Let There Be Light (2017) - News - IMDb
Let There Be Light (2017) - News Poster

(I) (2017)

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Palm Springs Film Fest 2020 Presents a Showcase of 51 International Oscar Contenders

Palm Springs Film Fest 2020 Presents a Showcase of 51 International Oscar Contenders
The annual Palm Springs International Film Festival in California is always an opportunity to catch up on many of the contenders for the Best International Feature — née Best Foreign-Language — Film Academy Award. Now in its 31st edition, the festival this year has 51 of them, from favorite-to-beat “Parasite” from South Korea and Senegal’s “Atlantics,” to other films quietly making strides in the race: Czech Republic’s “The Painted Bird,” Sweden’s “And Then We Danced,” Russia’s “Beanpole,” Romania’s “The Whistlers,” North Macedonia’s documentary contender “Honeyland,” Norway’s “Out Stealing Horses,” and many more.

The festival will screen 188 films from 81 countries, including 51 premieres, from January 2-13, 2020. The Awards Buzz section includes a special jury of international film critics, who will review these films to present the Fipresci Award for Best Foreign Language Film of the Year, as well as Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Screenplay in this category.
See full article at Indiewire »

Palm Springs Film Festival Sets Lineup; ‘An Almost Ordinary Summer’ & ‘Military Wives’ Are Opening- And Closing-Night Movies

Palm Springs Film Festival Sets Lineup; ‘An Almost Ordinary Summer’ & ‘Military Wives’ Are Opening- And Closing-Night Movies
One hundred eighty-eight films films from 81 countries including 51 premieres highlight the lineup for the 31st annual Palm Springs International Film Festival, which kicks off January 2 with a star-studded gala that has become a must-stop during awards season for Oscar hopefuls. The festival, which runs through January 13, also is known for showcasing a large number of submissions in the Motion Picture Academy’s International Film (formerly Foreign Language) competition and will feature 51 of those entries.

The opening-night film on January 3 is the Italian farce An Almost Ordinary Summer, while the closer is director Peter Cattaneo’s heartwarming dramedy Military Wives in which Kristin Scott Thomas, Sharon Horgan and Jason Flemyng lead a superb ensemble cast. The film had its world premiere at September’s Toronto International Film Festival and became an instant crowd-pleaser. Bleecker Street releases it in 2020.

Among the previously announced honorees at the January 2 gala are Antonio Banderas, Renee Zellweger,
See full article at Deadline »

Denisa Buranová crowned Slovakian cinematographer of the year - Festivals / Awards - Slovakia

The Association of Slovak Cinematographers has dished out awards in recognition of the best domestic works. Slovakian DoP Denisa Buranová has received the main Camera 2019 Award for her work on the film By a Sharp Knife at the biannual gathering of domestic professionals from the Association of Slovak Cinematographers. Buranová belongs to the young generation of Slovakian cinematographers, and she also lensed Iveta Grófová’s Crystal Bear-winning Little Harbour, for which she also won the national The Sun in a Net Award for Best Cinematography (see the news), and Mira Fornay’s short film Gardeners. She has also worked with established director Peter Kerekes. Her work on Teodor Kuhn’s political thriller and family drama was singled out from among a total of 18 feature-length fiction films in contention. The runners-up were Ján Meliš for lensing Marko Škop’s drama Let There Be Light and Martin Štrba for Julius Ševčík’s period drama The.
See full article at Cineuropa »

The Father emerges triumphant at Arras - Arras 2019 - Awards

Kristina Grozeva and Petar Valchanov win the Golden Atlas. The Silver Atlas goes to Marko Skop for Let There Be Light and the Audience Award goes to Federico Bondi’s Dafne. The competition jury of the 20th Arras Film Festival, chaired by French filmmaker Thierry Klifa, has bestowed the Golden Atlas - Grand Jury Prize upon The Father by Kristina Grozeva and Petar Valchanov. Already crowned Best Film at Karlovy Vary and screened in Toronto, the third feature from the Bulgarian duo, after The Lesson and Glory, has also won in Arras the Critics’ Award and the Youth Jury Award. Written by the two directors with their usual partner Decho Taralezkov, the tender and hilarious film recounts the misadventures of a son (Ivan Barnev) trying his best to desperately contain the whims of his father (Ivan Savov) following the death of his mother. Produced by Bulgarian company Abraxas and co-produced by.
See full article at Cineuropa »

Made In Prague returns for 23rd edition by Amber Wilkinson - 2019-11-04 16:03:21

The Nagano Tapes will close the festival Photo: Courtesy of Made In Prague The Made In Prague Festival returns to London this month for its 23rd edition. Running from November 8 to 17, this year's selection aims to consider contemporary Czech society 30 years after the dramatic changes brought about by the 1989 Velvet Revolution.

It will open with comedy mini-series Most! and close with The Nagano Tapes, which charts the underdog story of the Czech ice hockey team’s surprising victory at the 1998 Olympics.

This year, there are seven UK premieres in the line-up, including comedy/revenge thriller Old Timers, which sees two ageing Second World War veterans embark on a final mission to murder the communist prosecutor who once jailed them. The lead actor Jiří Schmitzer and directors Martin Dušek and Ondřej Provazník will attend a Q&a. Other programme highlights include the latest from Eva Nova director Marko Škop, Let There Be Light,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

‘Ondog,’ ‘The Invisible Life’ Top Spain’s 64th Valladolid Festival of Arthouse Cinema

‘Ondog,’ ‘The Invisible Life’ Top Spain’s 64th Valladolid Festival of Arthouse Cinema
Valladolid, Spain – The Valladolid Intl. Film Festival (Seminci), the truest event dedicated to international arthouse cinema on Spain’s festival calendar, capped off eight days of screenings, press conferences and roundtables by handing out awards on Saturday evening at the Spanish city’s historic Calderon Theater. The evening’s big winners: Wang Quan’an’s “Öndög” and Karim Aïnouz’s “The Invisible Life.”

After premiering in competition at February’s Berlinale, Quan’an’s Mongolian dramedy “Öndög” has hit its stride eight months later scoring a best film award at last week’s Ghent Intl. Film Festival before repeating the feat at last night’s closing gala along with a best cinematography award for its Beijing-based French cinematographer Aymerick Pilarski.

Set on the seemingly endless planes of Mongolia, the film follows a rookie officer and a veteran shepard tasked with protecting a crime scene from harsh elements and harsher wolves.
See full article at Variety »

Marek Kuboš has a Secret to share - Production / Funding - Slovakia

The experienced Slovakian documentarian is working on his first feature-length fiction outing. Slovakian documentarian Marek Kuboš, who recently bade farewell to documentary filmmaking with the award-winning The Last Self-Portrait, which, as well as scooping other gongs, was victorious at the national Sun in a Net awards (see the news), is now making the leap to fiction filmmaking. Kuboš laid out the reasons why he might not make another documentary in his aforementioned cinematic love letter to documentary, and is joining the ranks of his peers who have traded documentary for fiction filmmaking. They include Marko Škop, Ivan Ostrochovský (Koza), Juraj Lehotský, Jaro Vojtek (Children) and Peter Kerekes, who is also preparing his first fiction feature, Censor. Secret, as Kuboš’s film is titled, is described as a psychological and moral drama, and its aim is to “capture the journey of the soul of...
See full article at Cineuropa »

Let There Be Light wins the second Almaty Film Festival - Almaty 2019 – Awards

The Grand Prix was bestowed upon Marko Škop’s drama at the up-and-coming Kazakh gathering, while Maryam Touzani received the Best Director Award for Adam. The fresh-faced and dynamic Almaty Film Festival has wrapped after a successful seven-day run (14-20 September), and ended on Friday night with the awards ceremony, which was held at the Palace of the Republic in Kazakhstan’s largest city. The triumphant film of the night was Marko Škop’s Let There Be Light, which won the Grand Prix in the Official Selection, focused on films that were co-produced by at least two countries. The prizes were dished out by the International Jury, headed up by British director-producer Hugh Hudson, and comprising Russian producer Natalya Ivanova, Portuguese producer António Costa Valente, president of the Tokyo International Film Festival Takeo Hisamatsu and Kazakh actress Samal Yeslyamova. The Best Director Award went to Maryam Touzani’s feature debut,
See full article at Cineuropa »

Let There Be Light wins at Batumi - Batumi 2019 – Awards

Other winners include A Tale of Three Sisters, End of Season, Shooting the Mafia, Lovemobil, Forman vs. Forman and Reza Mirkarimi's Castle of Dreams. The 14th Batumi International Arthouse Film Festival (15-22 September) wrapped last night with a ceremony in the Black Sea city's State Musical Centre. Marko Škop's Karlovy Vary title Let There Be Light picked up the Grand Prix, just two days after winning the same, main award at the Almaty Film Festival. Iran's Reza Mirkarimi received the Best Director gong for Castle of Dreams, as well as the Award of the Georgian Film Critics’ Jury. Emin Alper's A Tale of Three Sisters won both accolades in the acting categories: Best Actress for Ece Yüksel and Best Actor for Kayhan Açikgöz. Finally, the Jury's Special Prize went to Elmar Imanov's Rotterdam title End of Season (Germany/Azerbaijan/Georgia). In the Documentary Competition, Kim Longinotto's
See full article at Cineuropa »

Ray & Liz triumphs at Yerevan’s Golden Apricot - Golden Apricot 2019

The winners of the 16th edition of Armenia's biggest festival include Beanpole, Horizon and Midnight Traveler, while Carlos Reygadas was honoured with the Parajanov's Thaler Award. The 16th Golden Apricot International Film Festival (8-14 July) wrapped with a closing ceremony that saw Richard Billingham's slow-burning festival hit Ray & Liz pick up the main award, the Golden Apricot for Best Feature Film. The jury, presided over by veteran Russian filmmaker Aleksandr Mindadze (who was himself honoured with the "Let There Be Light" Prize of the Armenian Apostolic Church), and comprising Swiss director Nicolas Wadimoff, Iranian filmmaker and head of Tehran's Fajr International Film Festival Reza Mirkarimi, Tribeca executive producer Amy Hobby, Venice Film Festival programmer Paolo Bertolin, British producer Elizabeth Karlsen, and French actress and director of Georgian descent Nino Kirtadze, gave the trophy for second place, the Silver Apricot Award, to the Russian historical drama Beanpole, which previously garnered.
See full article at Cineuropa »

Karlovy Vary Film Festival reveals 2019 winners

Karlovy Vary Film Festival reveals 2019 winners
Winners include Bulgarian-Greek comedy ‘The Father’ and Jan-Ole Gerster’s ‘Lara’.

Bulgarian-Greek comedy The Father won the Grand Prix - Crystal Globe at the 54th Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (June 28 – July 6), which closed yesterday with its annual awards ceremony.

Scroll down for full list of winners

Directed by Kristina Grozeva and Petar Valchanov, The Father was selected by grand jury comprising Annemarie Jacir, Štěpán Hulík, Sergei Loznitsa, Angeliki Papoulia and Charles Tesson. The Crystal Globe comes with $25,000 prize money.

The film tells the story of a middle-aged man (Ivan Barnev) attempting to stop his widowed
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘The Father’ and ‘Lara’ Win Big at Karlovy Vary International Film Festival

‘The Father’ and ‘Lara’ Win Big at Karlovy Vary International Film Festival
The 2019 installment of the sprawling Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (June 28 – July 6), held for more than 50 years at the sunny resort hub of the Czech Republic, boasted 12,521 accredited attendees, including 395 filmmakers, 1158 global industry professionals, and 605 journalists. They watched a selection of 177 films at 497 screenings.

Karlovy Vary, run by president Jiří Bartoška and artistic director Karel Och, runs three competitive categories. “The Father,” from Bulgaria and Greece, took home the Grand Prix, and “Lara,” from Germany, won three awards. The full list of winners is below.

Official Selection – Competition

Jury: Štěpán Hulík (Czech Republic), Annemarie Jacir (State of Palestine),Sergei Loznitsa (Ukraine), Angeliki Papoulia (Greece), Charles Tesson (France)

Grand Prix – Crystal Globe

Kristina Grozeva and Petar Valchanov’s “The Father

Special Jury Prize

Jan-Ole Gerster’s “Lara” (Germany)

Best Director Award

Tim Mielants for “Patrick” (Belgium)

Best Actress Award

Corinna Harfouch, star of Jan-Ole Gerster’s “Lara” (Germany)

Best Actor Award

Milan Ondrík,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘The Father’ and ‘Lara’ Win Big at Karlovy Vary International Film Festival

‘The Father’ and ‘Lara’ Win Big at Karlovy Vary International Film Festival
The 2019 installment of the sprawling Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (June 28 – July 6), held for more than 50 years at the sunny resort hub of the Czech Republic, boasted 12,521 accredited attendees, including 395 filmmakers, 1158 global industry professionals, and 605 journalists. They watched a selection of 177 films at 497 screenings.

Karlovy Vary, run by president Jiří Bartoška and artistic director Karel Och, runs three competitive categories. “The Father,” from Bulgaria and Greece, took home the Grand Prix, and “Lara,” from Germany, won three awards. The full list of winners is below.

Official Selection – Competition

Jury: Štěpán Hulík (Czech Republic), Annemarie Jacir (State of Palestine),Sergei Loznitsa (Ukraine), Angeliki Papoulia (Greece), Charles Tesson (France)

Grand Prix – Crystal Globe

Kristina Grozeva and Petar Valchanov’s “The Father

Special Jury Prize

Jan-Ole Gerster’s “Lara” (Germany)

Best Director Award

Tim Mielants for “Patrick” (Belgium)

Best Actress Award

Corinna Harfouch, star of Jan-Ole Gerster’s “Lara” (Germany)

Best Actor Award

Milan Ondrík,
See full article at Indiewire »

On the road to a win at Karlovy Vary by Richard Mowe - 2019-07-06 19:35:36

Patricia Clarkson on the red carpet for tonight’s prize-giving ceremony at Karlovy Vary Photo: Film Servis Karlovy Vary

The Bulgarian-Greek road comedy The Father took top honours, winning a Crystal Globe in tonight’s gala closing ceremony at the 54th Karlovy Vary International Film Festival.

The films tells of a long-suffering photographer trying to cope with his father’s weird behaviour in the wake of his wife’s death. It is the fourth team project by writer-directors Kristina Grozeva and Petar Valchanov.

The Spanish film The August Virgin has won this year´s Award of The International Federation of Film Critics (Fipresci). The citation read: "The award goes to a modest, unpretentious film, skilfully opening a number of issues and tackling a range of emotions while maintaining an inspiringly positive worldview."

The jury also honoured German psychological family drama Lara by Jan-Ole Gerster, which follows a protective mother’s
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Karlovy Vary Winners: Bulgarian Pic ‘The Father’ & German Drama ‘Lara’ Win Main Prizes

Karlovy Vary Winners: Bulgarian Pic ‘The Father’ & German Drama ‘Lara’ Win Main Prizes
The 54th Karlovy Vary International Film Festival has wrapped today and set its winners with Bulgarian road-trip comedy The Father taking home the top prize Grand Prix Crystal Globe, which comes with cash prize of $25,000. Scroll down for a full list of winners.

The Czech festival’s special jury prize went to German drama Lara, while best director went to Tim Mielants for Belgian feature Patrick. Milan Ondrík won best actor for his role in Czech film Let There Be Light and Corinna Harfouch won the best actress accolade for the aforementioned Lara.

This year’s competition jury comprised Štěpán Hulík, Annemarie Jacir, Sergei Loznitsa, Angeliki Papoulia and Charles Tesson. As previously revealed, there were career Crystal Globes for Julianne Moore and Patricia Clarkson.

Full List Of Winners:

Grand Prix – Crystal Globe (25 000 Usd)

The financial award is shared equally by the director and producer of the award-winning film.

The Father / Bashtata

Directed by: Kristina Grozeva,
See full article at Deadline »

Bulgarian-Greek Road Comedy ‘The Father’ Wins at Karlovy Vary

Bulgarian-Greek Road Comedy ‘The Father’ Wins at Karlovy Vary
Family angst and off-the-wall humor dominated the 54th Karlovy Vary film fest prize race, with Bulgarian-Greek road comedy “The Father” scoring the Crystal Globe Saturday eve in a gala closing ceremony at the Hotel Thermal.

The story of a long-suffering photographer trying to manage his father’s increasingly unhinged behavior in the wake of his wife’s death, the film is the fourth team project by writer-directors Kristina Grozeva and Petar Valchanov.

The jury also honored German psychological family drama “Lara” by Jan-Ole Gerster, which follows a protective mother’s frustrations as her aloof son faces an upcoming piano recital. Lead actress Corinna Harfouch took the actress prize for her tortured turn in the film.

Tim Mielants won the director prize for “Patrick,” his study of hammer obsession by a socially challenged maintenance man for a Belgian nudist camp, while Milan Ondrik won the actor prize for Slovak-Czech family drama “Let There Be Light,
See full article at Variety »

Karlovy Vary Film Review: ‘Let There Be Light’

Karlovy Vary Film Review: ‘Let There Be Light’
The multilayered “Let There Be Light” is an earnest, relatable state-of-the-nation drama from helmer-writer Marko Škop that highlights xenophobia, religious hypocrisy and the rise of the extreme right in a small Slovak village. Tapping into numerous of-the-moment issues, the story unfolds from the perspective of a middle-aged carpenter who returns at Christmas from working on a construction job in Germany and finds his community (and his sons) in thrall to a controlling Catholic priest and a mysterious, far-right paramilitary youth group called The Guard. Although some may be frustrated by former documentarian Škop’s observational rather than overtly critical view of his country’s rising nationalism, the film raises important and provocative questions for which there are no easy answers.

Cheerful construction worker Milan grew up in the remote village where his family still lives. He was raised by a brutal, critical father (Ľubomír Paulovič) and trained as a carpenter from a young age.
See full article at Variety »

John Huston’s Groundbreaking ‘Let There Be Light’ Continues to Resonate

When men returned home from World War II with brain injuries, they were diagnosed with “battle fatigue” or were referred to as “shell shocked.” It was not until the Vietnam War did doctors give the brain injuries and anxiety disorders a name: post-traumatic stress disorder, or Ptsd. In honor of June as Ptsd Awareness Month, it’s important to recognize one of the first films ever made on Ptsd: 1946’s “Let There Be Light.” According to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Ptsd is “a mental health problem that some people develop after experiencing or witnessing a life-threatening event, like combat,

John Huston’s Groundbreaking ‘Let There Be Light’ Continues to Resonate
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Karlovy Vary’s Works in Progress Lineup Lightens Up, Gives Women a Boost

  • Variety
Nine feature films currently in post-production will be presented this week as part of Karlovy Vary Film Festival’s Works in Progress section, a highlight of the festival’s Eastern Promises industry program.

The selected projects, which come from Central and Eastern Europe, the Balkans, the former Soviet Union, the Middle East and North Africa, will be pitched to an audience of industry guests on July 1 at 2 p.m. in Karlovy Vary’s Cas Cinema, followed by one-on-one meetings the next day. The best project will receive a €100,000 award that will enable the film to be completed at leading post-production facilities in Prague.

“Our main purpose is to help discover projects with good international potential that could travel beyond the region of Central and Eastern Europe,” said Karlovy Vary head of film industry office Hugo Rosak, programmer Lenka Tyrpakova and Wip manager Vojtech Strakaty by email.

The festival receives around
See full article at Variety »

How Absent Fathers Are at the Core of Far-Right Drama ‘Let There Be Light’

How Absent Fathers Are at the Core of Far-Right Drama ‘Let There Be Light’
Let There Be Light,” a contender for the Crystal Globe at the Karlovy Vary Film Festival, takes on troubling issues confronting Eastern Europe as a Slovak father, pushed to work abroad in the hopes of buying his family a better life, discovers his absence has allowed his eldest son to drift into a dangerous political fringe. Inspired by current events, writer/director Marko Škop takes on proto-fascist youth brigades and small-town intolerance in his sophomore feature. The film has its world premiere on Sunday.

How did the rise of so-called youth “Guard” groups factor into your thinking about what could drive a family apart?

For me the core of the film is the theme of a “missing father.” For the main character, Milan, it started with his father and his cold upbringing. He wants to be different: He would like to give his own children much more. In order to
See full article at Variety »
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