15) HHIII Former Doctor Who star Karen Gillan has forged quite the Hollywood career as an action woman in films like Guardians of the Galaxy and Jumanji. She parades her fighting skills again in Gunpowder Milkshake as the daughter of Scarlet, (Lena Headey) an assassin for a shadowy syndicate called The Firm. When she leaves town in a hurry, Sam (Gillan) takes up the murderous mantle under mentor Nathan (Paul Giamatti). He despatches Scarlet to terminate “an accountant” but she inadvertently murders the son of crime lord Jim McAlester (Ralph Ineson) then disobeys orders to use The Firm’s cash as ransom money for the dead accountant’s eight-year-old daughter, Emily (Chloe Coleman). Films NOVICE KILLER: Karen Gillan Nathan has no choice but to issue a kill order against Scarlet. She seeks sanctuary with three librarians – Anna May (Angela Bassett), Florence (Michelle Yeoh) and Madeleine (Carla Gugino) – who hide weapons in handsomely bound copies of classic novels. Gunpowder Milkshake is an explosive and fitfully entertaining melee that puts John Wick and Kill Bill in a blender. Body counts are high but emotionally satisfying thrills are in shorter supply. ■■In selected cinemas and on Sky Cinema now 12 MIGHTY ORPHANS (12A) HHIII In the aftermath of the Great Depression, war hero Rusty Russell (Luke Wilson) transplants his wife Juanita (Vinessa Shaw) and two young daughters from Temple in Texas to the dustbowl of Fort Worth. Husband and wife take teaching positions at The Masonic Home and School for around 150 orphans run by brutish disciplinarian Frank Wynn (Wayne Knight). While Juanita concentrates on moulding girls into ladies, Rusty inspires the boys in the classroom and then heads outside to assemble a ragtag American football team, featuring grief-stricken new arrival Hardy (Jake Austin Walker), who was found by police at the scene of his father’s suicide by shotgun. The boys slowly bend to Rusty’s will, with encouragement from avuncular school medic Doc Hall (Martin Sheen). The newly-formed ‘Mighty Mites’ capture the public’s imagination, sparking a fierce TEAM SPIRIT: Luke Wilson and Martin Sheen star in a predictable feelgood offering rivalry with Polytechnic High School coached by Luther Scarborough (Lane Garrison). Slavish in its adherence to sports movie tropes, 12 Mighty Orphans builds to the obligatory championship showdown where Rusty’s life lessons are tested. Director Ty Roberts’ film huddles with Jim Dent’s bestselling book to celebrate the achievements of disadvantaged boys from Texas who inspired an embattled nation. It’s wholesome, old-fashioned fare, Luke Wilson chews lightly on his football coach’s stirring speeches, but it’s Walker who emerges as this film’s most valuable player. ■■In cinemas now

28 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Screen Shots Copshop let me go into a much darker, brutal, ruthless mind BREAKING BAD: Gerard Butler relished not playing the hero for once and have fun Gerard Butler is no stranger to saving the world. In fact he’s made a long career of it. The 51-year-old Scottish star is best known for playing characters intent on doing the right thing, think Spartan warrior Leonidas in 300, a man determined to seek justice for his family in Law Abiding Citizen and fearless Secret Service agent Mike Banning in Olympus Has Fallen and its sequels. But he decided to take a walk on the dark side in his new movie Copshop, in which he plays a hitman who hunts his latest target, a conman played by Frank Grillo, into the confines of a small- town police station. “It was another muscle to stretch creatively,” Gerard offers in his distinctive Scottish burr, “to go into a much darker, brutal, ruthless, mysterious mind and have fun with that, because I normally play the guys trying to put an end to them. “It’s almost like changing from prosecuting attorney to defence attorney, swapping to look at things the other way, but it’s always fun to change it up and try something different.” Gerard had been keen to make the film since 2015, when he first read an early draft of a screenplay outlining a cat-and-mouse game between a con artist and the hitman who’s sent to take him out. “I always loved the idea and every now and again you just want to make a movie that is outrageous, entertaining, tense, mad, irreverent. So I always had it in my back pocket, and suddenly, in the middle of a pandemic, it felt like that was a good time to make it, a story about everybody trapped in a small space and just wanting to explode outside of that space. It felt kind of right,” he explains. So, when director Joe Carnahan, the filmmaker behind Blood, Guts, Bullets and Octane, Smokin’ Aces and The A-Team, called him up to ask him if he was ready to go, Gerard didn’t have to think twice. “We’d always said we were going to work together and Frank too, so why not? Let’s just do it now, shoot it quick, just real guerilla filmmak- I was watching a lot of Clint Eastwood, movies... to prepare for this... Alexis Louder Gerard Butler is used to swooping in to save the day but he takes a turn to the dark side in Copshop. He tells Laura Harding why CAGED KILLER: Gerard plays hitman Bob Viddick Inspiration: Western legend Clint Eastwood ing, and try and get all of that mayhem and excitement and highoctane energy.” The film finds Gerard’s contract killer Bob Viddick chasing wily con artist Teddy Murretto (Grillo) through the Nevada desert, until Teddy hatches a desperate plan to hide out and save himself – he sucker-punches a rookie police officer, played by Alexis Louder, to get himself arrested and locked up in a small-town police station, out of harm’s way. Viddick schemes his own way into detention, biding his time in a nearby cell until he can carry out the hit, but when a competing assassin, played by Toby Huss, arrives, mayhem ensues, with Alex’s cop Valerie Young caught in the crosshairs. “I was watching a lot of Clint Eastwood... movies like Dirty Harry and The Good, The Bad And The Ugly, to prepare for this because it did give me western vibes,” Alexis remembers. “Valerie just has this thirst for justice by any means, and she’s trying to get to the truth between Bob Viddick and Teddy Mercado and she can trust neither of them.” But for the actress, who previously starred opposite Chris Pratt in The Tomorrow War and with Regina King in the Watchmen TV series, watching movies was not enough. She also had to do some practical hands-on preparation. “I had no law enforcement experience, I had zero gun-slinging experience, the weapons that I’ve used in the past were automatic. The Blackhawk (the weapon Valerie uses) was a manual gun, so I had to work with a gunslinger on how to do the tricks and how to change the cylinder, that was a lot of practice. “There were certain times where I thought I might have lost the ligaments in my finger but, through the frustration of actually practising that for so long, I was just like ‘Alexis it’s gonna be so rewarding when you actually get it’ and now I watch that opening shot (where she performs a stunning routine of gunplay) I think, ‘That’s me, that’s my hand and I did that’.” Gerard was also excited to make a film that would stand alone, as Alexis Louder as Valerie Young something chaotic, grimy and nerve-shredding. “It’s a movie that’s not really like others,” he says. “It has elements of others, like Tarantino or Guy Ritchie, but at the same time, it’s completely its own beast in how weird and exciting it is. “I knew that there were so many fun, compelling, shocking characters, and the way they all have to face off against each other. I knew if we could, we would get some great actors in there, like, Alexis, and Frank and Toby Hoss, then we can really have a movie that is incredibly thrilling, exciting, compelling, shocking, hilarious, surreal, and then it just builds and builds. “We talked about those westerns with a small town sheriff, and the bad guy comes in, but then the worse guy comes in, another bad guy comes in and it just goes from bad to worse. “There is a real pressure-cooker feeling and weirdly, as the movie goes on, most thrillers extend out, they get bigger, but by the end this almost gets tighter and tighter with more people in a smaller space, and it’s unbelievable how they can’t quite get to each other but they’re all like cobras waiting to pounce.” ■■Copshop is in cinemas now

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 29 Sex Education heads to Africa in the new series with a powerful storyline as we see Eric return to his homeland Nigeria. But actor Ncuti Gatwa, 28, didn’t get to enjoy a jolly abroad because the scenes had to be filmed in Wales due to coronavirus. He says: “We had plans to film abroad, but then Covid happened, so we had to recreate Nigeria in Wales. “Our production designer Samantha Harley made the most wonderful set, down to the sand and gravel she imported from Nigeria.” Ncuti also reveals how scenes showing his lovable character Eric visit Nigeria as a gay man will have a huge impact on viewers. He explains: “I felt a lot of pressure, I think we all did, to get that storyline right. “Eric is half Nigerian and half Ghanaian, and this trip back to Nigeria is a huge part of his journey this season. He reconnects with his family. “Eric’s very proud of his heritage and yet it’s an undeniable fact that being gay is illegal in Nigeria. “Quite often, when we talk about LGBTQ storylines on TV, they’re focused on white characters. Eric meets a character named Oba who helps him become more aware of all parts of himself – a black man, a gay man and a Nigerian man.” Describing Gen Z-ers as “so socially aware”, Baftanominated Ncuti says of the hit show: “We’re expanding so many conversations regarding gender and sexuality and I think [Sex Education] just hit gold with the timing.” Opening with a montage of sexual encounters that’s sure to make you sit up and pay attention, the third series of Sex Education, penned by returning Bafta-nominated writer Laurie Nunn, starts as it means to go on. It tackles everything from penis size insecurities to the long-term mental health concerns arising from character Aimee Gibbs’ sexual assault aboard a bus in the last series. Played by 26-year-old Aimee Lou Woods, who won a Bafta for her on-screen portrayal, the continuation of Aimee’s assault story was of vital importance to her. “Sex Education is very true to life in the way that it conveys that things don’t just get better and better and better,” reflects Aimee Lou. “Things go up and down all the time. I think that it was lovely that she gets on the bus with the girls and there’s that beautiful moment, and then it’s all like, ‘Oh, yay. She’s better’. But of course, that is not real life. “And actually, that was the start of her journey. It wasn’t the end.” Describing the way in which her character took “steps forward” last series thanks to the support of her female peers, Aimee Lou is quick to emphasise that “growth is a process”. “It’s going to be with her forever – and that’s what she hears in therapy. It’s going to be with her forever. And it’s altered her forever.” With actress Gillian Anderson returning as sex therapist Dr Jean F Milburn, who is now heavily pregnant, we find Moordale Secondary School under the new leadership of headmistress Hope Haddon, played by Screen Shots Covid happened... so we had to recreate Nigeria in Wales Ncuti Gatwa as Eric As Bafta Award-winning comedy Sex Education returns, we talk to the cast about what to expect and the trials of shooting a series in a pandemic L-R: Aimee Lou Wood as Aimee Gibbs, Emma Mackey as Maeve Wiley and Asa Butterfield as Otis Milburn Girls’ star Jemima Kirke. Revamping the school in a matriarchal fashion, Hope’s iron-fist approach to education is not to the liking of everyone. From the demolition of the toilet block once used as a sex clinic by Maeve Wiley and Otis Milburn, to the implementation of school uniforms, the show’s central characters find themselves united against a common evil. “The uniforms were a little triggering,” recalls Asa Butterfield, 24, who reprises his role as Dr Milburn’s son Otis alongside Maeve (Emma Mackey). “It’s a great part of the show, but I think one of the things I loved is everyone on set’s individuality,” continues Asa, best known for his roles in Nanny McPhee and The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas. “But of course, that’s one of the point of the uniforms, it’s to see what happens when you take that away.” ■■Sex Education series 3 is on Netflix now

30 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 TV Highlights Bread alert Last autumn fans rejoiced as The Great British Bake Off returned under exceptional circumstances and this year is no different. For much like before, all those involved in the popular Channel 4 show, which sees passionate amateur bakers compete to be crowned the UK’s best, were obliged to test and self-isolate before entering into a Covid-free bubble. In this case, a six-week stay at the luxurious Down Hall Hotel. A long time away from family, maybe. But if its predecessor is anything to go by (a whopping average of 9.2 million viewers tuned in to witness Peter Sawkins triumph last November), its imminent 12th series will be well worth the extra measures. “We were in a lovely hotel, getting really good food, I had my dog with me, and we’re eating cake for a living – so you can hardly complain about the job!” quips Prue Leith, who returns as a co-judge alongside veteran Paul Hollywood. “So even saying that I found it a little longer and I missed home seems ungracious, because there are people who have had a horrible lockdown.” “There was [also] yoga, meditating, tennis, pizza nights,” lists Paul, 55. “Prue taught floristry skills; I taught a load of people how to use nunchucks...” “And we could play boules, old ladies can play boules, which I enjoyed,” restaurateur Prue, 81, interjects. “It’s about all I can do now as I can’t play tennis, I can’t go riding, I can’t do any of the things that I used to do, so boules it is!” Competition is in tents: This year’s Bake Off contestants Strictly Come Dancing Tomorrow, BBC1, 7.45pm The celebrity line-up has been announced, and it’s time to find out who the stars have been paired with as Tess Daly and Claudia Winkleman host the Strictly launch show. A couple of the celebs are about to make Strictly history as EastEnders actress Rose Ayling-Ellis becomes the first deaf contestant, and Great British Bake Off winner John Whaite forms the first all-male partnership. The stars will take to the floor for a group dance, and we’ll discover what the judges – including veteran dancer Anton Du Beke, who is stepping in for Bruno Tonioli – think of their chances. The Great British Bake Off is back and it may be the most skilled batch of amateur bakers yet, judges Paul Hollywood and Prue Leith tell Gemma Dunn Also partaking in the “fun” are returning co-hosts Noel Fielding and Matt Lucas. All this in addition to the top-tier baking, of course. So just what can the judges tell us about the latest batch set to enter the famous white tent? “I think the youngest one was 19 and the oldest one nearly 70 – 69, so the usual mix,” Prue reveals. “Not one baker is like the other, I don’t know how the production company manages to do it! “I mean, I know that the first requirement is that they have to be fantastic bakers, but then they are TV PICKS OF THE WEEK Last Man Standing: Suge Knight and the Murders of Biggie and Tupac Sunday, BBC2, 9pm Documentary-maker Nick Broomfield looks at the unsolved murders of Biggie Smalls and Tupac Shakur, two hip-hop giants who ended up entangled in a turf war. Broomfield examines Death Row Records and how Los Angeles’ street gang culture came to dominate its just so interesting and so nice.” “The standard this year is certainly the highest I’ve ever encountered,” says Paul. “It starts like that and ends like that, so it’s pretty constant all the way through. “I think the semi-final was harder (to judge), to pick the three for the final!” “We did have very good bakers in the final,” Prue agrees, “If I had to choose one episode that I would say you have to watch, it’s the semifinal. They were so good that we had no idea who was going to win!” No disasters of note that would tip the scales, then. “There was a bit of a collapsing going on...,” offers Paul. “And there was the most overflavoured bake I’ve ever had on Bake Off,” Prue recalls. “It was unbelievably ill judged, and it was surprising because it came from a baker who was so good with flavour. It can happen to anyone. “But, and I know it sounds an odd thing to say, I actually prefer it when some of them are not so good as it’s much easier to judge if you have a few disasters. “You think: ‘Right, OK, that one’s out, that one’s out, that one’s out,” she reasons. “There was one business workings, as well as an association with corrupt LA police officers. Manhunt The Night Stalker Monday, ITV, 9pm In 2019, Manhunt chronicled the investigation into French student Amelie Delagrange’s murder, and its eventual connection to the deaths of Marsha McDonnell and Milly Dowler at the hands of serial killer Levi Bellfield. Written by Ed Whitmore, it starred Martin Clunes as Martin Clunes as DCI Colin Sutton tive ingredient week,” Paul says, last year having set a total of 30 different tasks. “And actually, it was very, very good standard. “But you’ll see how well Matt and Noel interpreted how I felt about it before it started...” “We’re both classically trained, me a cook, him a baker, so we tend to be approving of what we’re used to – the classic way to do things,” Prue explains. “I have always liked gluten-free cakes, for example, because gluten-free cakes could be flourless cakes like a chocolate roulade or something. “But where I think my prejudice shows is I was surprised that they could do so many amazing bakes with substitute ingredimoment, which was one of my signatures right towards the start of the competition, and I thought, ‘This is a good thing to do for a technical’, but in fact, they did it too well, and we were faced with 12 notquite-identical but damn-nearperfect bakes. “Well, how do you judge 12? It’s impossible; you have to rate them one to 12, and number one and number 12 are hardly any different. “They’re both sellable, perfect cakes that you’d pay good money in the shop for. “I’d much rather they were not such good bakers.” So they’re a skilled bunch – but just what challenges can fans expect to see? “Well, we have alterna- Paul and Prue on the red carpet ex-London Metropolitan Police detective, DCI Colin Sutton. Whitmore and Clunes are back, exploring a case that went unsolved for almost two decades. Based on Sutton’s diaries, it follows the police pursuit of a serial rapist, whose 17-year reign of terror left thousands of elderly people in south east London living in fear. A House Through Time Tuesday, BBC2, 9pm David Olusoga’s search through the history of a house in Leeds is up to 1913, when Number 5 is home to the respectable couple Frederick and Louisa Pryce Lewis. A look through their photo album puts David on the trail of their son Walter, who went to the battlefields of Gallipoli before returning to Leeds and a life of crime. The next residents were textiles chemist Percival King and wife Rose, whose seemingly happy family was torn apart when Percival admitted himself to a psychiatric institution. Grand Designs Wednesday, Channel 4, 9pm Kevin McCloud meets teacher Gretta, who moved to Malaysia 17 years ago with her husband Ray and two sons. Then, a couple of years ago,

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 31 Great British Bake Off judges Paul Hollywood and Prue Leith (centre) with hosts Noel Fielding (far left) and Matt Lucas (on the right) TV FILMs of the week TV Highlights 1 Detroit Tomorrow, BBC2, 11.15pm Kathryn Bigelow’s slow-burning John Boyega in Detroit fact-based thriller picks at the fresh wounds of divided race relations in America by reliving one tragic night in a fractured city that resulted in the deaths of three black teenagers at the Algiers Motel. Detroit skilfully weaves together multiple character arcs, building to a protracted sequence of gut-wrenching terror that draws uncomfortable parallels with the present day. Hand-held camerawork stokes tension and sweat-drenched performances from a fine ensemble cast, headed by John Boyega, are horribly believable. ents you know, using, erm...” “Butter?” Paul interrupts. “Well to cook without butter would seem to me to be impossible, but actually it’s perfectly possible and the bakers prove it!” Prue adds. “It was good for us. I learned something all the time [because] I mean the bakers are, let’s face it, obsessed with cakes and baking. “They absolutely live, breathe and think about baking all the time, and so they are way ahead of me anyway on techniques and ingredients!” “I almost rely on the bakers to introduce me into this world of alternative ingredients,” Paul concludes, “I’ve been surprised!” From butter-free cakes to damehood, it’s certainly been a summer to remember for Prue, who was among a host of stars recognised on the Queen’s Birthday Honours list this June, notably for her services to food, broadcasting, and charity. “When it was announced that I was a dame, [Paul] bought me tragedy struck when Ray died. Gretta returned to the UK and went to live with her sister Mary and brother-in-law Fernando in rural Cambridgeshire, in a caravan. She has now bought part of their garden as a building plot and employed her nephew Carlos to design her a Malaysian-inspired, single-storey pavilion. With a budget of £300k and a schedule of seven months, they’re up against it. Taskmaster Thursday, Channel 4, 9pm Series 12 of the hilarious comedy game show sees QI’s Alan Davies, comedian Desiree Burch, Man Like I actually prefer it when some of them are not so good as it’s much easier to judge if you have a few disasters Prue Leith on judging Bake Off some really fancy champagne, and we had a party at about three o’clock in the afternoon,” Prue reveals. “It was everything, you know, flowers and cake, a sing along, it was great. I felt like a child with a birthday party only with alcohol!” “I’ve worked with three dames, Dame Prue, Dame Mary [Berry] and Dame Edna [Everage], and I won’t bow to any of them!” Paul teases. “But I mean, good on her. Prue’s done an amazing job, so we had a little bit of a party and then we added ‘Dame’ at the beginning Taskmaster is back Mobeen’s Guz Khan, The Windsors star Morgana Robinson and Only Connect’s Victoria Coren Mitchell take on a range of outrageous tasks in a bid to impress the Taskmaster, Greg Davies. As usual, Alex Horne is on hand of her name on the hut.” “It was on a little wooden plaque with a rope over it so I could lift it off, and I took it home with me,” says Prue. “I don’t know where I’ll put it, but I’ll put it somewhere!” Do they feel a stronger bond, having bubbled up for the last couple of years? “I feel I know these three guys better than I did Mel [Giedroyc], Sue [Perkins] and Mary, for instance,” Paul confides, referring to the show’s previous lineup. “You know sometimes you can sit in the same room as a really close friend and not say anything for half an hour and feel quite comfortable with that... “(Whereas) if you feel you have to fill that space with voices, then you know that’s because you’re slightly uneasy about something.” “So it’s more like family then?” Prue asks. “Yeah it is,” finishes Paul. “A really weird dysfunctional family.” ■■The Great British Bake Off is on Channel 4 on Tuesday at 8pm to welcome the contestants to the Taskmaster house and keep score The Graham Norton Show Friday, BBC1, 10.35pm There is less than a week before the 25th entry in the James Bond canon No Time to Die, hits cinemas. The Covid-19 delayed flick is the final outing for Daniel Craig as 007. He joins French star Lea Seydoux to discuss the movie and we’ll hear from Rami Malek, who plays villain Safin, alongside Lashana Lynch, who has been touted as a potential replacement for Craig. Also tonight, Ed Sheeran will perform his new single Shivers. The rock 2 Sunday, Channel 5, 10.25pm A US General (Ed Harris) takes tourists hostage at Alcatraz prison, demanding the government pay compensation to families of Marines killed during covert operations. After he threatens to release chemical weapons, an FBI chemist (Nicolas Cage) recruits John Patrick Mason (Sean Connery, left), the only man to ever escape Alcatraz, to help. The Devil Wears Prada 3 Monday, Film4, 6.45pm Anne Hathaway shines as Andy Sachs who lands a plum job as second assistant to fearsome fashion editor Miranda Priestly (Meryl Streep, left with Hathaway). Andy is unprepared for the challenges catering to her tyrannical boss’s every whim. Watch out for a star-making turn from Emily Blunt (pictured right), too. The Silence of the Lambs 4 Tuesday, ITV4, 10.30pm Jonathan Demme’s terrifying treatment of the Thomas Harris novel sees Jodie Foster, left, play FBI trainee Clarice Starling, who is eager to please her superior, Jack Crawford (Scott Glenn). He implores Clarice to earn the trust of cannibal murderer Dr Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins) in order to track down serial killer Buffalo Bill. 5 Whiplash Wednesday, BBC2, 11.15pm Drummer Andrew Neiman (Miles Teller, left) is determined to excel at his Manhattan music conservatory, and catches the eye of the school’s most revered teacher, Terence Fletcher (JK Simmons). Andrew transfers to Fletcher’s class, but the game of one-upmanship between teacher and pupil spirals out of control in this drama. Lone Survivor 6 Thursday, ITV4, 11.20pm Mark Wahlberg, left, plays one of four Navy SEALs on a top-secret mission to find a high-ranking Taliban member. When three shepherds stumble upon the SEALs’ hiding place, the soldiers must decide whether to shoot the locals or let them go, potentially compromising their safety, in this rousing tribute, based on a true story. A Monster Calls 7 Friday, BBC1, 11.25pm Fantasy drama. Schoolboy Conor O’Malley (Lewis MacDougall, left) is in denial about his mother’s terminal illness and seeks refuge in his drawings. As darkness falls, a nearby yew tree morphs into a gnarled creature (voiced by Liam Neeson) which promises to share three parables, demanding one thing in return: “Tell me your nightmare.”

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46 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 TV Pick Strictly Come Dancing Tomorrow, BBC1, 7.45pm Last year was one of the most challenging in Strictly Come Dancing’s history, as the team behind the show had to deal with Covid regulations, some of which were changing as the show was on the air. Admittedly, it’s not quite Strictly business as usual in 2021 either. Due to the uncertainty around international travel, it was announced earlier this year that Bruno Tonioli would not be returning as a judge for this series. He is being replaced by veteran dancer Anton Du Beke, who promises “to be kinder to all the couples than any of them have ever been to m e ”. Tomorrow, he’ll be taking to the panel alongside Motsi Mabuse, Shirley Ballas and Craig Revel Horwood, but we won’t find out if he’ll be sticking to his word about being kind just yet. That’s because as a launch show, tonight Tess Daly and Claudia Winkleman will be introducing viewers to this year’s crop of celebrities and pairing them up with their professional partners. They include Olympian Adam Peaty, actor Greg Wise and McFly’s Tom Fletcher. We’ll get a chance to assess their form when they take to the floor for a group number, while last year’s winner Bill Bailey returns to show them how it’s done. Then next week, the competition begins in earnest... Here we take a look at this year’s hopefuls: Adam Peaty, 26, Olympic gold medal-winning swimmer He says: “Honestly, I can’t wait! It’s just going to be different. “I spend my whole life in swimsuits and if I’m not doing that, it’s photoshoots covered in oil so now I get to change the oil to glitter!” Greg Wise, 55, actor He says: “I can’t dance! So that’s the challenge. I think I’m in good shape, I’m lucky that I’m able to keep active. I know I’ll still be thrust into the ground by my professional partner, obviously, and find muscles I never knew existed. “I’ve just got to learn how to dance, that’s the bottom line.” The Strictly professional dancers Strictly 2021 contestants, (L-R) Sara Davies, Ugo Monye, Nina Wadia, John Waite, Robert Webb, Rose Ayling-Ellis, Adam Peaty, Judi Love, Tom Fletcher, Tilly Ramsay, Rhys Stephenson, AJ Odudu, Dan Walker, Katie McGlynn, Greg Wise Who’s ready for a ballroom blitz? Spray tans, sequins and salsas means only one thing – Strictly is back. Jane Haase takes a look at the latest batch of celebs to hit the dancefloor Nina Wadia, 52, former EastEnders star She says: “This year feels like the perfect year to just let off steam. “It’s been a bit of a dark time for a lot of people, and it certainly was in our family as well, so I just want to go out and enjoy my life.” Robert Webb, 48, actor and comedian He says: “I’m up for an extreme costume. “You can spray me most colours but I just don’t want to look like Donald Trump.” Tom Fletcher, 35, singer in McFly and children’s author He says: “I’m so inflexible, I’m just trying to touch my toes, I don’t know what else I can do! “At the beginning of the year, when I first said yes, I said to myself I was going to get into really good shape and life just got in the way.” AJ Odudu, 33, TV presenter She says: “I have zero previous experience, and I mean zero! “I’ve never been to stage or drama school, but I’ve always liked clubbing. “I’m confident when it comes to hitting the dance floor, but whether I should be confident, I’ll leave it to everyone else at home to decide!” Dan Walker, 44, BBC Breakfast presenter He says: “Yes, I’m competitive but I haven’t reserved a spot for the Glitterball Trophy. I haven’t got that in my headspace in any way shape or form. “My idea is that I want to go home on a Saturday night, see the kids and hear ‘Dad, that was good!’ “If I get just one ‘Dad, that was good!’, that would be great.” Katie McGlynn, 28, former Coronation Street star She says: “Every year I watch Strictly Come Dancing and I think that everyone has the time of the life doing it, so I’ve always wanted to do it. Secretly, I’ve always wanted to be a dancer.” John Whaite, 32, former Great British Bake Off winner He says: “Between the ages of 10-14, I did ballet, modern and tap. “So I may have a few dancing bones in my body, but I’m not Strictly hosts Claudia Winkleman and Tess Daly necessarily very good rhythmically. “Ballet is very stiff and I can do a triple timestep but who knows what I will be like at ballroom or Latin!” Ugo Monye, 38, sports pundit and former rugby union player He says: “Both my girls, especially my eldest, Phoenix, love dance. She does ballet every single week. “She’s obsessed by it and now she’s of an age where she can watch the show and watch her daddy on TV. “So I’m really excited about that.” Judi Love, 41, stand-up comic and Loose Women panellist She says: “Everyone’s advice has just been enjoy, enjoy, enjoy and don’t worry about anything. And to really put myself into different characters every time I go onto the dancefloor. “Also, not to read anything on social media and not to see it as just a competition but to see it as I’m New judge Anton Du Beke and the man he’s replacing, Bruno Tonioli experiencing something that is a whole moment.” Rhys Stephenson, 27, CBBC presenter He says: “I’m in it for the experience, but I’m also in it to win. “For me, even when I am rubbish, I play to win. I want to know I’ve given it my all and shown what I can do.” Rose Ayling-Ellis, 26, plays Frankie in EastEnders She says: “I feel like it’s so important for somebody like me to be on the show, I want to break down the stereotype that deaf people can’t dance and can’t enjoy music.” Sara Davies, 37, Dragons’ Den star She says: “Deborah (Meaden) talks about it all the time and says it was one of the best experiences of her life. “Obviously, I wasn’t able to tell anybody I was doing it, so she didn’t know that when she was talking to me about it and I was asking her questions, it was because I was going on the show. I had to keep it top secret. “She said mainly your feet hurt a lot but other than that everything else is really positive!” Tilly Ramsay, 19, TV presenter and chef, daughter of Gordon She says: “I’m really excited to learn the waltz. It’s very elegant and graceful and something you can use that later on in life, I can keep that for a wedding!”

okd fashion | film | recipes | bookS issue 482 staying in & going out FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Peter Also inside Psychedelic furs, simon amstell & a midsummer night’s dream plus your 7-day tv listings perfect Peter andre chats to us as he gets ready to perform in Grease at the bristol hippodrome

01st Oct Sidmouth - 5 days £455.00pp 22nd Oct Autumn Colours - 2 days £199.00pp 25th Oct South Downs - 5 days £459.00pp 13th Nov Thursford - 3 days £380.00pp includes visits to Torquay, Donkey Sanctuary, Teignmouth and Weymouth. Visit Batsford Arboretum & Coughton Court. Staying in Chichester, visit Bluebell Railway, High Tea Spinnaker Tower & St Mary’s House. Tickets to the Christmas Spectacular, Norfolk Broads Cruise. 29th Nov Festive St Anne’s - 5 days £435.00pp 05th Dec Chatsworth at Christmas - 2 days £225.00pp 11th Dec Christmas at Windsor Castle - 2 days £199.00pp 23rd Dec Christmas in Norfolk - 5 days £729.00pp Christmas themed events, Blackpool Tower Tea dance, Ribble Valley Tour & Chester. Entrance to Chatsworth house, visit Stratford-Upon-Avon. Entrance to castle + free day London. Staying in Kings Lynn. Trip to Pantomime, scenic tour & festive foods & entertainment. 04th Feb Mystery Tour - 4 days £345.00pp 05th Mar Mountbatten Festival of Music - 2 days £255.00pp 07th Mar Cornwall All inclusive - 5 days £495.00pp 28th Mar Sidmouth - 5 days £470.00pp includes entertainment & excursions. The rest is a mystery. Festival at the Albert Hall + free day in London. Staying in Newquay - Visit Eden Project, Padstow, St ives , Entertainment, Pack lunches + Free bar in evening. Trips include Torquay, Donkey Sanctuary, Exeter & Bickleigh Mill.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 3 hellothere INSIDE. 8 4 Big Interview We meet the team behind Brown Rock Market Garden, who supply organic veg to a host of Bristol shops TO ADVERTISE Tracie Simms tracie.simms@reachplc.com 01179343165 ON THE COVER Peter Perfect Peter Andre in Grease - see pages 10&11 Photography: Sean Ebsworth Barnes CONTRIBUTORS Natalie Banyard, Mark Taylor, Tim Foster, Jeffrey Davies, Chris Rundle, Bee Bailey, and Rob Campbell Food & dRINK Jamie Oliver shares recipes from his new cookbook for meals made for get-togethers 12 what’s On The Psychedelic Furs are back - Mark Taylor looks ahead to their Bristol gig 24 books Actor David Harewood talks about psychosis, racism and how American TV saved him Corrections & Complaints If we have published anything that is factually inaccurate please contact the editor, Bill Martin, via email bill.martin@reachplc.com or write to The Editor, Bristol Post, 1 Temple Way, Bristol, BS2 0BY. Once verified, we will correct it as soon as possible. The Bristol Post newspaper is published by Local World a subsidiary company of Reach PLC, which is a member of IPSO, the Independent Press Standards Organisation. We adhere to the Editors’ Code of Practice as enforced by IPSO, who are contactable for advice at IPSO, GateHouse, 1 Farringdon Street, London EC4M 7LG. Website http://www. ipso.co.uk, telephone 0300 123 2220, email advice@ipso.co.uk If you have a complaint concerning a potential breach of the Code of Practice, we will deal with your complaint directly or IPSO can refer your complaint to us. Please go to http://www.@reachplc.com/ howtocomplain where you can view our Complaints Policy and Procedure. A ‘How to Complain’ pack is also available by writing to the Legal and Compliance Department, Reach PLC,One Canada Square, Canary Wharf,London E14 5AP. 30 tv highlights Bake Off is back on our screens this week - Prue Leith and Paul Hollywood give us the lowdown IN YOUR AREA Get everything you need to know about where you live with our app or via InYourArea.co.uk

4 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Big Feature Seasons to be cheerful On a one-acre plot in North Somerset, Brown Rock Market Garden grows East Friesian palm kale, ananas noire, turnips and tomatoes. BEE BAILEY chats about pollinators, pesticides and lunch WHEN Ria Marshall and Anna Barrett stop for lunch in the middle of their working day, there are no sandwiches with curled up edges, or plastic boxes filled with last night’s leftovers, and definitely nothing grabbed from the supermarket on the way in - it’s a freshly prepped salad or something inspired by Japanese cooking, some succulent tomatoes straight off the vine, leaves that have been picked in the last few minutes, beans that are popped straight out of the pod in to the pan. Lunch when you’re growing your own seasonal veg in a market garden is something to look forward to all morning. “We eat lunch together on the farm every day we’re working here,” says Anna, from Brown Rock Market Garden. “One of us just takes half an hour to rustle something up and we eat whatever is in season, whatever’s fresh. Most of the time we are totally spoilt for choice. “At the moment we’ve got some lovely tomatoes; you slice them and have some olive oil and some salt and fresh basil from the polytunnels, and have some bread and you’re away. It’s very simple food but very delicious.” Ria, 31, started Brown Rock Market Garden in Tickenham, North Somerset in 2019, running it on her own for the first season. Anna, 37, joined two seasons ago and it’s now run equally between them. The friends met through mutual acquaintances in the horticulture world, having both changed course from other careers, Ria from working as a special effects prosthetic artist in film and TV, Anna as a lighting designer in theatre. Anna still enjoys doing some freelance work in the industry, but felt disconnected when working long hours in dark theatres with nothing but a single spotlight shining. Now she embraces being out in all weathers on the farm. “I wanted to be much more in connection with the outdoors and the weather and nature and do something that was quite physical as well as mentally challenging,” she says. “I was indoors an awful lot. You go into a room and turn the lights off, and then you put a light on and sit in that room with just one light on for the whole day. With growing work, I find I’ve got much more of a sense of the natural rhythm of the seasons.” It’s around May that things start getting exciting, when the new crops start coming through and lunch is all Anna Barrett enjoys the physical hard work and tranquility at Brown Rock Market Garden in Tickenham Picture: copyright Paul Blakemore, Instagram @blikmo about the first taste of something neither of them have eaten since last year. “We both eat seasonally because we know what food that’s in season tastes like – it’s a bit of a curse, you can’t really eat stuff out of season once you’ve had it,” Anna says. “The first tomatoes are a real thing. They’re super sweet, juicy, and fresh and absolutely epitomise the time of year. “With some crops like chard or radishes, you plant them and you get a crop off of them quite quickly. Whereas with tomatoes, you put these thing things in the ground and then you wait, and wait, and wait, and they grow, and grow, and grow, then they make some little flowers, then they make the fruit, the fruit gets bigger and it has to get ripe and then you finally get to eat it. That is why it’s so special. “When you haven’t tasted it since last year, you can remember where you were when you had the first tomato on previous years. It’s a really nice marker of passing time.” With just under an acre of rented land, this all-woman team produces a tasty crop of vegetables to organic standards, planting four or five different things in the beds over the course of a year, working exclusively with hand tools, and to the natural rhythm of the seasons, with no pesticides, extra heat or artificial light. By choosing to stay small scale, they can work the way they want to. Every bit of soil is dug by hand, every seed is planted by hand, every weed pulled up by hand, and every piece of food harvested by hand. With no need to leave room for tractors and machinery between the beds, Anna says they can also cram more produce into the space. That, in turn, gives them the luxury of having a wildflower grass meadow strip along the edge of the veg plot where pollinators thrive. “It’s a great place for all the beneficial insects to live, which means you’ve got pest control for the things that would eat your veg – ground beetles eat slug eggs; crickets are hosts for parasitic wasps which will predate on aphids,” Anna says. “A lot of places just maximise productivity so would have another row of cabbages there, but we’re such small scale that it’s really important to us to look after the eco system so it can help us look after our crops. “We’ve seen grass snakes, toads, voles, there are often birds of prey wheeling around in the summer – it’s alive with wildlife. You’re often just out picking vegetables and it’s buzzing. It’s pretty idyllic really, quite an amazing spot.” As well as being beautiful, the site, which overlooks the start of the Somerset Levels, has alluvial soil, rich and free draining, that has drawn other market garden growers to the area in the past. “It’s nice to work,” Anna says of the soil. “It’s what old school farmers call boys’ soil because it’s supposed to be so easy to farm on that even a boy could do it. We call it smug soil.” Maintaining good soil health is key for Ria and Anna, something that helps their pledge to make everything ecologically grown. For Anna, the proactive decision to work in a way that predates the invention of pesticides is significant. “It feels like there’s a huge amount of chemicals and external input in what we call modern agriculture, though that has only really been the way we’ve done it since post-Second

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 5 Big Feature From left: Chard ’Rhubarb’ and ‘canary’, squash ‘Delicata’, parsley ‘Italian giant’, tomato ‘San Marzano’, courgette ‘Goldy’, cucumber ‘Akito’, beetroot boro, onion ’Long Red Florence’, runner bean ‘Helda’, sweet pepper ‘Long Red Marconi’, kale ‘Dazzling Blue’, spring onion ‘Ishikura’ grown at Brown Rock Market Garden Picture: copyright Rhiannon Marshall @brown.rock.market.garden I wanted to be much more in connection with the outdoors and the weather and nature and do something that was quite physical as well as mentally challenging Anna Barrett, on switching careers to work Brown Rock Market Garden World War when pesticides and fertilisers were created, because they had a lot of chemicals left over from making munitions in the war. The more degraded the soil gets, the more fertiliser you need to put on, so it’s a never-ending cycle. “I love food and I’m a big fan of nature so it makes lots of sense to farm organically.” With an eye on maintaining consistency and quality throughout the season Brown Rock Market Garden has a select number of about 15 lines, including salad which has 30 different varieties within it. Their produce supplies shops and restaurants in the Bristol and North Somerset area, catering to the needs of chefs by growing unusual veg and leaving tops on crops. “We’ve got four different types of tomatoes at the moment, like tomatillos – Mexican green tomatoes that come in a papery case. They are delicious. They taste very sharp, almost zingy, a limey tomato,” Anna says. “We’ve got different types of kale: one really tall, it’s about six foot now; East Friesian curly kale that looks like a palm tree. Then we have lots of successional sowings of different things, which is when you have something like eight different sowings so you’ve got a steady stream of something. We’ve got spring onions, fennel, earlier in the year we Ria Marshall, left with Houdini the chicken, and Anna Barrett, right, run Brown Rock Market Garden on a plot overlooking the start of the Somerset Levels in Tickenham Picture: copyright Paul Blakemore, Instagram @blikmo had lots of radish and little gem lettuce heads. “We’ve got a lovely salad mix which changes weekly. In autumn you’ll have spicy mustards, in the spring, endives, and in the winter chicories, which are a bit more bitter and also delicious. They are amazing colours, bright pinks, and reds and stripy. “And then you have all sorts of fancy bits, pea shoots, perennial salad like salad burnet, which tastes a bit cucumber-y and has a lovely frilly-shaped leaf. There’s buckshorn plantain, we do things like beetroot and chard leaf and kale leaf but we sow them close together and that makes really small, quite tender leaves. “There’s agretti, it’s a bit like an Italian samphire. We sell those to chefs and put the tips of it in the salad mix. It’s hard to come by and I think chefs always like something that is unusual and looks good on the plate. It is quite succulent… a bit like eating a houseplant! It’s got that crunchy, succulent texture to it which it maintains when it’s cooked,” she says. “Chefs love the fennel. We sell it with the tops on so you get two crops for the price of one; you can use it for flavouring in dishes and then you’ve got the bulb at the bottom. We sell our beetroots bunched with the tops on and you can just use the tops as you would use chard. “It’s interesting having conversations with the chefs and the people who run veg shops, who are all very much on board with what we do. We can make sure things are packaged in the way they want. There’s beauty in that detail.” While Brown Rock Market Garden is thriving on a relatively small plot, the ethos is big – encouraging people to buy as much local produce as possible. “We don’t want people to be trying to buy our food from far away,” Anna says. “It’s about supporting local producers. “We’re not going to feed the world. We’ve chosen to stay this scale and do things at this scale because it suits us and it allows us to take good care of what we have. It’s definitely important that there are other scales of growers out there, mid-scale and large-scale growers are super important – we are just trying to do our little bit.” ■ Follow Brown Rock Market Garden @brown.rock.market. garden on Instagram. ■ The produce can be found in shops including Hugo’s Greengrocer Deli on Bedminster Parade and North Street, Bristol; and The Public Market food store and deli in Easton, Bristol.

6 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 opinion VOICES OF THE WEST COUNTRY ROB CAMPBELL A few older folk tell me they are now a little more inclined to catch a train into town and scoot to appointments Riding an electric scooter need not be a political statement, but it sometimes feels that way in an era where everyone is apparently divided into two camps. One camp is leftie or woke or whatever the label is this week, and the other right-wing and reactionary and the rest. An item appeared in the news last week about a group of Bristol City councillors demanding an end to the trial of e-scooters, warning of chaos on the roads and risk of accidents. Guess which party hates the scooters? The Greens, Lib Dems, Labour? The anarchists, revolutionary communists, tree-huggers or the monster raving loony party faction? It is instead, and utterly predictably the Conservatives, but they do have a point about the roads in Bristol and Bath. On my visits to those cities, I have to battle for space on roads clogged with people weaving in and out, some so recklessly that they must presumably be drunk or drugged. Parking is so bad that pedestrians frequently have to walk in the road. That’s just the cars. The scooters, which were introduced across the area as a trial, cause their own problems too. It’s the people, though, who worry me. It feels as if you can divide the anti and pro scooter folk along ideological lines with such depressing predictability that every other view they hold would fall into place. Scooterists are also Remainers, cyclists, happy about same-sex marriage, pro-immigration, and they applauded the toppling of Colston’s statue while eating an organic bean-burger. They also want everyone to go to university and do media studies. They like wearing masks, too. Their opponents are just as easy to define, wanting mostly to bring back everything. The empire, hanging, racist jokes, proper food, proper wars, women who do ironing, smoking in pubs, ties for chaps, no more masks and The Black and White Minstrel Show. They would turn the trendier universities in to re-education camps for people who drink oat milk and convert their playing fields into golf courses. It looks like ‘culture wars’, that American disease that we caught during Brexit, with scooters just being another weapon in that tedious division of our nation in to two mutually suspicious tribes. The truth about anything is, of course, more complicated than that. Take those scooters: there are real doubts about whether they are directly replacing car journeys and are, instead, making people less fit because they use them instead of walking or cycling. But even that seems perhaps a little short-sighted. Anecdotally, because there seems little longer-term research so far, it seems possible that having a scooter handy could delay - perhaps permanently - a decision to buy a car. In my own un-scientific survey, young people have told me that the availability of everything from scooters to cycle lanes means they cannot see the point in having four wheels to move around at 10mph on city streets with nowhere to park. A few older folk, too, tell me they are now just a little more inclined to catch a train into town and scoot to their appointments, rather than join the hordes of angry people on the M32. In each case that’s one less lump of metal threatening the lives of the rest of us. Scooters are also fun and we have had precious little of that these past 18 months of pandemic, but fun can’t be counted. The best news of all, though, from people who actually do proper research, is that the polarisation of us into those tribes more widely might not be quite as bad as it looks. There’s a wonderful organisation out there called More In Common which, among other things, studies the links that bind us together. They have, for example, a recent podcast called We Are Not As Divided As We Think. They look at evidence, rather than just shouting on social media. They found recently that “most people believe cultural change is a central part of the British story, and something that they embrace…there is a particular ‘British way’ of doing change, that allows space for people to ask questions, to voice their opinions, and to learn from their mistakes. People are deeply concerned that the way politicians and campaigners are inflaming culture wars is undermining that British approach to change.” Goodness me. There are dangers in all this polarisation, far more serious than some clogged pavements and broken ankles from the scooter wave, but it seems we don’t really hate each other so much after all. Somewhere out there is a Tory riding a scooter en route to a Black Lives Matter protest, and a vegetarian driving a massive car to a golf course while laughing at Jim Davidson jokes. Or maybe not quite, but it’s a nice thought.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 7 Food & Drink CHRIS RUNDLE The house move did noT go down well wiTh The grape vines, says chris rundle guinea fowl with black grapes (Serves 4) INGREDIENTS One guinea fowl, quartered; three tablespoons brandy; 50g butter; dash of olive oil; one large (about 400g) bunch black grapes; 75g raisins soaked overnight in four tablespoons of port; sea salt; freshly ground black pepper 3. Arrange the raisins and grapes around them, cover and cook for an hour, remove the lid and return to the oven for 15 minutes at 180C gas mark 4 before serving. METHOD 1. Heat the oven to 190C gas mark 5. Season the guinea fowl joints well. Using a large casserole with a tight-fitting lid heat the butter and oil until sizzling, add the joints and cook singly until browned all over. 2. Place all the joints in the pan, pour in the brandy and flame. Soak the raisins chicken and grape tagine (Serves 4) INGREDIENTS Four free-range chicken legs; large bunch (about 400g) black grapes; 50g raisins; two onions; three garlic cloves; four branches flat-leaved parsley; 10 branches coriander; teaspoon each ground ginger and turmeric; two pinches saffron; 20g butter; two tablespoons olive oil; sea salt; freshly ground black pepper 4. Add the grapes and cook for a further 20 minutes, check the seasoning and serve topped with chopped parsley and coriander. MY friend Tony was thin to the point that if he ate a grape you’d think he’d developed a hernia. Not that he would find as much as a single specimen in the garden this year, sadly. It’s the vine, you see. We brought it with us when we moved; a veteran of some seven seasons which had been providing us with a moderate crop of juicy black grapes every autumn – as long as we got to them before the blackbirds did. The blackbirds which, naturally, barely gave the food we had put out for them on the bird table as much as a glance as they flew past it on the way to perform their predations. We were very keen to bring it with us so I asked Keith, who gave us a hand in the garden now and then, how we should go about it. Dig it up while it’s dormant and put it in a big tub and then get it into the ground as soon as you get to the new place, he said. Then, he said, walking around the vine and observing it closely, one of two things will happen. I awaited the delivery of the next, succinct nugget of horticultural wisdom distilled from his years of experience. Yeah, he said. Either it will be OK - or it will die. He didn’t say anything about sulking. And sulking is definitely what the vine has been doing since we got here. We found a nice, sheltered spot with a southerly aspect to plant it. We prepared the soil well and made sure it was draining properly so the vine didn’t have to sit around with wet roots. We eased it in, replaced the soil around it, watered it and provided it with a couple of strong canes for support. And that vine just sulked. It visibly sulked. Clearly it was upset because we hadn’t asked its opinion about moving house and particularly about whether it minded being dug up, shoved into a pot, taken on a rattling journey with all the other garden pots and finally deposited in totally unfamiliar surroundings. There may have been other issues. Perhaps it didn’t like the neighbours. Perhaps their dog was too noisy. Perhaps it didn’t like having to look at a washing line two or three yards away. Perhaps it was just homesick and missing the company of the Grapes are great in savory dishes, as Chris’ recipes show this week raspberries that used to grow next to it. Anyway, it was weeks into the spring (and almost at the point where we had given up hope and concluded that Keith’s more pessimistic option had come true) when it finally decided to wake up, put out a bud or two and reluctantly (and you could almost hear it huffing and puffing about it) start to produce some branches. But fruit? Not a chance. Not this year. Not after all we have put it through. Its outrage may have dissipated by next year but in the meantime I shall have to step round to the greengrocer for a supply of grapes to use in some unlikely, but delicious pairings. The first for guinea fowl, one of two poultry breeds named after its place of origin. In this case the area formerly known as the Guinea Coast in Africa. The other is the turkey, but that of course is a misnomer. The birds originally came from the New World: Turkey was merely the last port of call before London for the spice ships bringing them here. METHOD 1. Peel and chop the onions and garlic, chop the herbs and wash the grapes. 2. Heat the butter and oil in a large casserole with a closefitting lid and sweat the onions until translucent. 3. Season the chicken well and brown for two minutes. Sprinkle in the saffron, turmeric and ginger and cook for a further five minutes, turning frequently. Add the garlic, herbs and raisins and season well then pour in 300ml of water, bring up to a boil, cover and simmer very gently for 30 minutes, adding a little more water if necessary. grape and apple pickle Not a long-keeping condiment but quick and easy to prepare and great with cold meat and pâté INGREDIENTS 500g green grapes; one large eating apple; 150g sultanas; 150g trimmed spring onions; 100g golden caster sugar; 200ml cider vinegar; 50g piece ginger root METHOD 1. Wash the grapes, halve and remove the pips. Finely chop the Season the chicken legs onions, peel the ginger and cut into fine juliennes. Peel, quarter and de-core the apple and cut into small dice. 2. Place the vinegar and sugar in a pan and bring to the boil then add the remaining ingredients. Return to the lowest possible simmer and cook very gently for 30 minutes, stirring now and then. 3. Allow to cool in the pan and decant into a sterilised jar for storage.

8 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Food & Drink RAISE A GLASS WITH JANE CLARE What a few days. I’ve been hot (phew, a September sun), I’ve been rained on (lots and lots). Who knows what the weather gods will be throwing around by the time you’re reading this. But those few days have also been perfect. I’ve been “out out” – not in a posh frock and lipstick sense – but in a wine sense. I’ve met real wine people at live tasting events. Bordeaux Day was a joy, and for the first time, I had the chance to taste the wines in the latest Bordeaux Hot 50. I brought you one of them just a couple of weeks ago: Château Pey de Faure 2019 (£12.99, online at Averys). I’ve now met its wine friends, all of them highlighting the modern approach adopted by Bordeaux winemakers – whether through their techniques or sustainable practices. The Hot 50 wines are under £25 and chosen to be approachable and appealing. If you’re nervous about trying new wines they’re a great place to start exploring the diversity of the region. Here are three: A sparkling, a white and a red. I love a drop of fizz and Premius Crémant de Bordeaux Brut (£RRP £10-£12, Slurp) is gorgeous. The grapes sémillon, muscadelle and cabernet sauvignon have been cajoled into creating a wine with aromas of fresh and baked apples, toasty bread and baking spice. It is fresh, characterful and zesty. One of my favourite whites of the day was Château Argadens 2019 (£12.50, tanners-wines.co.uk). It’s vegan, and the vineyards are managed in a way which increases biodiversity and decreases any negative environmental impact. It is also very enjoyable. The white is a blend of sauvignon blanc (which takes the lead role in this palate performance) and sémillon. The aromas just keep on giving; tangy citrus, especially grapefruit. A savoury edge adds depth and interest. The flavours zing and twist and delight. As for the red, there were many to choose from, but for this missive I’ve opted for Roc de Lussac 2019 (£7.75, Sainsbury’s). The wine is from the Saint-Emilion appellation where the fruitily plummy merlot grape dominates. Cabernet sauvignon and cabernet franc are the blending partners in this wine which speaks of red and black fruits, and spice. Tannins play their part in an undemanding way. ■ The Bordeaux Hot 50 list is online at bordeaux.com/gb/selection ■ Jane is a member of the Circle of Wine Writers. Find her on social media and online as One Foot in the Grapes. JAmIE OlIvEr is an absolute machine. The celebrity chef – no longer ‘naked’, but very much clothed and still campaigning for us all to cook (stress-free) from scratch at home – is back with a new recipe collection, Together. While not all five of his children are featured on the cover (three are, we get the sense the teenagers have bowed out this time around), this book is all about feeding the people you love. With most people now vaccinated and social restrictions lifted, Jamie is betting people will be eager to host dinner parties, brunches and holiday gatherings. His 25th cookbook shows readers how to throw a big party in true Oliver fashion – without too much fuss, so the cook can have fun, too. The emphasis is on sharing delicious meals together rather than spending all your time stressed in the kitchen and it is packed full of tasty, comforting dishes that require minimum preparation. Jamie says: “Together is a real homage to the great home feast, something I have really missed sharing with friends and family over the past year. “So many people find real joy in a shared meal, have rediscovered a love of cooking or perhaps even given it a go for the first time. “I wanted the recipes to feel like a culinary light at the end of the tunnel, where food can be enjoyed and savoured. “This is about giving you an excuse to get the people you love around the table again.” As is usually the case nowadays, the cookbook is tied to a new television series. In each episode of Channel 4’s Jamie Oliver: Together, the chef will take us through the recipes step by step, making them for his InGredIentS: 1tbsp quinoa; 1tbsp frozen edamame beans; 100g crunchy veg, such as cucumber, sugar snap peas, mangetout, carrots; 2 level tsps white miso paste; 2tsps rice wine vinegar; 1 fresh chilli; 1cm piece of ginger; 1 lime; 2tsps sesame oil; 2tsps low-salt soy sauce; 2tsps sesame seeds; 200g super-fresh chunky tuna steak, from sustainable sources OptIOnAL: 2 sprigs of shiso, mint or basil Get AHeAd: You can prep all this on the day, if you prefer. MetHOd: 1. Cook the quinoa in plenty of water according to the packet instructions, adding the edamame for the last 2 minutes, then drain and cool. Take time to prep your crunchy veg – it’s nice to have a mixture, so use up any veg from the fridge – and finely slice everything as delicately as you can. 2. Muddle the miso into the rice vinegar, then scrunch with the prepped It’s (dinner) party time! Dedicated to NHS staff, the impact of the pandemic is a thread that Jamie picks up on throughout. In the first episode the chef prepares a feast for people doing volfamily and friends, so we can make them for ours. Whether it’s hosting a beautiful curry night, summery feast, or a celebration meal, Jamie’s got you covered. Jamie Oliver in an image from his new book Together Jamie Oliver’s new recipe book, Together, is a homage to the great home feast. The chef reveals why it’s the perfect time to entertain once again veg, quinoa and edamame – flavours will develop and deepen overnight. 3. To make a dressing, deseed and finely chop the chilli and place in a clean jam jar. Peel and finely grate in ginger, squeeze in lime juice, then add sesame oil and soy and pop the lid on. 4. Toast the sesame seeds in a non-stick frying pan on a high heat until lightly golden, tossing regularly, then remove. Sear the tuna for just 20 seconds on each side and edge, turning with tongs. Leave to cool. Cover and refrigerate the veg and tuna overnight. tO SerVe: If you’ve prepped ahead, get everything out of the fridge 15 minutes before serving. Finely slice the tuna and arrange around a platter. Pile the dressed veg in the centre, shake up the dressing and spoon over the tuna. Finish with the herb leaves (if using), and toasted sesame seeds. ■ ENERGY 253kcal; FAT 12.7g; SAT FAT 2.5g; PROTEIN 17.7g; CARBS 7.6g; SUGARS 2.6g; SALT 1.2g; FIBRE 1.8g Together is a real homage to the great home feast, something I have really missed sharing with friends and family over the past year. Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver on his new TV series and book untary work through the pandemic, from helping at food banks and vaccination centres to sewing PPE. The centrepiece of the meal is salmon decorated and flavoured with rosemary, chillies, capers and anchovies, served with a lemony potato salad and extra sweet oregano and garlic roasted tomatoes. Jamie also serves up cheesy puffs as canapés, strawberry and prosecco cocktails, and a summer pudding made with strawberries, cucumber and Pimm’s. And he’s right, it’s very lovely to be able to sit down, chat and eat together again. ■ Together by Jamie Oliver is published by Penguin Random House (c) Jamie Oliver Enterprises Limited (2021 Together), priced £26. Photography by David Loftus. Available now ■ Jamie Oliver: Together is on Mondays, Channel 4, at 8pm JAMIE OLIVER’S ELEGANT TUNA CARPACCIO, MISO VEG, CHILLI AND LIME DRESSING AND SESAME (Serves 2)

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 9 Food & Drink Jamie Oliver’s fragrant squash curry with chickpeas, ginger, spices and coconut milk (Serves 6 + 2 leftover portions) Ingredients: 1 butternut squash (1.2kg); Olive oil; 1 onion; 2 cloves of garlic; 4cm piece of ginger; 1tsp coriander seeds; 1tsp fenugreek seeds; 1tsp medium curry powder; 300g ripe cherry tomatoes; 2 tinned pineapple rings in juice; 1 x 400ml tin of light coconut milk; 1 x 400g tin of chickpeas Optional: 2 sprigs of coriander, to serve GET AHEAD: You can make this on the day, if you prefer. METHOD: 1. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Scrub the squash (there’s no need to peel it), carefully halve it lengthways and deseed, then chop into 2cm chunks. 2. Place in a roasting tray, toss with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and a pinch of sea salt and black pepper, then roast for one hour, or until soft and caramelized. 3. Meanwhile, peel and roughly chop the onion, peel the garlic and ginger, and dry fry in a non-stick frying pan on a medium-high heat with the coriander and fenugreek seeds and the curry powder, stirring until lightly charred all over. 4. Add the tomatoes and pineapple rings (reserving the juice), and cook for 10 minutes to soften and char, stirring regularly. 5. Tip it all into a blender, add the coconut milk and blitz until very smooth. Return to the pan, tip in the chickpeas, juice and all, and simmer gently until the sauce is thickened. 6. Stir in the roasted squash, then season the curry to perfection, tasting and tweaking, and loosening with the reserved pineapple juice. 7. Cool, cover and refrigerate overnight. TO SERVE: Preheat the oven to 150°C. Place the covered pan of curry in the oven until hot through – about an hour. Nice with picked coriander leaves. Jamie Oliver’s chocolate orange crÈme brÛlÉe (Serves 2 + 2 leftover puds) Ingredients: 100ml double cream; 300ml semi-skimmed milk; 100g dark chocolate (70%); 4 large free-range eggs; 80g golden caster sugar, plus extra for sprinkling; 1 orange; Seasonal berries, to serve GET AHEAD: Pour the cream and milk into a non-stick pan, snap in the chocolate, and place on a medium-low heat until chocolate has melted, whisking regularly. Remove from the heat and allow to cool slightly while you separate the eggs. Method: 1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk the yolks (freeze the whites to make meringues another day) with the sugar and the finely grated orange zest until pale and fluffy. Whisking constantly, gradually pour in the chocolate mixture until combined. Return to the pan and place over a low heat, then very gently bring to a simmer, whisking constantly for about 10 minutes, or until you have a custard-like consistency. 2. Divide between four small heatproof cups or two sharing bowls, then cool, cover and leave to set in the fridge overnight. TO SERVE: Sprinkle a little sugar over two of the puds, then melt it under a hot grill or using a blowtorch. Serve with orange segments, berries or cherries. The two extra puds will keep for up to 5 days in the fridge, if you can wait that long! ■■ENERGY 414kcal; FAT 27.1g; SAT FAT 13.7g; PROTEIN 8.9g; CARBS 39.8g; SUGARS 39.6g; SALT 0.2g; FIBRE 1g

10 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 What’s On It’s the one that you want, says NATALIE BANYARD. Don your leather jackets and head to the Bristol Hippodrome as mega-musical Grease hurtles into Bristol, starring Peter Andre, who tells us he’s excited to return to the stage It’s got groove, it’s got meaning AFTEr being put on hold last year because of coronavirus restrictions, Grease The Musical is back with a wop ba-ba lu-bop a wop bam boom! The world’s best-loved musical takes to the Bristol Hippodrome stage this month with all the sing-along songs, awesome choreography, terrific costumes, talented cast - and the small matter of Peter Andre complete with angel wings! After a whirlwind summer romance, leather-clad greaser Danny and girl-next-door Sandy are unexpectedly reunited when she transfers to rydell High for senior year. Friendships and love matches are formed between the T-Birds and Pink Ladies - but can Danny and Sandy survive the trials and tribulations of teenage life and find true love once more? Directed by Nikolai Fosterre, ignite your passion and get ready for an explosion of summer loving. Pop icon and TV star Peter Andre will be joining Danny, Sandy, rizzo, Kenickie, Frenchy, Doody, Marty, Sonny, Jan and roger, as Teen Angel and Vince Fontaine. “The atmosphere is going to be, excuse the pun, electrifying,” says Peter. “I want to make up for lost time and make sure that every single show is going to be immense fun! “We’re going to be so grateful to be performing and I believe audiences are going to be so happy to be back in a theatre. I’m sure I can speak for anyone who is going back on stage after all this time in saying how exciting it’s going to be. And Grease is such a great show to put a smile on people’s faces.” Peter says he’s excited to be playing dual roles of Frenchy’s imaginary guardian angel (which he played in the 2019 tour) as well the slick, stylish and fast-paced disc jockey Vince Fontaine. “I may even be doing a third role,” laughs Peter, “namely a police officer, depending on whether or not I can get changed on time. The more characters the better for me. Each one of them has a different accent, so I get to do different dialects, and it’s good to be acting as well as singing. “With Vince Fontaine and Teen Angel, it’s a very quick change but I love the energy of that. There’s just one song, which I’m not in, during which I have time to get out of one outfit and into a completely different one, with the wig and everything. But it’s really good fun.” Grittier and more glamorous than ever, the show has a famous and phenomenal score, bursting with hits including Summer Nights, Greased Lightnin’, Hopelessly Devoted to You and You’re the One That I Want. “It’s a great score,” says Peter. “Even

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 11 What’s On Peter Andre (front centre) as Vince Fontaine. Photo: Sean Ebsworth Barnes “The new generation see the stage show and then go and watch the movie, whereas the old generation have seen the movie and now they want to go and watch the stage show. “There’s a glamour to the teenagers in Grease, though, and that’s another draw; it’s set in sunny America, whereas you might have grown up in wet and windy England.” Father-of-four Peter made his professional debut as a contestant on Australia’s New Faces when he was just 16. He shot to global fame in the ’90s with his hit songs including Mysterious Girl and Flava and became the sixth highest-selling artist in the UK. He has had numerous hit singles, two number one albums and toured all over the world, collecting a multitude of national and international awards along the way. With many television shows and appearances under his belt, and with his Celebrating 25 Years tour now completed, the rest of the year sees Peter turn all of his attention to Grease. Peter Andre. Photo: Ant Robling “I’m so grateful I’ve had this career and I never take it for granted,” he says. “I remember being on tour with Bobby Brown as the opening act in Australia and at the time he was the biggest R&B star. “There I was on stage with him and he was a megastar to me. I thought he’d be going for ever and I’d just have my five minutes of fame, so I look back and think ‘I would never in a million years have expected to have had all this’. “I feel very lucky and luck does play a big part in it, as does staying with the same people; I mean, I’ve been with my manager for 30 years now. I think loyalty and keeping friends in the industry are definitely part of it.” Grease hurtles into Bristol’s Hippodrome from September 21 to 25, and Peter says the city has a special place in his heart: “Bristol means a lot to me. My brother Andrew, who we’ve sadly lost now, used to live in nearby Weston-super-Mare and we spent a lot of time in Bristol. It’s one of my favourite cities in England. “I love the cafes and bars and restaurants and the way it’s set out, with all those hills.” So, get ready Bristol – Grease is back. Round up your T-Birds, pick up your Pink Ladies and re-discover why Grease really is the one that you want. ■ Grease The Musical is at The Bristol Hippodrome from September 21 to 25. For more information and to book, visit www.atgtickets. com/bristol Peter Andre as Teen Angel. Photo: Hugo Glendinning though my main song is Beauty School Drop-Out, I also get to sing Grease with the rest of the cast and that’s such a great, iconic song that really gets everyone going.” Spectacularly staged and bursting with energy, this show is a treat for all ages – fans of the iconic 1978 movie will be in their element and they can bring along their children (and in some cases, grandchildren) to introduce them to the joy that is Grease. Peter says: “Everybody loves it. For me, as a child, there were two movies I watched again and again - and those were Back to the Future and Grease. Everyone can relate to being a teenager, whether that’s from a nostalgic point of view or if you’re a teenager right now or going to be soon. “When I said to my kids Junior and Princess ‘Let’s watch the movie Grease, it’s brilliant’ before I went on stage with it they were like ‘No thanks, it’s not our type of thing’. Then they came to see me in the show one night and suddenly they were like ‘We love this, let’s watch the movie’. It’s come full circle. The cast of Grease. Photo: Sean Ebsworth Barnes

12 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 What’s On Return of the Furs BY MARK TAYLOR To celebrate the 40th anniversary of their classic second album, Talk Talk Talk, The Psychedelic Furs make a long-awaited return to Bristol on September 27. Best known for 1980s hits like Love My Way, The Ghost In You, Heaven and Pretty In Pink, the band, formed by Richard Butler in 1977, are touring the UK to promote their latest album, Made Of Rain, which is their second highest charting UK album in a career spanning six decades. Made Of Rain was produced by the band and Richard Fortus, while mixing duties were handled by Tim Palmer, who previously worked with David Bowie, U2 and Robert Plant. Formed in London in 1977, by Butler and his brother, Tim, The Psychedelic Furs have been based in the US for years. The band has continued to perform and play acclaimed shows at The Hollywood Bowl, All Points East, Hyde Park and Benicàssim, plus a celebrated run of UK shows including headlining Robert Smith’s Meltdown at the Royal Festival Hall. The Furs’ enduring influence continues to resonate with The Strokes, The Killers, Foo Fighters and even Bob Dylan tipping their hats to them. Joining them on tour will be Pauline Murray, who first came to prominence as the lead singer and bass guitarist of pioneering punk band Penetration in the late ’70s. ■■The Psychedelic Furs play Bristol 02 Academy on September 27. Tickets are available from www.academymusicgroup.com/ o2academybristol/ events/1316743/psychedelic-furstickets RWA Secret Postcard Auction - final montage Artistic secrets Original artworks from hundreds of leading artists are being sold online in the Royal West of England Academy (RWA) Secret Postcard Auction on Thursday, September 23, following huge success last year with £107,000 raised for the charity. Now a major event in the national art calendar, the Secret Postcard Auction offers collectors and first-time buyers the chance to buy unique works of art by leading figures from the art and cultural world, from as little as £40. With hundreds of small artworks to choose from, dozens of lucky buyers will be in with Lot 225 - Amanda the opportunity to snap up an original piece of art for a tiny fraction of its true value. The event will be held online again this year as the building is temporarily closed, as they work on a major £3.8 million heritage capital project. Despite the success of the physical event in the past, the team were blown away when the online auction achieved an incredible £107,000, during the height of the pandemic in 2020. The auction has always been a vital contributor to the RWA finances and features many world-renowned contemporary artists and talents better known in other fields. Lot 201 - Dachshund The target for 2021 is £40,000, which will enable the RWA to continue its acclaimed creative work across Bristol when it reopens in early 2022 - including free family activities in some of the city’s most deprived wards, as well as support for people with a range of physical and mental wellbeing challenges. Alison Bevan, RWA director, said: “The Secret Postcard Auction is always a vital contributor to our finances. Due to the impact of Covid-19, and our consequent closure for the Light and Inspiration project, it is doubly vital now. As an independent charity that is hugely reliant on visitors, event and Drawing School income (and for the staff and artists who rely on us) the auction is really essential for us to continue to deliver life-enhancing creativity to communities across Bristol and beyond. It has always been such a fun event and there is no reason that needs to change this year. Many artists have been incredibly generous in supporting us, and as always we have a huge array of artworks to suit every taste.” Audiences are encouraged to bid from the comfort of their own home this year, with bids closing between 9pm and 9.30pm on Thursday, September 23. The identities of which artists did which postcard will remain secret until the auction ends. Above: The Psychedelic Furs, photo by Reed Davis. Pictured: lead singer Richard Butler.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 13 What’s On Afrika Eye festival is returning to Bristol after a year off. Photo: Afrika Eye Met by moonlight Eyes open THE South West’s biggest celebration of African cinema and culture is returning to Bristol, after Covid forced the cancellation of last year’s event. Afrika Eye will take place in a number of new venues for a full week of film, music and spoken word events. Highlights of the November festival will include the world premiere of Afrika Eye’s first documentary, and an intro to Moroccan ‘gnawa’ music featuring Robert Plant’s and Jah Wobble’s guitarist Justin Adams. Afrika Eye will be using several new venues in Bristol including The Cube, Easton Community Centre and The Old Picture House in Totterdown, as well as the Curzon cinema in Clevedon. One of the most eagerly anticipated events of the festival is the first public screening of Rooted in Bristol. The short film by Tay Aziz, which will be screened at the Watershed, celebrates Bristol allotment growers of African heritage who are using their plots to keep alive the African and Afro-Caribbean food traditions of their families. MARK TAYLOR takes a look at everything you can expect from this year’s Afrika Eye festival An opening night gig features guitarist Justin Adams and gimbri maestro Mohammed Errabbaa playing the gnawa sound of Morocco, and showcases new short films by Bristol-based filmmakers Michael Jenkins and Pierre Amiral. There will also be a pop-up tent where families and children will be able to enjoy a film and story-telling sessions with Kabbo Hue Ferdinand. Festival director Annie Menter says: “After Covid enforced the cancellation of last year’s festival, Afrika Eye is delighted to be bouncing back with a rich programme designed to engage, entertain and inspire, bringing us together as we explore global issues, including migration, music and politics, gender and climate emergency with Africa the focus. Lives lived and imagined, seen through the eyes of the filmmaker. “We are particularly thrilled to have renowned guitarist, Justin Adams and Mohammed Errabbaa bringing the compelling sounds of Moroccan ‘gnawa’ music to the Watershed cafe/bar on our opening night there.” Afrika Eye Film Festival was founded in 2005 by two Bristol-based film-makers: Zimbabwe-born Simon Bright and Ingrid Sinclair who lived and worked in southern Africa for nearly 20 years. The festival’s mission is to offer audiences of all ages and backgrounds opportunities to explore the richness of African creativity, culture and history, using film and arts to challenge the stereotypes, dispel the myths and uncover more about the ever-changing social and political landscape of the continent of Africa and diaspora. ■ Afrika Eye’s full 2021 programme is due to be published in late September. Keep up to date on Afrika Eye’s website A spRinKLing Of MAgic wiLL fALL OveR TObAccO fAcTORY TheA- TRes As OuT Of chAOs bRing An enchAnTing TwO-peRsOn AdApTATiOn Of A MidsuMMeR nighT’s dReAM TO The sTAge, wRiTes nATALie bAnYARd Rescheduled from July due to restrictions, the magic is finally happening at Tobacco Factory Theatres this month as a mesmerising reimagining of shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s dream flies into the theatre. love is confusing – especially when there’s magic involved and then a donkey shows up! confused couples compete for the wrong person’s affection; competitive performers try to steal the show; combative fairies battle for supremacy - and two actors play them all. Following the international success of their hit two-actor Macbeth, Out of chaos are back to reimagine another shakespeare masterpiece in their own fast, furious and fantastically funny style. hannah Barrie and Paul O’Mahony star in this innovative and immersive production, playing at Tobacco Factory Theatres from september 21 to 23. Out of chaos has been touring the uK and internationally since 2008 with shows including unmythable, Norsesome and Macbeth. The company’s work has won awards in four countries and its two-person Macbeth toured bY nATALie bAnYARd Following his triumphant performance at Bristol Comedy garden earlier this summer, the masterfully understated and brilliantly unique Simon Amstell heads back to the city with his new show. His first stand-up tour since the release of internationally acclaimed feature film Benjamin and netflix Special Set Free, the neurotic, searingly honest and very funny comic now brings Spirit Hole to The Redgrave Theatre tomorrow (Saturday). loosely based around his fear of growing older, Spirit Hole is a blissful, spiritual, sensational exploration of love, shame, mushrooms and more. Amstell, whose work on television has included presenting Popworld and Never Mind the Buzzcocks, is a stand-up who has made anxiety into an art form. Here, he will share his worries extensively in the uK and us. Out of chaos is committed to making work which is exciting, challenging and generous, combining creative physical approaches and rigorous text work to investigate old stories and their enduring relevance to modern audiences. The audience is at the heart of the company’s work and are included in the action to create truly communal events with the power to move, entertain and enthral. Out of chaos artistic director Paul O’Mahony says: “We’re thrilled to be opening our two-person A Midsummer Night’s dream at Tobacco Factory Theatres. It marks the third consecutive tour that we’ve opened in Bristol - in 2019 we performed unmythable at the Wardrobe Theatre, and earlier this year our unique telephone play Is Now A Good Time? started its tour at Tobacco Factory Theatres. “We’ve been waiting a long time to get back on stage - and we’re so excited to share our take on this classic play. Two actors are playing all the roles and we guarantee a joyful night out for audiences.” don’t miss this spell-binding show with music, magic and laughter guaranteed. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is at Tobacco Factory Theatres from September 21 to 23. For more information and to book, visit tobaccofactorytheatres.com That’s the spirit and regrets about everything from hallucinogens, Hamilton and hair dye to climate change, children and sex clubs. if you yearn for a night of unprecedented joy and laughter, book now to avoid your own regrets! ■ Simon Amstell is at The Redgrave Theatre on September 18. For more information and to book, visit redgravetheatre.com Simon Amstell

14 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Your Garden plot lineswith tim foster foster Watch out - the badgers have been eating the corn, and the purple potatoes have gone rotten Tim has come up with a few ways to deter the badgers - but have they been successful? I tHOuGHt it would be quite fun to look at how crops have gone this year, but maybe the word ‘gone’ is more appropriate than I’d care to dwell on. Our sweet corn, for example, has gone inside one or more badgers. I have personally encountered badgers only a handful of times and none of these have been catching them in the act of consuming our produce or using the fruit area as a latrine. My response would probably be the same no matter what: this is urban wildlife – wonderful. OK, so I may have uttered one or two choice words when I saw the flattened sweet corn, but I’d always be thrilled to have wild animals around especially when they’re so persecuted in the countryside nowadays. They are nocturnal animals, so carried out their raids while I was tucked up in bed. It wasn’t as if we had left the plants unprotected – we were well aware from previous years that our humbug-striped friends live not far away. So, we installed a fortress (is that a politically incorrect female fort?) consisting of a double layer of wire mesh. ‘Aha, you idiot,’ you say, ‘They’ll push underneath.’ Idiot, maybe, but also seasoned badger repeller: the mesh extended flat on the ground for about a foot and was pegged down. This was accompanied my own urine for which, to produce, I was forced to go on a high beer diet. Apparently, human male urine deters badgers and, what is more, the combination of this and fencing worked last year. What we didn’t account for were two things. One was the dry weather resulting in harder ground, therefore making it difficult for the badger family to find slugs and worms – they must have been a bit desperate. The Our sweet corn, for example, has gone inside one or more badgers. I have personally encountered badgers only a handful of times and none of these have been catching them in the act of consuming our produce or using the fruit area as a latrine. other issue was they used an aerial attack, not, as immediately springs to mind, a large black and white mammal parachuting in, but an avoidance of the smelly ground approach altogether by rearing up on hind legs and collapsing the mesh. Full marks for ingenuity, full stomachs of sweet corn. Just wait until next year – there’ll be sentries in the turrets at every corner. And that was just one crop. Here’s another. Purple potatoes. Now this is, I’m sorry to say, another sad story, but maybe we can learn from it: be very wary about unlabelled gifts. I was given some amazing dark purple seed potatoes by a friend who not only didn’t know what the variety was but didn’t know whether they were early, second early or maincrop potatoes. I can almost hear you slapping your forehead, saying ‘Duh’. But I was seduced by the colour – purple is good for you (apart from the berries of deadly nightshade and even then it isn’t the purple-ness which finishes you off). Most coloured fruit and vegetables are good for you – the pigments are antioxidants, meaning anti-cancer. And these spuds had the colour all the way through the flesh as well as the skin – fantastic. So, what went wrong? Pretty much No sweet corn or purple potaoes, right, for Tim this year everything. The tops died off early – early potatoes showing they’d had enough, or blight? Then the removal of the tubers was ten times harder… because of the colour: normal creamy white potatoes stand out in dark soil but not these things. Those discovered were rotten, had a little bit of rot or were fine but went rotten later. Rotten luck, I’m sure you’ll agree. Finally, the flavour of the surviving few wasn’t anything special, with the texture being quite dry. Now there is an excellent chance I’d done something seriously wrong in the growing but all of my other spuds were terrific, so I’m going to put the Great Purple Potato Disaster of ’21 in the file marked ‘Erase this from your memory’. ■ tim Foster teaches horticulture at the university of Bristol Botanic Garden and is the author of Fruit For Life - www.eco-logicbooks.com and Good Earth Gardening – a friendly guide to growing vegetables organically - currently unavailable ■ timfostergardener@gmail.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 15 Your Garden Expert advice Brown shades for autumn Presenter Adam Frost looks at the value of ornamental grasses, structural seed heads and deep brown flower centres, with hannah stephenson gArdenerS should be looking at all shades of brown to fill their outdoor space with interest through autumn, insists BBC Gardeners’ World presenter Adam Frost. “Brown has become the new black. Planting design is very much about asking a little bit more from our plants,” he said at the recent BBC Gardeners’ World Live show at the neC, Birmingham. “We are all sucked in by flowers. Most of the time, if we go flower shopping, we should probably cut the flowers off and let the plants concentrate on getting their roots in the ground, but we never do that. “rather than just being driven by that flower, we should be asking what this plant is going to be when it goes over. What’s it going to look like going into the winter months? A lot of plants will hold structure.” what mUst-have plants will brown well? “I love herbaceous perennials like asters and eupatorium, and grasses including some of the panicums, stipas and molinias are awesome. Grasses are great, because you can play with and manipulate light, so a lot of them are at their best in late summer going into autumn. rudbeckias, echinaceas and heleniums will hold good structure and are great for wildlife. The deep brown flower centres will remain when the petals are spent and add structure and interest, plus, they’re fantastic for wildlife, he says. “echinacea is good for bees, as is eupatorium. Some asters will go brown and hold a decent structure, although frikartii might collapse. “They will go brown, and if you underplant them with low grasses, you will get this wonderful hue of browns, bronzes, beiges and caramels right through the winter months. “I have used eupatorium ‘Little Joe’ in gardens, which is in contrast to the many larger eupatoriums which are quite big. I also really love echinacea pallida, because it’s slightly different – the flowers hang rather than stand tall. “There’s the little Aster [now called eurybia] divaricata, which works on the edge of a woodland, and will carry on flowering from summer and keep going.” don’t forget grasses “Panicums are good for creating a rich beige haze. There’s a lovely one I use called ‘Heavy Metal’. Calamagrostis is another ornamental grass that holds a decent structure. They all go brown.” Adam Frost, pictured below, says ‘brown has become the new black’ in the garden; clockwise from this picture, helenium seedheads; eupatorium in autumn; ornamental grass calamagrostis; the seedhead of Echinacea purpurea how shoUld yoU combine them? “A lot of the plants I’ve mentioned would be interplanted in a late autumn planting scheme. Use different sizes and don’t be worried about repeat planting to achieve balance. “Look at flower shapes and how many different shapes you can add. Some of them will be daisylike, others are umbellifer types [where many tiny flowers are held on short flower stalks, such as cow parsley, angelica and astrantia]. “The more different flower shapes you have, the better, and the same goes for leaf shapes. If you do that, your garden becomes completely different.” how long do i leave the plant skeletons? “I’d leave it ’til the next February. Most cutting back in my garden goes on in February or early March, depending on the winter. Cut back the grasses when new grass is appearing in spring. “If you ask me what the garden will be in 30 years’ time, I think it will be mix of ornamentals planted within a wild landscape. We are not just gardening for beauty. We are gardening for habitat. “When people have a big clean-up and think they are putting their garden to bed for the winter, they’ll clear away leaves, cut everything back and tidy it all up. But by doing that, they are taking away wildlife housing. “If you leave it, you are leaving homes for insects, material to forage on and shelter. And if you leave enough old plant material, that will be used as nesting for birds the following year.” Use the light “As much as it’s lovely to have beautiful colour in autumn, it’s also important to understand where the best place for light is in late September and early October, and work out which places you are drawn to. Is there an area where the afternoon light will catch the back of a border, for instance?” don’t be afraid of the shade “Certain plants will take a little shade. A lot of our real shade-loving plants tend to be at their best earlier on in the year, although there are shade-loving ferns, such as dryopteris (wood fern) which carry good autumn colour. “Climbing hydrangeas can take shady spots and are good when they lose their leaves, because you can leave the brown flowers on for structure.”

16 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Travel Landmark tea at top hotel mark taylor enjoys the lap of luxury on a hot a few days in london The London landmark afternoon tea served at The Kensington ARRIVING hot and sweaty after a long train journey, followed by a short but steamy trip on the packed tube, the greeting at The Kensington Hotel reception desk couldn’t have been more refreshing. Before we’d even had chance to catch our breath or wipe our brows, a genial concierge had whisked our bags away, and the receptionist was presenting us with a silver tray containing hand sanitiser, a warm face towel and an ice-cold carton of mineral water. Now, that’s what I call arriving in style. One thing I’ve noticed since returning to high-end London hotels after the pandemic is that each has its own Covid system. The more expensive places tend to do things a little differently and, although staff wear masks and keep their distance, The Kensington is pretty relaxed about it. Of course, all the proper regulations are still in place but they leave it to the guests to make their own judgments about things rather than ruin the moment with lurid signs and hazmat suits. Right in the heart of South Kensington, this opulent hotel is part of The Doyle Collection, a Dublin-based family-owned group that has hotels in Ireland, London and Washington DC. It also owns The Bristol Hotel in the city’s harbourside area, so it’s a brand a lot of Bristolians are familiar with. A large mansion with a grand stucco facade and more than 120 guest rooms, The Kensington has an immediately relaxed ambience from the minute you arrive and are welcomed by the immaculate door staff who welcome every guest as if they were returning regulars. Light, airy and laid-back, it’s an elegant modern hotel and service was faultless throughout our stay. Our stunning suite overlooked leafy Queen’s Gate but the triple-glazed windows meant that we didn’t hear any noise from the bustling street below. The suite we had was more like a large apartment with a lounge and small kitchen area (complete with Nespresso coffee machine) leading through to the huge bedroom, which then carried on to an equally big bathroom. It was beautifully furnished in a regal style with antique furniture, sumptuous sofas and armchairs, floor-to-ceiling drapes, crystal chandelier and striking artwork on the walls. The seriously comfortable king-size bed had a luxurious duck-down duvet and crisp, cool Egyptian cotton sheets. The bright and spacious marble-clad bathroom had a roll-top bath and separate shower with a waterfall head the size of a large frying pan. There was even a plentiful supply of posh Malin + Goetz bath and shower products to use and these were topped up during our stay, as was the complimentary bottles of mineral water. For added home comfort, the lounge had a state-of-the-art in-room entertainment system complete with 55-inch Smart TV with Chromecast (so you can stream Netflix, videos and music from your own device), and a Bose iPod docking station. There was also a TV in the bedroom and even a small one over the bath. It all makes the act of leaving the room very difficult indeed. Each room also has a card with a QR code that enables guests to access a digital print platform of newspapers and magazines. On the ground floor, the public areas are relaxed and comfortable with open fires, high Victorian ceilings and interconnecting drawing rooms. The stunning K-Bar combines modern style with classic detail, including sumptuous fabrics and contemporary artwork. This awardwinning cocktail bar oozes elegance and has the oak-panelled look and feel of a discreet and exclusive gentleman’s club, albeit one that welcomes everybody. The underlit lamps and velvety furnishings add a touch of extra glamour. The bar staff here serve a mix of creative contemporary cocktails and classics, plus an extensive wine list and seemingly endless choice of top-end spirits. I tried the French 75 - a blend of Tanqueray No. Ten gin, fresh lemon juice, sugar syrup and Perrier Jouët Champagne - and it was perfectly made. One of the most popular options for guests and non-residents is the traditional afternoon tea served in the restaurant. Presented on a London Eyeinspired tea stand, it’s a celebration of London’s iconic skyline and architecture with cakes and savouries representing the likes of The Gherkin (in the form of a white chocolate and dark chocolate ganache), The Shard (carrot cake with milk chocolate) and Big Ben (a lemon curd tart). The Kensington The Knightsbridge suite The teas are supplied by the award-winning Rare Tea Company founded by Henrietta Lovell, who buys direct from the farms and growers. As the name suggests, some of these teas are very rare indeed, with only a few kilos produced in some cases. The delicious single estate English Breakfast tea comes from the oldest tea estate in Malawi and the Japanese Genmaicha sencha tea, which is blended with toasted brown rice, was exceptional with its unique buttery popcorn flavour. In the stylish Town House restau- rant that evening, we enjoyed a delicious dinner from the modern British menu, including The Kensington classic prawn cocktail with Marie Rose sauce; chicken schnitzel with rocket, caper and lemon vinaigrette, and English strawberries with Jersey cream. The following morning, breakfast options included a traditional Full English (bacon, sausage, black pudding, mushroom, tomato and potato scone), and Chapel and Swan smoked salmon scrambled eggs, as well as healthier choices. Of course, you can work off any extra calories in the well-equipped gym in the basement or go for a run in nearby Kensington Gardens. And that’s the beauty of staying in such a well-positioned hotel. There are so many attractions on the doorstep and the West End is only minutes away. The Natural History Museum and Victoria and Albert Museum are a short walk from the hotel, as is the Royal Albert Hall, should your visit coincide with a concert. There are also numerous restaurants and pubs on the Old Brompton Road around the corner and Harrods and Harvey Nichols are close by, too. It feels like normality is now returning to London’s top hotels at long last. The Kensington was busy when we visited, with obvious signs that wealthy American tourists are coming back, which must be music to the ears of the capital’s hospitality industry. Long may that continue. ■ Rooms at The Kensington start at £375 per night and suites start at £585 per night. townhousekensington.com

Late summer is the perfect time to visit the Mediterranean holiday island now open to vaccinated UK travellers, says sarah marshall It’s not too late to see Sardinia Blue heaven: Sardinia’s crystal clear waters ESCAPE PLANS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 17 Travel ■ Visit Barbados from £1,049: Jet off on this seven-night holiday staying at the four-star Mango Bay Hotel in St James. Price includes return flights from London Heathrow Airport on September 28 and seven nights’ accommodation on an book visit awayholidays.co.uk or call 0208 705 0107. ■ Malta from £383pp: Jet out of Manchester on October 5 for seven-nights at the four-star Qawra Palace Hotel on the Qawra seafront. Includes breakfast. Book at awayholidays.co.uk or all-inclusive basis. To Barbados call 020 8705 0107. With turquoise waters comparable to tahiti and fine sandy beaches to rival the Seychelles, Sardinia is a mosaic of so many paradise places. Yet its identity remains hidden to most. Cloaked in myths and legends, the island’s history far predates grand temples and citadels built by the Romans, while a thriving population of centenarians defies science with a diet of red wine and cheese. Once the heat has subsided and italian holidaymakers have gone home, the Mediterranean island is a late summer delight. And now italy has scrapped a five-day quarantine for vaccinated UK arrivals, requiring only a negative PCR or antigen test taken no more than 48 hours in advance, the last drops of sunshine are within easy reach. here are a few of the island’s delights. The ruby coral Used to make jewellery, red coral has been prized for centuries and underpins the economy of Catalan town Alghero on the northwest coast. Only 25 licences are granted each year to specialised deep sea divers, who use an axe to excavate no more than 2.5kg of the brittle branches. During the late 1800s, hundreds of vessels arrived for the “red gold” rush, but now the only boats in Alghero’s harbour are tourist vessels ferrying visitors to marine caves like Neptune’s Grotto, an underground lake decorated with spikey stalactites. The sapphire waTers The water lapping Sardinia’s shores is reliably clear and clean, providing excellent conditions The water lapping Sardinia’s shores is reliably clear and clean... Ruby coral jewellery A Sardinian watch tower Sardinia Radio Telescope for swimming, snorkelling and diving. Among the finest beaches are Stintino’s La Pelosa on the west coast and 9km-long La Poetto in the south. One of the most scenic spots is undoubtedly the Maddalena archipelago, sitting between the Strait of Bonifacio and Corsica. take a boat trip to explore the protected pink sands of Budelli, coloured by tiny fragments of coral, and look out for wild boars swimming in pine-fringed bays. The bronze age seTTlemenTs More than 7,000 conical watchtowers, known as nuraghe, have been unearthed across the island, built between the 18th and 15th centuries BCE. Found nowhere else on earth, little is known about the megalithic stone buildings – although many are still remarkably well preserved. The biggest settlement, awarded Unesco World heritage status, can be found at Su Nuraxi di Barumini in the south. Walk between a geometric labyrinth of dry stone walls, ending up at a magnificent look-out tower. The silver skies Outside towns and cities, a lack of light pollution makes Sardinia an excellent place to study the night sky. An hour’s drive from Cagliari, the Sardinia Radio telescope is the largest of its kind in italy – although tours are currently suspended due to Covid. But you don’t need a scientific platform to view constellations. Not far from Alghero, in the northwest, the cliffs of Capo Caccia have become a popular place for hardcore star-gazers.

18 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Fashion Focus JOANNE Watkinson can your wardrobe sustain you? Becoming more sustainable is a responsibility that we all share. Sir David Attenborough made it very clear by telling us “what we do in the next 20 years will determine the future for all life on Earth”. It is an apocalyptic statement, that we must heed. Each of us can make small changes to the way we live in order to reduce our carbon footprint such as eating less meat, reducing our home energy consumption and water waste, and of course consuming fashion less ferociously. Lately, savvy influencers have switched their content and narrative to include the phrases repeatwear and recycle to appeal to those who care about climate change. If, like me, wearing your clothes on repeat is the norm this concept may amuse, but it’s refreshing compared to the influencers who wouldn’t be seen in the same garment twice. Some people have a tendency to stand on their soap box and preach this newly-found message causing us to feel guilty unnecessarily. “Shop your own wardrobe”, “Buy nothing for a year” are popular phrases with influencers. This vow is the perfect Q&A i’m a big fan of Q pastel colours but the shops never seem to have anything. i would like some pastel coloured knitwear for my work wardrobe. Pastels can be A tricky on some but they look amazing on others, lucky you! I love these knitted sweaters with their puff sleeves. Stella McCartney has long been a champion of sustainability, both in her fashion line and her own life option for influencers and fashion insiders who have spent the past decade being sent a steady supply of free clothes, but not everyone is in this position of privilege. A Bottega-touting influencer shopping from their own bulging wardrobe for a year isn’t too much of a stretch, but there are any number of reasons this might not be something you can do. You may have just had a baby/lost weight/gained weight, or you aren’t fortunate enough to have built up a wardrobe of useful clothes. Someone who has consumed fashion heavily deciding to stop is positive, however, it’s also a sign of extreme privilege and those who suggest you do it via their platforms should be transparent about how their circumstances might be very different to yours. They may take multiple long haul flights but there will be no mention of that. Another message I am seeing being pushed more frequently is “buy one thing a month” again, great, I’m here for considered purchases, buy what you love. But when that one thing a month is a Chanel bag, we’re not on the same page. Be sustainable in a way that works for you. Hunkin Abire top £75, wild-swans.com Joanne is a stylist with more than 20 years’ experience in the fashion industry. email joannewatkinson@me.com. Follow her on instagram @myfashiondirectory for style tips Fall into autumn The temperatures have got to drop some time, so get your wardrobe ready for the transition with these easy to wear pieces. by EMMA JOHNSON Sage sweater £29.99, chiffon flounce skirt £29.99, Lindex. Other items stylist’s own Leaf stitch jumper £69.95, skirt £64.95, anle boots £69.95, Joules Frill sleeve midi dress £75, tote bag £65, leather sandals £95, & Other Stories Blouse and skirt both £12.50, boots £26, Matalan

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 19 STYLE FILE ■ Want to choose more sustainable fashion without skimping on style? Look no further than Baukjen’s luxe transitional collection. Crafted from 85% responsibly sourced fabrics, the latest drop features gorgeous ditsy floral print dresses alongside wardrobe classics. You’ll wear these pieces again and again throughout the season. Dress £165, baukjen.co ■ We already love Dancing Leopard for its brightly coloured wrap dresses, slip dresses and palazzo pants. But did you know about its Halo Collection? Consciously crafted from sustainable fibres, think eco-friendly activewear, responsible swimwear and organic cotton staples, all in moodboosting colours and hand-drawn prints. Jaiden yoga unitard £75, Fashion Focus Samaya bomber jacket £75, dancingleopard.co.uk ■ How much cheerier will your back-towork experience be if you return to the office carrying this bag? The Cambridge Satchel Company has just launched its Little One, Pushlock (above) and Poppy Backpack designs in this sunny limited edition Bumblebee Matte colourway. Priced £100- £160, cambridgesatchel.com *All prices correct at time of going to press and while stocks last Left: Peacock paisley dress £50, belt £38, The Spy Who Loved Me boots £85. Right: Floral skirt £40, sweater £40, Make Your Move buckle boots £55, Joe Browns

20 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Step into new season in style Sparkle: A model at the Halpern autumn/winter 2021 show at London Fashion Week AW21 Style Guide BeAUty Buzz The laTesT producTs & glamour gossip Autumn/winter fashion will be all about maximalism. Katie Wright reveals five trends to try now With autumn on the horizon, it’s time to find out what’s in store on the fashion front next season. Looking at the catwalk collections, there’s a real sense of renewed optimism, as designers embraced punchy colours, strong silhouettes and a healthy dose of glitter with their autumn/winter offerings. As the world continues to open up once more, lockdown loungewear is making way for mood-boosting garments for day and night, with maximalism the overarching theme of AW21. in short, there’s a lot to look forward to. here are five ways you can tap into the new season trends right now... Bright colourS From to fuchsia to emerald, bubble-gum pink to lemon yellow, and aqua blue to tangerine orange – there was a kaleidoscope of colour on the AW21 runways, with Versace, Prada and Gucci leading the charge on the continent, while Roksanda, Halpern and Bora Aksu brought us brights at London Fashion Week. This trend is about a shock of head to toe colour, so pick your favourite saturated shade and wear it with pride. Winter floralS Dark florals are often present on the autumn/winter catwalks, but this time around the petal prints seen at London Fashion Week favourites Erdem, Molly Goddard (left) and Yuhan Wang had a distinctly summery feel. A floral midi dress is a key transitional piece this season. Team yours with chunky angle boots now and slouchy over-theknees later. CRUSH SequinS and Sparkle The epitome of joyful maximalism, this season’s partywear looks were a riot of sequins, diamante, beading and metallic fabrics, with standout looks including the golden gowns at Gucci and Alberta Ferretti, as well as the sequinned frocks at Halpern and Louis Vuitton. Come festive season, a River Island beige sequined oversized shirt, £50 glittery dress should be top of your shopping list, but for now, a sequinned shirt teamed with this season’s baggy jeans is a more laidback option. In the pink on the runway at Bora Aksu Monsoon Frida floral print dress green, £70 (belt, stylist’s own) Sonder Studio pink midi dhirt dress, £65 * Prices correct at time of going to print. While stocks last OF THE WEEK Dune Cassie pink snaffle trim sling backs, £90 Big BagS puffer coatS Bundling up has never looked cooler, thanks to the voluminous quilted coats and cropped puffer jackets on show at Jason Wu, Isabel Marant, Mark Fast and Celine. Keep it classic in a neutral tone like camel or khaki, or take it to the max in a brilliantly bright hue. George at Asda green midweight quilted coat, £26 Is the micro purse trend officially over? According to Jil Sander, Marni and Art School (right), big bags are back. Now that more and more workers are returning to the office, a sizeable bag is needed for lugging laptops and other essentials. Take your cue from the catwalks and opt for a cooltoned tote. M&Co faux leather tote bag, £29 We love a slogan T-shirt and this one, £45, from Orwell + Austen (orwellausten.com) has got us thinking... (PS. It means ‘reality does not exist’) ■ If you look back fondly on the Nineties you will adore Peacci’s 90s Baby Nail Polishes , £10 each. They pay homage to everything from Sex And The City’s cosmopolitan cocktails, Posh Spice’s nude lippy and the red Baywatch swimsuit, to Britney Spears and Justin Timberlake’s legendary double denim. ■ Dull Faaces are the last thing any of us want, yet it’s also the name of a fab new multitasking product from skincare brand Faace . Perfect for mucking out plugged pores, the kaolin clay-based cleanser, £24, can be used as a quick daily face wash or left on for 10 minutes as a skinsmoothing mask. ■ Here’s a juicy little addition to your skincare regime, at a price that won’t leave your bank balance feeling squeezed. Revolution Skincare has just expanded its glowboosting Vitamin C range with a Brightening Power Eye Serum, £10, Vitamin C, Turmeric and Cranberry Seed Energising Mask, £8, and Brightening Hydro Gel Eye Patches, £15. Dull skin will drink it up. ■ MyBeautyBrand’s Perfect Pink Lip Oil , £19 is the creation of Princess Eugenie’s bridal make-up guru Hannah Martin, and what looks rather Legally Blonde from the outside turns out to be the prettiest, plumping gloss once it’s on the lips. Just try not to kiss too many frogs with it while searching for your prince, eh?

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 21 Beauty that will give you change from a fiver Affordable cosmetics and skincare have never been better, says HannaH Britt. She asks the experts how to stock up without splashing out The beauty industry has changed. Cheap is no longer a dirty word. Affordable cosmetics have never been better, and often have as much science behind them as their pricer counterparts. “There are now some fabulous brands which are really affordable and uncompromising on quality,” says make-up artist Christiane Dowling (christianedowling.com). “I’ve found hidden gems among brands like Kiko, NYX, Max Factor and Maybelline, which are a staple in my professional make-up kit.” “There are plenty of designer brands with brilliant products, but some can be quite overpriced,” says make-up artist Roseanna Velin (roseannavelin.com). “Premium brands also have premium packaging, which reflects in the price,” adds makeup artist Tamara Tott (tamaratott. com). “It’s all about being savvy. We live in an age where you don’t need to pay top dollar.” So what should you look for? “Think about the quality of pigment, the product finish and longevity,” says Roseanna. “Before purchasing, know what you want to achieve, whether it’s smoky eyes, dewy skin or longwearing lipstick. Don’t get distracted by branding and packaging,” says Roseanna. “Get to know the product inside the pot by testing it on the back of your hand.” “Notice the texture – is it silky, shiny, shimmery or matte? Does it glide on or take a bit of effort to blend? What is the pigment like – does it show up straight away or does it need to be built up? Beauty should be fun, so don’t take it too seriously,” says Christiane. “One of the best things about a budget product is that you can take a punt on it.” here we share some of the best budget brands and our top buys. Make-up marvels elF: Founded with the mission of making the best of beauty accessible to every eye, lip and face, Elf is a favourite of beauty editors for its high-performing products. Prices start from £3. ■ TRY: Elf Flawless Brightening Concealer, £5, elfcosmetics.co.uk nYX: For great pigments at low prices, NYX is unbeatable. Its high-quality palettes and primers are a favourite with make-up artists and influencers alike. Prices start from £4. ■ TRY: NYX Born To Glow Illuminator, £4.50, Boots skincare saviours tHe orDinarY: Want powerhouse ingredients for pennies? You can’t do better than The Ordinary, which aims to show consumers that a lower point is not reflective of efficacy. Its skincare starts from £2.75. ■ TRY: The Ordinary Niacinamide 10% + Zinc 1%, £5, Boots laCUra: Known for its cut-price takes on popular and more expensive products, Aldi’s beauty brand sells out as soon as it hits stores. From 55p. ■ TRY: Lacura Miracle Cream, £3.99, Aldi Brilliant bodycare Ps…: Prices start from a purse-friendly 50p for PS at Primark beauty products, which sees high-end ingredients contained in budget packaging. ■ TRY: PS... Vitamin E Hand Cream, £2, Primark PalMer’s: Palmer’s wrote the book on no-frills skincare. From lip balm to body cream, products are reliable, get the job done and smell delicious too. Prices start from £2.50. ■ TRY: Palmer’s Cocoa Butter Formula Body Lotion, £3.99, Boots Hot haircare treseMMÉ: Salon-worthy hair can be yours for as little as £2 thanks to Tresemmé, with nutrient-packed products you can trust to deliver stunning results. ■ TRY: Tresemmé Pro Collection Keratin Smooth Heat Protect Spray, £2, Boots Batiste: Many dry shampoos come and go, but few will beat this bargain brand. A staple of festivals, school-runs and desk-todancefloor makeovers. Try the travel size for just £1.50. ■ TRY: Batiste Dry Shampoo, £3.25, Boots nifty nail art riMMel: No make-up bag should be without Rimmel. This budget brand has products for as little as £2.99, which perform as well as their more expensive counterparts. ■ TRY: Rimmel 60 Seconds Super Shine Nail Polish in Caramel Cupcake, £3.49, Superdrug BarrY M: This fashionforward brand has prices from £2.49. The nail polishes are the heroes, with every colour imaginable. ■ TRY: Barry M Gelly Nail Paint in Lavender, £3.99, Superdrug WHat We’re loving tHis Week: ■ Jo Malone, founder of Jo Loves, was the first to create an interpretation of a truffle note in perfumery. She’s just relaunched her Red Truffle 21 A Fragrance Parfum, from £75, which combines the note with fig, citrus and pine. It’s a rich, complex and modern scent. ■ Avon’s Anew Skin Reset Plumping Shots were a standout skincare launch of 2020. They feature a patented new ingredient A NEW LOOK FOR YOUR OLD KITCHEN THIS AUTUMN • Trusted reputation • Huge choice of doors, worktops appliances, sinks & taps • Free planning & design service • Door swaps to full kitchens – tailored to your needs www.dreamdoors.co.uk Beauty called Protinol that claims to restore seven years’ worth of collagen in seven days. Now they have put this technology into a serum. Anew Renewal Power Serum is out now, RRP £22, but on offer at £16 throughout September. ■ OPI is giving us some serious cool-girl vibes with its latest collection, which is inspired by the art scene of Downtown Los Angeles. Taking you on a tour of the area’s hippest hangouts, the new Nail Lacquer shades, £13.90 each, include pale lilac Graffiti Sweetie, Espresso Your Inner Self – inspired by the ultimate sightseeing essential, coffee – and the deep blue Isn’t It Grand Avenue – named after the street where you’ll find all the big art museums. 11/12 The Promenade, Gloucester Rd, Bristol BS7 8AL FAMILY RUN BUSINESS by just swapping the doors and worktops BEFORE ® THE UK’S #1 KITCHEN MAKEOVER EXPERTS D Call for a free estimate on: 0117 944 3223 AVERAGE SCORE 9.8/10

22 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Memory Lane Curtain Call with Jeffrey Davies Jeffrey Davies looks backs at some of his favourite interviewees from the last few decades. This week it’s singer Tony Bennett TONY Bennett has been hailed by some as the world’s greatest singer. His many records and albums have sold by the millions, his concerts have always been filled to capacity wherever he has performed in the world, and his television appearances have consistently attracted massive audiences. Tony Bennett’s back catalogue of classic songs include The Lady is a Tramp, The Shadow of Your Smile, The Way You Look Tonight, The Very Thought of You and his signature song, I Left My Heart in San Francisco. Born Anthony Dominick Benedetto in 1926, the multi award-winning internationally renowned Italian-American singer of jazz, traditional pop standards, big band and show tunes, has also (in recent years) been duetting on albums with Lady Gaga. A class act if ever there was Tony Bennett performing in 2007 one. A much-acclaimed visual artist too, the New York-born crooner’s paintings hang on the walls of several institutions in the US and in collectors’ and art enthusiasts’ homes and offices around the world. One of his paintings is called Sunday in Central Park, which is the view from the singer and artist’s window in Manhattan. In 2016 Tony Bennett was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, but it was only last month that he made the decision to retire from performing. I interviewed the charismatic and very welcoming legend, now 95, in I’ve had a lot of influences. The three biggest influences are Bing Crosby, Louis Armstrong and Frank Sinatra the ‘Star’ dressing room at the Capitol in Cardiff 50 years ago... Your concert was amazing, I remarked to a clearly jubilant Tony Bennett, who had just left the stage to a standing ovation, following a third well-deserved encore on this Welsh leg of his sold-out tour of Britain. “Thank you. I enjoyed myself. I think the audience did as well, if the applause is anything to go by,” the friendly star replied, clearly happy at his ‘wonderful’ reception in the Principality tonight. You are acknowledged today as the world’s greatest singer, I commented. What a compliment, even fellow Italian-American crooner Frank Sinatra, has himself said it. “Well I’m always kind of confused by that remark because there are so many wonderful singers in the world. Even an audience on a singalong all sound good to me,” the modest star replied. “When Sinatra did say this, it really did kind of change things around for me. He kind of put me into the position where I just took on a very positive stance. I started living up to what he said about me. It did help me improve as a singer, funnily enough - and as a person.” Tony has lived through a period of musical change through the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s. What has been the main influence in his maturation to international singing star status? “Well, making the decision to dedicate yourself to it. Once that happens the concentration takes over and you really get involved with it,” he said, summing it up simply. Most singing stars admit to having been influenced by other performers, either by their type of songs or the way they sing them. Does Tony? “Oh I’ve had a lot of influences. The three biggest influences are Bing Crosby, Louis Armstrong and Frank Sinatra,” he admitted, allowing me to come back to my question with a rather flippant rejoinder. You mean unlike some of the pop stars or groups that I’ve interviewed who claim their main influence was definitely drugs or our British beer! “Well it’s a different age group. My son’s in a rock ’n’ roll group and there’s no one else in the world except The Beatles for him. They’re the biggest thing in the musical world.” Sixties pop, and now the beginnings of ’70s glam-rock with the likes of Marc Bolan. What is Tony’s view of contemporary pop music culture? “Well, it’s pretty good. A couple of things I like. Some of The Beatles’ things. I also like Jimmy Webb - and Burt Bacharach,” he replied. “They’re all good.” I remarked that many older people think today’s ’60s and now ’70s pop Tony Bennett in 1960 (Photo by CA/Redferns, photo, below, by Frazer Harrison/ Getty Images) stars and their genre of pop and rock music has been a retrograde step too far. “The only thing I like that has really happened is they’ve made a lot of old people feel a lot younger, funnily enough!” he said with a laugh. Tony Bennett with Lady Gaga winning a Grammy in 2015 “The young ones felt older, a little, because they were allowed on stage. But the older ones, all of a sudden, had their hair style growing. They also had a lot of way-out psychedelic clothes. Normally, ten years ago, that would have never happened. There was a kind of emotional revolution as you would call it. But no, musically, it doesn’t compare to Cole Porter or Gershwin or people like that. I don’t think that music is as good,” he answered candidly. Currently, Tony Bennett is on a British tour. What has been the reaction from audiences up and down the country? Has it been what he had hoped for? “Oh, it’s beyond that. We’ve played to full houses everywhere. We’re very surprised at that because of all the political strife and strikes that are going on here right now. I had anticipated running into politics. But it didn’t happen. The audiences have been wonderful,” he said. Having performed before audiences all over the world, how does he rate his British fans. Or, as this evening, his Welsh fans? “Well they really appreciate music in Wales. I just love the people here and the way of life. Welsh people are generally interested in music. And I’m always impressed by this.” A musical nation. The Land of Song. With a reputation like that, are the people of Wales more critical of a visiting singing star than most other cultures? And does a performer have to work that much harder to win the people over in Wales than anywhere else in the world, I asked? “Yes, Wales is a musical nation, no doubt about that. Because of that I think you really do have to put on a good performance when you’re here,” he said entering into the spirit of my questioning, and adding that he always aims to perform to his very best no matter which country he is performing in. “I am Italian and the two best places in the world for singing are Italy and Wales,” the most engaging star stressed quite definitely, and with a twinkle in his eye. As I was leaving the venue, I noticed a large crowd of excited fans queueing in an orderly fashion at the stage door. They were waiting to get Tony Bennett’s much-coveted autograph. Being the star and gentleman that he is, he signed each autograph book in turn - and all with a most agreeable smile.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 23 we’re so excited to be going on the road... I’m going to lose it on stage The ScripT’S Danny O’DOnOghue TellS Marion McMullen emOTiOnS will be running high aS The banD STarTS TOuring again The Script lead singer Danny O’Donoghue, can’t wait to perform for the fans again Music album oF ThE wEEk CERTIFIED LOVER BOY Drake HHHII Over the course of almost 90 minutes, the 34-year-old revisits his favourite subjects, including how he still doesn’t get enough respect despite his vast success. He samples the lyrics of The Beatles’ Michelle on first track Champagne Poetry, as if underlining how he belongs in A-list company, and talks about himself in the third person as he outlines his power and influence. There’s a vast array of producers and numerous guest appearances including Jay-Z and Lil Wayne. Drake is at the top of his game on tracks like Knife Talk, Fountains and No Friends In The Industry, but no-one is editing Drake at this stage of the game, and most of the time Certified Lover Boy is almost as good as he thinks it is. SINGEr-SONGWrITEr Danny O’Donoghue has had enough of staring at the walls at home and is ready to do what he does best ... entertain people with music. The Script’s frontman says performing in arenas again will be “super-emotional and supercharged” as people start to come together again. “It feels like being let off the leash and going a bit crazy, but we all deserve it. Whatever makes you feel happy go and do it,” says the singer. “I’ve been at home like everyone else during lockdowns and the whole world has experienced this. “People have been really tested and the entire world has faced this challenge. Now we have the new normal.” Danny says people have suffered the loss of family, loved ones and friends and it feels like the best way to honour their memories going forward is to live life to the full and make the most of every moment. “The first lockdown felt like a bit of an extended holiday where you could have a barbecue and enjoy a few drinks at home, but the second lockdown was extreme and there was a real sense of urgency. People were looking for answers. It was a crazy place to be.” Danny has also had to come to terms with losing his mother Ailish to a brain aneurysm on Valentine’s Day last year and poured his grief into the band’s last album Sunsets And Full Moons. He says martial arts and Thai boxing have also helped him get through a lot – “beating up the pads instead of beating up myself” – but says his beloved music industry has suffered badly. “We’ve lost so many professional people behind the scenes. “They are doing other jobs like Danny with guitarist Mark Sheehan and drummer and bassist Glen Power driving for Amazon and I really hope we can get them back.” Now he and bandmates, Glen Power and Mark Sheehan, are counting down the days to when they can tour again with European dates starting this month. New career-spanning greatest hits album Tales From The Script is also released on October 1 with tracks including Hall Of Fame (featuring will.i.am) and Top 10 hits The Man Who Can’t Be Moved, For The First Time and Superheroes. The album also includes landmark moments and staples of their live show including Breakeven, their debut single We Cry, and Rain. The album will be followed by live performances in the UK and Ireland next year with Ella Henderson as special guest and two homecoming performances at Dublin’s 3Arena. It all celebrates a musical career that has included five UK number one albums, six billion streams, and more than two million ticket sales. Danny admits greatest hits albums are getting rarer as a lot of bands now only survive for a few records before breaking up and are not around long enough to notch up enough bestselling tracks to bring out one. He says the band’s fans have also remained loyal over the years. “Like everyone, I’ve missed being with family and friends and playing for our fans. I want to give them a great night. They have given me a life, a roof over my head and clothes on my back.” Danny spent lockdown with his girlfriend and says relationships that were fractured have broken during the last year, while strong relationships have grown even stronger. “If you had a problem with yourself, you had to face yourself,” he points out. “If you had a problem with a relationship you had to face each other. If you had a strong relationship if became stronger and if it was broken it became fractured. What would have taken four years in relationship terms has taken just a year.” The band have been rehearsing every day and are looking forward to performing live again. Danny jokes he will be word perfect by then when it comes to lyrics, adding: “We’ve written a lot of songs about love and you sometimes go ‘which one is this’. It’s the second verses that can trip you up.” He says they also want to be positive for the future and bring that positivity to audiences. “The Tales From The Script album is a springboard to our next chapter, but it’s also our story so far,” says Danny. “We’re so excited to be taking it on the road. I know I’m gonna lose it on stage, night after night.” ■ For album and tour details go to thescript music.com

24 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Books My career has blossomed since talking about my mental health... Acclaimed actor David Harewood, star of Homeland and Supergirl, was just 23 and fresh out of Rada when he suffered a psychotic breakdown, during which he had to be physically detained by six police officers, sedated and then sectioned under the Mental Health Act. He had spent weeks walking all over London talking to strangers and blacking out, waking up in a different part of town hours later, with no idea what had happened in between. Recreational weed smoking only exacerbated the situation. Eventually, after an episode dominated by the booming voice of Martin Luther King in his head, several friends took him to hospital. “I was highly disturbed and I do remember being physically restrained and I was absolutely terrified. I’d lost my mind. The demons were coming to get me. But I was really lucky to come through it,” the actor says today. In 2019, David, now 55, appeared in the BBC documentary Psychosis and Me, in which he charted his ordeal, and has now followed this up with Maybe I Don’t Belong Here, his written account in which he describes how he has come to understand the extent to which his psychosis and subsequent treatment was rooted in race and racism. His Barbadian father, Romeo, had been sectioned when David was 15, and diagnosed with hypermania, and the book became a love letter to his father, he says. The actor, who has spent the best part of the last decade in the US and Canada because of better job opportunities, explains: “With the David suffered racial abuse as a young boy David Harewood talks to Hannah Stephenson about his psychotic breakdown, racism and why the US is a better place for a British black actor than the UK death of George Floyd, I started thinking about what the whole Black Lives Matter thing was trying to say. I’d seen the marches around the world and the outpouring of support and revulsion and started to notice that in England there was this hesitation to support, or instantly there was a rejection of Black Lives Matter, an instant (attitude) of, ‘Oh, that doesn’t happen here, that’s in America’. Actually that’s not true. “It made me think of how difficult my youth was growing up. This ‘denialism’ that we are so good at in England was a real spark for me to try to find a way of navigating into the argument, which wasn’t trying to shout at people.” David was born in Birmingham, the son of Barbadian parents who arrived in Britain in 1957 looking for a better life. From a young age he and his family were subjected to racist attacks, from a brick through the window to excrement through the letterbox. His parents warned the young David and his three siblings that there were certain white people who didn’t like them and were told to watch out for one another whenever they left the house. “I grew up watching Benny Hill, Tommy Cooper and Freddie Starr and loving it, and naively feeling that I am those people,” he recalls. Yet racism was on his doorstep, he observes. The “walk from home to school was terrifying as a kid” as he didn’t know if he was going to be attacked, have something thrown at him or receive racist abuse. He adds: “But when I got to school I could be a clown and the life and soul of the classroom. That’s what led to me being an entertainer.” When he was seven, he was playing alone in the street when an David and his wife, Kirsty older white man approached him full of hatred and anger and told him, in no uncertain terms, to get out of his country. Today, he reflects: “That was the start of this crack in my identity. “People say to me, ‘It’s in the past, forget about it’ but it’s who I am. That’s what led to my breakdown.” He was sectioned for five days in a psychiatric hospital before returning home, where his mental health dipped again and the hallucinations and delusions loomed large, which resulted in another short stay in a locked psychiatric unit until he was discharged with a supply of anti-psychotic drugs. Slowly he recovered, and as his mother gradually reduced his tablet intake he got back much of the energy he’d been lacking. David finally returned to London to pursue his acting career, largely in the theatre, later becoming the first black actor to play Othello at the National Theatre. But the TV roles he secured were minor, which frustrated him. Then, almost broke, he was offered the role of CIA counterterrorism director David Estes in the American espionage thriller Homeland alongside Damian Lewis. “After 30 years of struggling, I was down to my last 80 quid and was taken by the Americans and put in a really prominent position in a great TV show. It has turned my entire career and life around.” He says it’s easier for a black person to get meatier roles in the US than in Britain, despite the racism issues there. “The roles I had in the States don’t compare with the TV roles I’d had for the previous 10 years in England, when I just didn’t have central roles. It was really frustrating coming on and doing a couple of lines here and a couple of lines there. “There’s a fantastic young genera- tion of black British talent – John Boyega, Daniel Kaluuya, Michaela Coel – which is just storming the world, and that’s tremendously exciting. Most of them are making movies in America but I hope there’s an industry here that can cope.” Filming in LA, New York and Vancouver has meant long periods away from his family, wife Kirsty and their two teenage daughters, who have remained in London. “We decided early on that we didn’t want to raise our children in America and I’m quite glad about that. It’s an insane country right now and scary. I didn’t want to bring them up in that environment. “As my career has got busier it’s difficult, but we have FaceTime, so I can still see their faces.” He is recognised over here but people often mistake him for another famous actor, David says. “I’m constantly being confused with Idris Elba, which I always find hilarious. I remember a day when this guy came up to me and said, ‘I really like your work – when’s Luther back on?’” He reflects that racism is tackled more openly in the US than the UK. “I’m not saying America is the promised land in any way,” he notes. “Racism fear really upset me as a kid and I didn’t want to deal with it, whereas in America you David Harewood describes his new book as a love letter to his father, Romeo, who was sectioned when David was 15 have no choice. Parents will sit their children down and say, ‘These are the things you have to be careful of: the police, the authorities etc’. “You have to educate them to the threats they are likely to encounter. I was too busy dealing with it on my own.” “The scars of slavery and the struggle for black emancipation are much more prominent and understood, and are much more of an open wound in America. Over here, we don’t have the numbers to have these great civil rights movements.” He has been having therapy on and off since the age of 27, most recently when the documentary opened old wounds which he needed to deal with. Since the documentary, many have approached him to thank him for addressing the problem of mental health. “My career has actually blossomed since talking about it. We are on the cusp of a real revolution when it comes to bringing mental health to the fore. I can’t tell you the amount of tweets and messages I get saying thank you. But there’s still a long way to go to break the stigma.” ■■Maybe I don’t Belong Here by David Harewood is published by Bluebird, £20

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 25 Books REVIEWS Fiction freCkleS by Cecilia Ahern, HarperCollins, £16.99, ebook £10.99 HHHHI Cecilia Ahern – best known for her debut novel PS, I Love You – is back with her latest offering, Freckles. Misfit country girl Allegra ‘Freckles’ Bird moves to Dublin to achieve her dreams, but as reality sets in, she realises she isn’t exactly who she hoped she would become. A tense encounter with a stranger sets her on a journey to uncover the five people who have made her who she is, and in pursuit, she begins to uncover what truly defines her. This is fresh and timely, picking apart Allegra’s character thoughtfully without cliché or judgement. Asking boldly what and who make us who we are, Freckles teams wit and wisdom harmoniously – albeit wrapped in a slightly saccharine bow. pick of the week SnoW CountrY by Sebastian Faulks, Hutchinson, £20, ebook £9.99 HHHHI Snow Country returns to the Schloss Seeblick sanatorium in Austria, loosely following Faulks’ 2005 novel Human Traces. The clinic is as much a personality as the two main characters, Anton and Lena – he a journalist, fortunate enough to travel before being plunged into the German trenches of the Western Front, and she an impoverished, uneducated child of a prostitute Beautiful World, Where are You by Sally Rooney, Faber & Faber, £16.99, ebook £8.99 HHIII The cult of Sally Rooney is so strong – her work has been adapted into an awardwinning TV programme, and her style has inspired waves of new writers – it’s easy to forget the latest release is looking for somewhere, or someone, to call home. Through all the political turbulence, love and loss, Schloss Seeblick is a place of calm – both for the characters that end up there, and for us, through Faulks’ flawless prose. Snow Country’s pensive wandering expresses mental resilience and wistful yearning in a love story that struggles to bloom in the lugubrious period between two world wars. only her third book. Beautiful World, Where Are You is unmistakeably Sally Rooney: but magnified to an extent it almost seems like a parody. Alice – a famous writer who has moved to the seaside after a mental breakdown – and Eileen – her best friend living in Dublin with a nice but unfulfilling job – are the central characters, along with the two men in their lives: Felix and Simon. There’s not too much plot in the book – it’s more of a meditation on life when you’re in the tail end of your 20s, and every second chapter is a long email between the two women. This format hinders the flow of the book – it feels like pages of selfindulgent musings about life, sex, capitalism and more. It’s heavy-handed and has none of the emotional heart of Rooney’s previous books. Non-fiction the tranSgender iSSue: an argument for JuStiCe by Shon Faye, Allen Lane, £20, ebook £9.99 HHHHI Few books are as urgent as trans activist and journalist Shon Faye’s debut. She covers the dire situation facing the trans community today. The analysis is thorough and heartbreaking. It’s a highly fact-based book backed up with statistics and case studies, but Faye manages to write it in a hugely emotive and powerful way. ToP TEnS bESTSEllERS 1. The Song Of Achilles: Madeline Miller 2. The Dark Remains: Ian Rankin & William McIlvanney 3. A Slow Fire Burning: Paula Hawkins 4. Magpie: Elizabeth Day 5. Snow Country: Sebastian Faulks 6. How To Kill Your Family: Bella Mackie 7. The Heron’s Cry: Ann Cleeves 8. The Women Of Troy: Pat Barker 9. Freckles: Cecelia Ahern 10. 1979: Val McDermid Chart courtesy of Waterstones EbookS 1. One August Night: Victoria Hislop 2. The Holiday: T.M. Logan 3. Find Them Dead: Peter James 4. Dark Sacred Night: Michael Connelly 5. All That Remains: Sue Black 6. The Road Trip: Beth O’Leary 7. The Whistler: John Grisham 8. The Last Letter from Your Lover: Jojo Moyes 9. The Only Plane in the Sky: Garrett M. Graff 10. Beautiful World, Where Are You: Sally Rooney Chart courtesy of the Kindle store at Amazon Monica Wills House Set in the heart of Bedminster, stylish one and two bedroom apartments offer all the advantages of independent living with a vibrant community scene. From the panoramic roof garden vistas, to delicious dining, discover why the St Monica Trust offers the very best in retirement living. To find out more please call 0117 919 4256 For available apartments please visit www.stmonicatrust.org.uk Registered Charity 202151

26 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Soaps WHO’S DADDY? THE After rAinie posts flyers sAying MAx is the fAther of lindA’s child, Mick decides it’s tiMe to show her who she’s Messing with EASTENDErS BBC1 Linda is determined that Mick will be her baby’s legal father once he signs the birth certificate, but Rainie has other ideas as she posts flyers claiming Max is the real dad. So, Mick decides to take matters into his own hands, leaving Rainie and Stuart shocked. Bobby, dana, Waseem, iqra and Kioni are also handing out flyers, but theirs are in support of the local mosque. They attract the attention of a group of aggressive men, who start throwing out racial slurs before assaulting dana. Whitney’s latest gig Rainie finds herself in Mick’s crosshairs goes well until Rocky spots Sonia’s new love interest Ethan kissing another woman and punches him. What will this mean for Whitney’s career and Sonia’s budding romance? also, Patrick gives his blessing to isaac’s plan to move Lola in, but Sheree is less impressed as she tries to push ahead with her Trinidad plan. Meanwhile, denise finds herself shocked when the headteacher tells her that isaac still has a job there, before finding Sheree showing an estate agent around the house. Elsewhere, Martin drowns his sorrows and Kat encourages Janine to get an above-board job. TAKING THE MICK: Rainie’s flyers have Mick on the warpath HOME AND AWAY Channel 5 Martha suggests holding a fundraiser for mental health awareness and Ryder tries to persuade Bella to get involved but she’s not interested. Cash has a breakthrough in his attempts to woo Jasmine, after she tells Irene she’s agreed to a date with him, while poor Dean is knocked for six when Ziggy drops a bombshell about Tane, after chatting with Mackenzie. As Mia decides to go back to work, Ari frets that it’s still too soon. Mercedes is forced to face facts HOLLYOAKS Channel 4 Mia decides to go back to work Mercedes has been putting off telling Bobby about the end of her marriage in the hope the relationship can still be salvaged, but when Sylver returns home, he tells his stepson the truth. Meanwhile, after overhearing Yazz and Tom rowing about her presence, Cher claims that her dad has forgiven her and she’s moving back to The Dog. In reality, she has nowhere to go, and soon hits rock bottom. EMMErDALE ITV Marlon and Chas are forced to close the Woolpack when the electric cuts out, but what they don’t know is that someone has deliberately severed the external mains cable. Charity later walks in on a hooded intruder making off with the contents of the pub till, but the thief leaves her unconscious in a pool of blood. She’s taken to the hospital, where Chas is distraught to hear her cousin is suffering from a bleed on Kim tries to get Paddy to dope her racehorse Charity is knocked out by the intruder the brain. Will Charity pull through? Meanwhile, Paddy is horrified at the idea of having Al as a co-owner of the Woolpack, and asks Kim to help get rid of him. She points out it’s actually in her best interests if Al is distracted from HOP and says the vet will have to sweeten the deal – by doping her racehorse. Also, Diane is horrified when she realises Gabby is planning to elope with Jamie, but what the would-be bride doesn’t know is that he’s busy trying to convince Dawn that they can runaway together. COrONATION STrEET ITV Alya accepts Zeedan’s loan, but when he belatedly tries to play the protective big brother by having a go at Ryan for cheating on her, she points out that he wasn’t there when she and Yasmeen really needed him. It seems Zeedan could have an ulterior method for coming back now, as he is later found bleeding and battered in the ginnel. He initially hints to the police that Ryan was behind the attack, before coming clean to his family about being in serious trouble. Elsewhere, grieving Freda is hurt when Bernie claims that Aled will be ‘normal’ once he’s got his cochlear implant. She offers to take the youngster for a walk and then disappears with him, just as Gemma and Chesney are about to take their son for his operation. Norris manages to stir up trouble at his own funeral thanks to a final letter, a row between David and Daniel over the teacher’s supposed favouritism threatens to get out of hand, and Kelly is convinced her dad must be the anonymous donor who’s paid her legal fees. Zeedan is attacked NEIgHbOurS Channel 5 Toadie ends up kissing Rose The rumblings of dissent among the Lassiters’ staff at Harlow’s nepotistic appointment turn into a fullscale strike. Terese is grateful for Jesse’s support during the tense time, but a slip of the tongue leaves her working to smooth things over. There’s woe for Toadie, who vows to remain at Melanie’s side, only to lose his head with Rose. He comes clean about it, but it’s obvious he has no idea what he wants.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 27 EVERYBODY’S TALKING ABOUT JAMIE HHHII REVIEWS BY DAMON SMITH LIFE’S a drag, in the best possible sense, in Everybody’s Talking About Jamie, a defiantly feel-fabulous film version of the awardwinning coming-of-age musical. Theatre director Jonathan Butterell makes his feature film debut with a faithful stage-toscreen adaptation, expanding the rousing song and dance numbers beyond the classrooms and hallways of a secondary school in Sheffield to follow the out and proud 16-year-old hero as he chases a dream of attending the end-ofyear prom as his authentic self, in heels and a dress. Jenny Popplewell’s celebrated 2011 TV documentary Jamie: Drag Queen At 16 provides the narrative frame- work (footage of the real Jamie and his mother fes-- toons the end credits) which Tom MacRae’s script embroiders with energeti-- cally choreographed dream sequences and wrenching ballads from the heart. “This story really hap-- pened... then we added the singing and dancing,” cheek-ily declares the film. Jamie New (Max Harwood) celebrates his 16th birthday with a gift of glittery red heels from his supportive mother, Margaret (Sarah Lancashire). Classmate Dean Paxton (Samuel Bottomley) bullies Jamie but he deflects barbs flanked by best friend Pritti Pasha (Lauren Patel) and SOURCES OF STRENGTH: Richard E Grant plays a local drag artist and Sarah Lancashire is Jamie’s mum A BIG NIGHT OUT Riotous musical follows teenageR’s stRuggle to oveRcome homophobia and attend his pRom as his tRue self The story is peppered with musical numbers escapes into song-and-dance fantasies. Careers adviser Miss Hedge (Sharon Horgan) laments Jamie’s life goal of performing on stage. Unfazed, the teenager recruits Hugo Battersby (Richard E Grant) aka drag doyenne Loco Chanelle as his mentor to step confidently into the spotlight. Jamie’s rise to stilettoed greatness is hampered by selfdoubt and shame, sown by his estranged homophobic father (Ralph Ineson). With music courtesy of Dan Gillespie Sells from rock group The Feeling, the songs resonate in widescreen including The Wall In My Head, Don’t Even Know It and He’s My Boy, a heartfelt ballad about a mother’s unconditional love, which Sarah Lancashire delivers with tears in her eyes. A new song, This Was Me, performed largely by Holly Johnson, lead singer of Frankie Goes To Hollywood, is a deeply moving memento mori to beautiful creatures lost to Aids. Powered by Harwood’s performance, Everybody’s Talking About Jamie is almost two hours of unabashed pure joy, which preaches acceptance and self-love with the same sequinned intensity as The Adventures Of Priscilla, Queen Of The Desert and Kinky Boots. There are dramatic lulls before Jamie’s big reveal as Mimi Me but Butterell understands how to get toes tapping. People will be talking, glowingly, about his Jamie. ■ In selected cinemas and on Amazon Prime Video now NEW STAR: Max Harwood shines as Jamie GUNPOWDER MILKSHAKE (15) HHIII Former Doctor Who star Karen Gillan has forged quite the Hollywood career as an action woman in films like Guardians of the Galaxy and Jumanji. She parades her fighting skills again in Gunpowder Milkshake as the daughter of Scarlet, (Lena Headey) an assassin for a shadowy syndicate called The Firm. When she leaves town in a hurry, Sam (Gillan) takes up the murderous mantle under mentor Nathan (Paul Giamatti). He despatches Scarlet to terminate “an accountant” but she inadvertently murders the son of crime lord Jim McAlester (Ralph Ineson) then disobeys orders to use The Firm’s cash as ransom money for the dead accountant’s eight-year-old daughter, Emily (Chloe Coleman). Films NOVICE KILLER: Karen Gillan Nathan has no choice but to issue a kill order against Scarlet. She seeks sanctuary with three librarians – Anna May (Angela Bassett), Florence (Michelle Yeoh) and Madeleine (Carla Gugino) – who hide weapons in handsomely bound copies of classic novels. Gunpowder Milkshake is an explosive and fitfully entertaining melee that puts John Wick and Kill Bill in a blender. Body counts are high but emotionally satisfying thrills are in shorter supply. ■ In selected cinemas and on Sky Cinema now 12 MIGHTY ORPHANS (12A) HHIII In the aftermath of the Great Depression, war hero Rusty Russell (Luke Wilson) transplants his wife Juanita (Vinessa Shaw) and two young daughters from Temple in Texas to the dustbowl of Fort Worth. Husband and wife take teaching positions at The Masonic Home and School for around 150 orphans run by brutish disciplinarian Frank Wynn (Wayne Knight). While Juanita concentrates on moulding girls into ladies, Rusty inspires the boys in the classroom and then heads outside to assemble a ragtag American football team, featuring grief-stricken new arrival Hardy (Jake Austin Walker), who was found by police at the scene of his father’s suicide by shotgun. The boys slowly bend to Rusty’s will, with encouragement from avuncular school medic Doc Hall (Martin Sheen). The newly-formed ‘Mighty Mites’ capture the public’s imagination, sparking a fierce TEAM SPIRIT: Luke Wilson and Martin Sheen star in a predictable feelgood offering rivalry with Polytechnic High School coached by Luther Scarborough (Lane Garrison). Slavish in its adherence to sports movie tropes, 12 Mighty Orphans builds to the obligatory championship showdown where Rusty’s life lessons are tested. Director Ty Roberts’ film huddles with Jim Dent’s bestselling book to celebrate the achievements of disadvantaged boys from Texas who inspired an embattled nation. It’s wholesome, old-fashioned fare, Luke Wilson chews lightly on his football coach’s stirring speeches, but it’s Walker who emerges as this film’s most valuable player. ■ In cinemas now

28 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Screen Shots Copshop let me go into a much darker, brutal, ruthless mind BREAKING BAD: Gerard Butler relished not playing the hero for once and have fun Gerard Butler is no stranger to saving the world. In fact he’s made a long career of it. The 51-year-old Scottish star is best known for playing characters intent on doing the right thing, think Spartan warrior Leonidas in 300, a man determined to seek justice for his family in Law Abiding Citizen and fearless Secret Service agent Mike Banning in Olympus Has Fallen and its sequels. But he decided to take a walk on the dark side in his new movie Copshop, in which he plays a hitman who hunts his latest target, a conman played by Frank Grillo, into the confines of a small- town police station. “It was another muscle to stretch creatively,” Gerard offers in his distinctive Scottish burr, “to go into a much darker, brutal, ruthless, mysterious mind and have fun with that, because I normally play the guys trying to put an end to them. “It’s almost like changing from prosecuting attorney to defence attorney, swapping to look at things the other way, but it’s always fun to change it up and try something different.” Gerard had been keen to make the film since 2015, when he first read an early draft of a screenplay outlining a cat-and-mouse game between a con artist and the hitman who’s sent to take him out. “I always loved the idea and every now and again you just want to make a movie that is outrageous, entertaining, tense, mad, irreverent. So I always had it in my back pocket, and suddenly, in the middle of a pandemic, it felt like that was a good time to make it, a story about everybody trapped in a small space and just wanting to explode outside of that space. It felt kind of right,” he explains. So, when director Joe Carnahan, the filmmaker behind Blood, Guts, Bullets and Octane, Smokin’ Aces and The A-Team, called him up to ask him if he was ready to go, Gerard didn’t have to think twice. “We’d always said we were going to work together and Frank too, so why not? Let’s just do it now, shoot it quick, just real guerilla filmmak- I was watching a lot of Clint Eastwood, movies... to prepare for this... Alexis Louder Gerard Butler is used to swooping in to save the day but he takes a turn to the dark side in Copshop. He tells Laura Harding why CAGED KILLER: Gerard plays hitman Bob Viddick Inspiration: Western legend Clint Eastwood ing, and try and get all of that mayhem and excitement and highoctane energy.” The film finds Gerard’s contract killer Bob Viddick chasing wily con artist Teddy Murretto (Grillo) through the Nevada desert, until Teddy hatches a desperate plan to hide out and save himself – he sucker-punches a rookie police officer, played by Alexis Louder, to get himself arrested and locked up in a small-town police station, out of harm’s way. Viddick schemes his own way into detention, biding his time in a nearby cell until he can carry out the hit, but when a competing assassin, played by Toby Huss, arrives, mayhem ensues, with Alex’s cop Valerie Young caught in the crosshairs. “I was watching a lot of Clint Eastwood... movies like Dirty Harry and The Good, The Bad And The Ugly, to prepare for this because it did give me western vibes,” Alexis remembers. “Valerie just has this thirst for justice by any means, and she’s trying to get to the truth between Bob Viddick and Teddy Mercado and she can trust neither of them.” But for the actress, who previously starred opposite Chris Pratt in The Tomorrow War and with Regina King in the Watchmen TV series, watching movies was not enough. She also had to do some practical hands-on preparation. “I had no law enforcement experience, I had zero gun-slinging experience, the weapons that I’ve used in the past were automatic. The Blackhawk (the weapon Valerie uses) was a manual gun, so I had to work with a gunslinger on how to do the tricks and how to change the cylinder, that was a lot of practice. “There were certain times where I thought I might have lost the ligaments in my finger but, through the frustration of actually practising that for so long, I was just like ‘Alexis it’s gonna be so rewarding when you actually get it’ and now I watch that opening shot (where she performs a stunning routine of gunplay) I think, ‘That’s me, that’s my hand and I did that’.” Gerard was also excited to make a film that would stand alone, as Alexis Louder as Valerie Young something chaotic, grimy and nerve-shredding. “It’s a movie that’s not really like others,” he says. “It has elements of others, like Tarantino or Guy Ritchie, but at the same time, it’s completely its own beast in how weird and exciting it is. “I knew that there were so many fun, compelling, shocking characters, and the way they all have to face off against each other. I knew if we could, we would get some great actors in there, like, Alexis, and Frank and Toby Hoss, then we can really have a movie that is incredibly thrilling, exciting, compelling, shocking, hilarious, surreal, and then it just builds and builds. “We talked about those westerns with a small town sheriff, and the bad guy comes in, but then the worse guy comes in, another bad guy comes in and it just goes from bad to worse. “There is a real pressure-cooker feeling and weirdly, as the movie goes on, most thrillers extend out, they get bigger, but by the end this almost gets tighter and tighter with more people in a smaller space, and it’s unbelievable how they can’t quite get to each other but they’re all like cobras waiting to pounce.” ■■Copshop is in cinemas now

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 29 Sex Education heads to Africa in the new series with a powerful storyline as we see Eric return to his homeland Nigeria. But actor Ncuti Gatwa, 28, didn’t get to enjoy a jolly abroad because the scenes had to be filmed in Wales due to coronavirus. He says: “We had plans to film abroad, but then Covid happened, so we had to recreate Nigeria in Wales. “Our production designer Samantha Harley made the most wonderful set, down to the sand and gravel she imported from Nigeria.” Ncuti also reveals how scenes showing his lovable character Eric visit Nigeria as a gay man will have a huge impact on viewers. He explains: “I felt a lot of pressure, I think we all did, to get that storyline right. “Eric is half Nigerian and half Ghanaian, and this trip back to Nigeria is a huge part of his journey this season. He reconnects with his family. “Eric’s very proud of his heritage and yet it’s an undeniable fact that being gay is illegal in Nigeria. “Quite often, when we talk about LGBTQ storylines on TV, they’re focused on white characters. Eric meets a character named Oba who helps him become more aware of all parts of himself – a black man, a gay man and a Nigerian man.” Describing Gen Z-ers as “so socially aware”, Baftanominated Ncuti says of the hit show: “We’re expanding so many conversations regarding gender and sexuality and I think [Sex Education] just hit gold with the timing.” Opening with a montage of sexual encounters that’s sure to make you sit up and pay attention, the third series of Sex Education, penned by returning Bafta-nominated writer Laurie Nunn, starts as it means to go on. It tackles everything from penis size insecurities to the long-term mental health concerns arising from character Aimee Gibbs’ sexual assault aboard a bus in the last series. Played by 26-year-old Aimee Lou Woods, who won a Bafta for her on-screen portrayal, the continuation of Aimee’s assault story was of vital importance to her. “Sex Education is very true to life in the way that it conveys that things don’t just get better and better and better,” reflects Aimee Lou. “Things go up and down all the time. I think that it was lovely that she gets on the bus with the girls and there’s that beautiful moment, and then it’s all like, ‘Oh, yay. She’s better’. But of course, that is not real life. “And actually, that was the start of her journey. It wasn’t the end.” Describing the way in which her character took “steps forward” last series thanks to the support of her female peers, Aimee Lou is quick to emphasise that “growth is a process”. “It’s going to be with her forever – and that’s what she hears in therapy. It’s going to be with her forever. And it’s altered her forever.” With actress Gillian Anderson returning as sex therapist Dr Jean F Milburn, who is now heavily pregnant, we find Moordale Secondary School under the new leadership of headmistress Hope Haddon, played by Screen Shots Covid happened... so we had to recreate Nigeria in Wales Ncuti Gatwa as Eric As Bafta Award-winning comedy Sex Education returns, we talk to the cast about what to expect and the trials of shooting a series in a pandemic L-R: Aimee Lou Wood as Aimee Gibbs, Emma Mackey as Maeve Wiley and Asa Butterfield as Otis Milburn Girls’ star Jemima Kirke. Revamping the school in a matriarchal fashion, Hope’s iron-fist approach to education is not to the liking of everyone. From the demolition of the toilet block once used as a sex clinic by Maeve Wiley and Otis Milburn, to the implementation of school uniforms, the show’s central characters find themselves united against a common evil. “The uniforms were a little triggering,” recalls Asa Butterfield, 24, who reprises his role as Dr Milburn’s son Otis alongside Maeve (Emma Mackey). “It’s a great part of the show, but I think one of the things I loved is everyone on set’s individuality,” continues Asa, best known for his roles in Nanny McPhee and The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas. “But of course, that’s one of the point of the uniforms, it’s to see what happens when you take that away.” ■■Sex Education series 3 is on Netflix now

30 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 TV Highlights Bread alert Last autumn fans rejoiced as The Great British Bake Off returned under exceptional circumstances and this year is no different. For much like before, all those involved in the popular Channel 4 show, which sees passionate amateur bakers compete to be crowned the UK’s best, were obliged to test and self-isolate before entering into a Covid-free bubble. In this case, a six-week stay at the luxurious Down Hall Hotel. A long time away from family, maybe. But if its predecessor is anything to go by (a whopping average of 9.2 million viewers tuned in to witness Peter Sawkins triumph last November), its imminent 12th series will be well worth the extra measures. “We were in a lovely hotel, getting really good food, I had my dog with me, and we’re eating cake for a living – so you can hardly complain about the job!” quips Prue Leith, who returns as a co-judge alongside veteran Paul Hollywood. “So even saying that I found it a little longer and I missed home seems ungracious, because there are people who have had a horrible lockdown.” “There was [also] yoga, meditating, tennis, pizza nights,” lists Paul, 55. “Prue taught floristry skills; I taught a load of people how to use nunchucks...” “And we could play boules, old ladies can play boules, which I enjoyed,” restaurateur Prue, 81, interjects. “It’s about all I can do now as I can’t play tennis, I can’t go riding, I can’t do any of the things that I used to do, so boules it is!” Competition is in tents: This year’s Bake Off contestants Strictly Come Dancing Tomorrow, BBC1, 7.45pm The celebrity line-up has been announced, and it’s time to find out who the stars have been paired with as Tess Daly and Claudia Winkleman host the Strictly launch show. A couple of the celebs are about to make Strictly history as EastEnders actress Rose Ayling-Ellis becomes the first deaf contestant, and Great British Bake Off winner John Whaite forms the first all-male partnership. The stars will take to the floor for a group dance, and we’ll discover what the judges – including veteran dancer Anton Du Beke, who is stepping in for Bruno Tonioli – think of their chances. The Great British Bake Off is back and it may be the most skilled batch of amateur bakers yet, judges Paul Hollywood and Prue Leith tell Gemma Dunn Also partaking in the “fun” are returning co-hosts Noel Fielding and Matt Lucas. All this in addition to the top-tier baking, of course. So just what can the judges tell us about the latest batch set to enter the famous white tent? “I think the youngest one was 19 and the oldest one nearly 70 – 69, so the usual mix,” Prue reveals. “Not one baker is like the other, I don’t know how the production company manages to do it! “I mean, I know that the first requirement is that they have to be fantastic bakers, but then they are TV PICKS OF THE WEEK Last Man Standing: Suge Knight and the Murders of Biggie and Tupac Sunday, BBC2, 9pm Documentary-maker Nick Broomfield looks at the unsolved murders of Biggie Smalls and Tupac Shakur, two hip-hop giants who ended up entangled in a turf war. Broomfield examines Death Row Records and how Los Angeles’ street gang culture came to dominate its just so interesting and so nice.” “The standard this year is certainly the highest I’ve ever encountered,” says Paul. “It starts like that and ends like that, so it’s pretty constant all the way through. “I think the semi-final was harder (to judge), to pick the three for the final!” “We did have very good bakers in the final,” Prue agrees, “If I had to choose one episode that I would say you have to watch, it’s the semifinal. They were so good that we had no idea who was going to win!” No disasters of note that would tip the scales, then. “There was a bit of a collapsing going on...,” offers Paul. “And there was the most overflavoured bake I’ve ever had on Bake Off,” Prue recalls. “It was unbelievably ill judged, and it was surprising because it came from a baker who was so good with flavour. It can happen to anyone. “But, and I know it sounds an odd thing to say, I actually prefer it when some of them are not so good as it’s much easier to judge if you have a few disasters. “You think: ‘Right, OK, that one’s out, that one’s out, that one’s out,” she reasons. “There was one business workings, as well as an association with corrupt LA police officers. Manhunt The Night Stalker Monday, ITV, 9pm In 2019, Manhunt chronicled the investigation into French student Amelie Delagrange’s murder, and its eventual connection to the deaths of Marsha McDonnell and Milly Dowler at the hands of serial killer Levi Bellfield. Written by Ed Whitmore, it starred Martin Clunes as Martin Clunes as DCI Colin Sutton tive ingredient week,” Paul says, last year having set a total of 30 different tasks. “And actually, it was very, very good standard. “But you’ll see how well Matt and Noel interpreted how I felt about it before it started...” “We’re both classically trained, me a cook, him a baker, so we tend to be approving of what we’re used to – the classic way to do things,” Prue explains. “I have always liked gluten-free cakes, for example, because gluten-free cakes could be flourless cakes like a chocolate roulade or something. “But where I think my prejudice shows is I was surprised that they could do so many amazing bakes with substitute ingredimoment, which was one of my signatures right towards the start of the competition, and I thought, ‘This is a good thing to do for a technical’, but in fact, they did it too well, and we were faced with 12 notquite-identical but damn-nearperfect bakes. “Well, how do you judge 12? It’s impossible; you have to rate them one to 12, and number one and number 12 are hardly any different. “They’re both sellable, perfect cakes that you’d pay good money in the shop for. “I’d much rather they were not such good bakers.” So they’re a skilled bunch – but just what challenges can fans expect to see? “Well, we have alterna- Paul and Prue on the red carpet ex-London Metropolitan Police detective, DCI Colin Sutton. Whitmore and Clunes are back, exploring a case that went unsolved for almost two decades. Based on Sutton’s diaries, it follows the police pursuit of a serial rapist, whose 17-year reign of terror left thousands of elderly people in south east London living in fear. A House Through Time Tuesday, BBC2, 9pm David Olusoga’s search through the history of a house in Leeds is up to 1913, when Number 5 is home to the respectable couple Frederick and Louisa Pryce Lewis. A look through their photo album puts David on the trail of their son Walter, who went to the battlefields of Gallipoli before returning to Leeds and a life of crime. The next residents were textiles chemist Percival King and wife Rose, whose seemingly happy family was torn apart when Percival admitted himself to a psychiatric institution. Grand Designs Wednesday, Channel 4, 9pm Kevin McCloud meets teacher Gretta, who moved to Malaysia 17 years ago with her husband Ray and two sons. Then, a couple of years ago,

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 WEEKEND 31 Great British Bake Off judges Paul Hollywood and Prue Leith (centre) with hosts Noel Fielding (far left) and Matt Lucas (on the right) TV FILMs of the week TV Highlights 1 Detroit Tomorrow, BBC2, 11.15pm Kathryn Bigelow’s slow-burning John Boyega in Detroit fact-based thriller picks at the fresh wounds of divided race relations in America by reliving one tragic night in a fractured city that resulted in the deaths of three black teenagers at the Algiers Motel. Detroit skilfully weaves together multiple character arcs, building to a protracted sequence of gut-wrenching terror that draws uncomfortable parallels with the present day. Hand-held camerawork stokes tension and sweat-drenched performances from a fine ensemble cast, headed by John Boyega, are horribly believable. ents you know, using, erm...” “Butter?” Paul interrupts. “Well to cook without butter would seem to me to be impossible, but actually it’s perfectly possible and the bakers prove it!” Prue adds. “It was good for us. I learned something all the time [because] I mean the bakers are, let’s face it, obsessed with cakes and baking. “They absolutely live, breathe and think about baking all the time, and so they are way ahead of me anyway on techniques and ingredients!” “I almost rely on the bakers to introduce me into this world of alternative ingredients,” Paul concludes, “I’ve been surprised!” From butter-free cakes to damehood, it’s certainly been a summer to remember for Prue, who was among a host of stars recognised on the Queen’s Birthday Honours list this June, notably for her services to food, broadcasting, and charity. “When it was announced that I was a dame, [Paul] bought me tragedy struck when Ray died. Gretta returned to the UK and went to live with her sister Mary and brother-in-law Fernando in rural Cambridgeshire, in a caravan. She has now bought part of their garden as a building plot and employed her nephew Carlos to design her a Malaysian-inspired, single-storey pavilion. With a budget of £300k and a schedule of seven months, they’re up against it. Taskmaster Thursday, Channel 4, 9pm Series 12 of the hilarious comedy game show sees QI’s Alan Davies, comedian Desiree Burch, Man Like I actually prefer it when some of them are not so good as it’s much easier to judge if you have a few disasters Prue Leith on judging Bake Off some really fancy champagne, and we had a party at about three o’clock in the afternoon,” Prue reveals. “It was everything, you know, flowers and cake, a sing along, it was great. I felt like a child with a birthday party only with alcohol!” “I’ve worked with three dames, Dame Prue, Dame Mary [Berry] and Dame Edna [Everage], and I won’t bow to any of them!” Paul teases. “But I mean, good on her. Prue’s done an amazing job, so we had a little bit of a party and then we added ‘Dame’ at the beginning Taskmaster is back Mobeen’s Guz Khan, The Windsors star Morgana Robinson and Only Connect’s Victoria Coren Mitchell take on a range of outrageous tasks in a bid to impress the Taskmaster, Greg Davies. As usual, Alex Horne is on hand of her name on the hut.” “It was on a little wooden plaque with a rope over it so I could lift it off, and I took it home with me,” says Prue. “I don’t know where I’ll put it, but I’ll put it somewhere!” Do they feel a stronger bond, having bubbled up for the last couple of years? “I feel I know these three guys better than I did Mel [Giedroyc], Sue [Perkins] and Mary, for instance,” Paul confides, referring to the show’s previous lineup. “You know sometimes you can sit in the same room as a really close friend and not say anything for half an hour and feel quite comfortable with that... “(Whereas) if you feel you have to fill that space with voices, then you know that’s because you’re slightly uneasy about something.” “So it’s more like family then?” Prue asks. “Yeah it is,” finishes Paul. “A really weird dysfunctional family.” ■■The Great British Bake Off is on Channel 4 on Tuesday at 8pm to welcome the contestants to the Taskmaster house and keep score The Graham Norton Show Friday, BBC1, 10.35pm There is less than a week before the 25th entry in the James Bond canon No Time to Die, hits cinemas. The Covid-19 delayed flick is the final outing for Daniel Craig as 007. He joins French star Lea Seydoux to discuss the movie and we’ll hear from Rami Malek, who plays villain Safin, alongside Lashana Lynch, who has been touted as a potential replacement for Craig. Also tonight, Ed Sheeran will perform his new single Shivers. The rock 2 Sunday, Channel 5, 10.25pm A US General (Ed Harris) takes tourists hostage at Alcatraz prison, demanding the government pay compensation to families of Marines killed during covert operations. After he threatens to release chemical weapons, an FBI chemist (Nicolas Cage) recruits John Patrick Mason (Sean Connery, left), the only man to ever escape Alcatraz, to help. The Devil Wears Prada 3 Monday, Film4, 6.45pm Anne Hathaway shines as Andy Sachs who lands a plum job as second assistant to fearsome fashion editor Miranda Priestly (Meryl Streep, left with Hathaway). Andy is unprepared for the challenges catering to her tyrannical boss’s every whim. Watch out for a star-making turn from Emily Blunt (pictured right), too. The Silence of the Lambs 4 Tuesday, ITV4, 10.30pm Jonathan Demme’s terrifying treatment of the Thomas Harris novel sees Jodie Foster, left, play FBI trainee Clarice Starling, who is eager to please her superior, Jack Crawford (Scott Glenn). He implores Clarice to earn the trust of cannibal murderer Dr Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins) in order to track down serial killer Buffalo Bill. 5 Whiplash Wednesday, BBC2, 11.15pm Drummer Andrew Neiman (Miles Teller, left) is determined to excel at his Manhattan music conservatory, and catches the eye of the school’s most revered teacher, Terence Fletcher (JK Simmons). Andrew transfers to Fletcher’s class, but the game of one-upmanship between teacher and pupil spirals out of control in this drama. Lone Survivor 6 Thursday, ITV4, 11.20pm Mark Wahlberg, left, plays one of four Navy SEALs on a top-secret mission to find a high-ranking Taliban member. When three shepherds stumble upon the SEALs’ hiding place, the soldiers must decide whether to shoot the locals or let them go, potentially compromising their safety, in this rousing tribute, based on a true story. A Monster Calls 7 Friday, BBC1, 11.25pm Fantasy drama. Schoolboy Conor O’Malley (Lewis MacDougall, left) is in denial about his mother’s terminal illness and seeks refuge in his drawings. As darkness falls, a nearby yew tree morphs into a gnarled creature (voiced by Liam Neeson) which promises to share three parables, demanding one thing in return: “Tell me your nightmare.”

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46 WEEKEND FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 TV Pick Strictly Come Dancing Tomorrow, BBC1, 7.45pm Last year was one of the most challenging in Strictly Come Dancing’s history, as the team behind the show had to deal with Covid regulations, some of which were changing as the show was on the air. Admittedly, it’s not quite Strictly business as usual in 2021 either. Due to the uncertainty around international travel, it was announced earlier this year that Bruno Tonioli would not be returning as a judge for this series. He is being replaced by veteran dancer Anton Du Beke, who promises “to be kinder to all the couples than any of them have ever been to m e ”. Tomorrow, he’ll be taking to the panel alongside Motsi Mabuse, Shirley Ballas and Craig Revel Horwood, but we won’t find out if he’ll be sticking to his word about being kind just yet. That’s because as a launch show, tonight Tess Daly and Claudia Winkleman will be introducing viewers to this year’s crop of celebrities and pairing them up with their professional partners. They include Olympian Adam Peaty, actor Greg Wise and McFly’s Tom Fletcher. We’ll get a chance to assess their form when they take to the floor for a group number, while last year’s winner Bill Bailey returns to show them how it’s done. Then next week, the competition begins in earnest... Here we take a look at this year’s hopefuls: Adam Peaty, 26, Olympic gold medal-winning swimmer He says: “Honestly, I can’t wait! It’s just going to be different. “I spend my whole life in swimsuits and if I’m not doing that, it’s photoshoots covered in oil so now I get to change the oil to glitter!” Greg Wise, 55, actor He says: “I can’t dance! So that’s the challenge. I think I’m in good shape, I’m lucky that I’m able to keep active. I know I’ll still be thrust into the ground by my professional partner, obviously, and find muscles I never knew existed. “I’ve just got to learn how to dance, that’s the bottom line.” The Strictly professional dancers Strictly 2021 contestants, (L-R) Sara Davies, Ugo Monye, Nina Wadia, John Waite, Robert Webb, Rose Ayling-Ellis, Adam Peaty, Judi Love, Tom Fletcher, Tilly Ramsay, Rhys Stephenson, AJ Odudu, Dan Walker, Katie McGlynn, Greg Wise Who’s ready for a ballroom blitz? Spray tans, sequins and salsas means only one thing – Strictly is back. Jane Haase takes a look at the latest batch of celebs to hit the dancefloor Nina Wadia, 52, former EastEnders star She says: “This year feels like the perfect year to just let off steam. “It’s been a bit of a dark time for a lot of people, and it certainly was in our family as well, so I just want to go out and enjoy my life.” Robert Webb, 48, actor and comedian He says: “I’m up for an extreme costume. “You can spray me most colours but I just don’t want to look like Donald Trump.” Tom Fletcher, 35, singer in McFly and children’s author He says: “I’m so inflexible, I’m just trying to touch my toes, I don’t know what else I can do! “At the beginning of the year, when I first said yes, I said to myself I was going to get into really good shape and life just got in the way.” AJ Odudu, 33, TV presenter She says: “I have zero previous experience, and I mean zero! “I’ve never been to stage or drama school, but I’ve always liked clubbing. “I’m confident when it comes to hitting the dance floor, but whether I should be confident, I’ll leave it to everyone else at home to decide!” Dan Walker, 44, BBC Breakfast presenter He says: “Yes, I’m competitive but I haven’t reserved a spot for the Glitterball Trophy. I haven’t got that in my headspace in any way shape or form. “My idea is that I want to go home on a Saturday night, see the kids and hear ‘Dad, that was good!’ “If I get just one ‘Dad, that was good!’, that would be great.” Katie McGlynn, 28, former Coronation Street star She says: “Every year I watch Strictly Come Dancing and I think that everyone has the time of the life doing it, so I’ve always wanted to do it. Secretly, I’ve always wanted to be a dancer.” John Whaite, 32, former Great British Bake Off winner He says: “Between the ages of 10-14, I did ballet, modern and tap. “So I may have a few dancing bones in my body, but I’m not Strictly hosts Claudia Winkleman and Tess Daly necessarily very good rhythmically. “Ballet is very stiff and I can do a triple timestep but who knows what I will be like at ballroom or Latin!” Ugo Monye, 38, sports pundit and former rugby union player He says: “Both my girls, especially my eldest, Phoenix, love dance. She does ballet every single week. “She’s obsessed by it and now she’s of an age where she can watch the show and watch her daddy on TV. “So I’m really excited about that.” Judi Love, 41, stand-up comic and Loose Women panellist She says: “Everyone’s advice has just been enjoy, enjoy, enjoy and don’t worry about anything. And to really put myself into different characters every time I go onto the dancefloor. “Also, not to read anything on social media and not to see it as just a competition but to see it as I’m New judge Anton Du Beke and the man he’s replacing, Bruno Tonioli experiencing something that is a whole moment.” Rhys Stephenson, 27, CBBC presenter He says: “I’m in it for the experience, but I’m also in it to win. “For me, even when I am rubbish, I play to win. I want to know I’ve given it my all and shown what I can do.” Rose Ayling-Ellis, 26, plays Frankie in EastEnders She says: “I feel like it’s so important for somebody like me to be on the show, I want to break down the stereotype that deaf people can’t dance and can’t enjoy music.” Sara Davies, 37, Dragons’ Den star She says: “Deborah (Meaden) talks about it all the time and says it was one of the best experiences of her life. “Obviously, I wasn’t able to tell anybody I was doing it, so she didn’t know that when she was talking to me about it and I was asking her questions, it was because I was going on the show. I had to keep it top secret. “She said mainly your feet hurt a lot but other than that everything else is really positive!” Tilly Ramsay, 19, TV presenter and chef, daughter of Gordon She says: “I’m really excited to learn the waltz. It’s very elegant and graceful and something you can use that later on in life, I can keep that for a wedding!”

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2 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Breaking news at www. Bristol .live FRIDAY 17.09.21 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live Follow us on instagram /Bristollive Follow us on twitter /Bristollive Murders probe: Victim, 56, named A 56-year-old man from Easton was one of the victims found dead by police over the weekend. Detectives have now launched a murder investigation after two bodies were found in a house on Wood Street at lunchtime on Sunday. Yesterday evening, police confirmed that one of the victims was Denzil McKenzie, who lived in Wood Street. Fahad Hossain Pramanik, 27, who was from London, was identified in court on Wednesday as the other victim in the suspected double killing. An Avon and Somerset Police spokesperson said: “Our sympathy goes out to their families, who are now being supported by specialist officers. We’d ask for their privacy to be respected at this difficult time.” Two men have been charged with murder in connection with the deaths. Ionut-Valentin Boboc, 21, and Jacob Bebe Chers, 45, both of Fishponds, were remanded in custody at Bristol Magistrates’ Court on Wednesday pending their next court appearance. Psychedelic Furs gig postponed The Psychedelic Furs’ gig previewed on page 12 of today’s Weekend magazine has, unfortunately, been postponed until next year. The announcement was made after the magazine had gone to press. The band have rescheduled the date to April 13, 2022, at the same venue, Bristol O2 Academy. Corrections&Complaints If we have published anything that is factually inaccurate please contact the Print Editor, Michael Scanlan, via email michael. scanlan@reachplc.com or write to The Editor, Bristol Post, 1 Temple Way, Bristol, BS2 0BY. Once verified, we will correct it as soon as possible. The Bristol Post newspaper is published by Reach plc, which is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO). We adhere to the Editors’ Code of Practice as enforced by IPSO, which can be contacted for advice at IPSO, Gate House 1, Farringdon Street London, EC4M 7LG; www.ipso.co.uk; telephone 0300 123 2220; email advice@ipso.co.uk. If you have a complaint concerning a potential breach of the Code of Practice, we will deal with complaint directly or IPSO can refer your complaint to us. Please go to www. reachplc.com/how-to-complain where you can view our complaints policy and procedure. A ‘How to Complain’ pack is also available by writing to the Legal and Compliance Department, Reach PLC, 1 Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5AP. Licence renewed Reprieve for strip club – but ban proposal still looms Adam PostAns Local Democracy Reporter adam.postans@reachplc.com A STRIP club has won the right to operate for another year despite a proposed ban in Bristol and dozens of objections from women’s rights campaigners. Central Chambers in St Stephen’s Street had its annual application for a sexual entertainment venue (SEV) licence granted by Bristol city councillors on Thursday. But public consultation is in the pipeline for the local authority’s controversial draft licensing policy including a “nil cap” on lap-dancing clubs, which would prohibit such establishments anywhere in the city. Licensing sub-committee members were told 67 objections had been received to Central Chambers’ renewal application. Bristol Women’s Commission chairwoman Penny Gane told the City Hally hearing: “In the case of SEVs, including the one seeking the licence today, women’s bodies are objectified for the sexual gratification of men. “Bristol City Council has a duty to uphold equality law, yet it is this committee of the council that has enabled harmful attitudes towards women. The women’s commission is asking you now to end the support of these practices.” She said many women avoided the area near the club because they felt unsafe. Another objector said: “The dehumanisation of women makes it easier for men to behave violently towards women.” She said the harms caused were to all women and not just those in the club. Barrister Philip Kolvin QC, representing Central Chambers, said: “The dancers are strong, independent women who are capable of making their own choices and are both protected and in control. They regard themselves as feminists. Feminism fails when it tells a woman what she can and cannot do with her body.” He said there were no objections from any authorities, including the police, licensing and environmental health. “There is a very good reason for that – the applicant company and its owners and managers are of impeccable character,” he said. “The conditions on the SEV and premises licence are observed, as are the codes of conduct for customers and dancers which are designed for public protection. “The house rules are clearly understood and they are applied rigorously by the vigilant management team. “There is a no-contact rule. It’s strictly enforced. “The premises do not cause crime and disorder in the vicinity or more widely.” Mr Kolvin said the Hale family, who have run the venue for 19 years without issues, were of “impeccable character”. He said: “They generate a family atmosphere around the workers. The dancers are valued, respected and protected. It is a female-led venue.” Mr Kolvin said some of the objectors were more concerned with whether lap-dancing was good or bad for society. “Parliament has had that debate and it has decided lap-dancing is a lawful activity,” he said. “These objections are just not relevant to this committee. “I am conscious there is a political debate being had in this city but Above and left, Central Chambers strip club in Bristol this is not a debate for you to have today. This is not a meeting to determine whether sexual entertainment should be permitted. It only concerns these premises and the regulatory tests under the legislation.” He said no Core City, of which Bristol is one, had a nil cap of SEVs. Mr Kolvin said the venue was open for topless and fully nude performances after 9pm, which require a licence, but that it was open in the day for private functions and activities that did not, including tea parties with a male butler and naked life-drawing classes. A council licensing officer told the panel there were no statutory grounds for refusal, and the panel ruled there was also no reason to reject the licence on discretionary grounds, such as the club’s location or the applicants’ suitability. Sub-committee chairwoman Cllr Fi Hance said: “We are assessing the application against current policy as it stands. There was insufficient reason not to grant.” A hearing into a parallel licence renewal application by sister venue Urban Tiger takes place this afternoon.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 3 Breaking news at www. Bristol .live Letters Join the deBate on the issues of the day with letters Page 36 write to: the Bristol Post: letters temple way, Bristol Bs2 0By email: epletters@Bepp.co.uk Puzzles get some Brain training with our mind-Bending teasers Pages 44&45 suBscriBe: www.trinitymirrorsuBscriptions.com/Bristol-post telePhone: 0333 202 8000 email: homedelivery@localworld.co.uk Weather rain or shine? get the weather forecast in full on Page 37 Television what’s on the Box tonight Pages 42&43 in brief Police Man found critically injured Jack Donoghue bristolpostnews@reachplc.com TheRe was a heavy emergency service presence in south Bristol yesterday evening after a man was found critically injured. Police were called to a residential property at around 6pm, with reports from residents of armed officers and an air ambulance seen Footpath through school playground set to be diverted Adam PostAns Local Democracy Reporter adam.postans@reachplc.com A publIC footpath that has run through a primary school playground for up to half a century is being diverted on safeguarding grounds. St Mary’s CE School in Yate received planning permission last year to install a security fence with the intention of having the route changed to run around the edge of the site, a council meeting heard. but the work was finished quicker than expected and it could no longer use the planning process, so it applied to the local authority under its highways powers. South Gloucestershire Council public rights of way and commons registration sub-committee has landing at the scene. Officers remained on the scene late last night. nearby residents reported emergency services surrounding Rowan house on Bishport Avenue, with one local saying that police have cordoned off the area. A spokesperson for Avon and Somerset police said yesterday: “We were called by the ambulance now issued an order to divert the footpath. Members heard this was formalising what had been the situation on the ground for many years. Officers told the meeting on Thursday, September 9, that the 63-metre section of the path’s route had cut through the grounds since at least the 1990s and probably since the school was built two decades earlier. However, it had long been unusable because of a dense hedge and a chain-link fence on Church Road, as well as a low-level picket fence in the school grounds. The diversion will take it down School Road cul-de-sac from the school entrance, through the edge of the adjacent car park and onto Church Road a few yards from service shortly before 6pm this evening to an incident in which a man was found critically injured at a residential address in Bishport Avenue, in hartcliffe. “At this time we believe this to be an isolated incident and there to be no wider risk to the public. “Officers remain at the scene and enquiries are ongoing.” One person reported seeing Left, an air ambulance was seen landing in Hartcliffe and, above, police reportedly cordoned off an area near Rowan House on Bishport Avenue ZeDy Zee BeRZOn & STACey LeWIS armed officers at the scene and emergency services vehicles were also spotted at the scene. A resident said: “Something big in hartcliffe police fire and ambulance helicopter by flats in hartcliffe.” Another said the incident was unfolding “opposite in tower block house”. She added: “There are lots of police cars, ambulance and response unit came now.” where the existing, impassable route emerges. Councillors were told no objections had been received to the proposal and the footpath could be altered because it would provide privacy and security for the school and was just as convenient for the public who were “likely to feel more comfortable with a path which is not running through school grounds” and that they were already using the alternative route. Sub-committee member Cllr Mike Drew said: “I don’t think this path has been accessible as long as I’ve been a councillor, which is nearly 40 years. “So I don’t think there are any problems in diverting it as I suspect most people don’t realise there’s a formal path there, and the diversion is the route they would use anyway.” A report to members said: “The grounds on which the request for an order was made are to enable the school grounds to be securely fenced off from public access for safeguarding purposes.” It said the school would pay for the costs of the diversion. If there are no objections to the advertised order then it will be confirmed, but if there are any then a further report will be submitted to the sub-committee. LETTERs share your opinion at epletters @bepp.co.uk Police say death not being treated as suspicious The death of a man whose body was found in St Philip’s is not thought to be suspicious, say police. Avon and Somerset police found a body in the search for the missing man Kevin Crewe, pictured, just before 5.30pm on Wednesday, in water off Feeder Road. “While formal identification has not yet taken place, we’ve updated the family of missing Bristol man Kevin Crewe about this development,” said a police spokesperson. The force said that the death was being treated as unexplained. In an update yesterday, the spokesman said: “At this time we believe this death to be non-suspicious. enquiries will continue on behalf of the coroner.” Mr Crewe, 62, was last seen at about 9pm on Monday in east Street, Bedminster. Hurt girl airlifted to city hospital An 11-year-old girl has been left fighting for her life in hospital after being hit by a car on Wednesday afternoon. her mother, 39, has suffered lifechanging injuries as a result of the collision, which happened at around 3.40pm in Paignton, on the Devon coast. The incident happened on Windmill Road and saw the pair involved in a collision with a black BMW and a white Peugeot. As a result of the collision, the child sustained what were described as life-threatening injuries and was airlifted by Devon Air Ambulance to Bristol Children’s hospital, according to website Devon Live. The driver of the BMW, a 54-year-old woman was treated by paramedics at the scene for minor injuries. Local officers attended the scene and were joined by Forensic Collision Investigators who conducted an examination of the scene.

4 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol.live live NEWS The Red Arrows at Weston Air Festival in 2018 - there are hopes they could return to the festival next year Red Arrows grace skies over North Somerset as they head to Battle of Britain tribute tHe red arrows could be seen in the skies over north somerset yesterday as they travelled to Cardiff from their Lincolnshire base at raF scampton. the jets were spotted flying down Court ‘Large axe was for chopping wood’, defendant tells magistrates Conor GOGARTY Chief reporter conor.gogarty@reachplc.com A BARTON Hill man has appeared in court after police found him with a lock knife and “very large” axe. Osman Adan, of Beam Street, attended Bristol Magistrates’ Court and pleaded not guilty to two the coast near Weston-super-Mare and Clevedon before making their way across the Bristol Channel to Cardiff for a Battle of Britain flypast. they were first spotted at around 11.47am approaching Clevedon. counts of possessing an offensive weapon in public. The 23-year-old denied the offences, both alleged to have taken place on September 5 last year in Sheffield. Prosecutor Jeremy Oliver told the court: “Police came across the defendant’s vehicle on Vale Road. They searched the defendant, and found a lock knife on him. the flypast in Cardiff impressed spectators, with the iconic raF aerobatic team potentially returning to north somerset next year for Weston air Festival. they soon departed from the “They also found a very large axe in the boot of the car.” Mr Oliver added: “He said it was for chopping wood to keep himself fit.” Victoria Ellis, defending, said the prosecution’s case was likely to be based on body-worn footage from police officers, while the defence will rely on “Mr Adan simply giving his explanation”. Bristol Channel area to head for Bournemouth, and they were spotted just south of Chard in somerset. their next destination was the Isle of Wight, where they were due to perform at 5pm. She added she expects a “very short” trial and her client’s defence will be that he had “good reason” to have the items. Presiding Justice Tina Symons scheduled the trial for November 11. She asked Adan if he had any issues with that date, to which he replied it was “perfect”. He was granted unconditional bail ahead of the trial. Breaking news at www.Bristol.live .live The Christmas Cracker 10K run is set for return Weston-super-Mare’s popular Christmas Cracker race is to return to the resort this year. the 10k race, organised by Weston athletic Club, will take place on December 19 at 11am. the main adults 10k race will be preceeded by a 2k event for junior runners. Last year, due to the coronavirus pandemic, the main race was cancelled with people asked to run 10k in their local area in groups of six or as individuals instead. entries for the 2021 event are now open. the 10k race will take place on its usual route along the beach, seafront and through the village of uphill with a race entry limit of 2,500 runners. the junior races will follow a 2k course on the beach, divided into two age categories, starting at 9.30am and 9.45am. this year’s event will be overseen by new director Jason Wyatt who is taking over from longstanding race director Malcolm Gammon. Jason said: “Huge thanks to Malcolm for all his dedication and leadership over the years, always putting on a first-class event and raising huge amounts for charity. He’s going to be a very hard act to follow.” the entry fee will be lower than in previous years at just £12 (or £10 for affiliated runners) as the club has decided not to offer a t-shirt this time because of pandemic. entry to the junior race is £3 to include a medal and donation to charity. Weston athletic Club will also be running its popular 10 week Christmas Cracker training group from Monday, october 4 at a cost of £30 for the course with all proceeds donated to Weston Hospicecare. For more about the training course, email sherylselway@ btinternet.com. entries are now open for the adult and junior races at www.westonac. co.uk/christmas-cracker. WE BUY & SELL All gold, silver & platinum jewellery, collectable coins, gold & silvers bars & more! Visit our website for fantastic rates! 298, Lodge Causeway, Fishponds, Bristol, BS16 3RD Call us on 01179144998 | www.bristolgold.com

Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live NEWS ‘Racist’ product Skin-whitening facial mask shocks customer Conor GOGARTY Chief reporter conor.gogarty@reachplc.com A WeSTBurY-oN-TrYM pharmacy has apologised for stocking a mask for “whitening” skin. Westbury Pharmacy, in Charlecombe Court, will no longer offer the product – made by Korean company Purederm – after a complaint from a customer who described it as “racist”. The pharmacy’s director Mitul Patel told the Post’s website Bristol Live he was unaware the £3.87 item was being stocked. He said the product is “appalling” and “racially insensitive”. Mr Patel accepted the branch must take responsibility for the mask being on its shelves, but he expressed shock that its supplier Fortuna Healthcare had distributed the product. Fortuna has said it had withdrawn the item from sale “with immediate effect”. Deborah, who did not wish to give her surname, made the complaint after going into the pharmacy earlier this week to pick up a prescription for her 10-year-old child. She said: “I popped in and was waiting at the counter to collect it. I saw this box, and at first I was like, ‘Maybe I’ve misunderstood, maybe it’s for teeth or something.’” The packaging for the Purederm “whitening facial essence mask” offered “visibly whitening, antiaging and moisturising treatment”. It also read: “Made in Korea.” Deborah said: “I thought, ‘That’s just mental.’ eventually the pharmacist came back with the prescription, and I just asked him why they were selling this stuff. “He looked like he had not really registered that product before and didn’t know what it was. He said, ‘oh, I don’t know.’ “I told him, ‘It’s a skin whitening facial - that’s just not acceptable, you shouldn’t be selling these products in this day and age, let alone in Bristol, which is so multicultural.’ “He seemed a bit taken aback, and said, ‘Yeah, I agree, I’ll speak to my boss.’ A few people in the queue behind me were like, ‘oh God, that’s shocking.’” Deborah, a teacher who lives in the area, added she had heard of skin bleaching products in the media but had never seen an item like this herself. ❝It’s a skin whitening facial - that’s just not acceptable , you shouldn’t be selling these products in this day and age, let alone in Bristol, which is so multi-cultural Customer Deborah She said: “I don’t know if they’re sold abroad and seen as a beauty standard but in our society it’s just not acceptable. That is racist, essentially. “Does the pharmacy not engage with the products? You enter an NHS pharmacy and it’s meant to be an area where you trust what’s on the shelf. “It’s there for your health and you think it’s been vetted. It’s great the guy agreed with me, but you also wonder why it was on the shelf in the first place.” Mr Patel, who runs the pharmacy and three others in Bristol, said he would find it “insulting” if he walked into a shop which was selling the item. “We get our over-the-counter products from Fortuna, one of the biggest suppliers to pharmacies across the country,” he said. “They’re the ones that supplied it to us without my knowledge. “They need to answer the question of why they were selling it to pharmacies. I genuinely can’t believe they’ve supplied that to us, to be honest. I’m an Asian man myself and I find it appalling. “Clearly we should have spotted it at our end. I don’t think our members of staff had even looked at it. We took this branch over from LloydsPharmacy a few months ago, and we had to fill up with stock because the shelves were bare. “If you are mechanically pricing everything up and doing lots of stock, things get missed. It’s clearly a failing on our part, but it’s not a case of us trying to sell something racially insensitive. It’s a case of us not knowing. “It’s going straight off our shelves and I’ve sent an email to all the pharmacies in our group, to make sure they’re not stocking it by mistake. We’re a small company and don’t always have the mechanisms to spot these things. However, it The skin whitening facial mask which was on sale at a pharmacy in Bristol. The shop has now removed the product from sale shouldn’t have gone out.” When we approached Fortuna, its spokesman said it would withdraw the product from the market “with immediate effect pending a full review”. Purederm, the Korean firm behind the product, has not responded to our approach for comment. Forbes reports that skin-lighten- ing products are “a controversial market worth billions of dollars” and “especially popular in Africa, Asia and the Middle ea s t ”. Last year L’oreal removed words including “white” and “light” from its skin-evening products, shortly after unilever removed the words “fair/fairness, white/whitening, and light/lightening” from some product packaging. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 5 Breaking news at www. Bristol .live The instructions sheet which explains how to use the product in brief Call 999 if you see dragon tattoo man PolIce are attempting to track down a wanted Bristol man. officers have urged the public to call police if they spot matthew Dobie. The 46-year-old is wanted on a court warrant issued by Bristol crown court on August 31. His last known address was in Avonmouth, but he may be in the cornwall area, specifically newquay or St Ives. Dobie is described as white, with short grey hair and a short grey beard, about 5ft 9ins, of medium build, with a black and white tribal tattoo on his right arm. He also has a black dragon tattoo on his left arm and a small bird tattoo on the left hand side of his chest. A force spokesperson said: “If you see him, please call 999 and give the call handler the reference number 5221207080. “If you have any other information about where he may be call 101 and give the same reference number.” Woman taken to hospital after crash A womAn was taken to hospital on wednesday evening after a crash. A spokesperson for Avon and Somerset Police yesterday said: “we were called to a two-vehicle collision on Hartcliffe way, Bristol, which happened shortly after 6pm yesterday. “Police and ambulance services attended and a female was taken to hospital. A road closure was put in place while emergency services were at the scene and the road was reopened at 8pm.” South western Ambulance Service Foundation Trust have been contacted for further comment on the woman’s injuries. Pictures taken at the time of the incident show a number of police vehicles at a turning near the Imperial Retail Park. THE LOSS • HOPE • LOVE TOUR THU 27 OCT 2022 O 2 ACADEMY BRISTOL NEW ALBUM LOSS · HOPE · LOVE OUT 6TH MAY 2022 - PRE ORDER NOW GIGSANDTOURS.COM | TICKETMASTER.CO.UK THEFEELING.COM AN SJM CONCERTS PRESENTATION BY ARRANGEMENT WITH CAA

6 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live NEWS Supermarket chain recruiting staff DISCoUnT supermarket Aldi is on the hunt for dozens of new staff across Somerset to work at its stores. And some of the jobs available will be at the retailer’s new store in Worle which was due to open yesterday. The supermarket chain has 42 jobs up for grabs at Clevedon, highbridge, Portishead, Westonsuper-Mare and the Worle store. There are 40 roles for store assistants and the firm is also looking to recruit one store manager, an assistant store manager and two deputy store managers. The salary for the store manager role is £47,080 rising to £61,400 after four years. Aldi bosses say they are looking for hardworking, driven candidates with leadership experience. Assistant store managers can expect to earn between £32,830 to £40,035 per year while the deputy store manager attracts a salary of £10.55 per hour rising to £11.57 per hour, plus an additional £4 per hour whilst running the store. Those looking for a store assistant role can expect to be paid a minimum hourly rate of £9.55 an hour rising to £10.57. Dan oakenfull, regional managing director at Aldi, said: “Aldi’s increased popularity and customer demand for quality products allow us to keep growing and create more and more new employment opportunities.” Applications and more information can be found on Aldi’s recruitment website. Helen Macdonald with Geronimo the alpaca before his death Picture: Andrew MAtthews/PA Breaking news at www. Bristol .live All the best bits The Breakfast Roll ‘Wall of silence’ Geronimo owner slams government Breakfast, done properly Served until 11am. Participating restaurants only. © 2021 McDonald’s Rod Minchin bristolpostnews@localworld.co.uk The owner of Geronimo the alpaca has accused the Government of erecting a “wall of silence” over her demand to know the circumstances of how the animal was culled. helen Macdonald said the Department for environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) had still not supplied detailed information of Geronimo’s last hours, including where, how and when he was put to death. The alpaca was euthanised after police officers and Defra staff arrived at Ms Macdonald’s farm near Wickwar, South Gloucestershire on August 31. The animal was culled after he had twice tested positive for bovine TB after Ms Macdonald lost a lengthy legal fight to halt the warrant. Following his death, Dr Christine Middlemiss, the UK’s chief veterinary officer, said the post-mortem examination showed “a number of TB-like lesions were found” during the examination and further tests were to be carried out. But veterinary advisers to Ms Macdonald claim the initial findings show Geronimo did not have the disease. Ms Macdonald said: “The Government continue to make this as distressing and as difficult as possible for everyone concerned. “They are using every tactic they can to prevent any disclosure, and indeed any closure for myself and everyone who was campaigning to save Geronimo’s life and improve bovine TB policy. “Defra know very well that the information they are refusing to provide, will not support their claim that there was any suspicion of bovine TB in Geronimo. “That is why they refuse to provide this information and hide behind their wall of silence.” Dr Iain McGill, Ms Macdonald’s veterinary scientific adviser, said she had still not received a copy of the TB50 form, which details the samples taken for further testing. “These findings would have been available within five days of the post mortem, the Government will already have a comprehensive set of results,” he said. “Despite repeated requests, there has been no disclosure of which blood or tissue samples have been taken from Geronimo, nor the results obtained from tests upon such samples.” In a statement last week, Dr Middlemiss said: “We have completed the initial post-mortem examination of Geronimo. “A number of TB-like lesions were found and in line with standard practice these are now undergoing further investigation. “These tests include the developing of bacteriological cultures from tissue samples which usually takes several months, we would expect to complete the full post mortem and culture process by the end of the year.”

Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 7 Breaking news at www. Bristol .live Billboard campaign calls on university to halt tests on rats The billboard on Bedminster Down Road PhoTo: PETA AnIMAl welfare group PETA has put up a billboard in south Bristol as part of its campaign against testing on rats and mice at the University of Bristol. The billboard at 94 Bedminster Down Road states: “Shame on University of Bristol. Ban the forced swim test now. The ‘science’ doesn’t hold water.” It is part of the charity’s campaign calling for an end to the university’s use of the ‘swim test’, in which mice and rats are dropped into containers of water that are too deep for them to stand up in, and not allowed to clamber out - forcing them to tread water in order to stay alive. During the tests, the mice and rats often panic, which supporters of the practice say can help inform experiments about stress levels. PETA – People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals – has been lobbying the university for months about the experiments. The test has also been criticised by some experts who argue floating is not a sign of despair, but rather indicates adaptation to a new environment. PETA science policy manager Dr Julia Baines said: “Sending rats into a panic by putting them into waterfilled containers tells us nothing about the complexities of human depression.” last year, The Maze Runner actor and former University of Bristol student Will Poulter wrote to the university as part of PETA’s campaign. A University of Bristol spokesperson said: “We acknowledge that some people have concerns about the use of animals in research, but we also recognise that research involving animals is vital for advances in medical, veterinary and scientific knowledge to improve our understanding of health and disease and the lives of both animals and humans.” Listed Pub conversion plans attract objections Estel FarEll-roig estel.farellroig@reachplc.com A PlAnnInG application has been submitted to turn a Stokes Croft pub into shops and apartments. 51 Stokes Croft was last occupied by pub no51 but is not currently in use, according to the documents submitted to Bristol City Council. The application states the property is no longer seen as financially viable as a pub by the owner, who wants to turn the ground floor into two shops and the upper parts into four onebedroom apartments. The Grade II listed building has been used as a pub since 1860 and includes a Georgian-style frontage, according to the documents, which would remain “largely unchanged” by the proposals. The application states: “The property owner is keen to retain qualities and character of the listed building and this specifically applies to the frontage of the building complete (which represents the only remaining item of any heritage value).” It adds: “Given the minimal nature of the changes to areas of heritage value, the location of the new intervention area with care in design and construction, we therefore conclude that the impact of the proposals will be minimal.” However, the Montpelier Conservation Group has submitted ❝We are appalled to read that ‘the interior listing is outdated’ ...There is no planning history of any authorised alterations to the building since it was listed in 1994 and an inspection and detailed audit of the building’s interiors is essential, to determine what features still remain an objection to the proposals, stating that their understanding is that before the pandemic the pub was popular and appeared viable. It says that the applicant has not provided the necessary evidence to justify the loss of a pub, which is a requirement under the Site Allocation and Development Management Policies (2014). The group continues: “We are appalled to read that ‘the interior listing is outdated. “The dogleg stair, moulded string and panelled doors etc have been removed at some stage in the past.’ “There is no planning history of any authorised alterations to the building since it was listed in 1994 and an inspection and detailed Montpelier Conservation Group audit of the building’s interiors is essential, to determine what features still remain. “While the unauthorised removal of the details mentioned in the listing may not have happened during the current ownership of the building, there is no time limit on enforcement action for listed buildings and responsibility rests with the current owner. “These applications cannot be determined until this matter has been fully investigated and resolved.” The Conservation Advisory Panel has also written to the council to object to the plans, giving similar reasons to the Montpelier Conservation Group. TICKETS NOW ON SALE - EARLY BOOKING ADVISED The magical after-dark illuminated trail AT STOURHEAD A new trail filled with after-dark festive fun 26 NOV– 2 JAN christmasatstourhead.co.uk Running selected evenings only in partnership with

8 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol.live NEWS Breaking news at www.Bristol.live on this day » 1745: The Jacobites, under the Young Pretender, occupied Edinburgh. » 1787: Some 39 delegates (out of 42), under the chairmanship of George Washington, approved the Constitution of the United States of America. » 1827: Wides in cricket were first scored in the Sussex v Kent game at Brighton. Harriet Tubman Elevated view of the promenade and sea front of Westonsuper-mare ‘Let’s Create’ Resort gets priority status in art and culture campaign Heather Pickstock heather.pickstock@reachplc.com WESTON-SuPER-MARE is to become a cultural and arts hub as part of a uKwide project to help communities recover from the coronavirus pandemic. Arts Council England has announced 11 priority areas across the South West as part of its threeyear delivery plan to bring more cultural experiences to communities that have been under-served in the past. North Somerset has been identified as one of the areas, with a focus on Weston-super-Mare. The Arts Council plan sets out a detailed roadmap for the implementation of its strategy Let’s Create. The plan aims to ensure that everyone has access to a ‘remarkable’ range of high-quality cultural experiences. Arts Council England (ACE) will focus its development time over the next three years in Weston, working with other partners, to develop new opportunities for CALLING ALL LANDLORDS I am looking to rent 3, 4, 5 or 6 bed property (also 3 bed if 2 receptions) in Bristol for up to 5 years through a company let. If a long term tenant, that can guarantee rent for 60 months is of interest to you please call me. I am also happy to pay for all maintenance in the house while we rent. Susan 0117 287 2891 ❝i’m delighted that Weston-super-Mare and North somerset have been selected by Arts council England as a priority place. We recognise the power of arts and culture to transform lives and are proud that the potential we see in Weston and beyond is also recognised by AcE. increased investment in culture. North Somerset Council executive member for placemaking and economy Mark Canniford said: “I’m delighted that Weston-super- Mare and North Somerset have been selected by Arts Council England as a priority place. “We recognise the power of arts and culture to transform lives and are proud that the potential we see in Weston and beyond is also recognised by ACE. “We have the ambition to make North Somerset a distinctive place for arts and culture and this is now firmly embedded in our placemaking plans for Weston. “It will also be reflected in our North Somerset Councillor Mark Canniford plans for our other towns. We have gained a huge amount from our partnership with the regional team over the past three years and are looking forward to working with ACE over the next three years to deliver even more for our residents, our visitors and for our creative sector.” In the past decade, the Arts Council has significantly shifted its investment outside of London. The publication of the Delivery Plan follows the Government’s unprecedented £1.96 billion Culture Recovery Fund, administered by the Arts Council and other bodies. Driven by former culture secretary Oliver Dowden, with the backing of Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Chancellor Rishi Sunak, the Culture Recovery Fund is the biggest one-off investment in culture from the Government in history. It has provided a vital lifeline for the cultural sector, and helped organisations prepare for reopening. Arts Council England CEO Darren Henley said: “Artists, arts organisations, museums and libraries have found creative new ways to serve their audiences and communities since the start of the pandemic. “Our new delivery plan shows how we’ll work with them to build on that spirit of imagination and innovation as our society reopens. “It’s particularly exciting to be focusing on our priority places over the coming years as part of the Arts Council’s commitment to play its part in delivering on the Government’s programme of levelling up. “We’re looking forward to nurturing dynamic new partnerships with local people and organisations in each of these locations.” Opportunity to help manage city’s National Trust sites THE National Trust is looking for a new ranger to work in some of Bristol’s “most stunning” outdoor locations. The role is based at Leigh Woods, but will also involve work at several other beauty spots in the city and beyond. A job advert posted on the organisation’s website states that the successful candidate will also help to manage National Trust sites at Failand, Shirehampton, Blaise Hamlets, Frenchay Moor, Clevedon Court, and occasionally Tyntesfield. It could be ideal for anyone who loves the outdoors, although it will not be suitable for everyone, as there are some specific skills required as well as the requirement to hold a UK driving licence. A salary of £19,928 per year is being advertised with perks including free entry to National Trust properties. The closing date for applications was listed as Sunday. » 1849: American abolitionist Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery. » 1894: A Gaiety Girl opened at Day’s Theatre, New York, the first British musical on Broadway. » 1931: Long-playing records (33rpm) were demonstrated in New York by RCA-Victor, but the venture failed because of the high price of the players, and the first real microgroove records did not appear until 1948. » 1944: The British airborne invasion of Arnhem and Eindhoven in the Netherlands began as part of Operation Market Garden. The objective was to secure a bridge over the Rhine as part of an Allied invasion of Germany, but after a battle which lasted until September 27, the bid failed. » 2001: The New York Stock Exchange reopened for trading after the September 11 attacks, the longest closure since the Great Depression. birthdays » Des Lynam, broadcaster, 79; Billy Bonds, former footballer Des Lynam and football manager, 75; Damon Hill, former racing driver, 61; Doug E Fresh, rap singer, 55; Ken Doherty, snooker player, 52; Mike Catt, former rugby union player, 50

Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 9 Breaking news at www. Bristol .live City video game developer sold in deal worth £6m Andrew Arthur andrew.arthur@reachplc.com A BRISTOl-BASED company that develops and publishes video games has been acquired in a deal worth at least £6m. Independent studio Auroch Digital, which is based in St Paul’s, is the maker of games such as space strategy title Mars Horizon on the Nintendo Switch, XBox and Play- Station. It also makes tabletop games, having previously collaborated with Warhammer manufacturer Games Workshop on the board game Chainsaw Warrior. The business has now been purchased by london-listed Sumo Group, the parent company of Sheffield-based developer Sumo Digital, which has also produced games for the industry’s leading consoles. In a statement published on its website, Sumo Group said the acquisition of Auroch Digital would provide a “complementary development team” to support its publishing division Secret Mode, which it launched earlier this year. Founded by Tomas and Debbie Rawling in 2010, Auroch Digital employs 48 staff. Mr Rawling, who is the company’s studio director, said it shared many values with Sumo Group, which he said would be a “good home” for the business. Mr Rawlings said: “We have a shared desire always to improve the quality and depth of the games we make, a commitment to being a positive and respectful workplace, a desire to invest in new talent, and a shared wish to make a lot of fun, engagement and gameplay for all. “Auroch Digital joining Sumo Group really is the natural next step in our journey and we’re really excited to be taking it together.” Sumo Group has identified Bristol as a key strategic location, as it seeks to tap into the talent pool of the city’s burgeoning tech and gaming sector. Carl Cavers, chief executive of Sumo Group, said: “Given our increasing focus on Own-IP (intellectual property), we are particularly excited by Auroch Digital’s pipeline of original IP. “So, while this is a relatively small acquisition, it is a highly significant one for us strategically.” Among those to congratulate Auroch Digital on its successful sale was the Bristol Private Equity Club (BPEC), a group of established entrepreneurs that has invested £10m in growing South West businesses over the past five years. BPEC members invested £200,000 into Auroch Digital three years ago, to help it fund the creation of its games. Jerry Barnes, founder of Bristol Private Equity Club said after seeing the early potential of Auroch Digital, it had proved a “fantastic return” for investors. Mr Barnes said: “We backed a very small company, enabling it to Auroch Digital founders Debbie and Tomas Rawlings; above, a promotional image for one of their games PHOTOS: NEIL PHILLIPS/AUROCH DIGITAL grow from 15 people to 48 and now that backing has come to fruition. “It is a life-changing moment for the founders and also sees the club members that backed them receive at least four times return on their investment. “Depending on future performance there could be up to ten times return.” Mr Rawlings said: “This deal is a life-changing moment for us and the next step on our business journey. “To receive backing from wellestablished Bristol-based entrepreneurs gave us the boost we needed to get us to the success we are celebrating today.” Eastbourne At the Cavendish Hotel, Afton Hotel or the Cumberland Hotel •Dinner, Bed & Breakfast •All Coach Travel •Excursions to Brighton, Battle, Hastings & Lewes •Festive Entertainment •Traditional Christmas Dinner Nov 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Dec 6 Llandudno Staying at the Chatsworth House Hotel or the Grand Hotel 5 Days 4 Nights from £209.99 •Dinner, Bed & Breakfast •All Coach Travel •2 for 1 Bar every night 6pm-9pm at the Grand Hotel •Festive Amosphere •A Trip to Chester & Snowdonia •Nightly Entertainment Nov 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Dec 6 2 for 1 BAR* 5 Days 4 Nights from £199.99 Torquay Early Christmas Fun Breaks at Torquay’s No.1 Tinsel & Turkey Hotel - the Majestic Templestowe Holidays Include •All Coach Travel •Dinner, Bed & Breakfast •Excursion Programme •Nightly Entertainment •Traditional Christmas Dinner • Carol Concert • A Visit from Santa •Award Winning Decorations •Christmas Atmosphere 5 Days from £319 Departs Monday 4 Days only £249 Departs Friday Oct 29, Nov 5, 12, Dec 10 Isle of Wight Staying at the Shanklin Beach Hotel or the Royal Pier Hotel •Dinner, Bed & Breakfast •All Coach Travel •Entrance to Osborne House •A Trip to the Needles, Newport & Godshill •Hotel Entertainment Nov 1, 22, 29, Dec 6 Cotswolds Staying at the Britannia Coventry Hotel •A 2 for 1 Bar every night from 6pm-9pm •A Trip to Birmingham, Cheltenham & the Cotswolds •Entrance to Warwick Castle •Nightly Light Entertainment Nov 1, 15, Dec 6 5 Days 4 Nights from £249.99 2 for 1 BAR 5 Days 4 Nights from £199.99 Our Seasonal Specials Brochure is available view online www.majestictours.co.uk 01626 770246 www.majestictours.co.uk

10 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol.live Rugby club to play match in Bob’s honour A memoriAl match is to be played in honour of a sporting legend who set up the first mini rugby sessions in the UK in Weston-super-mare. Bob Hedges, who passed away in July, was an honorary life member of Weston rugby Club. Under his leadership, Weston was the first club in the country to set up mini-rugby. With no guidance or even a set of rules, Bob set about creating an opportunity for youngsters to participate in a game that was his great passion. He coached, arranged matches, refereed and got the whole enterprise off to a successful start. As a result, for over 50 years, generations of Weston’s boys and girls, from the age of five up until the age at which they can play senior club rugby, have been introduced to playing the game. Bob served the club for many years on the management committee, particularly as chairman of rugby and chairman of selectors. He also made numerous and regular contributions through Bob Hedges match reports published across regional newspapers. A spokesman for Weston-supermare rugby Club said: “Bob’s contribution to the club’s life included meticulous and detailed records of everyone who pulled on a Weston shirt in any senior side. “Any player requesting a copy of their playing record would, within a few days, get a letter typed by Bob detailing when they made their debut, how many games they had played, and the points they had scored. “His gift to the club and his enduring legacy sets his contribution at a stellar level.” in his later years, Bob attended every first-team home game and for many years manned the microphone and made all the announcements about sponsors and scorers during games. He also attended most first-team away fixtures until his failing health prohibited it. Weston-super-mare rugby Club will be hosting the Bob Hedges memorial match this evening, Friday, September 17, when Weston Athletic play Cheddar rFC, kick-off 7.15pm. NEWS ‘There’s always hope’ Ella takes on challenge in memory of brother Liam BuckLer liam.buckler@reachplc.com A BrISToL woman has spoken of her pain at losing her little brother to suicide – just two years after her older brother tried to take his own life. on Monday, Ella rothwell will start a mission to run six marathons in six days to raise money for mental health charity CALM after losing her little brother Fred to suicide when he was just 23 years old. Ella, 28, is aiming to raise £20,000 for the charity CALM (Campaign Against Living Miserably) who do life-changing work for those suffering with their mental health or are in a crisis. She will be running from Soho Square in London to the Suspension Bridge in Bristol where there is a memorial to her younger brother, Fred. Ella said: “My brothers have been my best friends throughout my life. There’s just no bond that can come close to what you have with your siblings, it’s like this giant invisible hug that’s with you constantly, keeping you safe and never letting you feel alone. “Fred came walking into this world as the naughtiest, cheekiest, most loveable little boy you could ever meet. His infectious laugh and personality meant that anyone who met him instantly fell in love with him. “Jack, being the eldest of us three, would always look after us. He was the leader of the pack although he is one of the calmest people I know. “He was always incredibly protective and a voice of reason and support when both Fred and I found ourselves in trouble. “As we grew up, life took us all off on our own adventures. Jack and Fred both went to work on sailboats around Europe, and I moved to London to start my career.” In February 2017, Ella headed back to Bristol for a weekend with the family. She said: “As soon as I opened the door, I saw a very blurry-eyed mum and dad who sat me down and told me that Jack was currently in a coma in ITU after attempting to take his own life. “It was crushing. Fred was away on the boats but flew home as soon as he found out what had happened. For the following week the four of us sat at Jack’s bedside in ITU nervously waiting to see if he’d wake up.” She said: “Jack had been struggling with his mental health, insomnia and being away from Ella with Fred and Jack home and when he’d come back from working abroad it felt like we’d tried to wrap him up in bubble wrap to keep him safe as a family. “Jack survived, and Fred and I were with him supporting him throughout his recovery. “He worked so incredibly hard, and with the support of a local mental health rehabilitation unit in Bristol was able to get the help he needed to start his long and brave journey to recovery. “Jack got a new girlfriend, and they started a handmade jewellery business together, and Fred moved back to Bristol to start a new job after living on my sofa in London for a few months. Everything was starting to feel happy again.” But on April 13, 2019, Ella’s world changed forever with some heartbreaking news. She said: “My cousin arrived whilst I was doing a shift at the restaurant I worked at. I’ll never forget the expression on his face, it was terrifying. “He thought I already knew and was just coming to pick me up and take me back to Bristol but sadly he had to be the one to tell me that Fred had taken his own life. “My whole world went black. Anyone who has lost someone to suicide will know the feeling of complete helplessness, confusion, and indescribable pain that you experience.” Suicide rates in England have risen by 17 per cent in the past 10 GET YOUR POST AT 50% OFF SUBSCRIBE years, with 94 people taking their own life every week. Men are still disproportionately affected, with 75 per cent of all suicides being male. Ella added: “There had been no signs, no red flags that warned us this might happen. We never saw it coming. “Like so many who lose loved ones to suicide, I will always wonder if there was anything I could have done, any signs I should have spotted. “Life will never be the same without our beautiful Fred. He lit up any room he entered and when he died a little part of me went with him. “I want to do anything I can to fight for those who are feeling lost or like they have no other option. “So, I’m going to be running for my brothers and for every single person who has been affected by suicide.” And Ella is encouraging people to check in on friends and family members who might have gone a little quiet. She said: “Please check in on your favourite people, your loved ones, your mate who has been a little quiet recently and please be brave enough to ask the harder questions and start the conversations. “And to anyone who is struggling with their mental health just remember you are loved, you are special and there is always hope.” Ella’s efforts have been praised Breaking news at www.Bristol.live by James Baker, head of fundraising at CALM, who said: “We are completely blown away by Ella’s gargantuan fundraising efforts to run 157 miles from London to Bristol. “It’s thanks to our incredible supporters up and down the country, who raise vital funds and awareness, that we continue to be there for people who need us, no matter what. “Every week in the UK 125 people take their own lives, 125 individuals who couldn’t see a way out. “At CALM, we believe there is always hope, always a reason for living. That’s why we’ll be cheering Ella on all the way to the finish line.” Help available Most people who are thinking of taking their own life have shown warning signs beforehand. these can include becoming depressed, showing sudden changes in behaviour, talking about wanting to die and feelings of hopelessness. these feelings do improve and can be treated. If you are concerned about someone, or need help yourself, please contact the samaritans on 116 123. AND STRAIGHT TO YOUR DOOR! TODAY pAgE 37

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12 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live NEWS Breaking news at www. Bristol .live DownloaD the app ★4.7/5 ★4.2/5 The InYourArea iOS and Android app lets you follow the latest local news, information, events and more in your area. You can connect with other members of your community, submit events, promote a local business and more. Exclusively to our apps, we let you follow news, information, ‘things to do’ and property prices for where you are right now with our ‘near me now’ feature. Our app is the best way to enjoy InYourArea. Fun, Fast anD Free have a go! ‘Money doesn’t come for free’ is the old adage we’ve heard a million times before, but at InYourArea this may no longer be the case with our new free daily scratch card! It’s super-easy to play and works very much the same as a traditional scratch card — but online — and is 100% free to play. Prizes start as a £20 Amazon voucher, and rolls over if there is no winner until it reaches a maximum value of £500. traFFic upDates ‘InYourArea provides you with the latest up to date traffic and travel news to point you away from any snarls-ups on the road, trouble with rail cancellations or when the next bus is due — all in REAL time. ‘Horrendous’ Campaigners slam zoo’s homes plan ON Wednesday the Post reported how Bristol City Council officers have backed plans to build 62 new homes on one of Bristol Zoo’s two car parks. Yesterday Dr Justin Morris, Chief Executive Officer of Bristol Zoological Society, gave the argument for the homes plan. Today Christopher Jefferies, of Clifton and Hotwells Improvement Society, puts his case against the plan to Post reporter Conor Gogarty PLANS for housing to replace part of Bristol Zoo Gardens have been criticised as horrendous. Christopher Jefferies, who became a well-known campaigner for press reform after tabloids printed false claims linking him to the murder of Joanna Yeates in 2010, has spoken out against the proposals for housing on the site of Bristol Zoo in his role as a member of Clifton and Hotwells Improvement Society. Bristol Zoological Society, which owns the site, announced last year that the land would be sold and the zoo would move into the Wild Place Project, near junction 17 of the M5 in South Gloucestershire. The society plans to get permission for housing on the Clifton land before selling it - but there is an alternative proposal for the site to become an “augmented reality zoo”, driven by the OurWorld Bristol group which includes former Bristol mayor George Ferguson and broadcaster Prof Alice Roberts. Mr Jefferies, 76, is a planning coordinator for Clifton and Hotwells Improvement Society (CHIS), a residents’ group which has successfully applied for Bristol Zoo to become an asset of community value. The listing means CHIS must be informed if the site goes up for sale in the next five years. The group could then bring forward a Community Right to Bid, which would give it six months to raise funds for a purchase. Mr Jefferies, a retired Clifton College teacher, spoke to the Post about his belief that the listing could help make OurWorld Bristol a reality - and his fears over the planned housing scheme. He said: “To deny or restrict public access to such an important site would be a huge loss. It is quite obvious the zoo wants to generate the maximum amount of money for itself from that site. “The aesthetic considerations of what might be built there, the density of the development, the inconvenience to other residents - all that has taken very much second place in the zoo’s thinking.” Mr Jefferies believes the Zoological Society’s plans for its West Car Park in College Road are a worrying sign of what could be proposed for the main zoo site. Bristol City Council officers have recommended approval of the scheme for 62 homes on the brownfield car park, which will be decided by councillors on September 22. The proportion of affordable housing would be 20 per cent, the minimum required by the council. Mr Jefferies described the West Car Park proposals as “pretty horrendous”, adding: “The first issue with the car park plans is it is extremely dense development and to our mind, it’s very much an overintensive use of the site. “A certain amount of affordable housing is proposed and indeed has been allocated, but the provisions of that only meet the very basic requirements for such housing. That housing would meet only the minimum requirements in terms of space. “There is considerable need for the sort of housing which first-time buyers might be interested in Christopher Jefferies, of Clifton and Hotwell Improvement Society, pictured acquiring. The sort of housing built on a site such as Bristol Zoo is hardly going to be the sort your average 20- or 30-year-olds can rush out and acquire. “The zoo has had a very good reputation but if it is prepared to leave the sort of legacy currently proposed, it will do a huge amount of damage to that reputation.” CHIS is backing the OurWorld Bristol plans for “a fully immersive” zoo experience with technology like digital headsets and a “more accessible city garden” with bees, birds and butterflies. The residents’ group applied for the zoo to get protected status after being approached by Green councillor for Clifton, Paula O’ Rourke. “Paula O’Rourke is extremely keen on the OurWorld project and she suggested an application for listing it as an asset of community value, which has to come from the equivalent of a local community organisation,” he said. “We obviously thought it was an extremely good idea. “CHIS would not itself simply buy the site and hand it over to OurWorld, because it is OurWorld doing all the fundraising and developing a credible business plan... We hope (by the time it is marketed) that OurWorld will have the finances in place.” Mr Jefferies argued OurWorld would be “a feather in the cap for Bristol” and called on Bristol Mayor Marvin Rees to “give a large amount of excellent publicity” to the vision. Mr Rees did not respond to our approach for comment. Asked if the use of virtual rather than real animals could hold Our- World back, Mr Jefferies said: “I would think if anything (the augmented reality plans) might generate even more interest than the existing zoo. “The zoo claims it’s struggling at the moment to attract visitor numbers to the Clifton site. They might put that down to some problems with parking but I think that’s a minor part of it. “The days where we have wild animals contained in comparatively constricted areas are now passed. People are much more interested in the whole business of conservation and seeing wild animals in something much more akin to their natural habitat.” The Zoological Society intends to An artist’s impression of how the new housing development would look

Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 13 Breaking news at www. Bristol .live outside Bristol Zoo submit a planning application, late this year or early next, for housing on the main site. It believes only a residential-led scheme can “secure a sustainable future for the Society Picture: Jonathan Myers and for the gardens themselves”. Under its plans, Bristol Zoo Gardens would remain open until late 2022. Wild Place Project would remain open before becoming the new Bristol Zoo from early 2024. Responding to Mr Jefferies, the Zoological Society’s director of transformation Francesca Fryer said: “As a responsible wildlife conservation charity we have had to make some difficult decisions in order to safeguard our future after an incredibly challenging number of years, and to ensure an exciting new future for Bristol Zoo, for everyone in Bristol and beyond. “Our decision to sell the Bristol Zoo Gardens site, and the adjacent West Car Park in College Road, was not one that we took lightly. But it means we will be able to create a new, world-class Bristol Zoo at our Wild Place Project site and continue to deliver and expand our conservation and education work both in the UK and overseas, allowing us to continue leading the way as a modern conservation and education charity whilst inspiring the next generation of conservationists. “We care about what happens to the site, we care about our neighbours, we care about our future, and we care about our legacy. This is why we are leading the planning applications ourselves so we can be confident and proud of the legacy we leave there. “For our West Car Park, we have applied for planning permission for high-quality, environmentally friendly, low-carbon homes. This includes a mix of one, two and three-bed apartments and three to four-bed mews houses, of which 20 per cent will be affordable in line with Bristol City Council planning policy. “We want to ensure that we create an exemplar for environmentally and socially sustainable residential development that Bristol can be proud of and showcase to other cities across the UK. “There is a huge under-supply of housing in Bristol. New homes are needed in all parts of the city, including affordable homes, to address the housing crisis.” Ms Fryer said the society is still in the early stages of developing plans for the main sites and is holding a series of public consultations. “We plan to enhance the gardens to encourage greater biodiversity, and we are considering public access to the gardens beyond the Clifton Conservation Hub that is already planned for the zoo’s iconic main entrance building,” she added. “Our plans ensure that Bristol Zoo continues to exist for generations to come whilst meeting our mission of ‘saving wildlife together’ and offering millions more people the opportunity to experience the magic of a new Bristol Zoo, in its new home at the Wild Place Project site.” Ms Fryer encouraged people to help shape the plans by visiting the future.bristol zoo.org.uk website. ‘Capitulation to media pressure’ christoPher Jefferies became a well-known campaigner for press reform after tabloids printed false claims linking him to the murder of Joanna yeates in 2010. asked about last week’s channel 5 documentary on the murder of Ms yeates, he said: “i haven’t actually seen it. “i’ve only spoken to a couple of people who saw it, and they seemed to be reasonably impressed.” asked if thought the media harassment he suffered could happen again today, he replied: “it certainly could. “i don’t think things have essentially changed. one of the reasons for that is the (David) cameron Government bears a huge amount of responsibility for the way in which the media behaved, by not fully implementing the recommendations of part one of the Leveson inquiry and subsequently cancelling part two of the inquiry. “it was an outrageous capitulation to pressure from the worst elements in the tabloid media.” Brown Cream Blue Green Forget fence worries for good. Choose 25 years maintenance free metal fencing*. Choose ColourFence. Unique ColourFence GUARANTEE ◆ Virtually, maintenance FREE for 25 years* ◆ No warp, crack, shrink, rot or peel ◆ Withstands gusts up to 130mph Why choose anything else? ◆ A choice of styles and colours ◆ Professional installation ◆ Established in the UK for 15 years For a free, no-obligation quote, find out more via: 0117 2591 789 | colourfencebristol.co.uk *T&Cs apply – see website for details 25 YEAR GUARANTEE

14 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol.live NEWS Step out and discover more of the city this autumn tO help you shake off the Covid blues, why not get outdoors, enjoy nature, walk, explore and party at the brand new Let’s walk Bristol Festival over the weekend October 1 to 3? the event’s organisers say there will be something for everyone whatever your fitness level, with lots of free walks, evening entertainment, and an ashton Court family adventure trail for £5. the festival weekend will start on the Friday afternoon with a walk around Bristol’s lively re-generated historic harbourside, finishing at a local pub for drinks. On the Saturday, participants can choose from a range of events and walks from easy to challenging, including popular Bristol city walks and beautiful countryside trails, which will all be led by experienced insured guides. Free in-town walks include the Kings weston trail, the South Bristol Skyline walk and the Snuff Mills wellbeing walk. Plus, there will be a ‘ferry and Underfall Yard harbour experience’, a Stoke Park nature trail with Steve England, a Dudes and Dogs walk, and also planned is a Banksy and street art city tour. Further afield, there will be the chance to experience walks in the picturesque Cotswolds from Castle Combe; to discover a glorious circular walk around Clevedon, hike the famous Bath Skyline, or challenge yourself by trekking through the Mendips up above the magnificent Cheddar Gorge. to round the day off, festival organisers suggest walkers gather at Underfall Yard or toto’s wine Bar, to share their walk experiences and enjoy food and music. On Sunday, there will be a hub in ashton Court with street food and music. walkers can then enjoy a leisurely stroll around the Mansion House grounds, or set off on a selection of routes. all the trails are self-guided and easy to follow. tickets for walks and events are limited. to find out more and book tickets, visit letswalkbristol.co.uk. Breaking news at www.Bristol.live Pull on your walking boots for next month’s Let’s Walk Bristol Festival PCC NEWS WELCOME TO THE BACKSTAGE WHERE CREWS WORK AS ONE TEAM AND MANAGERS SUPPORT YOU Earn from £10 /hour as Warehouse Operative near you Apply now at jobsatamazon.co.uk With Police and Crime Commissioner Mark Shelford We want to hear your views about policing I want to start this week by acknowledging that there has been a lot of discussion lately, in the media and on social media, about public confidence in police conduct during warrants and operations. Please rest assured that this particular issue is of great concern to me and I am working hard to hold the police to account. I have asked the Chief Constable to further examine these instances, where police conduct has been called into question, and give me assurances that the relevant findings and learnings are carried forward by the service. the Police and Crime Board also met last week with a focus on the topics of public confidence and vulnerable women. the board meet on a monthly basis with the aim of helping me to carry out my role as Police and Crime Commissioner, this includes overseeing the delivery of the Police and Crime Plan and examining the work, performance, key projects and budget of the police and partners. Board members include myself, the Chief Constable and senior leaders from the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner (OPCC) as well as the police. You can read more about the Police and Crime Board, at the website www.avon andsomerset-pcc.gov.uk/reportspublications/police-crime-boardreports/ Some of you may be aware of an incident which took place at a petrol station in Hengrove, on the morning of thursday, September 9. a man armed with a knife was safely detained by officers after two hours of negotiations and arrested on suspicion of attempted murder. Local residents may have heard a number of bangs which came from police distraction devices and a baton round which was discharged. thankfully, incidents such as this are rare in avon and Somerset and neighbourhood officers will be patrolling the area to reassure the local community as investigations continue. as your PCC, I am the bridge between the police and the public and I write this column as a way to strengthen communications and increase transparency. It is in this spirit, that I recently accepted a role as the national lead for economic and cyber crime. Cyber crime and fraud are two of the fastest growing crime types in the country, almost doubling year on year. In fact, both crimes are growing so quickly that, according to the Office for national Statistics (OnS), people are more likely to be a victim of fraud or cybercrime than any other crime. It is for this reason that I decided to take on the role, as I feel that this is an area of work where I can make the most difference to the lives of residents of avon and Somerset and beyond. Finally, there is just one week left until the Police and Crime Survey closes! the purpose of the survey is to hear about which policing issues matter most to you. It is, therefore, so very important that you please take the time to complete the survey, as the findings will directly shape the future priorities and direction of avon and Somerset Police. to complete the survey, visit: www.avonandsomerset-pcc.gov.uk/ about/police-and-crime-survey/

Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 15 Breaking news at www. Bristol .live Ravenswood School, Nailsea, left; and dealing with the flooding inside the school, right Education Pupils home schooling again after floods Liam BuckLer liam.buckler@reachplc.com PaReNTS at a North Somerset school have expressed concern their children may not be able to return to the classroom until January after rainwater flooded the building. Ravenswood School, in Nailsea, will not reopen until September 27 at the earliest after pupils were sent home last week when heavy rain damaged a temporary roof causing extensive flooding and electrical damage. The temporary roof was in place as part of work to upgrade the main school structure during a 12-week works programme that started during the school holiday. Pupils are now working from home as repairs take place, including work being carried out to ensure the roof remains watertight. The school hopes to partially reopen to some pupils from ❝I’ll have to work evenings and attempt to provide some kind of schooling during the day Monday, September 27, but at least four classes may have to be relocated to a new facility in the longer term. and in a letter to parents, headteacher Mark Senior said the Primary building may be out of action until January 2022. In the meantime, home learning is being provided for the 137 pupils at the school and families are being regularly updated on any developments by school staff. But parents are concerned about the impact it is going to have on their children who have already missed months of their education due to Covid-19. Parent Helen Truan said: “I’ve been shocked to be informed that many of the children in the school, including my son, may not be able to return until January. For there to have been such widespread water damage to the school is devastating. “It’s my understanding that work was carried out on the roof over the summer holidays and therefore for such an amount of water to have poured into the school is deeply concerning. It was a danger to both the children and staff in the building and I just do not see how it could’ve happened.” Whilst the the school closure will affect the children, it will also have an impact on parents who are having to take time off from work to home school their children. Sarah Sullivan’s daughter was back at school for two days before being sent home. She said: “I’m self employed with my own business. I’ll have to work evenings and attempt to provide some kind of schooling for Faye during the day. She only started at Ravenswood in January 2020, then in March we went into lockdown. Faye didn’t return until September 2020. The children just can’t get a break at Ravenswood.” Mr Senior said: “The school’s suffered considerable water and electrical damage. Before pupils can return we have to be sure the school is dry and safe as that is our top priority. We appreciate this is an extremely stressful time for pupils and their families but we have to put safety first. “We’re doing all we can to support families and provide temporary learning solutions. If anyone has any concerns about the well-being of their child I would ask them to contact me directly.” Cllr Catherine Gibbons, North Somerset Council’s executive member with responsibility for education added: “This is an extremely difficult situation and we’re working with the school to resolve it as soon as possible. This further disruption to learning during the pandemic is upsetting but we’d like to reassure parents and carers that we’re doing all we can to get Ravenswood open again.” North Somerset Council said it was working with the school to find possible alternative classroom space if the repair work takes longer than expected to complete. Parent Sarah Sullivan Family Kids stay and eat free * Only available at premierinn.com *T&Cs apply, please head to our site for details. without the faff

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Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol.live COMMENT FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 17 Breaking news at www.Bristol.live Diary of an urban Grandad With Stan Cullimore Turning on the television is when the drama starts HARdLY ever watch television these days. Well, not proper telly. Can be a bit embarrassing at times, especially when people get excited, telling me about a new show they are watching that I just have to watch. Hmm. When I admit to avoiding modern TV whenever possible, things tends to get a tad awkward. Having said that, I do still watch a few shows. Ones about motorbikes or antiques, for instance, or bargain-loving Brits in the sun. Or better yet, ancient reruns of old sitcoms. Basically, I’m happy to watch shows that don’t feature politics, correctness or the minefield of millennial sensitivities. Reason being, my life is stressful enough without watching other people’s problems being paraded across the screen for general amusement. Got quite enough death, disease, divorce and disaster in my real life, thanks. No need to add to it by watching shows that focus on unhappiness. Either real or imagined. If you are wondering what got me thinking about all this, let me explain. Last week a few of us were in a caravan by the seaside. Very nice it was too. The weather was kind, the sea was balmy and life was everything it ought to be, on a late summer holiday. It was one of those weeks when you wish the world would stop, so you can enjoy the moment for as long as possible. Squeeze out as much pleasure as the day can bring. It was while feeling suitably chilled and content with life that we made a fatal mistake. Sigh. We turned on the telly. There wasn’t much choice by way of channels, so we ended up sticking to the same one all night. Things started well with a show all about the Mississippi river. Very nice it was too. Can’t beat a bit of riverside documentary. I’ve always had a soft spot for shows about places and animals. In my earlier life, I spent several years writing TV scripts for nature shows. So I tend to watch them these days with a sort of half professional eye. This one got a def- inite thumbs-up from me. When it finished, we put the kettle on, had a chat and then settled down to see what was coming on next. Which is when the trouble started. Next up on the schedule was a show about water. Clean water. The sort we use for drinking and watering crops. Which set alarm bells ringing straight away. You see, having written some shows like this, there is one thing I am sure of. When it comes to the natural environment and humans, there is no good news. None. So options for scripts are limited. Either you close one eye, face away from the truth and write an upbeat, mostly fictional, account of the subject. Or you tell it like it is. This show decided to go for the truth, the whole truth and nothing sugar-coated about it. Basically, we’re running out of clean water. Half the world relies on water that is pumped from underground aquifers. Thing is, they take ages to fill and we are rapidly running them dry. When they go, we’re in trouble. Big trouble. As the programme makers helpfully pointed out. No one knows what to do about it. All of which sounds absolutely true and also, completely depressing. By the time the closing credits appeared I was begging for the misery to end. Trouble is, the next show followed a bunch of people in Russia who do weird and wacky things in their garages. To be honest, I could cope with the weird and wackiness. One of them dug a mine shaft, another carved religious icons and a group played punk. All of which was fine and dandy. It was the people that broke my heart. Or rather, their stories. Like all of us, these folk lead complex lives. With plenty of drama, darkness and difficulty along the way. The simple message of the show seemed to be that you can dig, carve or sing, but you can’t escape the unrelenting horror of life. Which, speaking purely selfishly, is hardly the sort of message I am looking for in late evening television entertainment. It’s not an uplifting thought to take to bed. Practically gave me nightmares. Also reminded me why I don’t watch modern TV, or the news. It’s all far too downbeat. Too miserable. So, from now on, I’m sticking to my simple shows about motorbikes, antiques and bargain-loving Brits. If only someone would make a show about cheap antique motorbikes in the sun, ah. Now that Every pledge today helps secure life-saving research for tomorrow. Get your free Gifts in Wills Guide, visit cruk.org/pledgesouthwest would be a happy show worth watching! Hope you and yours are safe, well and happy. Until next time, all the best. Stan South West, play your part. When it comes to TV, Stan would rather tune it all out Together we will beat cancer Cancer Research UK is a registered charity in England and Wales (1089464), Scotland (SC041666), the Isle of Man (1103) and Jersey (247).

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 19 SuSAN LEE Straight-talking in the post-truth age It’s bang out of order AMID all the stories of shortages of toys this Christmas, food stuffs running low, too few lorry drivers and a paucity of fruit pickers – all thanks to Covid and to Brexit – I bring some good news. There may not be enough fireworks to go round this year. You see? Even a pandemic has an up-side. Don’t get me wrong, I like a sparkly Catherine wheel as much as the next woman. I love the oohs and ahhhs of the kids as the night sky explodes into a million coloured light fragments. And frankly if I can’t write my name in the air with a sparkler on November 5 then my Bonfire Night is ruined. But that’s my point. Fireworks should be reserved for one night only – perhaps a few days either side if it doesn’t fall on a weekend. I might even stretch to folk letting a few go at midnight on New Year’s Eve but only because we’ve all had such a rotten time of it of late. That’s not enough for some. Now it’s become the norm for bangers Fireworks shortage offers a chance to reset November 5 as a one-night event, not a weeks-long bombardment and rockets to be firing off from October through to mid January. Yet we light them to remember a specific event on a specific day – the foiling of the plot to blow up the Houses of Parliament. At this juncture I should mention that thanks to some excellent family history work by my motherin-law we’ve discovered there is a vague chance my husband is related to Mr Fawkes, so I have some skin in the game here. Anyway, my point is we use fireworks and gunpowder to mark a culturally significant moment in our historical calendar, we’ve been doing it since the 17th century yet somehow that meaning has been diluted. This has two effects. First, given fireworks seem bigger and louder than ever – it’s like being beneath the big guns on a battlefield round our way – it means weeks and weeks of terrified animals and old folk and people jumping out of their skin while trying to watch Corrie. Second, it spells a further blurring of the lines of what we used to fondly as seasons. DAMN AND BLAST! I’m hoping not to spend the next few months jumping out of my skin as random fireworks go off know Once, there was a rhythm to the year. Strawberries in June, and then pumpkins in October, tinsel in the shops at the end of November. Now it all blurs into one as Christmas starts in September, Halloween at the end of August and Easter just after the selection boxes have been cleared from shop shelves. I guess it’s part of this headlong race we’re all caught up in – with retailers firing the starting gun – to be constantly looking at the horizon at what’s coming next rather than enjoy being where we are right now. But all that does, apart from fill the coffers of the stores, is make us all wonder where the time went. After the last 18 months we’ve all endured, maybe it’s time to press reset. And when the fireworks do explode on November 5, maybe we’ll remember, remember why. one last thing Whether a tennis fan or not, you can’t fail to be thrilled and impressed in equal measure at Emma Raducanu, pictured below, the 18-year-old who has smashed her way into the record books by winning the US Open. Three cheers too for her honesty when she admitted her parents have pushed her to excel and her dad was ‘tough to please’. Pushy parents sometimes get a bad rap in the press. We’ve all met them at the school gate, elbowing others out of the way to thrust their kid forward, loading the child up with tutors and extracurricular clubs to enhance their CV. Even though they’re eight. But that kind of behaviour shouldn’t be confused with wanting the best for your child and setting them a high bar for which to aim. It’s a balance, no-one wants an unhappy little one, would-be champion or not... But spurring them on to be the best they can be isn’t pushy, it’s being a good parent. The Manor & ashbury hoTels Okehampton | Devon Craft, Sport and Spa HotelS StayCationS for 2022 Selling out faSt BooK noW and reCeiVe 15% OFF When yOu pay in Full By 26/09/21 Quote Spring15 Winter SpeCial any 2 nigHtS or More all WeeKend all Mid-WeeK BreaKS £69 BreaKS £55 per perSon per nigHt plus! 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20 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on Facebook /BRISTOL Live ENVIRONMENT Fungi to help find forgotten grasslands People are being urged to look out for colourful waxcap fungi, as part of efforts to help experts protect carbon-storing, wildlife-rich grasslands. Nature charity Plantlife said it received hundreds of records for rare waxcap grasslands across the country last year, and is urging volunteers to send in sightings via its WaxcApp app again this autumn. At this time of year, the pinks, oranges and reds of waxcap fungi, which pop up in meadows, lawns and graveyards, are a good indicator of long-undisturbed grassland habitat. These old, species-rich grasslands are not just important for the hundreds of wildflowers that grow in them, but are a key natural solution in the climate crisis, the charity said. Undisturbed grasslands store a third of the world’s land-based carbon in their soils. Sending in sightings of waxcaps can help experts identify forgotten patches of old grassland, which they can then target for protection, Plantlife said. Plantlife’s Dave Lamacraft said: “We can’t overlook this vital habitat as a key contender in the fight against climate change with its carbonlocking ability, but we need to know where the missing pieces are first.” Visit www.plantlife.org.uk/uk/ discover-wild-plants-nature/ habitats/grassland/waxcaps-fungi/ waxcapp-survey WALK ON THE wild side Celebrating crucial climate action led by our communities In a world where every week seems to bring a media story clamouring for our attention, it’s sometimes hard to work out what really matters. But the next 10 days aren’t just important – they’ll witness what some would describe as the most crucial community occasion of the year. The Great Big Green Week will take place this year from September 18-26, and is forecast to be the largest celebration of climate action and nature ever seen in the UK. Thousands of events, created by lots of different organisations, are being planned that celebrate communities as they tackle climate change and support green spaces. From concerts to community talks and workshops, there will be something for everyone: the only qualification for organisers is that they care about and want to act on climate change. Why now? The answer is simple. Climate change is the challenge of our lifetime. Here in Avon and across the UK we are already seeing its impacts on our wildlife populations, and the time to tackle it is now. This year, we in the UK have a huge opportunity to raise our ambitions, because we are hosting a major UN climate summit, known as COP26, in Glasgow this November. This means Government and local authorities want to be seen as ambitious in tackling climate change. With Avon Wildlife Trust’s backing, Bristol City Council, Bath and North East Somerset Council and North Somerset Council all declared ecological emergencies in 2020, and we hope they’ve set a path that others will follow. At a regional level, there are a host of ways for you to get involved with helping wildlife as part of the Great Big Green Week. Along with the Natural History Consortium, Avon Wildlife Trust is supporting Bristol City Council and other organisations to deliver the One City Ecological Environmental Strategy – a bold vision for how the city of Bristol can tackle the climate and ecological emergencies that face us. Taking part in the Great Big Green Week is a great way to engage in that local vision. Events range from hands-on, practical conservation sessions to art installations – check out ecologicalemergency.co.uk for a handy round-up. The coastline near Bristol contains some vital and rare habitats – but as elsewhere in the UK, they’re under pressure. So why not join the Great British Beach Clean, taking place around the UK coastline from today until Sunday, September 26, this year? This is an annual citizen science event led by the Marine

with Avon Wildlife Trust FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 21 Breaking news at www. Bristol .live ‘Bring our waterways back from brink’ RIveRS, wetlands and waters around the UK are being damaged by water pollution, putting habitats and wildlife at risk, a report warns. The report from a partnership of environmental charities including the RSPb, the Rivers Trust and the National Trust warns water bodies are being harmed by agricultural waste, raw sewage and pollution from abandoned mines. In england, only 14 per cent of rivers meet standards for good ecological status, less than half make the grade in wales and only 31 per cent of water bodies in Northern Ireland are classified as good or high quality. Protected sites are among the areas hit by poor water quality, harming key wildlife such as otters, the swallow-tail butterfly and salmon which depend on them. The report calls for better monitoring and sufficient resources for government agencies to enforce the rules on pollution. It also demands a transition to more nature-friendly, sustainable farming practices, legally binding targets for wildlife and freshwater, and moves to stop untreated sewage reaching rivers. RSPb deputy director of policy Jenna Hegarty said: “It is disturbing how it has become so normal for our waterways to be polluted and contaminated, and that many people do not realise there is something wrong. “Governments must demonstrate leadership and act with urgency and ambition to bring our waterways back from the brink of collapse and revive our world.” READER OFFER 5 YOU COULD SAVE Top left, a fundraising event at Knett; left, artist Dorcas Casey with youngsters at Tyntesfield . ON ENERGY BILLS Conservation Society, where hundreds of beach cleans take place up and down the UK. On every clean people are asked to run a litter survey, recording all the items of rubbish they find in a 100-metre stretch, with this data being used to campaign for real change. How else can you help? The great news is, sometimes the best way to help is by doing nothing. We’re currently celebrating Dormouse Week, a campaign backed by the charity People’s Trust for Endangered Species, which released its 1,000th dormouse this year as part of a long-standing reintroduction programme. Dormouse numbers are plummeting, and the species needs as much help as it can get. Here again, the ways you can support these charismatic little creatures mainly involve doing less, not more – they include allowing PHOTOS: MaTTHew RObeRTS/MICHaeL LLOYD ivy to grow on trees, embracing brambles in gardens, and building log piles, providing great places for them to bed down and prepare for the winter months. Meanwhile licensed volunteers for Avon Wildlife Trust have been giving the species an extra boost by putting out new dormouse boxes for them at Goblin Combe, our woodland reserve overlooking the Mendips, where we know there’s the potential for a thriving population. This vital work is only possible because of the support of our members. That’s a clue to another great way of taking action – join the trust, so that we can do more to fight the ecological and climate emergency. If you want to learn more about The Great Big Green Week or find an event near to you, check out greatbiggreenweek.com/getinvolved Let’s stand up for our world. Are you one of the millions of UK households currently overpaying on their energy bills? On behalf of our loyal readers, we’ve partnered with one of the UK’s most trusted energy switching brands to create the InYourArea Energy Campaign - built with our readers in mind and designed to find you the best new deals, we could save you up to a huge £216* on your energy bill. We do all the hard work for you... so why not start saving today? FIND OUT HOW EASY IT IS TO SWITCH AND SAVE... VISIT INYOURAREA.CO.UK/GO/ENERGYSWITCH OR CALL 0800 049 2435 *Between 1 July 2020 and 31 December 2020, people who switched energy supplier for both gas & electricity with Uswitch saved an average of £216.

22 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 QUOTES OF THE WEEK “In my view they should be ashamed” – England’s chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty on people who deliberately peddle “myths” about the coronavirus vaccine The Big Quiz “If you’re thinking about the country as a whole and looking after the people in it, you have to look after the farmers who provide the food. And I’d also ban the sale of avocados” CODE CHALLENGE Puzzle – Celebrity Saturday farmer Sep19,2021 Jeremy Clarkson SATURDAY EXTRA CC 630 MASTERMINDS 1. Which tennis club in Kent was Emma Raducanu’s home club as a junior? 2. What is the name of the forthcoming new Matrix movie? 3. Who was named artist of the year at the MTV VMAs? 4. New single My Universe, which will be sung in both English and Korean, is being brought out by which two bands? 5. Which British heritage site has had scaffolding erected so it can undergo repairs for the first time in 60 years? 6. What Covid-19 vaccine will be used as the primary source of the UK’s booster jab rollout? 7. Which reality TV star wore a full face covering and body outfit to the Met Gala? 8. How much did an art deco diamond and pearl bracelet once owned by Princess Margaret fetch at auction? 9. Who was the first footballer to score 100 goals in the Premier League? 10. Where did Oscar-winning animator Nick Park unveil a statue of his creations Wallace and Gromit? 11. A £10 million pandemic research base launched in which city this week? 12. Which Strictly Come Dancing contestant is part of the show’s first male same-sex couple partnership? 13. Abba entered the UK top 10 for the first time in 40 years with which song? 14. Which newly engaged American pop star has announced she is taking a social media break? 15. Which original Star Trek cast member turned 85 this week? 16. Runners at which marathon ended up running further than planned because 1 course measurements were wrong? 17. Who was the American pop star who surprised fans in Belfast by turning up at a popular city centre bar? 18. Which BBC television series about a grizzled detective is returning as a film on Netflix? 19. Which supermarket chain is extending an online zero-waste shopping service trial to stores? 20. Dina Asher-Smith is defending world champion in which athletics event? 21. Who has stepped down from his roles as the chairman and host of a primetime show on GB News? 22. Researchers have potty-trained cows in a bid to do what? 23. Which player holds the record for the most nine-dart finishes in televised matches? 24. When does the new series of The Great British Bake Off begin on Channel 4? 25. What is the name of the debut album from 2021 Mercury Prize winner Arlo Parks? 26. How many gold medals did Great Britain win at the Tokyo Paralympics? 27. Which mobile network has reintroduced roaming fees when travelling abroad? 28. Who was the first player to be sent off in an FA Cup Final? 29. Which showbusiness duo will present a new primetime game show featuring an unlimited jackpot called Limitless Win? 30. Vaccine passports are to be launched in Scotland on which date? ANSWERS 1. Parklangley Club, Beckenham. 2. The Matrix Resurrections. 3. Justin Bieber. 4. Coldplay and K-pop superstars BTS. 5. Stonehenge. 6. Pfizer/BioNTech. 7. Kim Kardashian. 8. Almost £400,000 9. Alan Shearer. 10. In his birthplace of Preston. 11. Liverpool. 12. Great British Bake Off star John Whaite. 13. Don’t Shut Me Down. 14. Britney Spears. 15. Walter Koenig who played Ensign Pavel Chekov. 16. Brighton Marathon. 17. Taylor Swift. 18. Luther. 19. Tesco. 20. Women’s 200 metres. 21. Andrew Neil. 22. Reduce ammonia emissions caused by their waste. 23. Phil Taylor. 24. On Tuesday. 25. Collapsed In Sunbeams. 26. 41 27. Three – a flat £2 daily charge when roaming within an EU country will apply to customers. 28. Kevin Moran in 1985 29. Ant McPartlin and Declan Donnelly. 30. October 1 CODE CHALLENGE 2021 You have just 20 minutes and 21 seconds to crack the Code Challenge. Each grid number represents a letter. Every letter of the alphabet is used. Today’s clue letters are below the main grid. Write in the appropriate letter wherever its number appears. Don’t give up. Call the Extra Letter line. Solution next week. 1 21 6 15 13 25 22 3 12 13 17 3 12 20 3 3 12 5 24 21 22 13 17 14 14 13 25 22 13 5 19 5 3 4 1 15 25 13 12 21 9 10 10 26 21 5 10 16 2 13 3 14 10 18 25 16 14 2 16 7 11 2 13 14 13 13 3 3 3 8 3 23 16 25 6 17 10 9 18 13 25 16 16 5 21 11 25 5 15 21 10 10 4 13 16 8 13 2 3 10 9 3 21 14 14 10 15 13 25 2 16 4 3 3 9 13 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z F G 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 0900 586 4352 For up to 5 EXTRA LETTERS and FULL SOLUTION, call: Use your Target Time minutes when you call the Extra Letters line. Deduct two minutes for each extra letter you use. Stay on the line for some hints, followed by the Full Solution. TARGET TIME 20:21 mins secs Last week: Across: Sage, Scandal, Exile, Enslave, Default, Felt, Reward, Cherub, Dolt, Unlucky, Prolong, Reign, Leaflet, Spit. Down: Slender, Dope, Grief, Welcome, Require, Golf, Create, Jungle, Nose, Cholera, Amateur, Crisp, Zest, Bayonet. Landline calls cost 61p/min plus network extras. Calls from mobiles will be higher. Minimum age 18. Line closes next Friday. Std Reach plc rules apply. See www.mirror.co.uk/rules. SP: J Media UK, SW4 7BX. Helpline: 08448001188. Giant Crossword Across 8 Leaves or eats the bit on the outside (5,2) 9 Sets up as rival to a successful body-building business? (7,2) 13 Jack will be a breeder (5) 14 Ways to make money (5) 15 Manage – to administer the anaesthetic to? (4,3) 16 Interrupt, but you start getting used to it (5,2) 17 Find one must take a right turn first (5) 18 Give, as a tip, a ball-point (5) 20 Took a chance and within days are caught (5) 22 A danger to the people ahead of one (6) 23 Leaned over and told you what to bet on (6) 25 Said ‘A mere outward show,’ which does offend (7) 27 That is among the various words meaning ‘hooligans’ (7) 30 Maybe black marks, thanks to being caught in wrongdoing (6) 31 Were all different, as a random drive round showed (6) 32 Catches ‘They ain’t hadders!’ (5) 35 Are too small to pick up (5) 36 Is first to be locked in the big prison (5) 37 As soon as you see round, things are different (2,5) 39 Renovate and stash away again (7) 41 A retiring person of little intelligence; a loner (5) 42 Animal of which there are many in the pound (5) 43 Amazed by the speculator and the awful greed (9) 44 The bird has flown, you understand from her (7) Down 1 Want Father Edward to come back at first (6) 2 Shot in the nude (8) 3 Are ice-picks used to work in it? (7,4) 4 Material wealth (9) 5 Zip up coats the salesman came back with (7) 6 Top time for successful mountaineering expeditions? (4,6) 7 The name on the metal disc (4) 10 Felt anti an all-night sitting? (6) 11 A beating by father hurt (7) 12 Brooded over when drunk (6) 19 Reduce the price of squash (7) 21 The notes you keep from (7) 24 An electric blanket when you want central heating? (4,7) 26 Pervade the whole of the rehearsal? (3-7) 28 When unmasked, is brazen (4-5) 29 Girl getting the first rise in a job (7) 30 A really good note to end on. Great (6) 32 Argues it’s intended to be read (3,5) 33 Put the plastic cup beside the seat (6) 34 The fellow had got angry but concealed it (7) 38 Look! The strawberry roan is rearing! (6) 40 The locale, or spot, spoken of (4) Last week’s solution Across: 9, Pulled out 10, Tee-total 12, (pe)Elsa (rev) 13, Assail (a sail) 14, B-Lister 15, Carrie-D-on 17, To-othsome 18, To-aster 20, Sh-odd-y 21, Pa-I-d 24, Entrance 26, Addition 28, Over 29, Knocks 31, Chisels 34, Ba-dmin-t-on 36, Runnersup 38, De-spa-ir 39, En-su-es 40, Ergo (rev) 41, Crackers 42, Ma-de has-te. Down: 1, Upper-cut 2, C-loser 3, Conside-r 4, (mo)St-rain 5, St-I-let-to 6, Redblooded 7, To-nigh-t 8, Tattoo 11, Fri-ends 16, In turn 19, Annie 20, She 22, A-L-one 23, Strif-E 25, Non-starter 26, (l)Ass 27, Forbad-e 30, Co-nverse 31, Contends 32, Supposed 33, Fin-ance 35, Desert (dessert) 36, R-esum-e 37, Stress.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 23 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live Smarter For ten Breaking news at www. Bristol .live Bright young thingS Everyone’s a winner. Marion McMullen looks at teenage sporting champs Emma Raducanu 1 2 3 4 British teen Emma Raducanu was sitting her A levels this summer and now the 18-year-old has become the first British female to win the US Open since Virginia Wade in 1968. Offers have been pouring in for the young tennis star who is represented by super agents IMG and Max Eisenbud, who helped Maria Sharapova become the world’s highest-earning female sports star. Top jockey Lester Piggott was only 12 when he rode his first winner, The Chase, at Haydock Park in 1948. He was 18 when he won his first Derby on Never Say Die. He went on to notch up 4,493 wins during his long racing career. Northern Ireland golfer Rory McIlroy began playing as a toddler and achieved his first holein-one when he was 10. He was 19 when he won the Dubai Desert Classic in 2009. Japan’s Momiji Nishiya was just 13 when she made history this summer by winning gold at the first street skateboard competition at the Tokyo Olympics. She said: “I want to be the famous one who everyone in the world knows. I want to win at Paris 2024.” 5 6 7 8 9 Track athlete Sir Mo Farah was just 15 when he won his first major national title – the English schools cross country championship – and said “I wished for just one medal as a junior”. He went on to win gold at both the 2012 (right) and 2016 Olympics. Kyoko Iwasaki of Japan became the youngest swimmer ever to claim an Olympic title when she won gold for the 200m breaststroke in Barcelona in 1992 at the age of 14 years and six days old. That was her only Olympic medal and she would go on to become a swimming coach. British sprinter Jonnie Peacock was 19 when he made his mark at the London Paralympic Games in 2012 winning gold in the T44 100m class. He added another gold for the same race in Rio four years later. American golfer Tiger Woods was just two-years-old when he appeared on TV on The Mike Douglas Show, putting with comedy star Bob Hope, and 18 when he became the youngest amateur champion in history. He played his first professional major championship in 1995 at the US Masters Augusta National. American tennis star Tracy Austin was two when she started playing and in 1980, when she was 17, became the youngest US Open female singles champion in history. She became the world’s youngest number one just a few months later. 10 American boxer Cassius Clay (centre), who later changed his name to Muhammad Ali, was 18 when he travelled to Rome to compete in the light heavyweight division at the Olympic Games. He defeated Zbigniew Pietrzykowski in the final to win the gold medal. £1000 Vouchers to be won We have £1000 for one lucky reader to win in our fantastic promotion. One lucky reader will receive a gift card to the value of £1000 to spend in whichever way they like in an M&S Store. M&S has a huge range of clothing for all the family, Home & Garden furniture, Gifts & Flowers and not forgetting the Food & Wine. How to enter: For your chance to win simply collect eight tokens from the tokens we will be printing until Friday 24th September. Attach your tokens to the form and send your completed entry to M&S competition Bristol Post. FAO Newspaper Sales Mitchell Henry House, Hollinwood Avenue, Chadderton, OL9 8EF Closing date is Friday 1st October 2021. ENTRY FORM Name: ....................................................................................................................... Telephone: .............................................................................................................. TOKEN £1,000 VOuCHERS ATTACH ANOTHER TOKEN HERE ATTACH ANOTHER TOKEN HERE ATTACH ANOTHER TOKEN HERE ATTACH ANOTHER TOKEN HERE ATTACH ANOTHER TOKEN HERE ATTACH ANOTHER TOKEN HERE ATTACH ANOTHER TOKEN HERE Terms & conditions: Standard competition rules apply rules apply see www.bristolpost.co.uk/rules One winner will be drawn at random from all entries received by the closing date. The winner will receive M&S gift cards to the value of £1000.

24 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow Us on FaCebook /bristol livE Game On breakinG news at www.bristol .livE Cube your enthusiasm Its sales may not have been the strongest but this classic Nintendo console is still worth celebrating CHERYL mULLIn End Of Level Boss IT’S a massive year for Nintendo with several of its most beloved games and consoles celebrating major milestones. June marked 25 years since the debut of the Nintendo 64, and this week sees the 20th anniversary of the GameCube – one of the gaming giant’s most underrated consoles. Released in Japan in September 2001, European fans had to wait eight more months to get their hands on the hardware, and when they did it was a little underwhelming. But the tiny little cube belied the power within. The GameCube was Nintendo’s first console to use optical discs, in the form of cute little miniDVDs – the idea being that they would be harder to pirate. But as adorable as they were, it meant the system was not able to play full-sized DVDs or audio CDs, something its Xbox and PlayStation rivals could easily do. It also offered limited support for online gaming – which was admittedly in its infancy in 2001 – with Still fresh: metroid Prime Sea change: The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker owners having to buy a modem adapter. The easiest way to access multiplayer was to use the console’s infamous carry handle to simply take it round to your mate’s house. Where it did shine though, was the games it offered. Animal Crossing, Luigi’s Mansion, and Metroid Prime all started life on the GameCube, and Resident Evil 4, Metal Gear Solid: The Twin Snakes, and Super Monkey Ball were all originally released as GameCube exclusives. Ultimately though, it went on to be Nintendo’s worst selling console, a title it really didn’t deserve. If you have a GameCube gathering dust in the loft, and want to break it out for some anniversary fun, these are the games you should be diving straight back into. metroid Prime (PEGI 12) Samus was back for her fourth Metroid instalment, and to be brutally honest, there weren’t high hopes for it. The first in the series to use 3D graphics and to be played from the first-person perspective, it’s now considered one of the greatest games of all time. With rich planets that begged to be explored, and challenging puzzles presented in the manner of a first-person shooter, Metroid emerged as a fresh, vibrant franchise that still thrills to this day. Resident evil 4 (PEGI 18) Released on the GameCube in 2005, this sixth major instalment in the Resident Evil series is considered the best. Its arrival saw a sweeping reinvention of the series, and is credited with popularising the “over-the-shoulder” thirdperson perspective. Focusing on action and shootouts with fewer survival horror elements, and ‘quick time’ events which sees you having to press buttons indicated on-screen to execute actions such as dodging a boulder or wrestling an enemy. The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (PEGI 7) In a huge departure for the series, Simply the best: Resident Evil 4 anniversary: The nintendo GameCube turns 20 this week Old haunts: Luigi’s mansion this 10th instalment in The Legend of Zelda series set the action on a group of islands in a vast sea. Gone was Link’s horse for travelling around the map, instead using a boat – the King of Red Lions – which moves around the oceans using the winds. The game’s art style was also vastly different from what had gone before, but the bright, Disneyesque graphics have aged remarkably well. Luigi’s mansion (PEGI 3) A launch title for the GameCube in 2001, the series is also celebrating its 20th anniversary this week. It was only the second game in the Mario series to be missing the eponymous plumber, and is credited with helping to drive strong sales for the newly launched console. And while the fun graphics and gameplay win praise to this day, it’s disappointingly short. Still, a great title to dust off to get in the mood for spooky October. aLL GeeK TO ME the latest GaminG, ComiCs and Film news ExtrEmE CarnagE: toxin #1 Carnage makes his big screen debut next month alongside Tom Hardy’s Venom. And this new series introduces a new character to the mix – Bren Walker – the teen who found himself host to the sometimes-homicidal symbiote, Toxin. This issue is the sixth part of the larger ‘Extreme Carnage’ event, which has been running since July, but fleshes out the Walker/Toxin ‘partnership’. Written by Steve Orlando, with art by Gerardo Sandoval, Extreme Carnage: Toxin #1 is out now, priced £3.60. DEaDbox #1 Life in a small town can feel oppressive, especially when that town is Lost Turkey, where you can’t even get onto the internet. Penny runs the local convenience store, and from there she can see the town’s only source of entertainment – a dusty old DVD vending machine. The problem is, the movies the machine dispenses are haunted, reflecting back on the viewer things that are happening in the town. With tales that offer a deliciously dark twist, Deadbox #1 is out now, priced £3.60. TOP 10 GAMES Top three: GTA V 1. minecraft 2. mario kart 8 deluxe 3. Grand theft auto V 4. ratchet and Clank: rift apart 5. animal Crossing: new horizon 6. marvel’s avengers 7. marvel’s spider-man: miles morales 8. F1 2021 9. FiFa 21 10. super mario 3d world + bowser’s Fury Ukie Games Chart (C) Compiled by GFk

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 25 TECH JuSTIN Connolly Technology Editor WhEn the iPhone 12 was unveiled around 11 months ago Apple described the event as a ‘leap year’ – everything was new about the device. This year we’re taking smaller steps forward – with the iPhone 13 everything is better, but to the passing observer not a lot has changed. But the iPhone 13 in all its variants was revealed this week in another glossy presentation film broadcast online. The phone was not the only thing Apple CEO Tim Cook and a parade of top execs from the company showed off during the event. here’s what’s new from Cupertino this autumn. iPhone 13 Design-wise not a lot has changed with the iPhone 13 – the only way to tell them apart from the 12 is the smaller notch on the front-face to house the True Depth camera system, and the diagonal arrangement of the dual-lens camera system on the back. There are new colours, of course – pink, blue, midnight, starlight, and (PRODUCT)RED for the 13 while the 13 Pro will come in graphite, gold, silver, and the allnew sierra blue. But what’s really new this year is all on the inside. While the updates could be seen as incremental, they are far from insignificant. The new chip at the heart of both phones is the A15 Bionic, the latest in a long line of Apple-designed chips that make the iPhone the fastest smartphone you can buy. Everything else these new iPhones can do flows from that power. As well as general processing duties, the A15 also houses dedicated hardware to process images – which makes the computational photography features of the new phones possible. Paired with the extraordinary new camera units, the image processor arguably makes the devices more cameras than phones. The 13 houses ultra-wide and wide camera units which have The iPhone 13 Pro and Pro Max Cinematic Mode brings rack focus to mobile video capture, while the iPhone 13 Pro is capable of macro photography The iPhone13 Teenage kicks The iPhone 13 wasn’t the only thing offered up at Apple’s latest launch event improved a lot on last year’s. The 13 Pro adds a telephoto lens to the mix. They are great cameras, but what they and the power increase mean for users is new features in software. Chief among those is the new Cinematic Mode. The phones will shift focus from one subject to another in shot automatically, according to what happens on screen. Say one person turns to look at someone else who is blurred in the background, the focus will shift from them to the person in the background. You can even edit these transitions after shooting. The still images get new ‘photographic styles’. You can set up the character of your photos in terms of tone and warmth and the camera will remember your style, while still applying its software smarts to keep skin tones natural. The other big upgrade this year comes in the Pro, which now features a display with a variable refresh rate. It can switch between refreshing the screen 10 times a second and 120 times a second depending on what you are doing, which helps to save power. Battery life on all the phones is better than previous models too. The phones come in the same sizes and variants as the 12, so we have the 13 Mini with a 5.4in screen, a 13 and 13 Pro with a 6.1in screen, and a 13 Pro Max with a 6.7in screen. The 13 Mini starts at £679, with the 13 from £779. The Pro starts at £949 and the Pro Max at £1,049. Storage tiers start at 128GB, while the Pro model is now available with 1TB of storage. Should you pro-order? I’d say if you have any 12 model you’ll still be happy with that. But these new phones will feel like a massive upgrade to anyone else. You can pre-order all four models of the iPhone 13 now for delivery on September 24. iPad mini The iPad mini has received a big redesign that means it’s now more the baby brother of the iPad Air than the base-model iPad. It’s got the flattened edges and the Touch ID button on top, and it supports the second generation Apple Pencil, which attaches magnetically to its side. The new design allows for an allscreen front – and that allows for a bigger 8.3in screen. There are four new colours, too – pink, starlight, purple, and space grey. Inside the mini rocks the same super-fast A15 chip in the new iPhones. There’s also 5G support for fast data, making this the most portable iPad you can get. It’ll start at £479 and hit shops on September 24, but you can pre-order now. Apple upgraded the base model iPad as well – it now sports the faster A13 Bionic chip, and adds an ultra-wide FaceTime camera for the Centre Stage feature which zooms in on faces to keep you in shot during video calls. The feature is also coming to the iPad mini. Apple Watch Series 7 The new Apple Watch defied the The 2021 iPad mini The Apple Watch Series 7 will be available in green, blue, starlight, midnight and PRODUCT(RED) pre-event rumours – it does not feature the flatter sides many had predicted. What the Series 7 does have, though, is a bigger screen – about 20% bigger than the Series 6. This has allowed the software engineers to add features like a QWERTY keyboard. They’ve also optimised things like buttons for the larger display and there are new colours, too – the Series 7 will come in green, blue, starlight, midnight and PRODUCT(RED). Software updates include new pilates workouts, as well as fall detection while cycling. If you fall off your bike it’ll ask you if you’re OK and can call an ambulance for you. The Series 7 is also more durable with a stronger screen. There’s also faster charging – the battery can go from zero to 80% in around 45 minutes. There’s no price yet, and Apple’s vague release date for the device is ‘later this autumn’. The all-new operating systems We now know when the new operating systems for Apple devices will arrive. iOS 15 for iPhone, iPadOS 15 for iPad, and watchOS 8 for Apple Watch will be available for free download on September 20, bringing new features and upgrades. TECH ThAT the latest in the digital world Twitter’s new Communities feature EvEn morE from TwiTTEr New week, new feature from Twitter – this time we have Communities, which adds the same kind of functionality as Facebook’s Groups. Communities will allow users to create a group that others can join, and you can tweet to that group only, without those tweets being broadcast to the wider community. Communities are intended to focus on particular topics, and Twitter is hoping that will bring greater context to the conversations that take place there. At the moment, creating Communities is not available to everyone – just a select few as the kinks are ironed out. Anyone can, though, be invited to join the small number of communities that exist now. But pretty soon everyone will be able to make their own home. Ray-Ban Stories facEbook x ray-ban I remain unconvinced that glasses with built-in cameras are the future of technology we’ve all been waiting for. Yet Facebook and Ray-Ban have teamed up to make that very device. Ray-Ban Stories are sunglasses that come in three classic Ray-Ban styles (including Wayfarer) which also feature both speakers for listening to music and taking Messenger calls, and two 5MP cameras to capture video and still on the go – capture what you see, as Ray-Ban puts it. The cameras feature LED lights that light up when you are taking images, so passers-by know what you’re up to. It’s all controlled by tapping the frames of the glasses, or by voice control. The pictures and videos captured are shared to an app on your phone, and from there to wherever you want to share them. The Stories are available now for £299 from ray-ban.com, and there is an option to add prescription lenses

26 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 follow us on facebook /BriStol live eSCaPe PlAnS The laTesT news and deals from The Tourism indusTry Barbados BarBaDoS: Seven nights at the four-star boutique all suite South Beach hotel on the South Coast of Barbados costs from £1,055pp, based on two adults sharing a Junior Suite Room on a bed and breakfast basis and includes direct return flights from London Heathrow with British Airways. Price is based on an October 5, 2021 departure. To book go to ba.com/southbeach or call 0344 493 0124. Visit southbeach barbados.com for more hotel information. Malta Marriott Hotel MalTa: A week at the newly refurbished five-star luxury Malta Marriott Hotel and Spa costs from £766 per person. Price is based on two adults sharing a Superior Town View Room on a bed and breakfast basis and includes return economy flights from London Luton with Ryanair. This is for an October 13 departure. To book now visit mercuryholidays.co.uk or call 0333 321 3144. The Glacier Express SWITZerlaND: Why not climb aboard the Glacier Express this winter? This rail holiday, based in Chur and Kandersteg, provides ample opportunity to explore the majestic Swiss Alps, cloaked in their winter finery. Price is £1,495pp which includes seven nights hotel accommodation and 12 meals, based on departure January 8, 2022. For more information or to book, call 01904 527180 or visit greatrail.com (Prices correct at time of going to press) TraVel DuRING lockdown, most of us learnt to love our local parks. After hours cooped up inside, the chance to stretch our legs somewhere green helped keep us sane. This got me thinking about other parks I had visited across the globe. My new book Park Life: Around the World in 50 Parks is the result. Here are some of my favourites: dreaming of dc West Potomac Park in Washington D.C. is marvellous, both for a stroll after sightseeing in the nearby Smithsonian museums and for learning uS history. With the towering obelisk of Washington Monument in the middle, the Capitol to one side, the White House to the other, the Potomac River meandering by, it feels almost impossible you’re in the heart of the world’s most powerful nation, surrounded by so much greenery. The memorials to Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Martin Luther King Jr are moving – each with inspirational quotes. Go in the spring to enjoy the cherry blossoms. polonaiSe in the park During the summer, free Frederic Chopin concerts are held on Sundays beside a small lake and a statue of Poland’s favourite composer in Lazienki Park, Warsaw. This tradition has been in place since 1959 in the tranquil 76- hectare park, which is also home to a palace built in the late 18thcentury by Stanislaw II Augustus. Music is played on a grand piano by the country’s top pianists and those in the audience simply find a spare place on a lawn to spread blankets or nab a bench. Listening to polonaises (a Polish dance) amid the chestnut trees, close to the River Vistula, is delightful. a SpaniSh Stroll Valencia is Spain’s third biggest city after Barcelona and Madrid, and it has a wonderfully laid-back feel. Part of the reason for this is Jardin del Turia, which was created last century on the dried-out bed of the River Turia. In 1957, the Turia burst its banks causing widespread damage and more than 80 deaths. A decision was made to divert the river to the city’s south. This was completed in 1973 when city planners decided to turn the six miles of empty river into a splendid park, with fruit groves, woodland, fields, bike lanes and a futuristic City of Arts and Sciences centre. Beautiful in Beijing There are many parks with evocative names in the Chinese capital: the Longtanhu Dragon Lake Park, the Zizhuyuan Beijing Purple Bamboo Ming Dynasty Park and the Tombs GreaT PlaCeS To Park Tom Chesshyre’s latest book is a guide to discovering natural beauty in the middle of bustling towns and cities lazienki Park, Warsaw, Poland Jardin del Turia in Valencia Shuangxiu Double Elegant Park. But the Ming Tombs Scenic Area stands out for its marvellously peculiar stone statues in the shape of horses, elephants, lions and camels, set along an avenue of trees by the Ming dynasty tombs. Beijing’s smog can be awful, but the air is clearer in this park to the north of the city and the statues are terrific fun – splendidly obstinatelooking creatures yet with an overall comic effect. The sculptor obviously had a sense of humour. meeting of the nileS Not many people make it to the Al Morgan Family Park in Khartoum, Sudan’s capital. The troubled country has suffered a long-running bloody civil war, after all. However, those who make the trip to see its many antiquities, including the splendid Meroe Pyramids, often drop by this park at the confluence of the Blue and the White Niles. The Blue Nile originates in Ethiopia and the White Nile in Rwanda, and you can clearly see the muddy water of the White Nile clashing with the clearer Blue Nile. It’s a peaceful spot with a pleasant cafe. himalayan viewS Rani Jhansi Park is in the Indian hill- top town of Shimla, the state of Himachal Pradesh’s capital and once the summer base of the British Raj. From its terraces are breathtaking views across the foothills of the Himalayas. The park is named after the 19th-century female freedom fighter Rani Lakshmibai of Jhansi, and a statue of her astride a rearing horse, arm thrust aloft with her young son clinging to her back, is in pride of place. She was shot dead by the British in the rebellion of 1857, aged 32. It feels somehow right that she is honoured in Shimla, with its British colonial ties. Stockholm’S pleaSure iSland Djurgarden translates as ‘Royal Game Park’ in Swedish and it is on an island in Stockholm covering 700 acres. It is not really a traditional ‘park’ as around 800 people live there, alongside parkland, museums and attractions including Grona Lund, an amusement park that occasionally holds concerts (Bob Marley performed there in 1982). Learn about Swedish history in the Nordic Museum, the pop group Abba at ABBA The Museum, before discovering the tragic fate of the Vasa warship, which sank in 1628 on its maiden voyage and has been recovered and restored. ■ Park Life: Around the World in 50 Parks by Tom Chesshyre is published by Summersdale, RRP £16.99

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 27 TRaveL Sunset over the Nile in Kharthoum breakinG news at www. Bristol .live LaTe BREAKS Grab Great last-minute deals Lake Garda BLOOMING LOveLY: Sunrise over West Potomac Park in Washington D.C. with the cherry blossoms in full bloom Djurgarden, Stockholm, Sweden Djurgarden translates as ‘Royal Game Park’ in Swedish and it is on an island in Stockholm Statue of Rani Lakshmibai, Lakshmibai Park LaKe GaRDa: Al Fresco Holidays’ five-star Bella Italia park sits on the shores of Italy’s Lake Garda and is a great option for those wanting to make the most of the outdoors. A lively site with an action-packed activity programme, guests benefit from heated pools and access to a private beach. A seven-night, self-catered stay, arriving October 23, 2021 (halfterm week), is priced from £364 for a two-bedroom Comfort mobile home with air-conditioning, which sleeps up to six (was £452 total, saving 20%). Direct return flights with Ryanair from London Stansted to Milan’s Orio al Serio International Airport are available from £22pp. Contact Al Fresco Holidays on 0161 332 8900, alfresco-holidays.com Coffee, cocktails and chill Bringing you only the best recommendations to make every second of your free time count. Visit 2chill.co.uk

28 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on Facebook /BRISTOL Live Hotseat I just call myself a drag queen Michelle Visage is back on the judging panel for series three of RuPaul’s Drag Race UK. Georgia Humphreys found out why she adores the role From hitting the music charts with girl band Seduction to winning a whole new legion of fans thanks to starring in Strictly Come Dancing in 2019, Michelle Visage has had a glittering entertainment career. But there is one job which she is particularly famous for – being a judge on RuPaul’s Drag Race. The third series of the UK version of the reality competition lands on BBC iPlayer this month, and once again, New Jersey-born Michelle, 52, who is married to author and screenwriter David Case, will be sitting on the panel alongside drag queen RuPaul, who she met on the New York scene in the 80s. Graham Norton and Alan Carr will alternate each week as guest judges, while other famous faces who have been confirmed to appear on the show are comedians Matt Lucas and Kathy Burke, Strictly Come Dancing professional Oti Mabuse, pop star Nadine Coyle and Loose Women presenter Judi Love. A total of 12 queens will be sashaying down the runway. Amongst those hoping to impress is the show’s first-ever cisgender [meaning a person who’s sense of identity corresponds to their birth sex] female drag queen, Portsmouth-born Victoria Scone. Here, we find out more from mum-oftwo Michelle. How would you sum up the new series of RuPaul’s Drag Race UK? It’s completely different, because it’s completely different queens, with completely different stories, completely different trajectories. You don’t know where somebody is going to go, and that’s the beauty of RuPaul’s Drag Race, you go on a ride with these people. How important is the decision to include Victoria Scone in the line up? I’ve always maintained that all drag is A lot of people try to fit into a certain mould to make people happy instead of making themselves happy Michelle Visage ‘SHE’S WONDERFUL’: Drag Race contestant Victoria Scone: valid, and it really is. It needs to be on RuPaul’s Drag Racelevel to get into the competition. So, we will always welcome everybody to audition – that audition tape better be very, very good! Having Victoria on this series is gamechanging. I consider myself a cis woman drag queen, AFAB [assigned female at birth] queen, whatever you want to call it – I just call myself a drag queen. And I’ve been trying to compete behind that judging table for 14 years now. It’s just part of the beautiful growth of drag, and what we represent, and we are all-inclusive, so it is important that she’s there. And she’s wonderful. You must get some amazing reactions from fans. What’s the strangest place you’ve been recognised? An odd place was at the gynaecologists’ office; sitting there waiting to go in and you see somebody looking, and it’s like, Michelle Visage says she is looking forward to watching this year’s drag queens do their thing Michelle fought through an early knee injury on Strictly ‘Do I have something on my face?’ It was one of those moments where I was like, ‘Well, I’m gonna remember this one!’. The queens get a lot of support on social media too. How does it feel to see drag becoming more accepted? I’ve been a fan of drag since I was a kid, and people thought I was crazy for loving drag. But drag, to me, has always been as viable an art form as painting, as dance. So, it’s very rewarding for me to sit back and go, ‘See, I told you! I knew it’. Drag is amazing and expressive and artistic, and it fills my soul and my heart with joy. No matter what it is, there’s going to be haters, whether it’s politics, whether it’s the arts, whether it’s your face, there’s always going to be somebody who has something negative to say. You just can’t spend too much time soaking in that. What are the biggest lessons you’ve learned in your career? I’ve learned to be flexible. A lot of people try to fit into a certain mould to make people happy instead of making themselves happy, and I have been a victim of that as well. If you can stay steadfast to who you are, and true to what you believe, what you feel you represent, you’ll be unstoppable. I’m the best Michelle Visage that there can be, and I need to just focus on that. Have you kept up ballroom dancing since competing on Strictly? I left Strictly and had to have knee surgery. I hurt my knee on the launch show. I did that entire competition with a torn meniscus. Obviously, the team knew, but I was given the OK to dance through it. I didn’t want the judges to know because I didn’t want to have a target on my back, I wanted to give it all I could. Two weeks after knee surgery, I said to my doctor, ‘When can I dance?’ He’s like, ‘You’re good! You can go dance’. So I take a dance class at least once a week. I’m still not great, but I love it so much. I found my love of Latin and ballroom through doing Strictly and I had the best experience of my life. ■■RuPaul’s Drag Race UK series 3 will return to BBC Three and iPlayer on Thursday September 23, with new episodes dropping weekly.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 29 Follow us on FaceBook /BrisTol liVe To Do LisT Breaking news at WWW. BrisTol .liVe Nicki Minaj A daring rescue in The Finest Hours TRENDING sTriCTly Come danCing Summer may be over but at least we have the glitzy spectacle of fake-tanned celebs trying to get to grips with the foxtrot on live TV to keep our minds off the dark nights drawing in. We have high hopes for Corrie’s Katie McGlynn, right, and Loose Women’s Judy Love. emma radUCanU First she powered to victory in the US Open becoming the first British woman to win a Grand Slam title in 44 years, then she stole the show at the Met Gala. Is there anything this teenage tennis sensation cannot do? Surely national treasure status awaits. CoasTal Homes Our dream home is a four-bed detached house in a seaside village with a pub and a Tesco nearby. According to a study for estate agent Rightmove, the perfect pad also has two living rooms, two bathrooms, a garden, garage, utility room and an office. lUTHer It has been rumoured for months but Netflix has now confirmed that Idris Elba will reprise his role as DCI John Luther for a feature-length film version of the BBC crime series, alongside Oscar-nominated actress Cynthia Erivo and Planet of the Apes star Andy Serkis. Idris Elba as DCI John Luther niCki minaj The rapper stoked the ire of Professor Chris Whitty, England’s Chief Medical Officer, after she shared a story on social media about a man who was supposedly made impotent by the Covid vaccine. At a Downing Street press conference Prof Whitty said such claims were “clearly ridiculous” and “designed just to scare”. dominiC raaB The former Foreign Secretary was one of the highest-profile scalps in Boris Johnson’s reshuffle. Raab, who was on holiday as British troops were trying to manage the withdrawal from Afghanistan has been demoted to Justice Secretary. Education Gavin Williamson also got the elbow. Liz Truss and Nadhim Zahawi take their roles. CHrisTmas Toys Parents are being urged to shop early for toys to avoid tears on Christmas Day. Industry analysts warn stocks will be low as the festive season nears due to supply chain shortages. HoUse priCes House prices fell by £10,000 as the full stamp duty holiday ended. The average home cost £255,535 in July – £19,000 up on a year earlier but well below June’s record of £265,448, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) revealed. TANKING BOOK IT Roger Daltrey The Who’s roger daltrey is planning a series of solo dates and says he is eager to get back on stage after his 50-plus years of performing was interrupted by Covid restrictions. He says: “Live music is an important part of all our lives, something to free us from the groundhog days that life has become. This pandemic has brought home to me what an important part of me singing is and it’s made me determined to get back on stage asap.” He will be touring the country from November 7 offering a mix of music and conversation built around his musical journey and encompassing nearly every style imaginable – including blues, rock, country, soul and metal – and even reinterpreting a few Who classics and rarities along the way. Go to aegpresents.co.uk/events/ detail/roger-daltrey for tour and booking details. Drink iT Love iT TasTe iT Raise a glass to Negroni Week with a perfectly mixed version of the iconic Italian drink from the Bottle and Bar shop. A winner of the 2019 Great Taste Award, its negroni (£17 for 20cl, bottlebar-andshop. com) is infused with orange and grapefruit zest for several weeks to give it a perfect balance of flavours and just the right amount of bitterness. A combination of Campari, rock rose gin, vermouth and bitters, serve 100ml over ice with a slice of orange. All the Bottle and Bar Shop cocktails and infusions are handmade with all natural ingredients with no additives or added flavours. Thanks to the boom in online shopping, gone are the days of a mad dash to the high street to hunt down a last-minute birthday card. With so many online card market places a fantastic greeting is just a few clicks away, no matter how late you have left it. But prezzybox.com has gone that one step further. Buy one of its cards and you can have sweet treats such as Jaffa Cake slice, fizzy pick ’n’ mix, and lemon drizzle cake popped inside… Many happy returns indeed! Available for £11.99, prezzybox.com WATCH IT The Finest Hours (tomorrow, BBC2, 5.10pm) is a thrilling depiction of the most daring rescue in US Coast Guard history. It’s set in 1952, and Chris Pine plays Bernie Webber, a crewman sent on a suicidal mission during a devastating storm to save the survivors of a stricken oil tanker. Engineer Ray Sybert (Casey Affleck) galvanises the terrified crew and attempts to buy them some time. Chief Warrant Officer Daniel Cluff (Eric Bana), who oversees the lifeboat station at Chatham, Massachusetts, orders Bernie to assemble a threestrong team and attempt a rescue. The Finest Hours is a resolutely old-fashioned drama of gallantry at sea, that pays glowing tribute to real-life heroes. READ IT Live life on the veg with the limited edition sainsbury’s so organic Veg Box. The £7 boxes are available until October 13 and are packed with a variety of six different SO Organic vegetables. Sainsbury’s was the first UK supermarket to launch its own organic range more Author and musician Boff Whalley and his long-time friend British running champion Gary Divine are legendary. Boff is from the band Chumbawamba and infamous for throwing eggs at John Prescott. He has written several touring plays and large-scale musicals, working for Tate Britain, Manchester Museum, and most recently with Welsh National Opera. His latest book, Faster louder, tells the true story of how teenage punk Gary Divine, went from seemingly existing on a diet of cider, parties and loud music to rise to the top in the tough sport of fell running. The paperback from Great Northern Books is out now, RRP £9.99, and is also available on kindle. than 30 years ago and now offers more than 250 items. They are thinking inside the box to offer British produce including leeks, seasonal squash and hearty potatoes. Rebecca Sargent, from Sainsbury’s, says: “We want to showcase to our customers the best of our organic offering.”

30 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live Shop It Breaking news at www. Bristol .live lingerie to love Underwear drawer in need of a restock? we’ve got yoU covered 1 2 3 4 5 EMMA JohNSoN Fashion Editor 1 6 support team Enjoy comfort without compromising on support with this Daisy non-wire bra £24, Next 2 body beautiful This lace-trimmed all in one is too pretty to cover up, £29.99, Zara 3 mint source Stay comfy in this lace bralet, £12, Accessorize 7 4 petal powered Brighten up your undie offering with this Hazy Daisy Spectrum bra £40 and briefs, £28, Les Girls Les Boys 5 bring me flowers This floral triangle set is a bargain at £5, from primark 8 6 in the pink At these prices, you can fill up your underwear drawer. Left, rib-mould bras £12 (3pk), rib midi briefs £7 (3pk), right lace bralette £12 (3pk), lace briefs £7 (3pk), all Matalan 7 it’s seamless If you ditched your bra in lockdown this Anyday Anya bra is for you, £18, John Lewis 8 briefs encounter There’s nothing pants about this trio of knickers, £14.99, Lindex 9 9 simply the vest Two-pack lace trim cotton vests have added stretch for comfort, £8, Marks & Spencer 10 10 smooth operator This shapewear set is on offer reduced from £15 to £10.50, debenhams.com *All prices correct at time of going to press and subject to availability

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 31 studio album RI StudIo fRom RIveR ISland IS a collectIon of pRemIum StapleS and tImeleSS claSSIcS made to laSt. By EMMA JOHNSON Cream jumper £50, trousers £45 Check coat £100, cream jacket £65, jeans £50 All clothes RI studio collection, River Island and river island.com Men’s RooM ON THE RADAR ■ With many of us now working from both home and the office, luxury menswear retailer, Charles Tyrwhitt, has embraced the hybrid working week with its new Business of Life collection. Featuring everything from tailoring to shirts to knitwear, each piece from this ‘work anywhere wardrobe’ can be dressed up or down whether you are working from your home office, the sofa or back in the boardroom. Quilted gilet £129.95, non-iron chinos £69.95, non-iron shirt £69.95, merino sip-neck jumper £59.95, charlestyrwhitt.com ■ Award-winning British skincare brand The Gruff Stuff offers vegan, genderless and inclusive skincare using ingredients that are ethically Breaking news at www. Bristol .live and responsibly sourced. The Gruff Stuff All-In-1 Set, featuring a trio of face and body essentials packed with antioxidants and vitamins, is a great intro to the brand. Worth £71, get it priced £67 at mankind.co.uk ■ He was one of the standout stars of the Tokyo Olympics coming home with two gold medals and a silver and is soon to be seen in Strictly Come Dancing. And swimmer Adam Peaty, right, also has his own clothing range with Castore . The Castore X Adam Peaty collection features a range of activewear using technical fabrics to allow athletes to perform to their best ability. Green AP training top £68: sliders £30, castore.com We buy any house! Denim jacket £65, jeans £50, T-shirt £15, boots £55 WE BUY HOUSES FOR CASH Long cream coat £150, black T-shirt £16, trousers £45 Patterned shirt £35 Sell in days – or in your timescale No fees & no obligation Any condition or location NAPB approved & RICS regulated GET UP TO £30,000 CASH ADVANCE BEST PRICE PAID TAKe THREE Beard styling cream Savvy SPend SPLURGe L’Oreal Men Expert Barber Club Beard Hair Styling Cream (75ml) £7.49, fragrancedirect.co.uk Raw Naturals Beard Styling Cream (100ml) £12.99, feelunique.com Acqua di Parma Barbiere Styling Beard Cream (50ml) £27, escentual.com Call us FREE today for a cash offer available 24/7 0800 031 9071 goodhousemove.co.uk

32 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on Facebook /BRISTOL LIve FAsHiOn FOCus Animal texture hoops £25, trio bobble hoops £15, rectangular link chain bracelet £20, animal texture disc necklace £28, tiger eye orb necklace £25, clean metal signet ring £20 All items from the Orelia & Vick Hope jewellery collection at orelia.co.uk interlocking bangles £25, flat link curb chain necklace £15, snake chain necklace £22, open circle necklace £15, interlocking earrings £22, mini micro hoop earrings £12, clean metal huggie hoops £15, interlocking Russian rings £20, slim domed ring £15 A new HOpe Radio 1 dRivetime host and tv pResenteR vick hope has collaboRated with oRelia on a beautiful new jewelleRy collection. EMMA JOHNSON takes a look Chunky bamboo bracelet £25, bamboo circle necklace £28, satellite and snake layered necklace £25, bamboo interlocking earrings £25, clean metal signet ring £20, bevelled hoop earrings £25, slim domed ring £15 * Prices correct at time of going to print. While stocks last square charm necklace £25, square coin T-bar necklace £25, square signet ring £22, mini micro hoop earrings £12, baguette stone huggie hoops £25, slim domed ring £15 Chunky oval hoop earrings £18, satellite and flat curb bracelet £15, interlocking Russian rings £20, long link chain £25, mini padlock necklace £15, coin and frame necklace £20, mini micro hoop earrings £12

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 33 Breaking news at www. Bristol .live championing the environment Eco Future is the first 100% sustainable collection by sport and leisurewear favourite Champion. Featuring pieces that have a lower environmental impact, from the GOTS (Global organic textile standard) certified organic cotton used for the jersey sweatshirts, T-shirts and basics, to the embroidered signature “C” logo using recycled polyester, and the use of recycled and eco-friendly polybags in the packaging, everything has been carefully considered. The first drop of the timeless and gender-neutral collection, right, is available now in Champion’s flagship London store and at championstore.com, priced from £30 to £80. myleene Klass thandiwe newton plUS frEE EXclUSivE OK! vip BEAUTY And lifESTYlE mAgAzinE! # OKBEAUTYBOX Dua Lipa Keep it loose Madness may have sung about baggy trousers, but it’s all about baggy jeans for today’s stylish celebs. After the dominance of skinny jeans for what feels like forever, wide-legged relaxed denim is having a moment. For Myeleene Klass, a Thandiwe Newton jazzed up her denim with a triple dose of designer logos lace-trimmed blouse dressed up her bleachedout jeans. The radio presenter, 43, was the epitome of casual chic heading to work in London. Dua Lipa can always be relied upon to make a style statement and the 26-yearold singer looked fabulous as she made her way to a music studio in a checked Vivienne Westwood corset and super-loose black jeans. Finally, pictured arriving at a chat show interview in LA, Thandiwe Newton jazzed up her denim with a triple dose of designer logos. The Westworld star, 48, teamed her turned-up baggy jeans with a Chanel T-shirt and sparkly sandals, while carrying a Louis Vuitton holdall. Get their looks with these high street buys. SUBScriBE TOdAY And gET ThiS SignEd, limiTEd-EdiTiOn BEAUTY BOX cUrATEd BY SUpErmOdEl JOdiE Kidd fOr juSt £7.50 AvAilABlE OnlY WhilE STOcKS lAST! dr. PawPaw rich mocha Balm (full size) rrP £6.95 onLy £7.50* worth over £120 free p&p Monu Skin micellar Water (full size) rrP £23.95 London botanicaL LaboratorieS Bright me Up Serum (full size) rrP £55 revitaLaSh Advanced Eyelash conditioner (luxury sample size) rrP£31 eyeko Sport Waterproof mascara (luxury sample size) rrP £5 Brought to you by Blouse, £27.99, Zara; jeans, £24.99, H&M; sunglasses, £65, Quay Australia; sandals, £35, Birkenstock at Office Top, £4, New Look; jeans, £19.99, Mango at johnlewis. com; bag, £89.99, Tamarais at zalando.co.uk; sliders, £10.49, shein.co.uk Bustier, £21.99, Missguided at zalando.co.uk; jeans, £40, Monki; sunglasses, £6, Pretty Little Thing; trainers, £14.99, Ego SubScribe and Save today at okbeautybox.co.uk *£7.50 offer is only available to new customers. OK! Beauty Box subscription is £15 per month thereafter.

34 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live MoToRS Breaking news at www. Bristol .live Porsche dishes up its Big Mac The Porsche Macan GTS SUV looks very smart sporty suv brings back the goodwood old days GOODwOOD is an extremely quick race track with not a lot of room for run-off. If you crash at high speed you’ll hit something hard with a lot of energy. The instructor who was sat next to me after I drove the Porsche Macan Turbo around as fast as I could was either very brave, or mad. “I can tell after many years of doing this, who is putting me in mortal danger and who isn’t,” he explained afterwards. I was flattered but did wonder whether his barometer was playing up that day. The Porsche was hugely impressive. I couldn’t believe how easy it was to drive fast and how it felt almost like a sports car around the famous Sussex track. The experience – in 2014 when Porsche launched its smallest SUV – made me a Macan fan even though I don’t really like SUVs, especially very fast ones that are trying to be sports cars. The car then had a facelift and driving that particular model was very disappointing. But perhaps the latest version we’re testing today will put the Macan where it used to be in my estimation. This Macan GTS is another facelift – the car has never had a fullmodel change and won’t until 2023 when a fully electric Macan will be with us. COLIN GoodWin Motors Editor There is now no Turbo in the lineup – this GTS replaces it as the hottest Macan you can buy. In reality, this is really a jiggling of names and badges because the GTS has a mildly tweaked version of the Turbo engine and the new Macan S gets the engine that used to be in the GTS. A bit confusing. Anyway, the new GTS has a 2.9- litre twin-turbo petrol engine that produces 434bhp and drives through a 7-speed dual clutch transmission. Top speed 169mph and 0-62mph in 4.5sec. Economy is a thirsty 24.1mpg and considerably less if you hoof it along in this almost two-tonne car. Our left-hand drive test car looks THE FACTS Porsche Macan GTS SUV Price: £64,770 Engine: 2.9-litre six-cylinder, 434bhp Fuel consumption: 24.1mpg 0-62mph: 4.5secs either cool or blinged up, depending on your personal taste. I rather like it in this deep red although I could probably do without the same-coloured air vent surrounds inside the car. Outside there are very few changes to the car: the front bumper is a bit more upright, the indicators are higher up, LED headlamps are standard and at the back there’s a new diffuser. The Macan looks very smart in GTS guise. Another thing that is thrown in as standard with the GTS’s £64,770 price is air suspension. Porsche gives you a wide choice of driving modes but Comfort works exceptionally well. I have a regular route that I use for testing Porsches (that line should win me pretentious git of the year) that involves a bumpy A-road. This Macan tackled it well without loosening any fillings. The speed limit on this road is mainly 50mph with a bit of 60mph thrown in. Quick squirts up to these limits reveal an engine that sounds throaty and steering that’s very well weighted and accurate. I’d go as far to say that I’ve not driven many other hot SUVs that have better steering than the Macan GTS. Excusing the garish red trim around the air vents, which is an optional extra anyway, there’s the typical Porsche-like quality feel in the cabin. The large number of switches that used to live on the centre console have been replaced by touch sensitive pads that attract fingerprints and do nothing to make the car easier to operate. The reverse, in fact. Volkswagen is intent on removing all old-fashioned controls from its brands and that includes Porsche. I can’t fault the steering wheel though, it has a nice slim rim and isn’t festooned with buttons. This might be the last fast Porsche Macan I drive that isn’t fully electric. No doubt the electric Macan will be fast – faster than this one even. But I doubt it’ll have as much soul. THE RIVALS BMW X3 M Competition Has more power but costs substantially more. Overpriced for what it delivers. £84,765 Jaguar F-Pace SVR Fitted with fantastic supercharged V8 that has almost 550bhp. A great alternative to the GTS. £78,165 Mercedes-AMG GLC63 Mighty engine, mighty fast, mighty price. £90,360

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 35 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live Motors with Colin Goodwin Breaking news at www. Bristol .live As I’ve often declared on these pages, I like estate cars. They’re better to drive than an sUv thanks to a lower centre of gravity and are often more spacious. However, the future is not looking bright for estate car fans at the moment. Currently it is possible to buy only two fully-electric estates. One is the Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo which is a mighty fine machine but costs £81,500, and the other is the MG 5. You couldn’t get two more different machines. The Porsche is luxurious, full of leather, stylish and extremely fast. The MG 5 is quite basic inside, its plastic trim is a bit cheap and although it can do 0-62mph in 7.3sec (which is quite brisk) it couldn’t see where the Porsche had gone in a traffic light shootout. But there is one crucial area in which the humble MG 5 is very similar to the Porsche and that’s battery range. Originally launched just over a year ago, there’s now a new version called the MG Long Range. Fully charged, the car’s 57.7kWh battery gives it a range of 250 miles compared to 283 miles in the Taycan. This from a car that costs £26,495 after the PICG in its basic excite trim version. Move up to the exclusive, which Going the distance All-electric MG estAte cAn cover 250 Miles is the one we’ve been testing, and that goes up to £28,995. By electric car standards that’s extremely good value. Kia’s e-Niro, to get back to the real world after the Porsche, has a range of 180 miles for £30,000. Yes, the plastics inside are a bit cheap and cheerful, and some of the switches feel weak, but this is a car that has a 464 litre luggage area with the rear seats in place, sits adults comfortably in that rear seat and comes with a seven-year warranty. Although, like all MGs, the 5 is made in China, the UK engineering centre has an input into how the cars are set up for UK roads. The result of this approach is a car that is comfortable over bumps and is impressively quiet. You feel that you’re sitting slightly higher than you normally The MG 5 Long Range Exclusive would in an estate car or hatchback, particularly in the back where the seating position is in part dictated by the battery pack. It’s easy to find fault with the MG 5 Long Range. some of my fellow car critics have poured scorn on the car’s ambiguous and rather bland styling, and have stuck the knife into the basic interior. However, these are people who are probably not in the market for a tHE FACTS MG 5 Long range Exclusive Price: £28,995 Engine: Electric motor Power: 160PS Torque: 260Nm Top speed: 115mph 0-62mph: 7.3secs Range: 250 miles For: Range and value Against: Interior quality Sum up: No wonder MG is selling so many of them practical estate car that is so modestly priced. Only a fool could ignore the fact that the car’s range, which is a major concern with all fully-electric cars, beats all rivals at this price point. And as we’ve mentioned, many cars that are priced significantly above it. Free Issue oF magazIne Worth £1.70 hoW to claIm: Simply cut out the voucher and present it at any major retailer to get your free copy of The People’s Friend magazine. This offer is valid until Tuesday September 21 2021, while stocks last. Please read the terms and conditions on the voucher before redemption. For any queries relating to this promotion please email ceadmin@dcthomson.co.uk. Get your weekend off to a great start with this exclusive offer to claim the latest edition of The People’s Friend! If you’re in the mood for some feel-good reading, this issue has seven original short stories by favourite authors, and two exclusive serial instalments, plus a new episode of the much-loved soap, “Riverside”, by bestselling author Glenda Young From expert health advice to practical gardening hints and tips from regular columnist Alexandra Campbell and puzzles/brain teasers to keep your mind active, the “Friend” is the perfect companion to spend an hour or two with – just sit back, put your feet up and relax! So make sure you don’t miss out and visit your local retailer to get your free copy!

36 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live COMMENT Breaking news at www. Bristol .live Letters&Opinion Access issues will make build the best free show in Bristol WhAT ARe Bristol City planners paid to do? Just over three years ago they granted permission to a developer to build six apartments, over two storeys, on the flat roof at the rear of the gym that has its frontage on Shirehampton high Street. The build to be effected from a narrow lane/private road that leaves Pembroke Road in Shirehampton and almost immediately has a sharp right-angled turn to run along to the site at the end of the lane. The lane has the rear land of shops that front the high Street to one side and the rear gardens of private residences on Pembroke Road on the other. Now that, at last, preparations for the work have begun, the planners further required the developer to submit a build plan to them for approval. The plan submitted has elements originating in Fairyland! Most shocking is the developer’s claim that materials will be supplied to the site by lorries of up to six-wheeler size which, after delivery, will execute a three-point turn and exit the lane frontwards onto Pembroke Road. That this is impossible has already been demonstrated; a fourwheeled lorry arrived from a Portsmouth firm with a load of metal tubings to construct a safety barrier round the edge of the flat roof; it just could not negotiate the bend and had to set off on its three-hour return journey to Portsmouth with its load undelivered! Yet, when I outlined the flaws and other inaccuracies in the build plan to the planning enforcement department they told me that they proposed to “take no further action”. And the planners have now approved the impossible build plan. (Another vehicle, delivering portable toilets to the site, damaged the gate posts of the house on the right-angled corner.) So, anyone who wants to see the best “free show” in Bristol is encouraged to come along to Shirehampton in the coming months to watch these vehicles attempt to access the site – let alone attempt, within the narrow confines of the land adjacent to the site and the narrow private lane, a “three-point turn”! Bill Patten By email Ready for electrification ✒ The announcement on September 1 to electrify the 14-mile line between Bolton and Wigan provides hope that a similar announcement will soon be made to electrify Filton Bank to Bristol Temple Meads through to Bath Spa and thence to the already electrified Great Western main line. PICTURE OF THE DAY Duchess Pond, by Julian Low » Send your photos to pictures@ bepp.co.uk electrification was deferred in 2016 as it was argued that Bristol and Bath could be served by bimodal trains (electric trains with heavy diesel motors slung underneath). ever since Nikola Tesla devised high-voltage multi-phase alternating current as an optimum form of power transfer, the rail industry the world over has been converging on 25kV AC as the method of choice to power trains, the UK is no exception to this fact. Despite this logic that Brunel, were he alive today, could easily follow, Bristol Temple Meads is a frustrating four miles from the electrified main line serving London and Cardiff. The excuses for continued deferment of electrification are fast running out. » The remodelling of Bristol east Junction that was due to be completed on September 3 provides a new and more efficient layout, including an extra line that removes a bottleneck and permits the four tracks of Filton Bank to work to near full capacity (true full capacity requires electrification). » The challenge of electrifying the Severn Tunnel has been solved, proven by the spotting of Londonbased electric-only GWR electrostars in the Welsh capital. » electrification will make it easier to serve any proposed new stations in the Bristol area, due to improved acceleration and quieter trains. » Much of the bridge and gantry raising and track lowering work has already been carried out. Developments in South Wales suggest that any remaining bridge raising could be avoided by using high-voltage resistant paint applied to the underside of bridges, saving time, money, and disruption. » The delicate issue of wiring up through Bath had been resolved with concerned stakeholders before deferment in 2016. To put it simply, Bristol Temple Meads and Bath Spa are now ovenready for electrification. The benefits of electrification for Bristol, Bath and the West Country are enormous, and the completion of Bristol east Junction and other civil works puts the onus on Bristol’s and its surrounding area’s political leadership to press the Government to commit to ending Bristol’s Alcatraz-like isolation from country’s electrified rail network. Removing its historic carbon dependency for transport for good. Eric Wildman Madrid friday £1,000 AB42 2YL BD2 4PN CR2 0DN DE65 5FL DH8 7PL KY1 2BE L35 0LS LA12 9BU LN3 4ND NE3 2HR for every ticket in these winning postcodes RH1 5SP S61 1BQ SA34 0XU SE17 3JX SN5 8HY SP4 7WF SP5 4BE SS7 2PQ TQ12 5RH YO32 2PJ write to Email: epletters@bepp.co.uk Until coronavirus restrictions are lifted we are unable to receive letters by post SubScriptionS & home delivery Website: www.newspapersubs.co.uk/bhp Telephone: 0333 202 8000 Email: homedelivery@localworld.co.uk get in touch Switchboard: 0117 934 3000 Newspaper sales: 0117 934 3190 Advertising Telephone: 0117 934 3000 Email: ads@b-nm.co.uk Craig Sheppard: 07825 592949 craig.sheppard@reachplc.com Afisa Ahmed: 07785 658503 Newsdesk: epnews@bepp.co.uk Newsdesk: 0117 934 3331 Get everything you need to know about where you live with our app or via the InYourArea.co.uk All you have to do is enter a postcode.

Follow us on instagram /Bristollive WEATHER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 37 Breaking news at www.Bristol.live Weather Around the Country Today’s Weather Four-Day Outlook Birmingham Bristol Cardiff Carlisle Exeter Gloucester Leeds Liverpool London Manchester Norwich Nottingham Plymouth Swansea Friday Saturday °C °F °C °F cloudy 20 68 pcloudy 20 68 cloudy 21 70 showers 20 68 cloudy 20 68 cloudy 20 68 cloudy 20 68 rain 19 66 cloudy 19 66 showers 19 66 cloudy 21 70 cloudy 21 70 cloudy 20 68 pcloudy 21 70 pcloudy 21 70 cloudy 19 66 cloudy 22 72 pcloudy 22 72 cloudy 20 68 pcloudy 20 68 cloudy 21 70 pcloudy 21 70 cloudy 20 68 showers 21 70 rain 18 64 cloudy 18 64 cloudy 19 66 cloudy 19 66 Around the World Amsterdam Beijing Corfu Majorca Mexico City Moscow New Delhi New York Paris Rio Rome Sydney Tokyo Friday Saturday °C °F °C °F overcast 19 66 cloudy 20 68 sunny 27 81 cloudy 23 74 pcloudy 27 80 overcast 26 78 rain 27 81 rain 27 81 rain 25 77 rain 22 72 cloudy 11 51 sunny 12 54 rain 27 80 rain 34 93 rain 23 74 rain 24 75 pcloudy 23 74 cloudy 22 72 rain 23 74 pcloudy 27 80 rain 28 82 rain 29 84 sunny 18 64 rain 22 72 rain 22 72 rain 27 81 sponsored by Sun & Moon Sunrise Sunset Moonrise Moonset Truro 6:50 a.m. 7:21 p.m. 6:34 p.m. 1:54 a.m. Almanac Cardiff Bideford Plymouth www.crwindows.co.uk Skies will be partly cloudy to cloudy today with isolated rain. Afternoon highs will range from 18 to 21C. Gloucester Exeter Bristol Taunton Sep. 20 Sep. 28 Oct. 6 Oct. 12 Full Last New First Bideford Exeter Taunton Yesterday's High (°C/°F) 22/72 22/72 20/68 Yesterday's Low (°C/°F) 13/55 13/55 14/57 Yesterday's Precip 0.00" 0.00" 0.00" Bristol Gloucester Truro Yesterday's High (°C/°F) 20/68 22/72 22/72 Yesterday's Low (°C/°F) 13/55 12/54 12/54 Yesterday's Precip 0.00" 0.00" 0.00" High Tides Saturday Cloudy. 21°C/ 70°F 13°C/ 55°F Sunday Isolated light showers. 18°C/ 64°F 13°C/ 55°F Monday Cloudy. 19°C/ 66°F 11°C/ 52°F Tuesday Cloudy. 19°C/ 66°F 11°C/ 52°F Friday Saturday Milford Haven 5.5 4:06 a 5.9 4:39 p 6.0 5:14 a 6.5 5:36 p Swansea 7.3 4:09 a 7.9 4:47 p 8.0 5:19 a 8.6 5:45 p Cardiff 9.4 4:45 a 10.0 5:23 p 10.3 5:56 a 11.1 6:23 p Weston 9.1 4:29 a 9.7 5:02 p 10.0 5:35 a 10.7 6:01 p Minehead 8.1 4:11 a 8.7 4:43 p 8.9 5:15 a 9.5 5:41 p Padstow 5.9 3:12 a 6.3 3:46 p 6.3 4:21 a 6.8 4:44 p Newlyn 4.5 2:36 a 4.8 3:03 p 4.8 3:41 a 5.2 4:00 p Falmouth 4.1 3:11 a 4.5 3:36 p 4.4 4:15 a 4.8 4:30 p Plymouth 4.4 3:32 a 4.7 3:59 p 4.7 4:42 a 5.1 4:58 p Torquay 3.9 4:05 a 4.2 4:32 p 4.2 5:14 a 4.6 5:30 p CALLING ALL PROUD PARENTS! We want to feature your little one on their first day at school in our special First Class photo supplement on Thursday 14th October 2021 Upload your first class photo today at www.bristolpost.co.uk/firstclass In Association with Terms and Conditions Apply

38 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 NEws / NATIoNAl Catherine Cargill receiving one of the first Covid-19 booster jabs, administered at Croydon University Hospital MINUTE BRIEFING Travel rules overhaul aN overhauL of the rules for international travel is expected to be announced today. it has been reported that the green and amber lists will be merged to form one category of low-risk countries, while the number of destinations on the red list will be reduced. There is also speculation that fully vaccinated arrivals will no longer need to take a pre-departure lateral flow test or a post-arrival PCr test. This would save travellers around £100 per trip. Ambulance crisis Nicola Sturgeon has apologised for long ambulance waiting times, announcing that the military could be brought in to help with the backlog in Scotland. The First Minister was questioned about the death of Gerald Brown, 65, from Glasgow, who died after waiting for 40 hours for an ambulance. She said the issues in the service would continue “for a period” as pressure caused by the pandemic continues. Dorries under fire NadiNe dorries faced comments about her “long anti-gay rights voting record” as she made her first Commons appearance since becoming Culture Secretary. The SNP’s culture spokesman John Nicolson joked it was “just as well there are no homosexuals in the arts sector” as he made reference to the issue when welcoming Ms dorries to her new post. Mr Nicolson said: “Now is perhaps not the time to ponder her long anti-gay rights voting record.” Morgan back on TV PierS Morgan is to join News corp and Fox News Media in a deal which will see him host a new global TV show, it has been announced. The 56-year-old will also publish two weekly columns online for the New York Post and the Sun. North’s ‘brain drain’ The North of england and coastal areas are experiencing a “brain drain” of university graduates as many move to London and other cities with better labour market opportunities, a report suggests. Graduates are 10 percentage points more likely to have moved away from the area where they grew up than otherwise similar non-graduates by the age of 27, an institute for Fiscal Studies (iFS) report says. First covid-19 booster jabs given a MaTerNiTY support worker has spoken of her joy after becoming one of the first people in the UK to receive a covid-19 booster jab. catherine cargill, who works at croydon University Hospital in south london, said the vaccination means she can carry on working, studying and spending time with her family. The NHS officially launched its coronavirus booster campaign on yesterday, which will see millions of eligible people offered a Pfizer vaccine, or in some cases a half-dose of Moderna. They include frontline NHS and social care staff, anyone aged 50 and over, and those under 50 with health conditions that put them at risk of severe covid. People are likely to be offered their booster jab in the same order of priority as was set down during the initial vaccination campaign. Ms cargill said: “i’ve just had my booster vaccine, my Pfizer vaccine, and i have had it ahead of the winter season to make sure i am protected, to make sure i can carry on working, i can carry on spending time with my family, and so i can carry on with my studies. i would definitely want to encourage you to get your booster shot when you are invited to do that.” Hospital hubs have started inoculating frontline health and care workers in Wales and england, as well as identifying eligible patients, with GP-led local vaccination services to follow in the coming days. Nuclear sub pact ‘not adversarial’ Boris Johnson has insisted Britain’s new defence pact with the United states and Australia is not intended as an “adversarial” move against China. in a ground-breaking agreement, dubbed Aukus, the three allies agreed to co-operate on the development for the first time of a fleet of nuclear-powered submarines for the Australian navy. The move, widely interpreted as an attempt to check China’s growing military assertiveness in the indo-Pacific, was swiftly condemned by Beijing as a “geopolitical gaming tool”. But in a Commons statement, the Prime Minister said that, while the agreement to share nuclear submarine technology with Australia represented a “huge increase” in the levels of trust between the three countries, it was not “revolutionary”. “Aukus is not intended to be adversarial towards any other power,” he said. “it merely reflects the close relationship that we have with the United states and with Australia, the shared values that we have and the sheer level of trust between us that enables us to go to this extraordinary extent of sharing nuclear technology in the way Nuclear submarine HMS Vengeance that we are proposing to do. “it is true that this is a huge increase in the levels of trust between the UK, the Us and Australia. “it is a fantastic defence technology partnership that we are building. But it is not actually revolutionary.” in Beijing, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said the move “seriously undermined regional peace and stability” while casting doubt on Australia’s commitment to the nuclear non-proliferation treaty. “The export of highly sensitive nuclear submarine technology to Australia by the Us and the UK proves once again that they are using nuclear exports as a tool for geopolitical game and adopting double standards. “This is extremely irresponsible,” he said. He said the three allies needed to abandon their “outdated Cold War zero-sum mentality” otherwise they would “only end up shooting themselves in the foot”. Defence secretary Ben Wallace insisted the Chinese were “wrong” to see the agreement as an attempt to engage in a new cold war. However, he acknowledged that China’s military expansion - and its involvement in a series of disputes with neighbouring nations over navigation rights in the south China sea - inevitably led to a “reaction” elsewhere. “China has launched on a huge investment in its military and its surface fleet and aircraft. it is probably one of the largest armed forces on the planet,” he told the BBC radio 4 Today programme. “China is obviously engaged in a number of disputes around freedom of navigation. That just causes a reaction elsewhere.” The pact was announced in a joint statement on Wednesday by Mr Johnson, Us president Joe Biden and Australian prime minister scott Morrison.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 39 Crew member Jared Isaacman, right, waves to family members at Cape Canaveral as he arrives for the historic flight JOhN RAOUx NEws / wORLd Lift-off at the Kennedy Space Center (JOe RAeDle/ GeTTy iMAGeS) First totally civilian crew enters Space GLOBAL BRIEFING ‘New’ Van Gogh on show A drawing newly attributed to Vincent van Gogh that has never been displayed publicly before is going on show at the Amsterdam museum named after the Dutch master. The “new” Van Gogh, called Study For ‘Worn Out’, from November 1882, is part of a Dutch private collection. The artist was drawing people over and over again to improve his portrait skills. SPACEX has sent the first-ever all civilian-crewed rocket into orbit from the Kennedy Space Centre. The company’s first private flight blasted off with two contest winners, a health care worker and their rich sponsor. It was the first time a rocket streaked toward orbit without any professional astronauts on board. SpaceX’s recycled rocket soared on Wednesday night from the launch pad in Florida which has been used by the company’s three previous astronaut flights for Nasa. But this time, the Dragon capsule aimed for an unusually high orbit, 100 miles higher than the International Space Station. The Dragon capsule’s two men and two women are looking to spend three days circling the world, before splashing down off the coast of Florida. EU aims to boost Indo-Pacific links The european Union has unveiled a new strategy for boosting economic, political and defence ties in the Indo- Pacific, just hours after the United States, Britain and Australia announced a new security alliance likely to reshape their relations with the region. The eU believes the region, which stretches from India and China through Japan to Southeast Asia and eastwards past New Zealand to the Pacific, is growing in importance given its rising population and political weight, its role in global trade and security and its impact on climate change. It says the aim of the strategy is to strengthen and expand economic relations while reinforcing the respect of international trade rules, help partners fight and adapt to climate change and biodiversity loss, and boost co-operation on healthcare so least-developed countries can better prepare for crises like the coronavirus pandemic. The plan, which comes amid rising US/China tensions, is also a bid to improve maritime security and ensure safe passage through sea lanes. The eU hopes it will result in more naval deployments to the region by european countries. Transport and energy ties would also be boosted. The bloc is already the top investor, leading development co-operation partner and one of the biggest traders in the Indo-Pacific. But it wants to step up its involvement given the rise in regional geopolitical tensions which are hurting trade and supply chains and undermining security. The 27-nation bloc’s relations with China are currently at a low point, but the eU insists that the move is not aimed at countering Beijing’s influence, even though the strategy does foresee the deepening of trade and investment ties with Taiwan. “On many areas such as climate and biodiversity, China’s co-operation is essential,” eU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell said. “Our strategy is one of co-operation, not confrontation. I think it’s important to stress this sentence: EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell our strategy is built on the will to cooperate, not to confront it.” The new security alliance between the US, Britain and Australia, which is aimed at equipping Australia with nuclear-powered submarines, is already seen as a provocative move by China. Beijing believes it will undermine regional stability and jeopardise efforts to halt the spread of nuclear weapons. The alliance has also angered France for resulting in the termination of a lucrative submarine contract with Australia. Asked about this, Mr Borrell said that “these events show the importance of the region and the need for us to engage there”. Mr Borrell lamented that the europeans had not been informed about the security alliance. eU foreign ministers are expected to discuss the matter when they meet next month. Joko Widodo President in court over air quality AN indonesian court has ruled that President Joko Widodo and six other top officials have neglected citizens’ rights to clean air and ordered them to improve the poor air quality in the capital. A three-judge panel at the Central Jakarta District Court came down on the side of 32 residents who filed a lawsuit two years ago against Mr Widodo and the ministers for environment, health and home affairs, as well as the provincial governors of Jakarta, Banten and West Java. The judges voted unanimously in favour of the complainants under the Coalition for the Clean Air initiative. Presiding judge Saifuddin Zuhri ordered the seven officials to tighten national air quality standards so they are “sufficient to protect human health, the environment and ecosystems”. Emissions ‘at 2019 levels’ FOSSil fuel emissions have bounced back after the pandemic, leaving the world far off course to tackle climate change, the United Nations has warned. A new report from UN agencies warns that global emissions are back up to around the same levels they were in 2019, after a dramatic drop in 2020 due to Covid-19 lockdowns and restrictions.

40 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /BRistol live Listen Up Breaking news at www. BRistol .live the hunt is on There’s lots to enjoy in this week’s trio of featured podcasts, from a prison break drama to chats with celebrity siblings and a dive into wild swimming LAURA DaVis Podcasts Editor hunted The opening of this podcast – rich tones warning you that it’s intended for a mature audience – are likely to sound familiar. That’s because it’s from Dick Wolf, the executive producer of TV drama Law and Order, which features a similar caution at the beginning. Parker Posey stars as deputy US marshal Emily Barnes on the hunt for four escapees from a maximum security prison in Texas. We hear the action from both sides as they outwit police to vanish out of state – and her increasingly desperate efforts to track them. Barnes is instantly likeable and there is some effort to flesh out the fugitives’ characters, but this is ultimately an exciting chase that leaves you wanting to know more about the people involved. Where to start: The story ramps up within seconds of episode one starting, as prison guards discover a colleague has been attacked by the escaped convicts. Relatively Usually the longest relationships we have in our lives are those with our siblings. They are often among the first people to hold us when we’re born and they have more influence on shaping our characters throughout childhood than almost anyone else. In this enlightening podcast, host Catherine Carr brings a set of brothers and sisters together – interviewing them at the same time as well as separately – to discuss the roles they play in each other’s lives. Among them are novelist Nick Hornby and his sister Gill, who escaped into reading as their father started being more and more absent, and radio star Nicky Campbell and his birth sister Esther Cameron, who met for the first time as adults. Carr also explores what it’s like to be a single child, with former Woman’s Hour presenter Jenny Murray. Where to start: It’s got to be with wildlife campaigner Chris and fashion designer Jenny Packham, whose very different personalities have given each Siblings: Jenny and Chris Packham other just what they needed. Actress Parker Posey stars in Hunted the tidal yeaR Wild swimming has become more and more popular as people have started to appreciate the healing power of nature. Freya Bromley talks with those who wouldn’t be without a splash outdoors in cold water, such as singer-songwriter Maruika Hackman, whose creative process is fired by dips in London Fields Lido, and ‘The Wild Swimming Brothers’ Calum, Robbie and Jack Hudson, who spent nine days swimming the River Eden. Where to start: Author Jessica J Lee was heartbroken in Berlin as a student and decided to get to know the region by swimming in a different lake every week – a total of 52 – and ended up discovering as much about herself. ■ All shows featured this week are available on all the usual podcast apps GET YOUR FAVOURITE PAPER AT HALF PRICE * ORDER YOUR COPY DELIVERED STRAIGHT TO YOUR DOOR OR SUBSCRIBE TO PURCHASE AT A RETAILER OF YOUR CHOICE AND YOU WILL SAVE 50% THERE ARE TWO EASY WAYS TO YOUR SUBSCRIPTION TO CLAIm THIS GREAT OFFER 1. You can order online at newspapersubs.co.uk/BHP It’s a quick and simple process that can be done 24 hours a day. Enter the offer code DAILYCP21 when prompted. 2. If you would prefer to speak to someone, please call us on 0333 202 8000 and one of our customer care advisers will be happy to assist you to arrange your home delivery or retail subscription. Don’t forget to mention the offer code DAILYCP21 to claim your additional discount. If you want to arrange home delivery from a local newsagent, the 50% discount is also available using the same offer code as above and you can give the retail subscription vouchers we send you to the newsagent as payment. If you have any other questions, please email newspapersalesteam@reachplc.com Terms and conditions: This offer is for new customers only and redeemable by direct debit. NEWS COLLECTED: *The price is £2.70 per week (50% discount) for the first 13 weeks and then £4.32 per week (20% discount) moving forward. NEWS DELIVERED *The price is £3.95 per week (50% discount) for the first 13 weeks and then £5.57 per week (20% discount) moving forward. After this period you will be given a 20% discount unless you decide to cancel. Offer ends: 31/10/2021 *Offer details correct at the time of printing.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 41 Food fight! No more fuN aNd games as Celebrity masterChef gets dowN to the last three CoNtestaNts FROM the utter madness of Su Pollard’s creations to Joe Swash’s total chaos in the kitchen and Katie Price nearly flipping her food onto the ceiling, this has been a delicious series of celebrity mishaps. It’s all got serious now however, as only three remain in the grand final, so larking about has been replaced by focus and fancy food. After a week that has included elevating the humble pie, impressing a Chef’s Table hosted by Tom Kerridge and putting their all into a personal dish, the cream of the crop are left. Joe Swash, Kadeena Cox and Megan McKenna have CELEBRITY MASTERCHEF BBC1, 9pm knocked out the competition and are all vying for the crown. Only one challenge stands in their way. They have two hours to cook and present a faultless three-course meal for final judgement by John Torode and Gregg Wallace. All of them have the eye of the tiger. “It’s time to show everyone I’m the real PICK OF THE DAY The Cream rises: Megan McKenna, Joe Swash and Kadeena Cox are still standing Judges John Torode and gregg Wallace deal,” says Megan, while Kadeena says she’s “ready and focused”. Joe says he’s going for the treble – jungle champion, ice skating champion, MasterChef champion. Megan, wearing her lucky socks, begins work on scallops, duck and a lemon tart. Joe is making an onion and tomato tart, coq au vin and a strawberry meringue dessert. Kadeena works on a seafood starter, with Caribbean goat curry pies and a choux pastry pud. But it will all come down to John and Gregg’s taste buds in the end... TonighT’s TV SEX EDUCATION Netflix The opening scenes of this third, longawaited season get straight down to business. It’s a hilarious montage of sexual encounters, all set to The Rubinoo’s I Think We’re Alone Now. This comedy drama has become a cult hit, beginning with focus on teenager Otis (Asa Butterfield, above), who is mostly mortified that his mother Dr Jean Milburn (a glorious Gillian Anderson) is an extremely candid sex therapist. The school is still reeling from last year’s chlamydia outbreak and the discovery – and shutting down - of Otis and his friend Maeve’s on-campus sex clinic. As a result, another student has taken it upon himself to run his own clinic, despite having zero knowledge. BY sara Wallis THE MORNING SHOW Apple TV+ Jennifer Aniston and Reese Witherspoon return for season two of this hit US drama, which tackles workplace power dynamics. Picking up after the explosive events of the season one finale, which saw the co-anchors on The Morning Show tell some hard truths about the toxic, misogynistic culture at the network, this follows UBA as it tries to emerge from the wreckage. A flashforward reveals that Bradley (Witherspoon, pictured) is now co-anchor with new guy Eric, while Alex (Aniston) is holed up in a secluded lodge in Maine writing her memoir. A stellar co-cast includes Billy Crudup, Steve Carell and Julianna Margulies as a news anchor. SOAP WaTCh CORONATION STREET ITV, 7.30pm & 8.30pm Alya, pictured, is stressed when the food delivery is late. As Elaine tries to placate the diners, Alya tries to solve the problem. But things get worse when a customer points at a tarantula crawling across a table. When Phill drops his car off at the garage, a jealous Tyrone searches the car, hoping to find something to discredit him. As the row over Norris’s funeral escalates, Mary announces she’s stepping down and Freda can sort out the funeral herself. EASTENDERS BBC1, 8pm Ruby is waiting for the results of her pregnancy test – she checks it and wells up. Later, Martin confronts her about why she has been lying to him. Will Ruby come clean that she sent Stacey down? Tiffany takes the opportunity of being boxing partners with Dotty to punch her in the stomach, then a fight breaks out between them. Rainie is agitated as she and Stuart wait for Bernie to go to a scan. It seems something is up. Tiffany hits Dotty EMMERDALE ITV, 7pm Rhona tries to talk to Marlon, pictured, but he’s fuming after the assault incident with Brenda – and then a police car arrives. April talks to the cop about the bullying. Bob is emotional at having to finally face his failings as a father. He tries to talk to Marlon but tensions soon run high and their family rift seems unrepairable. Moira tries to convince Matty compensation is the way forward, but Cain isn’t convinced as Chas doesn’t have the money.

42 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on Facebook /BRISTOL.LIve TONIGHT’S TELEVISION

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 43 Breaking news at www.Bristol.live

44 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live Puzzles & stars Breaking news at www. Bristol .live Cryptic crossword Quick crossword Gogen 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 13 14 8 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Stuck on today’s puzzle? Call 0905 789 4220 to hear individual clues or the full solution. Calls cost 80p per minute plus network extras. Service Provider: Spoke Ltd, helpline 0333 202 3390 YESTERDAY’S SOLUTIONS 17/09/2021 Across: 1 Deliberation; 7 Mined; 8 Clear; 9 Run; 10 Footnotes; 11 Exhale; 12 Equate; 15 Operative; 17 Boa; 18 Right; 19 Eider; 21 Secret Police. Down: 1 Divorce court; 2 Ban; 3 Red-hot; 4 Technique; 5 Overt; 6 Crossexamine; 7 Month; 10 Film actor; 13 Amber; 14 Divest; 16 Eagle; 20 Duo. YESTERDAY’S SOLUTIONS Across: 3 Strip; 9 Closer; 10 Tailor; 11 Widen; 12 Unit; 15 Malice; 17 Recalls; 19 Nod; 20 Eider; 22 Abuts; 24 Aesop; 25 Ether; 27 Old; 29 Singlet; 32 Alarms; 34 Note; 35 Italy; 37 Throne; 38 Tender; 39 Apron. Insert letters to form the listed words, moving between adjacent cells horizontally, vertically or diagonally in any direction. Insert all the remaining letters of the alphabet (except Z) in the grid so all the listed words are spelt out in this way. 1 L O C K J P H Y A W F E M S V X U D I B ACROSS 1. Dirt up, foul back (6) 4. Being dressed, returns worn cover to bed (6) 9. Place teacher – to keep controlling eye on 21 across? (7,6) 10. Unmated, and wild about it! (7) 11. Deliver the harvest (5) 12. Peg by pastime (5) 14. Proper way to help (5) 18. Puller of height? (5) 19. Gambler is a pinhead thruster (7) 21. Currently charged to educate – running on preconceived lines (8,5) 22. Take the plunge, and cause a sensation (6) 23. Showing spots of meanness? (6) ACROSS 3. Remove dirt from (5) 8. Cures (5) 10. Pixie (5) 11. By way of (3) 12. Gives out cards (5) 13. Strengthen (7) 15. Fertile spot (5) 18. Male offspring (3) 19. Acknowledge with praise (6) 21. Down payment (7) 22. Regrets (4) 23. Masculine (4) 24. Book of words (7) 26. Noisy quarrel (6) 29. Auction item (3) 31. Fortune-telling cards (5) 32. Metropolis (7) 34. Boy’s name (5) 35. Vigour, informally (3) 36. Flying toys (5) 37. Hereditary units (5) 38. Walking pole (5) DOWN 1. Stiff actor? Sop up and add the total (6) 2. Drawing a circle. Engine driver needing no 9 across, outmoded by 21 across (8,5) 3. I’d got one honour, so to speak (5) 5. The headshrinker has nasty latent complex – but not under canvas! (7) 6. Making sheep fritters to breach the enemy? (9,4) 7. Unhorse? What a laugh! (6) 8. A sonnet to a Pole (5) 13. Scolds wild bear setup (7) 15. Germs around Tynehead produces horsepower (6) 16. Health resort in the country (5) 17. Like a trademark, it shows spirit (6) 20. Unite? Unravel it (5) DOWN 1. English county (5) 2. Spectacles (7) 4. Look lasciviously (4) 5. At sea (6) 6. Of the nose (5) 7. Characteristic (5) 9. Feel unwell (3) 12. Indicates, designates (7) 14. Summit (3) 16. Girl’s name (5) 17. Cut off (5) 19. Like, resembling (7) 20. A sketch (5) 21. Exclude (5) 23. Reasons (7) 24. Most recent (6) 25. Policeman, informally (3) 27. Of rabies (5) 28. Manages (5) 30. Desert animal (5) 32. Prison room (4) 33. Metallic element (3) Down: 1 Occur; 2 Topic; 3 Sew; 4 Triple; 5 Item; 6 Panacea; 7 Plain; 8 Greed; 13 Netball; 14 Taste; 16 Coronet; 18 Sides; 21 Reign; 23 Stamina; 26 Rialto; 27 Oasts; 28 Dairy; 30 Lords; 31 Tears; 33 Step; 36 Yen. T R Q N G BINDS EPOCH EXTRUDING FUMED HEY LOCKJAW PHYSIQUE SWAY VIM YAMS A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y 2 F B G P S I R W O Q K E X U V Codeword This puzzle has no clues. Instead, every number printed in the grid represents a letter, with the same number always representing the same letter. For example, if 8 turns out to be a V, you can write in V wherever a square contains 8. Using your knowledge of words, complete the puzzle. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 C A Need a little help getting started? Then call 0901 293 6261 to hear four random extra letter clues. Or text CODE and send to 64343 to receive 4 clues. Calls and texts cost £1 plus any network extras. Service Provider: Spoke Ltd, helpline 0333 202 3390 YESTERDAY’S SOLUTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 D A R O E V Y Z L C M Q H 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 I G P S X B T N J F U K W Split Decision Cross out one of the two letters in each divided square to reveal a completed crossword grid. B C I O R T N E S D L D N A M L P E H H U Y T C H N U N E E I O D S N R T N T V C R B I O O A Z S E T BIKE EXACTLY FRENCH GREW JAUNTY MANE POUND POWER SQUANDER VOWEL A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y J YESTERDAY’S SOLUTIONS C L A S S R N W E A G L E A R A M A Y O R YESTERDAY’S SOLUTIONS V B H R P J O A W G M L C U N X I E K Q T Y F D S J Q G T R C U B I V M A X E H Y P W N D S K L O F

ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 45 FOllOw uS ON FAcebOOk /BRISTOL LIve LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO In association with teamdogs.co.uk breAkiNg NewS At www. BRISTOL .LIve SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES Sudoku 2 1 6 9 6 2 8 4 2 9 8 6 6 5 YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU: Easy Circlegram Niner 9 3 9 7 5 6 2 4 3 9 1 7 8 5 1 5 9 2 6 8 4 7 3 9 1 7 8 3 2 5 4 6 9 6 7 Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9, and so must each 3 x 3 box. EASY 1 4 2 3 1 6 7 9 4 8 7 1 6 2 4 1 4 8 1 5 7 8 3 9 4 2 8 6 7 5 6 3 9 1 4 2 2 6 3 4 8 7 9 7 4 3 5 1 5 8 1 9 2 6 8 4 5 2 6 3 7 9 6 5 1 4 3 1 2 7 9 8 YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU: Hard 3 2 1 8 7 4 1 3 9 5 5 7 7 2 3 8 4 5 6 9 1 3 8 2 9 7 4 1 5 6 5 3 7 4 6 9 2 1 8 5 6 2 HARD 1 7 4 9 5 8 6 1 4 9 5 6 8 3 2 6 9 1 7 5 8 7 3 2 4 6 9 4 1 7 5 8 5 1 2 3 6 2 7 3 4 8 9 9 1 8 6 4 2 7 3 2 8 5 1 4 6 5 7 9 3 Replace the question mark with a letter so that the letters within the circle can be rearranged to form words with a common theme. What are the three words, and the letter represented by the question mark? U O M B U U O L S L ? E A T E H F R YESTERDAY’S SOLUTIONS The letter represented by the question mark is C. Cabbage, cucumber, broccoli, all vegetables. Alphamuddle Wordsquare Rearrange the letters in the top grid to make five words that read both across and down. Five letters have been placed in the bottom grid to start you off. M E T E S T O H T E D S M E D E R E E R S M ARIES ARIES SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES RUSSELL GRANT LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO ARIES TAURUS GEMINI LEO LEO CANCER VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO SCORPIO VIRGO LIBRA arIEs March 21–April 20 SAGITTARIUS SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES If you have no set plans right now, you CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO TAURUS GEMINI CANCER ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS (80p/min PISCES + network TaUrUs April 21-May 21 GEMINI May 22-June 21 caNcEr June 22-July 23 lEo July 24-Aug 23 scorPIo Oct 24-Nov22 SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO (80p/min + network (80p/min + network LEO VIRGO LIBRA access SCORPIO charge) For more call 0905 789 4278 access charge) LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER LEO VIRGO SAGITTARIUS LIBRA CAPRICORN SCORPIO AQUARIUS PISCES LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES Scan from SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN LEO AQUARIUS VIRGO SAGITTARIUS PISCES LIBRA CAPRICORN SCORPIO AQUARIUS DINGBATS®, PISCES 2009: vector trace ARIES relying TAURUS DINGBATS® on you GEMINI 1987 in the workplace CANCER aren’t let SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES DINGBATS® original logotype, 1987 game board ARIES E E M O T E O C H R T H I E ARIES E R E C L E F T N M E T E R ARIES ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER TAURUS GEMINI CANCER ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER positive a way as you possibly can. LEO VIRGO ARIES LIBRA TAURUS SCORPIO GEMINI CANCER ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER LEO LIBRA SCORPIO VIRGO L E F T Y LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN LEO AQUARIUS VIRGO PISCES LIBRA SCORPIO ARIES LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER F ind as many words as possible using the letters in the grid. Each word must use the central letter and at least 3 others, and letters may be used only once. You cannot use plurals, foreign words or proper nouns, but verb forms ending in ‘s’ are permitted. There is one 9-letter word to be found. SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN LEO AQUARIUS VIRGO PISCES LIBRA SCORPIO K T N I N R ARIES G E I HOW YOU RATE 20 Good; 25 Very Good; 30 Excellent. YESTERDAY’S SOLUTIONS SAGITTARIUS SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN CAPRICORN AQUARIUS AQUARIUS PISCES PISCES ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES GEMINI CANCER TAURUS lIBra Sept 24–Oct 23 LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER saGITTarIUs Nov 23-Dec 21 SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN LEO AQUARIUS VIRGO PISCES LIBRA SCORPIO G=0 G=0 (80p/min + network (80p/min + network For B=0more call 0905 B=0 789 4273 access charge) For more call 0905 789 4279 access charge) LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER TAURUS GEMINI CANCER SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES DINGBATS® SAGITTARIUS Red CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER ARIES ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER amused. LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO LEO You VIRGO might resent LIBRAdemands SCORPIO being caPrIcorN Dec 22-Jan 20 LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER TAURUS GEMINI CANCER course ARIES a little TAURUS and it may GEMINI be appropriate CANCER to LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO (80p/min + network LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO LEO VIRGO LIBRASAGITTARIUSSCORPIOCAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER ARIES LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO PARODYING agony, airy, angry, dairy, diary, dingy, dray, drying, dying, gory, grainy, gray, gyro, irony, nary, orgy, parody, paying, pony, pray, praying, prodigy, prying, rainy, randy, rangy, ropy, yard, yarn, yoga, yogi, yond. KINGBATS logotype, 1999(?) Each number from 1 to 9 represents a different letter. Solve the clues and insert the letters in the appropriate squares to discover a word which uses all nine letters. 56734 gives an oven; 5921146 gives a pan; 8779 gives a chef. YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION: DYSTOPIAN YESTERDAY’S SOLUTIONS Find the familiar phrase, saying or name in this arrangement of letters. DINGBATS® iPhone logotype, 2009 YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION: Act out of character THINGBATS logotype, 1999(?) SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 TAURUS GEMINI CANCER SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER LEO VIRGO LIBRA SAGITTARIUS SCORPIO CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO ARIES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER might declutter your surroundings and clear your desk of any paperwork, correspondence and accounts that have recently been neglected. Your priority will be to use your time and energy in as For more call 0905 789 4271 Professional matters will provide the stimulation you need to feel you are making progress. You are taking on new commitments and the greater the responsibility, the happier you will feel. Some interesting developments will give your ARIES family a lot to talk about. SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES www.dingbats.net 17/09/2021 For more call 0905 789 4272 An alert frame of mind will ensure those down. Although things won’t go to plan all the time there will be a lot to keep you made on you within the family in which case speak R=255 your mind R=185 immediately. SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES If you drop your guard you could end up spending a lot of time talking but achieving nothing. Concentrate solely on the matter in hand. A group effort will seem to go off keep your next move quiet from some who might try to block your way. For more call 0905 789 4274 SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES TAURUS GEMINI CANCER For more call 0905 789 4276 LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO (80p/min + network access charge) For more call 0905 789 4277 access charge) DINGBATS®, 2009: for normal use SAGITTARIUS CAPRICORN AQUARIUS PISCES DINGBATS®, 2009: thicker stems. Only for use at very small sizes, optionally without ring. (80p/min + network access charge) For more call 0905 789 4280 access charge) (80p/min + network LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO You have discovered someone close been keeping a secret and you wish they had talked to you sooner. Now the truth is out you realise you should have noticed the signs. This is a situation that needs dealing eith now. In some matters you seem to have no choice but to take charge. People will complain about the drastic changes you feel you must now make. A problem is not going to go away until someone does something about it and you need to step in. Had someone else dealt with this matter sooner, there wouldn’t have been the need for you to get involved. Frustration is likely and this will come in the form of people who are uncooperative and unhelpful. You are determined to get a job out of the way and you won’t allow them to block your progress, because once you’ve overcome these obstacles it should be plain sailing. Some things you’ve been keeping to yourself have to be brought out into the open even though you know someone won’t be happy about it. Discussions will be tense but are necessary and can no longer be avoided. You feel more up to dealing with issues you have been avoiding. aQUarIUs Jan 21-Feb 19 The starting gun has not yet been fired but a Some people are getting you down with all project seems to already be under way. You their grumbling. Their negative attitude is R=60 R=0 have a lot to grapple with when some people having a dull impact on a group experience. have G=212 openly jumped G=130 in and took over matters You know life could be better but at the same LEO VIRGO LIBRA SCORPIO that B=0 had been standing B=7 still too ARIESlong. Without TAURUS time GEMINI you are CANCER grateful for your many warning, TAURUS you GEMINI seem to CANCER THINGBATS Green have heaps of things to blessings. All you wish for is that others get on with. could be a little more positive at times. THINGBATS, 2009 (80p/min + network (80p/min + network For more call 0905 789 4275 access charge) For more call 0905 789 4281 access charge) VIrGo PIscEs Aug 24-Sept 23 Feb 20-Mar 20 R=148 R=94 Whatever G=0 you had G=27 planned to do you might A partner or close friend will encourage you find B=207 yourself having B=109to help sort out some to follow your own choices as they know how messy business. You would like to give a much it will mean to you. 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46 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 ABBEY Elizabeth (Liz) In loving memory of a much loved Mum, Auntie, Nanny, Cousin and friend. Passed away peacefully on 6th September 2021 age 80. All welcome to attend her funeral service on Friday 24th September at 11.15am Canford Crematorium, Westbury-on-Trym Bristol. Please wear cheery clothes, rather than black. Family flowers only. Donations can be made to Blood Cancer U.K. and Ataxia U.K. c/o E.C. Alderwick and Son Kingswood. BENCE Jean Beatrice Ann Jean passed away at Southmead Hospital on 2nd September 2021 aged 84 years. A much loved wife to Leslie, Mum to Jonathan and Philippa and Grandma to Emma, Edward and Luke. Sister to Michael and Diane. Sister in law to Janet and Kathleen. Funeral service will be held on Monday 27th September 2021 in the Waterside Chapel, Westerleigh Crematorium at 11:45am. Family flowers only please. Donations in memory of Jean for Parkinson's UK & Kidney Research UK may be given on the day. All enquiries to Roy Preddy Funeral Directors, Mangotsfield, 0117 9562834. BENNETT Stephen Walter Sadly passed away on 1st September 2021 at home, aged 70 years. Much loved brother of Helen. Will be missed and fondly remembered by all who knew Stephen. Funeral Details. Thursday 23rd September. Service to be held at South Bristol Crematorium 3.45pm. All welcome. Family flowers only please, Donations, if so desired, in memory of Stephen to Help Bristol's Homeless, Spring Street, Bedminster, Bristol. BS3 4PZ BROWN Sally Elizabeth (Nee Stone) Born 13th June 1949 Sally suddenly passed peacefully in her sleep on 1st September 2021. Loving mum to Tony, Sandra, Damian, Katie, Peter and Martin. Also beloved grandmother and great grandmother. She will be deeply missed by all. Reunited with her mum. May she rest in eternal peace now she has her angel wings. Funeral service will be held in the Waterside Chapel, Westerleigh Crematorium on Friday 1st October 2021 at 11:00am. Flowers welcome or donations in memory of Sally for Bristol Dogs Trust may be given on the day. All enquiries to Roy Preddy Funeral Directors, Mangotsfield, 0117 9562834. CALWAY Angela Josephine (Higgins) Sadly passed away aged 88 peacefully at home on September 5th Husband Michael, Mother to Mark, Philip and Simon, Grandmother to Jack Funeral service at Westerleigh Crematorium September 23rd at 2:30pm COOK Mary Elizabeth Passed away 21st August 2021 aged 92 years. Her Funeral Service will take place on Friday 1st October, South Bristol Crematorium Chapel at 12 noon. Flowers may be sent to Thomas Davis Funeral Directors, Southville Lodge, Southville, Bristol, BS3 1DJ 0117 966 3268 DANIEL Michael Charles Aged 74, passed away peacefully after a long illness on Wednesday 8th September at St. Joseph's Home, Bristol. He will be greatly missed and always loved by his family and many friends. A special thanks for the care and support he received from the Sisters, Mgr Gabriel Leydon and all staff and residents at St. Joseph's. There will be a Requiem Mass at Clifton Cathedral on Friday 24th September at 10.30am. Family flowers only please, donations if desired for Clifton Cathedral or St. Joseph's Home may be forwarded to Austin Williams Funeral Services, 27 High Street, Portishead, Bristol, BS20 6AB. DECORDOVA CHRISTINE BLOSSOM My beloved Mum, Gran-Gran, Sister and Aunt sadly passed away on 20th August 2021. Christine was a devoted mother, grandmother and dearly loved sister. She will be sadly missed. Rest in peace, until we meet again. The funeral will be on Thursday 23rd September 2021 at 11:00, held at the Church of God Prophecy, 2 Tudor Road, Easton, Bristol, BS5 8EN Followed by interment at Kingswood Remembrance Park, Grimsbury Road, Kingswood, Bristol, BS15 9SL Due to the current Covid climate, we are unable to have a wake for Christine at this time. We will hold a memorial for Christine at a later date. Son Sacha, Grandson Marley, Sisters Julie, Sharon, Yvette, Malika and family. GINGELL Elsie Died suddenly on 17th August at home aged 90 years. A much loved mum, aunt, grandma, great-grandma and friend. Funeral to be held at Westerleigh Crematorium (Woodland Chapel) on Wednesday 29th September at 12.15pm. Family flowers only please. Donations if desired to The Salvation Army, Macmillan, PDSA and Bristol Animal Rescue Centre via E C Alderwick & Son Ltd 71 High Street, Hanham Bristol BS15 3DG Tel: 0117 935 3746 to whom all enquiries should be directed. GREEN Cleon Adalphus Passed away peacefully at Bristol Royal Infirmary on 21st August 2021 aged 83 years. He will be sadly missed by family and friends. Funeral Service to be held at Parkway Methodist Church, St Werburghs on Monday 20th September at 11 am, followed by the burial at Filton Cemetery at 12:45 pm. All enquiries to: - Cotton & Sons Funeral Directors Stapleton Road, Easton, Bristol. BS5 0NN Tel: 0117-951-0744 HACKER Marlow 15.04.1941-30.08.2021 Funeral to be held at South Bristol Crematorium 24th September 12:45 Marlow sleep in peace my love. Thank you for giving me the best time of my life. Your loving husband Dave HACKER Marlow Mum no words can express how much we love you or how much we will miss you. Michelle, Martyn,Tasha & Klarke Mum you will be dearly missed, you will live forever in our hearts. Mark, Ricky, Liaa, Ezra, Leticia & Naylise HACKER Marlow (Lou) My dearest friend. Our happy times in Berni Inns. We met in 1964 and stayed close friends, sharing lovely holidays and laughter. Remember you always. Rest in peace. Your friend Gill (Lou) xx MCKISSACK Ian Passed away peacefully on 5th September 2021 at Southmead Hospital aged 83 years. Funeral service to take place at Westerleigh Crematorium on Monday 4th October at 13:45. Donations, if so desired, will be gratefully received for SSAFA. All enquiries, contact Co-op Funeralcare, Redfield. MURRAY John (Jack) Died at home on 5.9.2021, aged 82 years. Beloved Husband of Beatrice, Father of Anna and John, Grandad of Iwan and Esther. Valued by all family and friends. Cremation service at 10.30am Thursday 7th October at Canford Crematorium, Westbury on Trym Family flowers only. Donations to Avon Wildlife Trust and UNICEF. PRICE Douglas Hector George Douglas passed away on 10th September 2021, age 90 years. He will be greatly missed by his wife Joan and all the family. His funeral will take place at Westerleigh Crematorium in the Waterside Chapel on Friday 1st October at 12.30pm. All Welcome. Family flowers only please. Donations if desired to the UK Dementia Research Institute. Enquiries to L J Guyan Funeral Directors, 12 Charlton Road, Keynsham, BS31 2JA. SMITH Lyn Peacefully at home on 6th September Lyn, aged 72 years. Dearly loved wife of Sonia, loving sister of Yvonne, Ivor, Shirley, Alan and the late Brian. Funeral service to be held at Holy Trinity Church Stapleton at 11.30am on Monday 11th October prior to committal at Filton Cemetery. Family flowers only please, donations in memory of Lyn may be given to PSDA. VINCENT David Edward Frank Passed away peacefully on 12th September 2021 at home aged 93 years. Much loved Husband of June, Father of Deb and Helen, Grandfather of James and Brother of Edna. Will be sadly missed. The Funeral service will take place on Wednesday 29th of September 2021 At 10.30 am at Canford Crematorium. Family flowers only. Donations in memory of David can be given to St Peter's Hospice on the day. Stenner & Hill Funeral Directors 2 Pembroke Road Shirehampton Bristol BS11 9SQ 0117 9823188 WHITE Brian Noel Passed away at home on Saturday 4th September aged 87 years. The funeral service will be held at South Bristol Crematorium on Monday 4th October at 2.15pm. Family flowers only please. Donations if desired for the British Lung Foundation may be given on the day or sent c/o Thomas Davis Funeral Directors Southville Lodge Southville Road Bristol, BS3 1DJ WILLIAMS Kathleen (Nee Hervey) Sadly passed away Sunday 5th September, aged 96 after a short illness. We are not ready to say goodbye but God needs you to enrich His garden. So please Lord, take care of her as she is precious to us. We love you so much Kathleen. From Ken & Liz, Joyce & Bill, Edward & Anne and all your devoted family. The funeral service will be held at St Mary's Church, Almondsbury, BS32 4DS on Friday the 1st of October 2021 at 2:00 pm. Followed by a burial at Almondsbury Cemetery. Donations on the day to St Mary's Church. Flowers welcome. Enquiries to R. Davies & Son, 381 Gloucester Road, Horfield, Bristol, BS7 8TN. WILLIAMS Mavis Mary Passed away at home on Sunday 5th September 2021, aged 93 years. Will be sadly missed by her brother Brian, family and many friends. Now reunited with Ray. Funeral service to be held on Thursday 30th September 2021 at 1:15pm in the Waterside Chapel, Westerleigh Crematorium. Family flowers only by request. Donations in lieu of flowers, if desired, for the continuing work of Stroke Association and The Alzheimer's Society. Any enquiries please contact Coop Funeralcare, 1, Cleeve Wood Road, Downend, BS16 2SF 01179575500 WYATT Pat (Pugh) Pat Wyatt (78) (nee Pugh) was a cherished Mother to Susan and Richard, Grandmother to Adam and Georgina and Great Grandmother to Theodore, Grace and Baby Scott- Avis, Mother-in-law, Aunty, Great Aunty, good friend and neighbour who after 30 years is now reunited with her Husband and the love of her life David. Pat finally lost her year long battle with cancer on Thursday September 9th 2021. Everyone is welcome to attend Pat's funeral at 2.15pm on Friday September 24th at St John's, Fishponds, Bristol BS16 3QG and will be followed by cremation at 4.15pm at Westerleigh Crematorium, and afterwards at The Compass Inn, Tormarton GL9 1JB from 5.30pm. Pat was a wonderful friend to many, a good Christian who lived her life being kind, honest, faithful and loving. Pat will be truly missed by all who knew her. All flowers and enquiries to: Co-op Funeralcare, Redfield Telephone: 01179556455 or email: redfield@ letsco-operate.com Donations to Beaumond House Hospice. www.beaumondhouse.co.uk BRYAN GEOFFREY MARK 20 years today Geoff since you left us. The day you left you took our hearts, It hurts so much now we're apart, But we can smile through the pain, Because one day we'll meet again. Love Mum and Dad and all the Family xx COOK Paul Jeffrey (Cookie) 18th September 2011. Ten long years with a broken heart that's how it is these days darling since you left us. time moves yet it seems to stand still. I miss you so much, we all do. I want to say so much but the words aren't enough so God bless you my darling boy lots of Love xxxxxxxxxx Mum Dad and All of your family xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx COOK Paul Jeffrey Our beloved Grandson left us 18th September 2011 but he is remembered with much love by us all Rest in Peace Gramps xxxxxx FLANNIGAN Kimberly (18th September) Darling Daughter Kim. 16 years have now passed by, sometimes it seems in the blink of an eye. But mostly it feels like an eternity since we last saw your smiling face and held you in our arms. We love you, miss you & talk to you every day.. Loves You Always Mum, Dad & Jess XXX MELHUISH David (Mel) Our dear Brother taken twenty two years ago Sunday. With Mum, Dad, Brothers Charlie and Chris and Sister Carol. May God bless you all. Your Brothers Cliff and Rog.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 47 PRIESTLEY Andrew Kenneth Twenty seven years tomorrow you passed away. Time passes so quickly, but not a day goes by that we don't think of you. Love from Andrea, Gary, Louise and Alec x PRIESTLEY Raymond William Dad, a year has passed, still can't believe you're gone. You will always be in my heart and in my thoughts. Love you always. Andrea, Gary, Grandchildren and Great-Grandchildren x STAITE Barbara May (Hale) A million memories of you and all the things you used to do... A year has gone by so fast, and the love you gave will always last. A much loved and missed Mum, Grandma, and Great Grandma. Love always xx Christine, Mike, Julie, Gill & Families • Religious or non-religious funerals • Bespoke funerals for burial or cremation • Fully guaranteed pre-paid funeral plans • Direct cremations 177 Crow Lane, Henbury, Bristol, BS10 7DR Telephone: 0117 950 8066 Website: www.bcm-funerals.co.uk Email: admin@bcm-funerals.co.uk *Conditions apply Classified WANTED CASH IN YOUR ATTIC Have you ever wondered if your possessions are of value? Free home visit, advice given. Distance no problem. Instant cash payment for - Old coins & banknotes - any age, country, quantity or condition. Gold and silver coins, sovereigns, guineas etc. Paintings, watercolours, china, pens, watches, clocks, corkscrews, old toys. Silver items incl. candlesticks trays, cutlery, tea sets etc. Jewellery, costume and fine jewellery. Medals, militaria, uniforms, stamps, postcards, photo albums. Any other items you feel could be of interest to me. Discretion assured. Contact Ian on - Tel: 07817 097343 or 01935 873839 Bicycle for sale TRAIN & MODEL CAR COLLECTIONS WANTED *** WANTED ******WANTED***** WANTED ******WANTED*** RAILWAY HORNBY BACHMANN ALL MAKES AND SIZES OO GAUGE N GAUGE O GAUGE 45MM LIVE STEAM DIECAST BOXED CORGI DINKY MATCHBOX METAL FIGURES & PLASTIC KITS MAMODS CALL ROGER 01225 420725 or 07752 222 645 POINT OF LAY HENS Cheshire blues, Russet greens. Blue and green egg layers. Strong healthy birds, Nr Radstock £15 07595279126 THREE WATCHES FOR SALE Swiss Supreme £95 Gents evening watch £60 Lifemax talking watch £40 01454228411 (Yate) Entertainment Malvern Flea & Collectors Market Up to 400 inside & outside exhibitors. Sunday 19th September Entrance: 7.30am-3.30pm - £5 Three Counties Showground, Worcs. WR13 6NW. SLIMMING WORLD Friendship, Fun & Laughter Special offer- 12 week Journal pay for 5 get 1 free. Beehive Centre, Whitehall, BS5 7AW Call 07961769988 Tel: 01636 676531 www.b2bevents.info Dawes Ladies hybrid bicycle for sale - new, hardly ridden. Genuine reason for sale. Also one Carrera ladies mountain bicycle - very little used. £200 each. £200.00 curlew00@yahoo.co.uk WANTED COINS English and Foreign Coins, Banknotes and Medals. Private Collector. Good Prices Paid. Any Distance 0117 9850863 or 07896 852038 WANTED CARAVANS cash paid any age, any size, any caravan considered 07785567739 WANTED F O O T B A L L P R O G R A M M E S WANTED PRE - 1969 , BADGES , TICKETS , SHIRTS , PHOTOS , Also RUGBY SPEEDWAY 07427 746 806 cornerprogrammes@ gmail.com

48 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Services Property Motors Asbestos Garage Roof Renewals For a FREE quote call 01454 250 400 Flat Roofs Garages Porches Flat Roof Conversions All work guaranteed apexindustrialroofing.co.uk Adams Burrows Solicitors Conveyancing For Fixed Price Conveyancing quote Tel: 970 2240 We offer a fast & friendly local service, also probate & family work 34 Broad Street Staple Hill Bristol BS16 5NS Your roof is our business '57' HONDA JAZZ 1.4 MANUAL 63750 MILES In an impressive condition with a comprehensive service history (13 stamps) and just 63,750 miles by one owner with an advisory free MOT to Sept 2022. Tax £155pa 55mpg. Alloy wheels, electric window, mirrors, radio CD, Spare key, wheel, tools, manual, and socket key all present. Will deliver for viewing. Call John anytime. See more details at www.viewthecar.online £1990 07966196755 WE WANT YOUR USED CARAVANS AND MOTORHOMES www.ndmh.co.uk Cash Waiting for Clean, Tidy Caravans and Motorhomes Left or Right Hand Drive For Fast & Friendly Service Give us a call: 07769 754968 or 01271 866333 WANTED CARAVANS cash paid any age, any size, any caravan considered 07785567739 WANTED TOURING CARAVAN Any make, model, year or condition. With or without damp. Same day collection. Payment of your choice. Please contact Martin with further details. 07388448303 HOLIDAY HOMES FOR SALE, close to Exmoor, Somerset SMALL, PEACEFUL, COUNTRY, CARAVAN PARK. New & Quality preowned caravans for sale FREE Swimming Pool FREE Wi Fi FREE Coarse Fishing Sorry, no pets & no sub letting More details visit: www.oxenleazefarm.co.uk £59,750.00 call Marian on 01984 623427 facebook WANTED MOTORHOME OR CARAVAN Any age or condition, any make or model even damp or damaged. Same day collection, same day payment genuine buyer please call James 07392180003

Public Notices CITY OF BRISTOL (VARIOUS ROADS, COTHAM, BRISTOL) (TEMPORARY PROHIBITION OF USE BY VEHICLES) ORDER 2021 NOTICE is hereby given that the City Council of Bristol in pursuance of the provisions of section 14 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 as amended have made an Order the effect of which is to close, temporarily, to vehicles the lengths of roads as specified in the Schedule to this Notice. The Order was required because of the likelihood of danger to the public consequent upon the need to facilitate the safe movement of pedestrians during periods of increased pedestrian and vehicle activity associated with the University of Bristol Open Days taking place on or in the vicinity of each road. The Order becomes operative from 21st September 2021 for a maximum period of eighteen months. However, the closures may not be implemented for the whole of the period, but only as necessitated by the need to restrict the roads during periods of increased activity (which are anticipated to take place between the hours of 10am and 5pm on 21st, 22nd and 23rd September 2021). ALTERNATIVE ROUTE: Elmdale Road, Tyndall’s Park Road, St. Michael’s Hill, Perry Road, Park Row, Woodland Road and vice versa SCHEDULE – Temporary Prohibition of Use by Vehicles 1. Priory Road – from Elmdale Road to Woodland Road 2. Tyndall Avenue – from St. Michael’s Hill to Woodland Road 3. Woodland Road – from Tyndall Avenue to Tyndall’s Park Road (DORMER ROAD, EASTVILLE, BRISTOL) (TEMPORARY PROHIBITION OF USE BY VEHICLES) ORDER 2021 NOTICE is hereby given that the City Council of Bristol in pursuance of the provisions of section 14 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 as amended have made an Order the effect of which is to close, temporarily, to vehicles that length of Dormer Road from Muller Road to Rousham Road. The Order was required because new water supply works are being or are proposed to be executed on or near the road and becomes operative from 21st September 2021 for a maximum period of eighteen months. However, the closure may not be implemented for the whole of the period, but only as necessitated by the works (which are anticipated to take place between 21st September 2021 and 23rd September 2021). ALTERNATIVE ROUTE: Muller Road, Stottbury Road, Rousham Road and vice versa (NEVIL ROAD, BISHOPSTON, BRISTOL) (TEMPORARY PROHIBITION OF USE BY VEHICLES) ORDER 2021 NOTICE is hereby given that the City Council of Bristol in pursuance of the provisions of section 14 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 as amended have made an Order the effect of which is to close, temporarily, to vehicles that length of Nevil Road which extends from Gloucester Road to Kent Road. The Order was required because of the likelihood of danger to the public and to allow the safe movement of pedestrians during Gloucestershire County Cricket Ground events taking place on or in the vicinity of the road. The Order becomes operative from 26th September 2021 for a maximum period of eighteen months. However, the closure may not be implemented for the whole of the period, but only as necessitated by the need to restrict the road during periods of increased activity (which is anticipated to take between 7.30am and 9.30pm on 26th September 2021). ALTERNATIVE ROUTE: Kent Road, Upper Belmont Road, Sommerville Road, Gloucester Road and vice versa (VARIOUS ROADS, ST. PHILIPS, BRISTOL) (TEMPORARY PROHIBITION OF USE BY VEHICLES) ORDER 2021 NOTICE is hereby given that the City Council of Bristol in pursuance of the provisions of section 14 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 as amended have made an Order the effect of which is to close, temporarily, to vehicles the lengths of roads as specified in Schedule 1 to this Notice. The Order was required because new road construction works are being or are proposed to be executed on or near the roads and becomes operative from 20th September 2021 for a maximum period of eighteen months. However, the closures may not be implemented for the whole of the period, but only as necessitated by the works (which are anticipated to take place between 20th September 2021 and 26th November 2021). ALTERNATIVE ROUTES: north eastbound – Oxford Street, Anvil Street (part unaffected)/New Kingsley Road (part unaffected)/Avon Street, Temple Way, Temple Gate, Bath Bridge Roundabout, Temple Gate, Temple Way, Old Mark Street Roundabout, Old Mark Street, Lawford Street, Trinity Road, West Street, Midland Road, Unity Street, New Thomas Street, Russ Street, New Kingsley Road (part unaffected) south westbound – New Kingsley Road (part unaffected), Russ Street, New Thomas Street, Unity Street, Broad Plain, Temple Way, Avon Street/Oxford Street, Anvil Street (part unaffected) SCHEDULE – Temporary Prohibition of Use by Vehicles Anvil Street – from New Kingsley Road south eastwards for 65 metres Old Bread Street – from New Kingsley Road north westwards for 84 metres New Kingsley Road – from 35 metres north east of Avon Street north eastwards for 28 metres Providence Place – from Avon Street to Old Bread Street P MELLOR Director: Management of Place. Traffic Regulation Orders Team (100TS), PO Box 3399, Bristol, BS1 9NE DiD you know? you can now book your Public notice by visiting bookanad.com For help booking online call our team on 01227 907972 9am-5pm Mon-Fri Self-Serve online CITY OF BRISTOL (REDLAND TERRACE, REDLAND, BRISTOL) (TEMPORARY PROHIBITION OF USE BY VEHICLES) ORDER 2021 NOTICE is hereby given that the City Council of Bristol in pursuance of the provisions of section 14 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 as amended intend to make an Order the effect of which will be to close, temporarily, to vehicles that length of Redland Terrace from Lower Redland Road to the common boundary line of No. 1 and No. 2 Redland Terrace. The Order is required because sewer repair works are being or are proposed to be executed on or near the road and will be operative from 17th October 2021 for a maximum period of eighteen months. However, the closure may not be implemented for the whole of the period, but only as necessitated by the works (which are anticipated to take place between 17th October 2021 and 29th October 2021). ALTERNATIVE ROUTE: Redland Terrace (part unaffected), Fitzroy Terrace, Evans Terrace, Lower Redland Road and vice versa (BARTLETTS ROAD, BEDMINSTER, BRISTOL) (TEMPORARY PROHIBITION OF USE BY VEHICLES) ORDER 2021 NOTICE is hereby given that the City Council of Bristol in pursuance of the provisions of section 14 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 as amended intend to make an Order the effect of which will be to close, temporarily, to vehicles that length of Bartletts Road from Buckingham Street to Stanley Terrace. The Order is required because gas mains and service replacement works are being or are proposed to be executed on or near the road and will be operative from 18th October 2021 for a maximum period of eighteen months. However, the closure may not be implemented for the whole of the period, but only as necessitated by the works (which are anticipated to take place between 18th October 2021 and 29th October 2021). ALTERNATIVE ROUTE: Buckingham Street, Stanley Street South, Stanley Terrace and vice versa (COURT FARM ROAD, WHITCHURCH, BRISTOL) (TEMPORARY PROHIBITION OF USE BY VEHICLES) ORDER 2021 NOTICE is hereby given that the City Council of Bristol in pursuance of the provisions of section 14 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 as amended intend to make an Order the effect of which will be to close, temporarily, to vehicles that length of Court Farm Road from 52 metres east of Tanorth Road eastwards for 266 metres. The Order is required because carriageway repair works are being or are proposed to be executed on or near the road and will be operative from 19th October 2021 for a maximum period of eighteen months. However, the closure may not be implemented for the whole of the period, but only as necessitated by the works (which are anticipated to take place between 8am and 6pm from 19th October 2021 to 27th October 2021). ALTERNATIVE ROUTE: Court Farm Road (part unaffected), Whitchurch Lane, East Dundry Road, Tanorth Road, Court Farm Road (part unaffected) and vice versa P. MELLOR, Director: Management of Place, Highways Service (100TS), PO Box 3399, Bristol, BS1 9NE JOHN SPEARE BAILEY (Deceased) Pursuant to the Trustee Act 1925 any persons having a claim against or an interest in the Estate of the above named, late of Fairview Court Nursing Home, 42A Hill Street, Kingswood, South Gloucestershire BS15 4ES previously of Highfield Park Farm, Riding Barn Hill, Wick, Bristol, BS30 5QZ, who died on 23/02/2021, are required to send written particulars thereof to the undersigned on or before 18/11/2021, after which date the Estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims and interests of which they have had notice. Royds Withy King, 5/6 Northumberland Buildings Queen Square, BATH, BA1 2JE ALAN ROGER STONE (Deceased) Pursuant to the Trustee Act 1925 any persons having a claim against or an interest in the Estate of the above named, late of 86 Court Road Oldland Common Bristol, BS30 9SW, who died on 24/04/2021, are required to send written particulars thereof to the undersigned on or before 19/11/2021, after which date the Estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims and interests of which they have had notice. FDC Law Solicitors 64 High Street Keynsham Bristol BS31 1EA JOHN JAMES HAWKESBY (DECEASED) Pursuant to the Trustee Act 1925 any persons having a claim against or an interest in the Estate of the above named, late of Olive tree house care home, Chessel Drive,Patchway, South Gloucesterhire, BS34 5BH, who died on 04/02/2021, are required to send written particulars thereof to the undersigned on or before 18/11/2021, after which date the Estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims and interests of which they have had notice. HONEY LEGAL, 193 Charles Street, Leicester, LE1 1LA(Ref:HAW0021.Hawkesby.S667/428) KEVIN BOWKER (Deceased) Pursuant to the Trustee Act 1925 any persons having a claim against or an interest in the Estate of the above named, late of Flat 52 Haberfield House, Hollway Road, Stockwood, Bristol, BS14 8AD, who died on 03/02/2020, are required to send written particulars thereof to the undersigned on or before 18/11/2021, after which date the Estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims and interests of which they have had notice. Cooke Painter Ltd 32 Gilda Parade Whitchurch Bristol BS14 9HY FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 49 PEOPLE’S PET AWARDS An uplifting celebration of Britain’s most inspirational pets NOMINATE NOW THEPEOPLESPETAWARDS.CO.UK

50 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live SPoRT Breaking news at WWW.Bristol. live Toolstation/Hellenic New manager Reid says the ‘sky’s the limit’ for Lebeq Simon PARKINSON postsport@b-nm.co.uk LEBEQ United’s enthusiastic new manager Curtis Reid insists the “sky’s the limit” for the famous and successful Bristol club. Easton-bred Reid, 31, was catapulted to the first-team helm in the wake of Aaron Wilson’s departure as manager and has overseen a reasonable start comprising four wins – the latest Wednesday’s 3-1 victory over Almondsbury at Lebeq’s Oaklands Park 3G base - two draws and four defeats heading into tomorrow’s trip to Wells City. It’s been quite a rise for Reid, just as it has been for his famous brother Bobby, the 28-year-old former Bristol City and Cardiff City star now playing with Championship high-fliers Fulham. Of his close-season call to Lebeq’s Toolstation First Division duties, Reid explained: “I’d been playing as a central midfielder for the club’s reserve team (Bristol Premier Combination) for a few years, and in more recent times helped out on the management side whenever required. “I’d heard Aaron was no longer managing our firsts, so me and Chris Da Costa, a first-team forward, approached Dwayne Smith (chairman) about the possibility of taking over and he was on board with what we had to say. “Although I’d had the chance to manage our reserves at times over the years, this was a massive opportunity for us and it was one Chris and me, with the help of Liam Henry, who is a UEFA B-qualified coach, couldn’t turn down.” He added: “Football is a massive passion of mine. I get to a lot of games when I’m not playing, not least Bristol City – I also support Man United – and Fulham, where my brother plays. “I don’t envy Bobby at all; we’re really close. I knew he’d make it as a pro, even though he was smaller than everyone else in his younger days running rings around the adults! It’s important to both of us, the local community here in Bristol we were raised in. We both played for St Philip’s Marsh in our early football careers.” Asked about Lebeq’s prospects under his rookie leadership, Reid’s response was unequivocal. “The sky’s the limit with Lebeq,” he maintained. “We have a good pool of talented players and it’s a case at this time of getting them to gel and trust each other. “I want to see us battling to get into the top half of the table; but ultimately I feel we have it in us to be challenging for promotion to the Toolstation Prem, where I would love to manage Lebeq and try to keep pushing us forward from there.” Welton Rovers – 2-1 midweek winners at Warminster - aim to keep up their terrific unbeaten form at home to Portishead Town, while second-placed AEK Boco, with only one defeat in 10 games thus far, are at Wincanton Town. As for Hengrove Athletic manager Jamie Hillman, he cast a concerned eye over the state of play at Norton Lane and conceded: “Some tough decisions need to be taken quickly.” Hengrove head into tomorrow’s away-day with Odd Down with only five points on the board, a scenario the club’s dedicated longtime leader admits he’s not prepared to tolerate. “We’re in a big old rut and at something of a crossroads, I feel,” said Hillman. “We had a lot of young lads to start the season with and we’re still not settled. I’m not even sure of my best team. “I shoulder the blame for that, although player availability hasn’t helped, just like with any other club. It’s not all doom and gloom; we have a new under-18 side we’re integrating well with. As a group we just need to know where we’re heading, and it’s down to me and my coaches to figure it out.” Of that aforementioned “crossroads,” Hillman stressed: “We’ve seen good things and bad things so far, and we need to decide what direction we want the club to go in. We know we need to be patient, to allow all our talented lads time to develop and fulfil their potential. “Yet even when I’ve gone with more experienced players as I’ve done recently, we haven’t performed as well as we can do. “The priority is to put points on the board and smiles on faces again. From a selfish point of view, I have to change something as I can’t go on losing week after week. “We have to do something different and pretty sharpish too.” Eye-catching local games in the Toolstation top-flight involve leaders Bitton’s home clash with fifthplaced Saltash United; Keynsham Town’s hosting of Exmouth Town; improving Ashton & Backwell’s bout with travelling Helton Athletic Lebeq United (red kit) in action away to Wells City last season. The sides meet again at the same ground tomorrow Picture: Jason Bryant at Lancer Scott Stadium, and Clevedon Town’s clash with Bridgwater Town at Hand Stadium. In the Hellenic Premier Division, new manager Stuart Jones admits he is still a bit shocked after a Sunday evening phone call from chairman Lee Fairman catapulted him into the Hallen hot-seat. His call to duty could hardly have begun in more successful or dramatic fashion, as Hallen celebrated an overdue first victory of the campaign with a 5-4 penalty shootout success at league rivals Lydney in the FA Vase following a 3-3 draw. Former Ashton and Backwell United boss Jones, who left shortly before they had been confirmed as promoted from Toolstation One to the Premier Division earlier this summer, having gone on to enjoy a stint as coach at Bridgwater Town, said: “To see the delight and relief on the players’ faces after coming through that tie was quite warming.” Hallen lost 3-2 at high-riding Corsham Town on Tuesday night, but the new supremo emphasised: “We’d thrown a new formation at the lads, and by the time they got to grips with it we were already 2-0 down. “But the way our boys adapted to it, and showed such courage, commitment and character to fight back as they did, was very encouraging. “We all know we can’t keep conceding three goals and more in games, as we’ve done eight times so far. “The priority for now is to get a first point on the board, then get a first league win and then keep a first clean sheet. And we need to do those things pretty quickly.” Glos County Patchway still ‘in a very healthy place’ says Minihane Simon PARKINSON postsport@b-nm.co.uk PATCHWAY Town manager Tim Minihane is optimistic his largely rebuilt ranks can soon start to hit the heights on a consistent basis in the Marcliff Gloucestershire County League. The Scott Park outfit had shown a marked improvement on their 2019-20 campaign when their season had to end even earlier last term due to the Covid pandemic. Then, Minihane’s men signed off with four wins and a draw from an unbeaten mini five-game sequence, the kind of form they hoped to take into a full and successful 2021-22 campaign jostling for the prized places in the upper echelons of the table. It hasn’t turned out quite that way, at least not to begin with, although former Oldbury Reserves and Tytherington Rocks supremo Minihane believes there are good reasons for that helter-skelter form. “We had a great squad last year, one which essentially picked itself,” he said. “For various reasons we began to lose some of our most influential players; so it was a case of rebuilding somewhat. “We’re still in a very healthy place, as can be seen by having a new third team competing in District Four which can only help funnel club players through to our reserves and firsts. That is our strategy, to promote players from within the camp rather than have to recruit from outside.” Minihane has, nonetheless, overseen the acquisition of several fresh faces, including Adam Porter, an “energetic, influential box-to-box player” promoted from Patchway Reserves duty having previously performed under the same manager’s stewardship at Oldbury and Tytherington. “Skilful and direct” wide man Matteo Pali has been in early scoring form with Patchway’s District Senior second string. Also aboard now, from Stoke Rangers, is Grant Mathieson, an “out and out pacy winger” who, like Pali, set his reserve-team commitments underway with a goal in their 3-2 opening afternoon victory over Real Thornbury. “All-action” central midfielder from Almondsbury, Harry Tetlow; fast-improving 17-year-old winger Hassan Hussein, and Filton Athletic’s attacking midfielder Carl Lakey, a “well-known local lad,” have all signed up and shown positive signs, says their new manager. Minihane added: “We did lose our left-winger Sid Bojang to Hallen; and our central midfielder Muhammed Jeng went to Cadbury Heath. Another performing in that position, Matt Barnes, also left us. “So we’d lost a few from the squad assembled the previous year and it’s a case at the moment of trying to stabilise it and hoping consistent performances follow.” The Scott Park supremo admits he and his team were “devastated” at bowing out 1-0 at the weekend in the first round of the Les James League Cup at the hands of undefeated title contenders Wick, who visit Patchway again tomorrow for a swift reunion, this time in the league. “We’d matched them pretty much all the way before they nicked a winner at the death,” said Minihane. “Play as well as we did in that game every week and we’ll win more than we lose. It’s a tough period coming up for us with Wick, Frampton United and Shirehampton our next three opponents. “We’re feeling pleased and encouraged, though; the club as a whole is in a good place with all the fund-raising and facilities improvements.” Ambitious Rockleaze Rangers expect a potentially tricky afternoon at winless Bromley Heath tomorrow. Second-placed Shirehampton are at Ruardean Hill Rangers.

Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live SPort Southern Paulton boss looking for ‘positive response’ against Parkway Simon PaRKINSON postsport@b-nm.co.uk JOHN Rendell feels his Paulton Rovers performers are confronting their “first little test” as they prepare to visit Plymouth Parkway tomorrow. Rovers have slipped the wrong side of 2-1 and 3-2 scorelines up against visitors Evesham United and Highworth Town, respectively, in their last two Division One South outings. Although that hardly represents a crisis heading to Devon – indeed, Paulton breezed to a 4-1 home victory over Highworth once more in Tuesday night’s spirit-raising League Challenge Cup preliminary round affair - Rendell insists he is looking for a “positive response” when it comes to league matters from a team lacking consistency personnel-wise, a fact he concedes has proved a frustration. “We’d had a good, positive preseason and start to the season with back-to-back wins and good fitness levels shown,” he reflected. “We then did okay in our goalless draw with Larkhall when we were denied by their outstanding ‘keeper time and again; and even against Frome, when we lost 3-1 there in the FA Cup, we went toe-to-toe with them and gave everything we had. “Our last two league games have been very disappointing. We’ve looked weak at the back and on Saturday after the Highworth defeat I kept the lads behind for a bit, because after getting it back to 2-1 to us we were very much in a winnable position. Again, the gifting of goals cost us.” Rendell has responded to the dip by signing 18-year-old full-back Leighton Tuodolo, who made a full debut against Highworth on Saturday following his arrival from Chippenham Town. The Paulton manager has also issued a seven-day approach to Larkhall for their more experienced, versatile full-back James Byrne, who had been part of Paulton’s exciting FA Cup march to the fourth qualifying round in 2017 when Rendell was still new to the Winterfield Road hot-seat. The Rovers leader admitted: “Player availability hasn’t helped. Key players have been missing for Cricket Golden Hill chasing league and cup double Steve HILL postsport@b-nm.co.uk GOLDEN Hill will be hoping to end a memorable season in style when they face Knowle on Sunday (noon) in the Stuart Canvas Gloucestershire Cup final at the Bristol County Ground. An historic promotion to the West of England Premier League’s A Paulton Rovers player gets a shot away during Tuesday night’s 4-1 victory against Highworth Town in the Southern League Challenge Cup Picture: Jenny Short second tier was wrapped up last month after the club finished top of the Bristol & North Somerset division. Golden Hill are set to be at full strength on Sunday as they bid to win the county cup for the first time. Admission to the game is free. Success, incidentally, has not been restricted to only the first team with the club’s 2nds, 3rds and various reasons and it has affected us. Dan Cottle, Nuno Felix and George Fowler were all missing on Saturday and are big players for us. “On the plus side our links with the club’s academy are paying off, as 16-year-olds Joe Paradise and Harley Prior are showing promising signs with us, as is Leo Eglin at 17, who has come over from Bath City Academy. It’s a great experience for them and it’s good having them around the first team set-up.” With Parkway now uppermost in his mind, Rendell said: “This period has proved a first little test for the boys to negotiate. It’s a pretty new group and a young one at that. On the whole they’ve been brilliant since stepping up with us.” Of that 4-1 midweek cup success over Highworth, courtesy of David O’Hare’s double and Ed Butcher and Liban Ibrahim strikes, Rovers assistant boss Paul Tovey said: “We made seven changes from Saturday and played great in the first half to go into half-time 2-1 up. “Highworth had one attack and scored from it, and in a more even second half they missed a golden chance before Dave came off the bench to score two quick goals and make the game safe for us.” It’s been a baptism of fire at Cossham Street for Mangotsfield United’s relatively new manager Ray Johnston, who takes his team to Willand Rovers in Devon tomorrow still looking to pin a first point to their board in Division One South. Field, who have been mourning the passing of groundsman and supporter John Tuck this week, did offer some welcome cheer on Monday evening as their under-18 team defeated Bristol Manor Farm visitors 3-1 to progress to the second round of the FA Youth Cup. Bristol Manor Farm’s first XI still seek some consistency results-wise after a mixed start to their Division One South season, as they hit the road for an encounter with Evesham United. Nonetheless, they travel to Worcestershire lifted by first half Lewis Leigh-Gilchrist and Owen Howe goals, the latter from the penalty spot, in Wednesday night’s 2-1 away defeat of Willand Rovers to move into top-six contention. Yate Town boss Paul Michael, meanwhile, is bracing his men for a second appetising collision with high-flying Premier Division rivals Gosport Borough in the space of a week, this time in the second qualifying round of the FA Cup tomorrow. The Bluebells took a 2-1 tum- 4ths all winning their respective league titles, while the 5ths missed out on top spot by a point but were still promoted. Dumbleton, meanwhile, saw off Bedminster and then Cheltenham to retain the Vitality U19 T20 in association with Stuart Turner at finals day at the Bristol County Ground. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 51 ble in Hampshire on Saturday at the hands of the Prem’s secondplaced side. After matching their opponents for lengthy spells in that one, the Lodge Road leader is confident his players can give Gosport a run for their money in the prestigious national knockout arena. “Saturday’s game was a really even one in which we took the lead and they equalised quite quickly,” he said. “We were then on top for the rest of the half and the game ebbed and flowed. Although Gosport had the best of the possession and territory in the early stages of the second half, we missed three great chances to take the lead and potentially win the game. In the end we felt we could have done better, although what it tells me is we can go into Saturday’s game confident that we can mix it with a strong, solid, typical Southern Premier side who give precious little away.” The Lodge Road leader is nonetheless charged with lifting his team following a frustrating 2-0 Tuesday night loss at home by Truro City. “We were gutted with our performance,” he said. “It’s the first time this season we’ve felt we were well beaten.” Bedminster totalled 156-7 in their semi-final clash, Shay Sainsbury retiring on 50 off 32 balls, but Dumbleton chased down the target to win by four wickets with just a ball to spare. Cheltenham reached the final with a five-wicket win over Twyford House, for whom Henry King top scored on 54 (retired). Breaking news at WWW.Bristol. live Horse racing Elliott back on the winning trail after his six-month ban By JIm BeavIS Gordon Elliott’s licence to train was restored this week after a six-month ban. He had a winner on Wednesday with his fourth runner after the resumption. The horses that remained in the yard were trained by denise Foster in the interim and her strike rate was a fairly ordinary 11 per cent, ie 30 winners from 275 runners. Elliott’s in the last few years averaged 15 per cent. Chances are that some of his horses that ran in the summer are well handicapped. Many punters will think the sentence for Elliott, pictured, was lenient. Their dilemma in the months ahead will be whether to take a kind of moral high ground and ignore his runners, or put principles aside and bet when the odds looks like good value. did you know we are in the midst of the first ever national racehorse Week? More than 100 stables up and down the country have opened their doors so that the public – whether racing fans or not – can see the conditions in which equine athletes live and train, and get an idea of the love, care and attention that goes into looking after racehorses. Some yards have had to put up the “house full” signs but if you go to https://nationalracehorseweek.uk/ and type in your postcode you may still find places available in relatively local yards. The retirement of Altior has been anticipated repeatedly for six months, and the decision was made earlier this week. In hindsight, the november 2019 race at Ascot against Cyrname over two miles and five furlongs got to the bottom of both horses. It ended Altior’s winning streak of 19. His three runs since were good but he wasn’t quite the same horse and had patently lost a bit of speed. He’s 11 now, and has done enough. Cyrname’s form since the Ascot race is F1PP, but he’s still only nine and Paul nicholls has brought other horses back from slumps in their form. There’s a quality card at newbury tomorrow, with three Group races. The fact that the Ayr Gold Cup had 163 entries demonstrates how keenly contested it is. They, of course, have the Silver Cup that day and a Bronze Cup the day before. newmarket also race tomorrow, and there the inventors of consolation and spin-off races have come up with an Amateurs’ Cambridgeshire as the last event on the card. Mercurius Power is the suggestion here.

52 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live Rugby We’ll keep on entertaining, says Lam, ahead of season opener John EVELY jonathan.evely@b-nm.co.uk PAT Lam’s faith in the highrisk, entertaining style of rugby Bristol Bears play remains unwavering despite the club’s dramatic defeat to Harlequins in last seasons’ semi-final. Having finished top of the table at the end of the regular season, and with half-an-hour gone at Ashton Gate in the semi-final back in June, the Bears had one foot in the final, leading 28-0 having played some of their best rugby since Lam’s arrival almost four years earlier. But Harlequins’ belief, a series of errors from the Bears, and loss of control of the momentum of the match saw Quins peg Bristol back to win 36-43 in overtime. For some coaches, it could have been a crushing blow that caused them to reevaluate their philosophies on the game. But Lam remains resolute. Speaking ahead of the new Gallagher Premiership season, which sees the Bears kick-off the new campaign at home to Saracens tonight, Lam said: “I honestly believe we have got a game that can beat any team with our structure of the game and how I would like it to be played. “What I am dependant on is the SPoRt players to come and play the game. I will never bring the game down to the players, it is up to the players to come up to the game-plan. “That is the importance of having quality staff and coaches (to upskill them) and that is what we are doing. “At the end of the day we have got human beings playing the game and as human beings all of us make mistakes, the key is if you raise the boys’ self-awareness of our system and structures they will identify where the improvements need to be. “I had three players who made key mistakes (in the second half of the semi-final) and before I even had to say anything they sent me a personal message to highlight what they had done wrong - which is great. “That is great as a coach, the worst thing is when people sit there saying I didn’t do anything wrong and there is a blame culture. “It is not the (style of our) game that lost us the semi-final, it is about our ability to do it.” After a British & Irish Lions series this summer which left fans underwhelmed by a dull, uninventive style of rugby played by Warren Gatland’s side in the 2-1 series defeat in South Africa, questions have been raised as to whether Steven Luatua will captain Bristol against Saracens at Ashton Gate tonight coaches have a duty to the game to play an entertaining brand of rugby. Saracens, for all their European and domestic success in the last decade, play a brand of rugby moe akin to the latest incarnation of the Lions. A game built on territory, pressure and physicality. In many ways. Bristol are the polar opposite, but Lam believes you can still win silverware as swashbucklers. The 2019-20 European Challenge Cup trophy sits in his office as evidence he is right, as is the Premiership trophy at Quins who play an equally attacking and flamboyant brand of the game. Lam said: “I think the way I want to play the game can both entertain and win. It can achieve both. “The way everyone gets the opportunity to play every element of the game, to run with the ball, pass, clean out, make tackles - but the biggest thing they all get the opportunity to do is to improve as a rugby player, and improve in learning the game. “I believe our way is entertaining because it is an all-round game. It is not about running everything or kicking everything, it is about using what is needed to win rugby games and it is generally entertaining as I have been told and as our 10,000 season ticket holders - which is a record - can attest to. “There are going to be 20,000 at Ashton Gate for Saracens, Bath looks set to be a sell-out, people wouldn’t come if it was boring and Breaking news at WWW.Bristol. live Picture: Robbie Stephenson they also won’t come if we are losing.” Steven Luatua will skipper the Bears from the back row, while eight internationals have been named in the starting line-up. Bristol: Charles Piutau; Luke Morahan, Piers O’Conor, Alapati Leiua, Ioan Lloyd; Callum Sheedy, Andy Uren; Jake Woolmore, Harry Thacker, Max Lahiff, Ed Holmes, Chris Vui, Steven Luatua, Dan Thomas, Nathan Hughes. Replacements: Will Capon, Yann Thomas, Jake Armstrong, Dave Attwood, Jake Heenan, Harry Randall, Sam Bedlow, Niyi Adeolokun. Saracens: Elliott Obatoyinbo; Alex Lewington, Dom Morris, Nick Tompkins, Rotimi Segun; Alex Lozowski, Aled Davies; Ralph Adams-Hale, Tom Woolstencroft, Marco Riccioni, Nick Isiekwe, Tim Swinson, Jackson Wray, Ben Earl, Billy Vunipola. Replacements: Kapeli Pifeleti, Richard Barrington, Alec Clarey, Callum Hunter-Hill, Sean Reffell, Joe Simpson, Manu Vunipola, Ben Harris. Athletics Promising triathlete all set to tackle professional circuit Kevin FAHEY postsport@b-nm.co.uk RISING triathlon star Hugh Brashaw has revealed he will take on the challenge of competing on the professional circuit next year. The 25-year-old Bristol-based software engineer, who is a member of Bristol & West AC, won a place at the elite level after winning the British Triathlon’s Middle Distance Championships in Aberfeldy, Scotland. “The British Championships were one of the gateway events and having won I can now compete at the elite, professional level,” said Brashaw, pictured. “So, I have decided I will give it a go next year. I’ll probably get my backside kicked and I don’t think I’ll set the world on fire but I might get into a top ten if I find the right race. “It will be cool to compete at that level, which is incredibly tough.” But the former University of Bristol student is a pretty tough athlete himself as he proved in Scotland when completing the 1900m swim, 90k bike ride and 21k run in just more than four hours to beat a top field of 600 amateurs. “Unfortunately, the run was 1k short so it makes my overall time look really good!” admitted Brashaw. » Another Bristol & West athlete enjoying a good start to the autumn is Anne Dockery. A latecomer to the sport at the age of 55, Dockery, who lives in Southville, won the over-70s age category at the England Masters International 10k held in conjunction with the Kew event last weekend. “I was really pleased with that and one of the joy of masters running is meeting other people, especially after such a long time, I love Bristol & West AC runners, from left, Phil Parry, Anne Dockery, Claire Jolliffe and Jon Goodland it,” said Dockery, aged 73. She will be training over the winter with the goal of competing at the World Masters Track & Field Championships in Finland next summer. Also at the Kew 10k, which was held within the grounds of the Royal Botanical Gardens, clubmate Phil Parry won a silver medal in the over-55s age group and there was a bronze medal for Clare Jolliffe in the over-50s age group. He might not have won a medal but Jon Goodland was delighted to make his first appearance in an England vest. » Tamara Jackson claimed a double victory in the fourth and final Avon League match at Yate on Sunday. The Bristol & West athlete won the under-17s 200m (26.30secs) and the shot (9.40m) to underline her versatility. Ethan Canning was also in good form winning both the under-15s 200m (25.30secs) and the 300m (40.90secs), while Nicholas Pestell won the under-17s 400m (55.60secs). In the throws there were also wins for Owen Garrett (javelin), Moni Brady (shot) and Alice Grosjean (discus), plus Mairi Carver- Brown and Holly Sanigar in the 800m. » Racing in the Chew Valley 10k, Dave Eagon claimed victory in 34:58, more than 30 seconds ahead of second place. Kate Hoffen was 1st over-50 veteran home in 49:28.

Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live SPort FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 53 Breaking news at WWW.Bristol. live A weekly column from the former Bristol Rovers player and manager IAN HOLLOWAY SoMETIMES things appear so gloomy for footballers, managers and supporters that the only sensible reaction is to laugh. I can’t imagine there were too many smiles on the faces of Bristol Rovers players and fans boarding their coaches for the marathon journey home from Hartlepool after last weekend’s 1-0 defeat, and that would also have been the case at Ashton Gate on Wednesday night when Bristol City conceded an injury-time goal against Luton Town to extend their run without a home win to 14 games. At such times it can seem the world is against you. But there is no point in dwelling darkly on what has already gone and the best pickme-up can be to find a way of lifting the atmosphere with some humour. Gerry Francis was brilliant at that when Rovers manager. He hated losing as much as any person I have ever met, but would invariably find a way of creating smiles among the players when heads might have dropped. If Nigel Martyn made a mistake in goal, as City’s excellent ‘keeper Dan Bentley did at the end of the Luton game, Gerry wouldn’t hang him out to dry. Instead, he would say something like: “Any chance of making a save, Flapper?”, which would break the ice and ease any tension in the dressing room. I remember my old mate Andy Reece once conceded own goals in successive games. At the next training session, Gerry made us mark him, even if he was on our side, pointing out that he was more of a threat to us than the opposition. If we faced a long trip home following a defeat, there would usually be things in place to lift spirits, providing we hadn’t played too badly. Either Gerry himself or one of the players would prepare a sports quiz in advance and everyone would have to interact as we were split into teams to compete with one another. The team that finished last would find their name posted on the noticeboard in our dressing room with some appropriate comment, so you did your best to answer the questions and it took our minds off the game. Gerry also had a pal called Ted Sellars, now in his 80s and still a friend of mind, who would often travel on the team bus. He played the harmonica. If we had a good result, there would be a Former Bristol Rovers manager Gerry Francis was brilliant at lifting the mood following a defeat, says Ian Holloway Game for a laugh? Sometimes it’s the best approach to adversity raucous singalong and even if we lost it would end up happening at some point later in the journey. Gerry’s dad also travelled with us and he loved the song ‘Underneath the Arches’ by Flanagan and Allen, so that was sung regularly, along with ‘Maybe it’s Because I’m a Londoner’, which our manager insisted on being part of the repertoire. Sometimes there is nothing anyone can do to avoid a nightmare journey, like the one me and my Rovers team-mates had when we played Hull City in the 1984-85 season. We stopped for lunch at a hotel an hour away from the ground and when we got there found it was also being used by the great Liverpool team of the time. Imagine the embarrassment when our coach wouldn’t start for the final leg of the journey because of a flat battery. After failing to get it going with jump leads, we saw the Liverpool lads going to board their coach and had to ask the likes of Ian Rush and Kenny Dalglish to help our lads give it a push. What they thought of us country bumpkins, I can only imagine. Anyway, nothing worked and the directors had to order a fleet of taxis to transport us to Boothferry Park. Even that wasn’t the end of the story. The taxi which goalkeeper Ray Cashley and I were travelling in had a puncture en route and Ray ended up changing the wheel! We got to the ground about 15 minutes before kick-off, but I still started the game, which we lost 2-0. As a manager, I never quite suffered the sort of run City are on at Ashton Gate, although a similar one got me sacked at Rovers. During Blackpool’s promotion season to the Premier League in 2009-10 we lost three games on the trot and I remembered the Gerry Francis way of dealing with adversity. Instead of training on the Friday before the next match, I took my players to the nearby Splash and Slide water park in the morning and followed that with lunch at the Grosvenor Casino, where we relaxed further with a game of poker. It did the trick because the next day we fought out a goalless draw at Preston North End to end the losing streak and went on to win promotion through the playoffs. Picture: Ian Cooper tHAT may sound a somewhat eccentric method of changing results, but I felt my team were playing as I wanted, even in defeat, and that a change of environment would be more beneficial than more training drills. Nigel Pearson is a vastly experienced manager and will have his own ways of handling spells when things don’t go to plan. I can only offer the same advice to City fans as I did to Rovers supporters in this column last week – stick with the man in charge and be patient. There isn’t a lot wrong with how their team are performing from what I can tell and sometimes it can take just one moment of luck to achieve the result that ends a bad run. Quite often that one moment can also transform confidence and it wouldn’t surprise me if, once City win again at Ashton Gate, they go on to a sequence of good results there. Fans moaning will only serve to prolong the losing run further. Sometimes it is difficult to smile and be positive, but it is the only attitude that helps the team.

54 BRISTOL POST FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live SPoRt Breaking news at WWW.Bristol. live Football Why it’s not gone to plan yet for Joey’s Rovers this season Sam FROST sam.frost@reachplc.com FIvE weeks of Bristol Rovers’ season are in the books, and so far things haven’t gone to plan for Joey Barton’s side. The league table, they say, is an irrelevance at this point in the calendar, but victory for Sutton united on Tuesday has left Barton’s side just a single point and place clear of the bottom two. That, certainly, will be a cause for concern for all involved and invested in the club. high standards have been set for Rovers and their manager, mainly by himself, and the club is falling way short of them early in the campaign. Confidence will remain in Barton’s inner circle that things will improve and his wholly-changed squad will come good, but the start of the season has thrown up plenty of talking points, ahead of tomorrow’s home game against leyton Orient. THE GOALKEEPER BATTLE BaRTOn wanted James Belshaw to bring competition to Rovers’ goalkeeping ranks, but few expected the contest to be so stiff, with the former harrogate ‘keeper making an excellent case for the number one spot. The 30-year-old got his chance at Rovers much sooner than expected, stepping into the breach with anssi Jaakkola’s achilles injury resurfacing, and the Finland international has a job on his hands trying to win back the gloves when he returns to training in the next week or two. Belshaw has not only shown his reflexes but the all-round quality a goalkeeper needs, showing impressive authority in the penalty area, with dealing with crosses - a longstanding problem for the Gas - something he appears a natural at. So the manager has his wish; Rovers boss Joey Barton urges his side on at Hartlepool last Saturday Rovers have excellent competition for places and with highly-rated teenager Jed Ward coming through the ranks, the Gas are pretty stacked in the position. INDIVIDUAL ERRORS IndIvIdual errors are part of the game, but Rovers are committing them at an alarming rate and it is underpinning their poor start in the fourth tier. Starting on the opening day when Jaakkola left his line to claim a cross but never reached the ball, Rovers’ performances have been littered with mistakes that have duly been capitalised on by predatory opponents. Even in victory, there have been moments of sloppiness from Rovers where they have escaped punishment. The stuttering and often unexciting performances are par for the course, given Rovers sent more than 20 players packing in the summer and brought in 17 new signings, but a lack of chemistry should not lead to such a high number of costly mistakes. This is an experienced group of players that should be performing much better than seven points from seven games, making basic errors along the way. HOME COMFORTS BUT AWAY WOES CONTINUE WhEREvER they played last season, Rovers were not a good side, failing to find enough form home or away to mount a credible bid for survival. They have continued that terrible trend away from home, taking just one point from four games on the road, with the last league victory on their travels coming at aFC Wimbledon in december, back when Paul Tisdale was in charge. This is a huge problem for Barton to sort in the coming weeks or the chances of a run towards the top end of the table - which Barton has claimed is a certainty - will become increasingly remote. But at least the home form is showing signs of improving, with Rovers winning their last three games at the Memorial Stadium without shipping a goal. TOWERING TAYLOR ThERE is plenty of experienced pros in and around him, but 19-year-old Connor Taylor has become the anchor of Rovers’ defence in recent weeks. a difficult start to life at Rovers had him out of the team and out of the squad at Exeter, but the Stoke City loanee has responded brilliantly to the challenge. he was pivotal in the wins over Cheltenham Town and Crawley Town and, despite being the least experienced member of Rovers’ centre-back ranks, Taylor has cemented his spot in the side for now. WHAT’S THE PLAN? PaTTERnS of play and methodology to win games is an increasingly in-vogue topic as the game becomes more nuanced and innovators at the top level lead the Xs and Os into new frontiers, but sexy, modern football is probably a tad over-discussed. Because any good team, particularly in the lower leagues, has an excellent command of basic principles and adheres to a clear plan to maximise its strengths and minimise its weaknesses. at the moment, Rovers have put neither of those things into action. When it comes to a plan, it is hard to recognise how Rovers are trying to hurt the opposition when in possession. Certainly away from home, they have been guilty of moving the ball too slowly. Rovers rank in the bottom half of the league in terms of aerial duels per game, indicating the ball is on the floor more than it is for most clubs in league Two, but that could be explained by the inaccuracy of their passing. 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Follow us on FaceBook /Bristol live SPort Football Pearson: It was a mistake, not collective anxiety, that cost us James PIERCY james.piercy@reachplc.com NIGEL Pearson admits Dan Bentley’s mistake ultimately cost Bristol City, as opposed to a collective defensive failing, as the Robins conceded a stoppage-time equaliser for the second time at Ashton Gate this season. A month on from their 1-1 draw against Blackpool on the opening weekend of the campaign, City took the lead via a Nathan Baker header but were unable to see the game out as Luton substitute Danny Hylton nipped in to score. The build-up to the goal, however, saw Bentley fumble a loose ball on the byline, as it appeared to be running out of play, allowing Carlos Mendes Gomes to slide in a cross to which Hylton tapped into an unguarded net. City, however, were indebted to Bentley prior to that moment with the goalkeeper making two excellent saves to deny Henri Lansbury and Cameron Jerome amid a frantic end to the opening 45 minutes, in which Pearson admits they could have been 2-0 down. But the result means the Robins have gone 14 games without a win at Ashton Gate, with promotion candidates Fulham and Bournemouth the next two visitors to BS3. “You’ve asked the question so you know the answer,” was Pearson’s response, when asked if Bentley was culpable for the equaliser. “Dan made a couple of really excellent saves in the first half. I don’t think straight after the game is the time to do that (speak to Bentley). What he says to his teammates, I don’t know but I’ll leave them to that. “The bottom line is, I try and be as pragmatic but as honest as I can. I know it was a game we could have easily of lost but when you’re in a Bristol City players show their disappointment after Danny Hylton scored a stoppage-time equaliser for Luton at Ashton Gate on Wednesday night Picture: Harry Trump/Getty winning position it’s very frustrating to not come away with three points but I can’t argue it’s not a fair result. “Once you get into the winning position, we didn’t do things as well as we could do but the bottom line is, it’s a mistake, it’s not a collective anxiety. I didn’t see that. “When Andy King went on, he was organising people and I thought we looked relatively comfortable in all honesty. It’s an unwanted record we’ve got but we have to make sure our ability to rise above negative feeling is there. “I’m as frustrated as everybody else but I have to try, along with staff, find the answers and keep working in a way that gives the players belief that we’ll come out on the other side.” Pearson made just one change to his starting line-up from Preston on the weekend, with Alex Scott replacing Andy King to try to bring greater guile and craft to the final third. But the England Under-19 international struggled to impact the game from an attacking right-sided position and was withdrawn before FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 BRISTOL POST 55 Breaking news at WWW.Bristol. live half-time for Nahki Wells in a clear tactical change. “Look, remember he’s 18. He’s only just 18 and he was playing in a position that’s not his favoured position,” added Pearson. “I’m not going to expose the lad. He’ll be hurting but he’s a top player. “I think he’ll play for England one day. He is a real talent. Sometimes you take players out of the firing line because it’s not working for them. I take the responsibility for picking him in the first place.” City return to action with a trip to seventh-placed QPR tomorrow. Forest seeking new manager after sacking Hughton NottiNgham Forest have announced manager Chris hughton has been “relieved of his duties” after the club’s poor start to the season. Forest sit bottom of the Sky Bet Championship and Wednesday night’s 2-0 home defeat to middlesbrough left them without a win from any of their first seven matches. the club said on their official website: “Nottingham Forest can confirm that Chris hughton has been relieved of his duties as firstteam manager. “the club would like to place on record its appreciation for Chris’ efforts. Chris joined the club in a difficult period for everyone in football and around the world and we thank him for the way he has conducted himself during his tenure. “Steven Reid will take temporary charge of the first team as interim head coach.” Former Newcastle and Brighton boss hughton spent less than 11 months in charge at the City ground after signing a two-year deal when he replaced Sabri Lamouchi in october last year. Forest added: “the search for the permanent successor has begun and the club will update supporters in due course. the club would like to wish Chris all the best in his future career.” Forest have made their worst start to a season in more than 100 years and slipped to a fifth successive home defeat in all competitions on Wednesday. they will be bidding for their first win of the season at huddersfield tomorrow under former Blackburn and millwall midfielder Reid, who had been first-team coach. hughton is the fifth permanent manager to depart the City ground since greek shipping magnate Evangelos marinakis bought the club off Fawaz al hasawi in 2017. Gasheads revel in Lockyer’s celebrations at Ashton Gate Sam FROST sam.frost@reachplc.com OVER seven years and 285 appearances, Tom Lockyer became Mr Dependable for Bristol Rovers. Rising through the academy and developing into a stalwart, and full international, under Darrell Clarke. He was, in many ways, a poster boy for that era of the club; a fine leader and ambassador for the Gas, anybody who has met Lockyer only has good things to say about him. It’s why, in the main, when he departed on a free transfer in the summer of 2019 for Charlton Athletic, he left with mostly good wishes and an understanding he deserved his crack at Championship football. Time has only enhanced Lockyer’s legacy at the Memorial Stadium as he’s become a reliable Championship-level defender for Charlton and now Luton Town, justifying his decision to leave but he has also displayed he still has blue and white running through his veins. For understandable reasons Lockyer has always been targeted by Bristol City fans due to his Gas connections, and in a game at The Valley in December 2019 he enjoyed a little playful banter at full-time and after the game. That battle was raised up a level at Ashton Gate on Wednesday night as Luton snatched a 91stminute equaliser, with Lockyer Tom Lockyer shows his delight at Luton’s stoppage-time equaliser against Bristol City having no doubt been on the end of verbal volleys throughout. As referee Jeremy Simpson blew his whistle and the Hatters claimed a 1-1 draw, Lockyer turned to the City fans on his side of the field in the Dolman Stand, cupped his ear, stood motionless for a few moments to take it all in and then delivered a couple of passionate “come ons” to further endear himself to the red half of Bristol. Chants of “who are ya?” were among the more polite responses but as the footage was posted on social media, Gasheads revelled in their man back in Bristol and doing his bit for the club. Outside of that moment, Lockyer delivered a fine performance at the heart of the Luton defence, keeping City at bay throughout most of the match and even striking the post late in the first half. The draw took the Hatters to 13th in the table on nine points and level with City. OFFICIALHORSERACING COMMENTARY AND RESULTS Cal09016094248 Calscost65pperminplusyourtelephonecompany’snetworkaccesscharge.18+only. SP:Spoke.Helpline:03332023390

Sport ★★★ in print | online | mobile why you have to laugh things off sometimes IAN HOLLOWAY COLUMN: page 53 ★★★ FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 In brief... Dyche delight at his 4-year Burnley deal »» Manager Sean Dyche has signed a new four-year deal with Burnley. The 50-year-old is the longestserving boss in the Premier League, having been at Turf Moor for nearly nine years, and he has now committed his future to the Clarets until the summer of 2025. Dyche said: “It is nice to be able to get this deal completed and now look towards the future of this football club and its constant evolution.” England up to third PAT PLANS TO KEEP THE FANS ENTERTAINED »» England are up to third in Fifa’s men’s world rankings, equalling their highest ever position. Following their defeat by Italy in the Euro 2020 final in July, England beat Hungary and Andorra 4-0 in World Cup qualifying earlier this month before drawing with Poland. Gareth Southgate’s men move above world champions France, who drop to fourth after two draws and a win.Belgium remain in top spot, while Brazil are second. Wales stay in 19th. GIVE US YOUR VIEW: To connect on a local sports story, visit www.BRISTOLPOST.co.uk SOUTH WEST WEBSITE OF THE YEAR BRISTOL BEARS BOSS SAYS HIS TEAM’S ADVENTUROUS STYLE WON’T CHANGE AHEAD OF TONIGHT’S SEASON-OPENER AGAINST SARACENS PAGE 52 Pat Lam’s Bristol side finished top of the regular Premiership table last season but lost to Harlequins in the play-offs Picture: David Rogers/Getty Published by Reach PLC at Temple Way, Bristol, BS2 0HD. Printed by Reach PLC. For permission to copy cuttings, contact the NLA, 7 Church Road, Tunbridge Wells, TN1 1NL. Tel 01892 525273 or email copy@nla.co.uk The recycled paper content of UK newspapers in 2016 was 62.8 per cent.

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