List of University of Michigan alumni

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Academic unit key
Symbol Academic unit

ARCH Taubman College
BUS Ross School of Business
COE College of Engineering
DENT School of Dentistry
GFSPP Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy
HHRS Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies
LAW Law School
LSA College of LS&A
MED Medical School
SMTD School of Music, Theatre and Dance
PHARM School of Pharmacy
SOE School of Education
SNRE School of Natural Resources
SOAD The Stamps School of Art & Design
SOI School of Information
SON School of Nursing
SOK School of Kinesiology
SOSW School of Social Work
SPH School of Public Health
TCAUP Architecture and Urban Planning
MDNG Matriculated, did not graduate

There are more than 500,000 living alumni of the University of Michigan. Notable alumni include computer scientist and entrepreneur Larry Page, actor James Earl Jones, and President of the United States Gerald Ford.

Alumni[edit]

Nobel laureates[edit]

Activists[edit]

AAAI, ACM, IEEE Fellows and Awardees[edit]

As of 2021, more than 65 Michigan alumni have been named as Fellows. Of those alumni, 4 have been awarded the Eckert-Mauchly Award (out of the 42 total awards granted), the most prestigious award for contributions to computer architecture.

  • Gul Agha (computer scientist) IEEE ACM Fellow
  • Frances Allen ACM Fellow; was an American computer scientist and pioneer in the field of optimizing compilers; a Turing Award winner;
  • Remzi Arpaci-Dusseau ACM Fellow; winner of the SIGOPS Mark Weiser Award
  • Farrokh Ayazi was named Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) in 2013[2] for contributions to micro-electro-mechanical resonators and resonant gyroscopes.
  • Andrew Barto, IEEE Fellow; IEEE Neural Networks Society Pioneer Award.
  • Randal Bryant ACM Fellow; IEEE Fellow
  • Robert Cailliau ACM Software System Award for Co-development of the World Wide Web
  • Sunghyun Choi, named an IEEE Fellow in 2014
  • Edgar F. Codd A Turing Award winner, was an English computer scientist who, while working for IBM, invented the relational model for database management, the theoretical basis for relational databases and relational database management systems; Turing Award Winner;
  • Stephen Cook, ACM Fellow; OC, OOnt (born December 14, 1939) is an American-Canadian computer scientist and mathematician who has made major contributions to the fields of complexity theory and proof complexity as a Turing Award Winner;
  • Edward S. Davidson IEEE Fellow; 2000 IEEE/ACM Eckert-Mauchly Award "for his seminal contributions to the design, implementation, and performance evaluation of high performance pipelines and multiprocessor systems"
  • Dorothy E. Denning ACM Fellow; The 2001 Augusta Ada Lovelace Award from the Assoc. for Women in Computing acknowledged "her outstanding in computer security and cryptography as well as her extraordinary contributions to national policy debates on cyber terrorism and information warfare
  • David DeWitt ACM Fellow; He received the ACM SIGMOD Innovations Award (now renamed SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award) in 1995 for his contributions to the database systems field.
  • Alexandra Duel-Hallen is a professor of electrical and computer engineering at North Carolina State University known for her research in wireless networks and was named an IEEE Fellow in 2011.
  • George V. Eleftheriades is a researcher in the field of metamaterials. He is a fellow of the IEEE and the Royal Society of Canada.
  • Usama Fayyad He holds over 30 patents and is a Fellow of both the AAAI (Association for Advancement of Artificial Intelligence) and the ACM (Association of Computing Machinery).
  • Michael J. Fischer ACM Fellow; is a computer scientist who works in the fields of distributed computing, parallel computing, cryptography, algorithms and data structures, and computational complexity. Fischer served as the editor-in-chief of the Journal of the ACM in 1982–1986.
  • James D. Foley is an ACM Fellow an IEEE Fellow and a member of the National Academy of Engineering
  • Stephanie Forrest ACM/AAAI Allen Newell Award (2011)
  • Elmer G. Gilbert IEEE Fellow. In control theory, he is well known for the “Gilbert realization,” still a standard topic in systems textbooks, and developed the foundational results for control over a moving horizon, which underlies model predictive control (MPC). Prof. Gilbert is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and Fellow of IEEE and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
  • Lee Giles ACM Fellow; IEEE Fellow; Most recently he received the 2018 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Computational Intelligence Society (CIS) Neural Networks Pioneer Award and the 2018 National Federation of Advanced Information Services (NFAIS) Miles Conrad Award.
  • Adele Goldberg (computer scientist) was president of the Association for computing Machinery (ACM) from 1984 to 1986
  • Robert M. Graham (ACM Fellow) was a cybersecurity researcher computer scientist
  • Herb Grosch ACM Fellow; Grosch received the Association for Computing Machinery Fellows Award in 1995; was an early computer scientist, perhaps best known for Grosch's law
  • Mark Guzdial ACM Fellow; He was the original developer of the CoWeb (or Swiki), one of the earliest wiki engines, which was implemented in Squeak and has been in use at institutions of higher education since 1998.
  • Rick Hayes-Roth AAAI Fellow;
  • Mark D. Hill He was named an Association for Computing Machinery Fellow in 2004 for "contributions to memory consistency models and memory system design", and was awarded the ACM SIGARCH Alan D. Berenbaum Distinguished Service Award in 2009; In 2019, he received the 2019 ACM - IEEE CS Eckert-Mauchly Award for "seminal contributions to the fields of cache memories, memory consistency models, transactional memory, and simulation."
  • Julia Hirschberg IEEE Fellow, member of the National Academy of Engineering, ACM Fellow, AAAI Fellow.
  • John M. Hollerbach named IEEE Fellow in 1996
  • Tara Javidi IEEE Fellow;
  • Bill Joy co-founder of Sun Microsystems In 1986, was awarded a Grace Murray Hopper Award by the ACM for his work on the Berkeley UNIX Operating System.
  • Nam Sung Kim, IEEE Fellow
  • John D. Kraus IEEE Fellow; winner of a IEEE Centennial Medal winner of the IEEE Heinrich Hertz Medal
  • David Kuck, Kuck is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is also a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has won the Eckert-Mauchly Award from ACM/IEEE and the IEEE Computer Society Charles Babbage Award.
  • Cliff Lampe Since 2018 he has been Executive Vice President for ACM SIGCHI.
  • John E. Laird ACM Fellow; AAAI Fellow; AAAS member;
  • Carl Landwehr IEEE Fellow; winner of the ACM's SIGSAC's Outstanding Contribution Award (2013)
  • Peter Lee (computer scientist) ACM Fellow. A longtime "Microsoft Researcher," Mr. Lee became the organization's head in 2013. In 2014, the organization had 1,100 advanced researchers "working in 55 areas of study in a dozen labs worldwide."
  • Chih-Jen Lin ACM Fellow; AAAI Fellow; IEEE Fellow is a leading researcher in machine learning, optimization, and data mining
  • K. J. Ray Liu IEEE Fellow; Liu was elected as 2021 IEEE President-Elect, and will serve as 2022 IEEE President and CEO.
  • Patrick Drew McDaniel ACM Fellow; IEEE Fellow
  • Olgica Milenkovic was named an IEEE Fellow "for contributions to genomic data compression".
  • Edmund Miller was named an IEEE Fellow "for contributions to computational electromagnetics".
  • David L. Mills He invented the Network Time Protocol (1981), the DEC LSI-11 based fuzzball router that was used for the 56 kbit/s NSFNET (1985), the Exterior Gateway Protocol (1984), inspired the author of ping for BSD (1983), and had the first FTP implementation. IEEE Fellow; winner of the IEEE Internet Award in 2013
  • Yi Murphey IEEE Fellow;
  • Shamkant Navathe ACM Fellow; a noted researcher in the field of databases with more than 150 publications on different topics in the area of databases.
  • Judith S. Olson ACM Fellow with over 110 published research articles
  • Kunle Olukotun ACM Fellow; is known as the “father of the multi-core processor
  • Elliott Organick Founder of ACM Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education, SIGCSE Award for Outstanding Contribution to Computer Science Education(1985)
  • C. Raymond Perrault named a founding member of AAAI in 1990 and a AAAS member in 2011
  • Raymond Reiter was a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), an AAAI Fellow, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.
  • Paul Resnick ACM Fellow as a result of his contributions to recommender systems, economics and computation, and online communities. Winner of the 2010 ACM Software Systems Award
  • Jennifer Rexford won the ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award (the award goes to a computer professional who makes a single, significant technical or service contribution at or before age 35) in 2005, for her work on introducing network routing subject to the different business interests of the operators of different subnetworks into Border Gateway Protocol.
  • Wally Rhines was named overall CEO of the Year by Portland Business Journal in 2012 and Oregon Technology Executive of the Year by the Technology Association of Oregon in 2003. He was named an IEEE Fellow in 2017.
  • Keith W. Ross ACM Fellow; He is the Dean of Engineering and Computer Science at NYU Shanghai and a computer science professor at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering.
  • Ronitt Rubinfeld ACM Fellow as of 2017 for Association for Computing Machinery for contributions to delegated computation, sublinear time algorithms and property testing.
  • Rob A. Rutenbar ACM Fellow; IEEE Fellow
  • Claude Shannon IEEE Medal of Honor; National Medal of Science; Claude E. Shannon Award
  • Daniel Siewiorek ACM, AAAS, IEEE Fellow; winner of the IEEE/ACM Eckert-Mauchly Award
  • David Slepian, IEEE Fellow; winner of a IEEE Centennial Medal
  • Anna Stefanopoulou IEEE Fellow,
  • Michael Stonebraker A Turing Award winner, He is the founder of many database companies, including Ingres Corporation, Illustra, Paradigm4, StreamBase Systems, Tamr, Vertica and VoltDB, and served as chief technical officer of Informix.
  • James W. Thatcher winner of ACM SIG Access Award (2008), for Outstanding Contributions to Computing and Accessibility for his contributions to digital accessibility
  • Eugene C. Whitney is an IEEE Fellow and a member of the IEEE Rotating Machinery, Synchronous and the Power Generation Hydraulic subcommittees.
  • Louise Trevillyan 2012: ACM SIGDA Pioneering Achievement Award
  • W. Rae Young In 1964 Mr. Young was named an IEEE Fellow "for contributions to mobile radio and data communications systems".
  • Bernard P. Zeigler IEEE Fellow in recognition of his contributions to the theory of discrete event simulation;
  • Xi Zhang (professor) Is an IEEE Fellow

Aerospace[edit]

Art, architecture, and design[edit]

See List of University of Michigan arts alumni

Arts and entertainment[edit]

See List of University of Michigan arts alumni

Astronauts[edit]

A campus plaza was named for McDivitt and White in 1965 to honor their accomplishments on the Gemini IV spacewalk. (At the time of its dedication, the plaza was near the engineering program's facilities, but the College of Engineering has since been moved. The campus plaza honoring them remains.) Two NASA space flights have been crewed entirely by University of Michigan degree-holders: Gemini IV by James McDivitt and Ed White in 1965 and Apollo 15 by Alfred Worden, David Scott (honorary degree) and James Irwin in 1971. The Apollo 15 astronauts left a 45-word plaque on the moon establishing its own chapter of the University of Michigan Alumni Association.[2] The Apollo 15 crew also named a crater on the moon "Wolverine".

Belles lettres[edit]

See List of University of Michigan arts alumni

Business[edit]

See List of University of Michigan business alumni

Churchill Scholarship or Marshall Scholarship[edit]

Churchill Scholarships are annual scholarships offered to graduates of participating universities in the United States and Australia, to pursue studies in engineering, mathematics, or other sciences for one year at Churchill College in the University of Cambridge.

  • 2011–2012: David Montague, Pure Mathematics
  • 2009–2010: Eszter Zavodszky, Medical Genetics
  • 2007–2008: Lyric Chen, BA in Political Science and Economics from the University of Michigan, Marshall Scholar 2007
  • 2006–2007: Charles Crissman, Pure Mathematics
  • 2005–2006: Christopher Hayward, Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics
  • 2005–2006: Jacob Bourjaily, graduated with honors, degree in Mathematics, Physics Marshall Scholar 2005
  • 1996–1997: Amy S. Faranski, Engineering
  • 1993–1994: Ariel K. Smits Neis, Clinical Biochemistry
  • 1990–1991: David J. Schwartz, Chemistry
  • 1989–1990: Eric J. Hooper, Physics
  • 1987–1988: Michael K. Rosen, Chemistry
  • 1985–1986: Laird Bloom, Molecular Biology
  • 1984–1985: Julia M. Carter, Chemistry
  • 1979–1980: David W. Mead, Engineering, Chemical

Computers, engineering, and technology[edit]

Turing and Grace Murray Hopper Award winners[edit]

Criminals, murderers, and infamous newsmakers[edit]

  • Hawley Harvey Crippen (MED: 1882), infamous murderer; an American homeopath, ear and eye specialist and medicine dispenser. In 1910 he was hanged in Pentonville Prison in London, England, for the murder of his wife Cora Henrietta Crippen.
  • François Duvalier (Public Health, 1944–45), repressive dictator of Haiti, excommunication from the Catholic Church; estimates of those killed by his regime are as high as 30,000.
  • Theodore Kaczynski (Ph.D. 1967), better known as the Unabomber, one of UM's most promising mathematicians; earned his Ph.D. by solving, in less than a year, a math problem that his advisor had been unable to solve; abandoned his career to engage in a mail bombing campaign.
  • Jack Kevorkian (MED: MD Pathology 1952), guilty of second-degree homicide after committing euthanasia by administering a lethal injection to Thomas Youk; spent eight years in prison
  • Nathan F. Leopold, Jr., thrill killer of Leopold and Loeb, transferred from Michigan in 1922 to the University of Chicago, before murdering 14-year-old Robert "Bobby" Franks
  • Richard A. Loeb (BA 1923), thrill killer of Leopold and Loeb, youngest graduate in the University of Michigan's history, murdered 14-year-old Robert "Bobby" Franks
  • Larry Nassar (1985), USA national team doctor who sexually assaulted approximately 250 people
  • Herman Webster Mudgett, a.k.a. H.H. Holmes (MED: MD 1884), 19th-century serial killer; one of the first documented American serial killers; confessed to 27 murders, of which nine were confirmed; actual body count could be as high as 250; took an unknown number of his victims from the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition; his story was novelized by Erik Larson in his 2003 book The Devil in the White City[3]

"Father of..."[edit]

  • John Jacob Abel (PHARM: Ph.D. 1883), North American "father of pharmacology"
  • Leon Jacob Cole (June 1, 1877 – February 17, 1948) was an American geneticist and ornithologist. He is regarded as the father of American bird banding.
  • George Dantzig (MA Math 1937), father of linear programming; studied at UM under T.H. Hildebrandt, R.L. Wilder, and G.Y. Rainich
  • Tony Fadell (COE: BSE CompE 1991), "father" of the Apple iPod; created all five generations of the iPod and the Apple iSight camera
  • Moses Gomberg (February 8, 1866 – February 12, 1947) was a chemistry professor at the University of Michigan. Called the father of radical chemistry.
  • Saul Hertz, M.D. (April 20, 1905 – July 28, 1950) was an American physician who devised the medical uses of radioactive iodine. Hertz pioneered the first targeted cancer therapies. Hertz is called the father of the field of theranostics, combining diagnostic imaging with therapy in a single chemical substance.
  • Ellis R. Kerley (September 1, 1924 – September 3, 1998) was an American anthropologist, and pioneer in the field of Forensic anthropology
  • Samuel Kirk (1904–1996) was an American psychologist and educator is recognized for his accomplishments in the field of special education, while sometimes being referred to as the “Father of Special Education”.
  • Chris Langton (Ph.D.), computer science; "father of artificial life"; founder of the Swarm Corporation; distinguished expellee of the Santa Fe Institute
  • Samuel C. Lind was a radiation chemist, referred to as "the father of modern radiation chemistry".
  • Li Shouheng (Chinese: 李寿恒; pinyin: Lǐ Shòuhéng; 1898–1995), also known as S. H. Li, was a Chinese educator, chemist and chemical engineer. Li founded the first chemical engineering department in China, thus is regarded as the Father of Modern Chinese Chemical Engineering.
  • Sid Meier, considered by some to be the "father of computer gaming"; created computer games Civilization, Pirates!, Railroad Tycoon, SimGolf
  • Daniel Okrent (BA 1969), public editor of New York Times; editor-at-large of Time Inc.; Pulitzer Prize finalist in history (Great Fortune, 2004); founding father of Rotisserie League Baseball
  • Oyekunle Ayinde "Kunle" Olukotun is the Cadence Design Systems Professor in the Stanford School of Engineering, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Stanford University and the director of the Stanford Pervasive Parallelism Lab. Olukotun is known as the “father of the multi-core processor”
  • Robert E. Park Emory S. Bogardus acknowledges that Park is the father of human ecology, proclaiming, "Not only did he coin the name but he laid out the patterns, offered the earliest exhibit of ecological concepts, defined the major ecological processes and stimulated more advanced students to cultivate the fields of research in ecology than most other sociologists combined."
  • Raymond Pearl was an American biologist, regarded as one of the founders of biogerontology
  • John Clark Salyer II he attended the University of Michigan where he received his MS in 1930. For his efforts as head of the Division of Wildlife Refuges, Salyer has become known as the "Father of the National Wildlife Refuge System".
  • Claude Shannon (April 30, 1916 – February 24, 2001) was an American mathematician, electrical engineer, and cryptographer known as "the father of information theory" and the "father of digital circuit design theory".
  • Richard Errett Smalley (June 6, 1943 – October 28, 2005) was the Gene and Norman Hackerman Professor of Chemistry and a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University. Upon Smalley's death, the US Senate passed a resolution to honor Smalley, crediting him as the "Father of Nanotechnology."
  • William A. Starrett, Jr. (June 14, 1877 – March 25, 1932) was an American builder and architect of skyscrapers. He was best known as the builder of the Empire State Building in New York City. He was once nicknamed the "father of the skyscraper".
  • Larry Teal (March 26, 1905 - July 11, 1984) is considered by many to be the father of American orchestral saxophone.
  • Olke Uhlenbeck is a biochemist. He is known for his work in RNA biochemistry and RNA catalysis. He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in 1964. Some have called him the “Father of RNA.”
  • Mark Weiser (July 23, 1952 – April 27, 1999) was a computer scientist and chief technology officer (CTO) at Xerox PARC. Weiser is widely considered to be the father of ubiquitous computing
  • Wu Ta-You (simplified Chinese: 吴大猷; traditional Chinese: 吳大猷; pinyin: Wú Dàyóu) (September 27, 1907 – March 4, 2000) was a Chinese physicist and writer who worked in the United States, Canada, mainland China and Taiwan. He has been called the Father of Chinese Physics.

Founders and co-founders[edit]

Educators[edit]

University presidents[edit]

Fiction, nonfiction[edit]

See List of University of Michigan arts alumni.

Fictional Wolverines[edit]

Finance[edit]

Foodies[edit]

Fulbright Scholars[edit]

Since the inaugural class in 1949, Harvard, Yale, Berkeley, Columbia, and the University of Michigan have been the top producers of U.S. Student Program scholars. As of 2021, Michigan has been the leading producer since 2005.

Top 10 Producers Scholars(All-time) Scholars(Since 2005)
Harvard University 1,437 410
Yale University 1,199 372
University of California, Berkeley 996 306
Columbia University 986 327
University of Michigan-Ann Arbor 931 450
Princeton University 882 299
University of Wisconsin-Madison 802 225
Stanford University 799 289
University of Chicago 758 354
Brown University 708 391

Guggenheim fellows[edit]

As of 2021, Michigan alumni include over 145 Guggenheim Fellows.

  • Richard Newbold Adams (August 4, 1924 – September 11, 2018) was an American anthropologist.
  • Thomas R. Adams (May 22, 1921 – December 1, 2008) was librarian of the John Carter Brown Library and John Hay Professor of Bibliography and University Bibliographer at Brown University.
  • Ricardo Ainslie is a Mexican-American documentary filmmaker.
  • John Richard Alden (23 January 1908, Grand Rapids, Michigan – 14 August 1991, Clearwater, Florida) was an American historian and author of a number of books on the era of the American Revolutionary War.
  • W. Brian Arthur (born 31 July 1945) is an economist credited with developing the modern approach to increasing returns.
  • John William Atkinson (December 31, 1923 – October 27, 2003), also known as Jack Atkinson, was an American psychologist who pioneered the scientific study of human motivation, achievement and behavior.
  • Dean Bakopoulos is an American writer, born in Dearborn Heights, Michigan in 1975. He is a two-time National Endowment for the Arts fellow, a Guggenheim Fellow, and writer-in-residence at Grinnell College.
  • John Bargh (/ˈbɑːrdʒ/; born 1955) is a social psychologist currently working at Yale University
  • Leslie Bassett was an American composer of classical music.
  • Richard Bauman is a folklorist and anthropologist, now retired from Indiana University Bloomington. He is Distinguished Professor emeritus of Folklore, of Anthropology, and of Communication and Culture.
  • Warren Benson (January 26, 1924 – October 6, 2005) was an American composer. His compositions consist mostly of music for wind instruments and percussion.
  • Theodore H. Berlin (8 May 1917, New York City – 16 November 1962, Baltimore) was an American theoretical physicist.
  • Derek Bermel (born 1967, in New York City) is an American composer, clarinetist and conductor whose music blends various facets of world music, funk and jazz with largely classical performing forces and musical vocabulary.
  • Robert Berner (November 25, 1935 – January 10, 2015) was an American scientist known for his contributions to the modeling of the carbon cycle.
  • Sara Berry (born 1940) is an American scholar of contemporary African political economies, professor of history at Johns Hopkins University and co-founder of the Center for Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins.
  • Lawrence D. Bobo is the W. E. B. Du Bois Professor of the Social Sciences and the Dean of Social Science at Harvard University.
  • Kevin Boyle (historian) (7 October 1960) is an American author and the William Smith Mason Professor of American History at Northwestern University.
  • Bertrand Harris Bronson (June 22, 1902 – March 14, 1986) was an American academic and professor in the English department at the University of California, Berkeley.
  • Clair Alan Brown (born August 16, 1903; died 1982) was an American botanist.
  • Roger Brown (psychologist) (April 14, 1925 – December 11, 1997) was an American psychologist. He was known for his work in social psychology and in children's language development.
  • Eugene Burnstein is an American social psychologist and professor emeritus of psychology at the University of Michigan College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.
  • John W. Cahn was an American scientist and recipient of the 1998 National Medal of Science.
  • David George Campbell (born January 28, 1949 in Decatur, Illinois, United States) is an American educator, ecologist, environmentalist, and award-winning author of non-fiction.
  • Victoria Chang is an American poet and children's writer. Her fifth book of poems, OBIT, was published by Copper Canyon Press in 2020.
  • Patricia Cheng (born 1952) is a Chinese American psychologist.
  • Laura Clayton (born December 8, 1943) is an American pianist and composer. She was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and studied at the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore and at Columbia University, New York, with Mario Davidovsky.
  • Allan M. Collins is an American cognitive scientist, Professor Emeritus of Learning Sciences at Northwestern University's School of Education and Social Policy.
  • Philip Converse (November 17, 1928 – December 30, 2014) was an American political scientist.
  • Richard M. Cook is an American academic who specializes in American literature.
  • Harold Courlander (September 18, 1908 – March 15, 1996) was an American novelist, folklorist, and anthropologist and an expert in the study of Haitian life.
  • Olena Kalytiak Davis (born September 16, 1963) is an American poet.
  • Philip James DeVries (born March 7, 1952) is a tropical biologist whose research focuses on insect ecology and evolution, especially butterflies.
  • Charles L. Dolph (August 27, 1918 – June 1, 1994) was a professor of mathematics, known for his research in applied mathematics and engineering.
  • William Doppmann (Springfield, Massachusetts, October 10, 1934 — Honokaa, Hawaii, January 27, 2013) was an American concert pianist and composer.
  • William H. Durham a biological anthropologist and evolutionary biologist,[1][2] is the Bing Professor Emeritus in Human Biology at Stanford University
  • W. Ralph Eubanks (born June 25, 1957) is an American author, journalist, professor, public speaker, and business executive.
  • Avard Fairbanks (March 2, 1897 – January 1, 1987) was a 20th-century American sculptor.
  • Ada Ferrer is a Cuban-American historian. She is Julius Silver Professor of History and Latin American Studies at New York University.
  • Sidney Fine (historian) (October 11, 1920 – March 31, 2009) was a professor of history at the University of Michigan.
  • Neil Foley is an American historian.
  • Gabriela Lena Frank (born Berkeley, California, United States, September 1972) is an American pianist and composer of contemporary classical music.
  • Steven Frank (biologist) (born 1957) is a professor of biology at the University of California, Irvine.
  • William Frankena (June 21, 1908 – October 22, 1994) was an American moral philosopher.
  • Ronald Freedman was an international demographer and founder of the Population Studies Center at the University of Michigan.
  • Douglas J. Futuyma (born 24 April 1942) is an American evolutionary biologist.
  • Neal Gabler (born 1950) is an American journalist, writer and film critic.
  • Mary Gaitskill (born November 11, 1954) is an American novelist, essayist, and short story writer.
  • David Gale was an American mathematician and economist.
  • William A. Gamson was a professor of Sociology at Boston College, where he was also the co-director of the Media Research and Action Project (MRAP).
  • Seymour Ginsburg (December 12, 1927 – December 5, 2004) was an American pioneer of automata theory, formal language theory, and database theory, in particular; and computer science
  • Charles R. Goldman (born 9 November 1930 in Urbana, Illinois) is an American limnologist and ecologist.
  • Francisco Goldman (born 1954) is an American novelist, journalist, and Allen K. Smith Professor of Literature and Creative Writing, Trinity College.
  • Leslie D. Gottlieb (1936–2012) was a US biologist described by the Botanical Society of America as "one of the most influential plant evolutionary biologists over the past several decades.".
  • Josh Greenfeld was an author and screenwriter mostly known for his screenplay for the 1974 film Harry and Tonto along with Paul Mazursky
  • Gwendolyn Midlo Hall (born June 27, 1929) is an American historian who focuses on the history of slavery in the Caribbean, Latin America, Louisiana (United States), Africa, and the African Diaspora in the Americas.
  • Amy Harmon is an American journalist.
  • Joel F. Harrington (born August 25, 1959) is an American historian of pre-modern Germany. He is currently Centennial Professor of History at Vanderbilt University.
  • Donald Harris (composer) (April 7, 1931, in St. Paul, Minnesota – March 29, 2016, in Columbus, Ohio) was an American composer who taught music at The Ohio State University for 22 years. He was Dean of the College of the Arts from 1988 to 1997.
  • Garrett Hongo (born May 30, 1951, Volcano, Hawai'i) is a Yonsei, fourth-generation Japanese American academic and poet.
  • Joseph Hickey (16 April 1907 - 31 August 1993) was an American ornithologist who wrote the landmark Guide to Bird Watching
  • Isabel V. Hull (born 1949) is John Stambaugh Professor Emerita of History and the former chair of the history department at Cornell University.
  • Philip Strong Humphrey (26 February 1926, Hibbing, Minnesota – 13 November 2009, Lawrence, Kansas) was an ornithologist, museum curator, and professor of zoology.
  • M. Kent Jennings (born 1934) is an American political scientist best known for his path-breaking work on the patterns and development of political preferences and behaviors among young Americans.
  • Lawrence Joseph (born 1948 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American poet, writer, essayist, critic, lawyer, and professor of law.
  • James B. Kaler (born December 29, 1938 in Albany, New York) is an American astronomer and science writer.
  • Rosabeth Moss Kanter (born March 15, 1943) is the Ernest L. Arbuckle professor of business at Harvard Business School.
  • Laura Kasischke (born 1961) is an American fiction writer and poet. She is best known for writing the novels Suspicious River, The Life Before Her Eyes and White Bird in a Blizzard
  • Mike Kelley (artist), (October 27, 1954 – c. January 31, 2012) was an American artist.
  • Aviva Kempner (born December 23, 1946) is an American filmmaker.
  • James Stark Koehler (10 November 1914 in Oshkosh, Wisconsin – 19 June 2006 in Urbana, Illinois) was an American physicist, specializing in metal defects and their interactions. He is known for the eponymous Peach-Koehler stress formula.
  • Timothy Kramer (born 1959) is an American composer whose music has earned him a Fulbright Scholarship, an NEA grant, and a Guggenheim Fellowship.
  • Edward Kravitz (born December 19, 1932) is the George Packer Berry Professor of Neurobiology at Harvard Medical School.
  • Armin Landeck (1905-1984) was an American printmaker and educator.
  • Chihchun Chi-sun Lee (Chinese: 李志純; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Lí Chì-sûn; Pinyin: Li Zhìchún, born 1970) is a composer of contemporary classical music.
  • Otis Hamilton Lee (28 September 1902, Montevideo, Minnesota – 17 September 1948, Vermont) was an American philosopher, noteworthy as a Guggenheim Fellow.
  • Normand Lockwood (March 19, 1906 – March 9, 2002) was an American composer born in New York, New York.
  • Alvin D. Loving Jr. (September 19, 1935 – June 21, 2005), better known as Al Loving, was an African-American abstract expressionist painter.
  • Mary Lum (artist) (born 1951) is an American visual artist
  • Suzanne McClelland is a New York-based artist best known for abstract work based in language, speech, and sound.
  • Jay Meek (1937 – November 3, 2007 St. Paul) was an American poet, and director of the Creative Writing program at the University of North Dakota.
  • Jonathan Metzl (born December 12, 1964) is an American psychiatrist and author.
  • Nancy Milford (born March 26, 1938) is an American biographer.
  • Harvey Alfred Miller (October 19, 1928, Sturgis, Michigan – January 7, 2020, Palm Bay, Florida) was an American botanist, specializing in Pacific Islands bryophytes.
  • Susan Montgomery (born 2 April 1943 in Lansing, MI) is a distinguished American mathematician whose current research interests concern noncommutative algebras
  • Howard Markel (born April 23, 1960) is an American physician and medical historian.
  • George H. Miley (born 1933) is a professor emeritus of physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.
  • Christine Montross (born 1973) is an American medical doctor and writer.
  • Paul M. Naghdi (March 29, 1924 – July 9, 1994) was a professor of mechanical engineering at University of California, Berkeley.
  • Homer Neal (June 13, 1942 – May 23, 2018) was an American particle physicist and a distinguished professor at the University of Michigan.
  • Marjorie Hope Nicolson was an American literary scholar.
  • Harald Herborg Nielsen (January 25, 1903 – January 8, 1973) was an American physicist.
  • Nicholas Nixon (born October 27, 1947) is a photographer, known for his work in portraiture and documentary photography
  • Richard Nonas (January 3, 1936 – May 11, 2021) was an American anthropologist and post-minimalist sculptor.
  • Mary Beth Norton (born 1943) is an American historian, specializing in American colonial history and well known for her work on women's history and the Salem witch trials.
  • Pat Oleszko is an American visual and performing artist.
  • Susan Orlean (born October 31, 1955) is a journalist and bestselling author of The Orchid Thief and The Library Book.
  • Peter Orner is an American writer. He is the author of two novels, two story collections and a book of essays.
  • Scott E. Page is an American social scientist and John Seely Brown Distinguished University Professor of Complexity, Social Science, and Management at the University of Michigan
  • Douglass Parker (May 27, 1927 – February 8, 2011) was an American classicist, academic, and translator.
  • Doug Peacock is an American naturalist, outdoorsman, and author.
  • Vivian Perlis (April 26, 1928 – July 4, 2019) was an American musicologist and the founder and former director of Yale University's Oral History of American Music.
  • Elizabeth J. Perry, is an American scholar of Chinese politics and history at Harvard University, where she is the Henry Rosovsky Professor of Government and Director of the Harvard-Yenching Institute.
  • Alvin Plantinga (born November 15, 1932) is an American analytic philosopher who works primarily in the fields of philosophy of religion, epistemology (particularly on issues involving epistemic justification), and logic.
  • Michael Posner (psychologist) is an American psychologist who is a researcher in the field of attention, and the editor of numerous cognitive and neuroscience compilations.
  • Richard Prum (born 1961) is William Robertson Coe Professor of ornithology, and head curator of vertebrate zoology at the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale University.
  • Rayna Rapp (pen name Rayna R. Reiter) is a professor and associate chair of anthropology at New York University, specializing in gender and health
  • Bertram Raven (September 26, 1926 – February 26, 2020) was an American academic. He was a member of the faculty of the psychology department at UCLA from 1956 until his death.
  • Roger Reynolds (born July 18, 1934) is a Pulitzer prize-winning American composer.
  • Roxana Barry Robinson (born 30 November 1946) is an American novelist and biographer whose fiction explores the complexity of familial bonds and fault lines.
  • David Rosenberg (poet) (born August 1, 1943 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American poet, biblical translator, editor, and educator.
  • Norman Rosten (January 1, 1913 – March 7, 1995) was an American poet, playwright, and novelist.
  • Elizabeth S. Russell (May 1, 1913 – May 28, 2001), also known as "Tibby" Russell, was an American biologist in the field of mammalian developmental genetics
  • Stanley Schachter (April 15, 1922 – June 7, 1997) was an American social psychologist.
  • Betsy Schneider is an American photographer who lives and works in the Boston Area.
  • Edwin William Schultz (1888 Wisconsin – 1971) was an American pathologist.
  • Paul Schupp (born March 12, 1937) is a Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign.
  • Kathryn Kish Sklar (born December 1939) is an American historian, author, and professor.
  • Paul Slud (31 March 1918, New York City – 20 February 2006, Catlett, Virginia) was an American ornithologist and tropical ecologist, known for his 1960 monograph The Birds of Finca "La Selva," Costa Rica and his 1964 book The Birds of Costa Rica: Distribution and Ecology.
  • Joel Sobel (born 24 March 1954) is an American economist and currently professor of economics at the University of California, San Diego.
  • Frank Spedding (22 October 1902 – 15 December 1984) was a Canadian American chemist. He was a renowned expert on rare earth elements, and on extraction of metals from minerals.
  • Edward A. Spiegel (1931 — January 2, 2020)[2] was an American professor of astronomy at Columbia University.
  • Duncan G. Steel (born 1951) is an American experimental physicist, researcher and professor in quantum optics in condensed matter physics.
  • Alexander Stephan (August 16, 1946 – May 29, 2009) was a specialist in German literature and area studies.
  • James W. Stigler is an American psychologist, researcher, entrepreneur and author.
  • Joan E. Strassmann is a North American evolutionary biologist and the Charles Rebstock Professor of Biology at the Washington University in St. Louis.
  • Larissa Szporluk is an American poet and professor. Her most recent book is Embryos & Idiots (Tupelo Press, 2007).
  • G. David Tilman (born 22 July 1949),[2] ForMemRS, is an American ecologist.
  • Richard Toensing (March 11, 1940 - July 2, 2014) was an American composer and music educator.
  • David Treuer (born 1970) (Ojibwe) is an American writer, critic and academic. As of 2019, he had published seven books
  • Susan M. Ervin-Tripp (1927–2018) was an American linguist whose specialities were psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic research.
  • Karen Uhlenbeck (born August 24, 1942) is an American mathematician and a founder of modern geometric analysis.
  • Sim Van der Ryn is an American architect. He is also a researcher and educator
  • Henry Van Dyke (novelist), Jr. (1928 – December 22, 2011), was an American novelist, editor, teacher and musician.
  • Andrew G. Walder (born 1953) is an American political sociologist specializing in the study of Chinese society.
  • William Shi-Yuan Wang (Chinese: 王士元; born 1933) is a linguist, with expertise in phonology, the history of Chinese language and culture, historical linguistics, and the evolution of language in humans.
  • Michael Watts (born 1951 in England) is Emeritus "Class of 1963" Professor of Geography and Development Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, USA.
  • Grady Webster (1927–2005) was a plant systematist and taxonomist. He was the recipient of a number of awards and appointed to fellowships of botanical institutions in the United States of America
  • Joan Weiner is an American philosopher and professor emerita of philosophy at Indiana University Bloomington,[1] known for her books on Gottlob Frege.
  • Morris Weitz (July 24, 1916 – February 1, 1981) "was an American philosopher of aesthetics who focused primarily on ontology, interpretation, and literary criticism".
  • Edmund White (born January 13, 1940) is an American novelist, memoirist, and an essayist on literary and social topics.
  • Michael Stewart Witherell (born 22 September 1949) is an American physicist and laboratory director. He is currently the director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
  • Jorge Eduardo Wright (20 April 1922 – 2005) was an Argentinian mycologist.
  • X. J. Kennedy (born Joseph Charles Kennedy on August 21, 1929, in Dover, New Jersey) is an American poet, translator, anthologist, editor, and author of children's literature and textbooks on English literature and poetry.
  • Al Young (May 31, 1939 – April 17, 2021) was an American poet, novelist, essayist, screenwriter, and professor.

Journalism, publishing, and broadcasting[edit]

Law, government, and public policy[edit]

MacArthur Foundation award winners[edit]

As of 2020, 29 Michigan alumni — 17 undergraduate students and 12 graduate students — have been awarded a MacArthur fellowship.

  • James Blinn (BS Physics 1970; MSE 1972; Communications Science 1970; MS Information and Control Engineering 1972)
  • Caroline Walker Bynum (BA 1962), Medieval scholar; MacArthur Fellow
  • Eric Charnov (BS 1969), evolutionary ecologist
  • William A. Christian (Ph.D. 1971), religious studies scholar
  • Shannon Lee Dawdy (M.A. 2000, Ph.D. 2003), 2010 fellowship winner; assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago
  • Philip DeVries (B.S. 1975), biologist
  • William H. Durham (Ph.D. 1973), anthropologist
  • Andrea Dutton (MA, Ph.D.) is an Associate Professor of Geology at the University of Florida
  • Aaron Dworkin (BA 1997, M.A. 1998), Fellow, founder, and president of Detroit-based Sphinx Organization, which strives to increase the number of African-Americans and Latinos having careers in classical music
  • Steven Goodman (BS 1984), adjunct research investigator in the U-M Museum of Zoology's bird division; conservation biologist in the Department of Zoology at Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History
  • David Green (B.A. 1978; MPH 1982), Executive Director of Project Impact
  • Ann Ellis Hanson (BA 1957; MA 1963), visiting associate professor of Greek and Latin
  • John Henry Holland (MA 1954; Ph.D. 1959), professor of electrical engineering and computer science, College of Engineering; professor of psychology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
  • Vonnie McLoyd (MA 1973, Ph.D. (1975), developmental psychologist
  • Natalia Molina (Professor) Molina received her Ph.D. and M.A. from the University of Michigan.
  • Denny Moore (BA), linguist, anthropologist
  • Nancy A. Moran (Ph.D. 1982), evolutionary biologist; Yale professor; co-founder of the Yale Microbial Diversity Institute
  • Dominique Morisseau (BFA 2000) is an American playwright and actor from Detroit, Michigan
  • Cecilia Muñoz (BA 2000), Senior Vice President for the Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation at the National Council of La Raza (NCLR), White House Director of Intergovernmental Affairs
  • Dimitri Nakassis (BA 1997), a 2015 MacArthur Fellow; joined the faculty of the University of Toronto in 2008; currently an associate professor in the Department of Classics
  • Richard Prum (Ph.D. 1989), William Robertson Coe Professor of Ornithology; Head Curator of Vertebrate Zoology at the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale University
  • Mary Tinetti (BA 1973; MD 1978), physician; Gladys Phillips Crofoot Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology and Public Health at Yale University; Director of the Yale Program on Aging
  • Amos Tversky (Ph.D.. 1965), psychologist
  • Karen K. Uhlenbeck (BA 1964), mathematician
  • Jesmyn Ward (MFA 2005), writer of fiction
  • Julia Wolfe (BA 1980), classical composer
  • Henry Tutwiler Wright (BA 1964), Albert Clanton Spaulding Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology; Curator of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Museum of Anthropology at the University of Michigan; 1993 MacArthur Fellows Program
  • Tara Zahra (MA 2002; Ph.D. 2005); fellow with the Harvard Society of Fellows (2005–2007) prior to joining the faculty of the University of Chicago; 2014 MacArthur Fellow
  • George Zweig (BA 1959), physicist who conceptualized quarks ("aces" in his nomenclature)

Mathematics[edit]

Fellows of the American Mathematical Society[edit]

As of 2021, UM numbers amongst its alumni 29 Fellows of the American Mathematical Society.

  • Kenneth Appel (October 8, 1932 – April 19, 2013) was an American mathematician who in 1976, with colleague Wolfgang Haken at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, solved one of the most famous problems in mathematics, the four-color theorem.
  • Susanne Brenner is an American mathematician, whose research concerns the finite element method and related techniques for the numerical solution of differential equations.
  • Ralph Louis Cohen (born 1952) is an American mathematician, specializing in algebraic topology and differential topology.
  • Robert Connelly (born July 15, 1942) is a mathematician specializing in discrete geometry and rigidity theory.
  • Brian Conrey (23 June 1955) is an American mathematician and the executive director of the American Institute of Mathematics.
  • Ronald Getoor (9 February 1929, Royal Oak, Michigan – 28 October 2017, La Jolla, San Diego, California) was an American mathematician.
  • Tai-Ping Liu (Chinese: 劉太平; pinyin: Liú Tàipíng; born 18 November 1945) is a Taiwanese mathematician, specializing in partial differential equations.
  • Russell Lyons (6 September 1957) is an American mathematician, specializing in probability theory on graphs, combinatorics, statistical mechanics, ergodic theory and harmonic analysis.
  • Gaven Martin FRSNZ FASL FAMS (born 8 October 1958) is a New Zealand mathematician.
  • Susan Montgomery (born 2 April 1943 in Lansing, MI) is a distinguished American mathematician whose current research interests concern noncommutative algebras
  • Paul Muhly (born September 7, 1944) is an American mathematician.
  • James Munkres (born August 18, 1930) is a Professor Emeritus of mathematics at MIT
  • Zuhair Nashed (born May 14, 1936 in Aleppo, Syria) is an American mathematician, working on integral and operator equations, inverse and ill-posed problems, numerical and nonlinear functional analysis, optimization and approximation theory, operator theory, optimal control theory, signal analysis, and signal processing.
  • Peter Orlik (born 12 November 1938, in Budapest) is an American mathematician, known for his research on topology, algebra, and combinatorics.
  • Mihnea Popa (born 11 August 1973) is a Romanian-American mathematician at Harvard University, specializing in algebraic geometry. He is known for his work on complex birational geometry, Hodge theory, abelian varieties, and vector bundles.
  • Jane Cronin Scanlon (July 17, 1922 – June 19, 2018) was an American mathematician and an emeritus professor of mathematics at Rutgers University.
  • Maria E. Schonbek is an Argentine-American mathematician at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her research concerns fluid dynamics and associated partial differential equations such as the Navier–Stokes equations.
  • Paul Schupp (born March 12, 1937) is a Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign.
  • George Roger Sell (February 7, 1937 – May 29, 2015) was an American mathematician, specializing in differential equations, dynamical systems, and applications to fluid dynamics, climate modeling, control systems, and other subjects.
  • Charles Sims (mathematician) (April 14, 1937 – October 23, 2017) was an American mathematician best known for his work in group theory.
  • Isadore Singer (May 3, 1924 – February 11, 2021) was an American mathematician.
  • Christopher Skinner (born June 4, 1972) is an American mathematician working in number theory and arithmetic aspects of the Langlands program.
  • Karen E. Smith (born 1965 in Red Bank, New Jersey) is an American mathematician, specializing in commutative algebra and algebraic geometry.
  • Kannan Soundararajan (born December 27, 1973) is an India-born American mathematician and a professor of mathematics at Stanford University.
  • Irena Swanson is an American mathematician specializing in commutative algebra.
  • Karen Uhlenbeck (born August 24, 1942) is an American mathematician and a founder of modern geometric analysis.
  • Judy L. Walker is an American mathematician. She is the Aaron Douglas Professor of Mathematics at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, where she chaired the mathematics department from 2012 through 2016
  • John H. Walter (born 14 December 1927, Los Angeles) is an American mathematician known for proving the Walter theorem in the theory of finite groups.
  • Charles Weibel (born October 28, 1950 in Terre Haute, Indiana) is an American mathematician working on algebraic K-theory, algebraic geometry and homological algebra.

Mathematicians: African American[edit]

African American pioneers in the field of Mathematics

Manhattan project[edit]

A number of Michigan graduates or fellows were involved with the Manhattan Project, chiefly with regard to the physical chemistry of the device.

  • Robert F. Bacher, Ph.D., member of the Manhattan Project; professor of physics at Caltech; president of the Universities Research Association
  • Lawrence Bartell before he had finished his studies he was invited by Glenn Seaborg to interview for a position working on the Manhattan Project. He accepted the job and worked on methods for extracting plutonium from uranium.
  • Lyman James Briggs was an American engineer, physicist and administrator.
  • Donald L. Campbell was an American chemical engineer.
  • Allen F. Donovan worked for the Manhattan Project on the design of the shape of the Fat Man atomic bomb and its release mechanism.
  • Taylor Drysdale earned master's degrees in nuclear physics and mathematics from the University of Michigan, joined the U.S. military, worked on the Manhattan Project, and retired from the U.S. Air Force as a colonel.
  • Arnold B. Grobman Grobman began his post-secondary education at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, earning his bachelor's degree in 1939. From 1944 to 1946, he was a Research Associate on the Manhattan Project, later publishing "Our Atomic Heritage" about his experiences.
  • Herb Grosch received his B.S. and PhD in astronomy from the University of Michigan in 1942. In 1945, he was hired by IBM to do backup calculations for the Manhattan Project working at Watson Scientific Computing Laboratory at Columbia University.
  • Ross Gunn was an American physicist who worked on the Manhattan Project during World War II.
  • Isabella L. Karle, was x-ray crystallographer
  • Jerome Karle was an American physical chemist.
  • James Stark Koehler was an American physicist, specializing in metal defects and their interactions. He is known for the eponymous Peach-Koehler stress formula.
  • Emil John Konopinski (1933, MA 1934, Ph.D. 1936), patented a device that made the first hydrogen bomb with Dr. Edward Teller; member of the Manhattan Project
  • John Henry Manley was an American physicist who worked with J. Robert Oppenheimer at the University of California, Berkeley before becoming a group leader during the Manhattan Project.
  • Elliott Organick chemist, Manhattan Project, 1944-1945;
  • Carolyn Parker was a physicist who worked from 1943 to 1947 on the Dayton Project, the plutonium research and development arm of the Manhattan Project.
  • Franklin E. Roach was involved in high explosives physics research connected with the Manhattan Project
  • Nathan Rosen was an American-Israeli physicist noted for his study on the structure of the hydrogen atom and his work with Albert Einstein and Boris Podolsky on entangled wave functions and the EPR paradox.
  • Frank Spedding (1925), chemist; developed an ion exchange procedure for separating rare earth elements, purifying uranium, and separating isotopes; Guggenheim award winner
  • Arthur Widmer was attached on a three-year stint in 1943 as one of the Kodak researchers assigned to the Manhattan Project in Berkeley, California and Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as an analytical chemists developing methods of uranium analysis, which led to the development of the atomic bomb.

Medicine and dentistry[edit]

Military[edit]

NASA[edit]

  • Claudia Alexander (Ph.D.) moved to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 1986. She was the last project manager of NASA's Galileo mission to Jupiter
  • Spence M. Armstrong (M.S.) is a retired United States Air Force general officer, combat veteran, and test pilot. Armstrong spent eleven years as a senior executive at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).
  • Jim Blinn James F. Blinn is an American computer scientist who first became widely known for his work as a computer graphics expert at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL),
  • Scott J. Bolton (B.S.E.) has been a Principal Investigator with NASA on various research programs since 1988. Bolton became the Principal Investigator of Juno, a New Frontiers program mission to Jupiter which began primary science in 2016.
  • Aisha Bowe (B.S.E. & M.S.E.) worked as an intern in the Ames Research Center in 2008, before joining as an Engineer. Bowe worked in the Ames Research Center, in the Flight Trajectory Dynamics and Controls Branch of the Aviation Systems Division.
  • Beth A. Brown (Ph.D.) was a NASA astrophysicist with a research focus on X-ray observations of elliptical galaxies and black holes. She earned a Ph.D. in Astronomy from the University of Michigan in 1998, becoming the first African-American woman to do so.
  • Steve Chappell is an American aerospace engineer. He is a Technical Lead & Research Specialist for Wyle Integrated Science & Engineering at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas
  • Bob Dempsey (B.S.) is a NASA flight director for the International Space Station selected in 2005. As astronomer he worked at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) prior to joining the ISS project.
  • Allen F. Donovan (M.S.) worked with NASA to solve the problem of combustion instability that affected Project Mercury, and later on the pogo oscillation problems that affected Project Gemini and Project Apollo.
  • Jeff Dozier (Ph.D.) worked as a senior member of the technical staff and the Project Scientist for a potential spectroscopy space mission at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. From 1990 to 1992 he worked at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as the Senior Project Scientist at the start of NASA's Earth Observing System
  • Julian Earls was made the Director of the Glenn Research Center in 2003, where he was responsible for technology, research and development, and systems development. This role involved Earls managing a budget of over a billion dollars and a work force of 4,500
  • Dorothy McFadden Hoover (A.B.D.) was an American physicist and mathematician. Hoover was a pioneer in the early days of NASA. She was then hired at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA, later NASA) in Langley in 1943 as a professional (P-1) mathematician.
  • Usama Fayyad (Ph.D.) From 1989 to 1996 Fayyad held a leadership role at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), where his work in the analysis and exploration of Big Data in scientific applications (gathered from observatories, remote-sensing platforms and spacecraft) garnered him the top research excellence award that Caltech awards to JPL scientists – The Lew Allen Award for Excellence in Research, as well as a U.S. Government medal from NASA.
  • Mei-Ching Hannah Fok (Ph.D.) is a Planetary Scientist at the Goddard Space Flight Center. She was awarded the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal in 2011 and elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union in 2019. She has worked on the IMAGE, Van Allen Probes and TWINS missions.
  • Jack Garman (B.S.) was a computer engineer, former senior NASA executive and noted key figure of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.
  • William W. Hagerty (Ph.D.) From 1964 to 1970, Hagerty was an advisor to NASA and served as a board member to the National Science Foundation.
  • Martin Harwit (M.S.) designed, built and launched the first rocket-powered liquid-helium-cooled telescopes in the late 1960s and also carried out astronomical observations from high-altitude NASA aircraft.
  • Richard C. Henry (M.S.) was a lieutenant general in the United States Air Force who served as commander of the Space Division, Air Force Systems Command, Los Angeles Air Force Station, Calif.
  • John T. Howe, (B.S.E.) During his 35 years with NASA, he served as Senior Staff Scientist, Head of Aerothermodynamics, Assistant Chief for the Physics Branch, and Branch Chief for Fluid Dynamics.
  • Hyuck Kwon (Ph.D.) From 1989 to 1993, he was with the Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Company, Houston, Texas, as a principal engineer, working for NASA Space Shuttle and Space Station satellite communication systems.
  • Joel S. Levine (Ph.D.) In 1970, Langley Research Center associate director John Edward Duberg recruited Levine to work on the Viking program. Levine joined the Center in July 1970 and was assigned to the Aeronomy Section of the Planetary Physics Branch. He continued working for NASA until his retirement in 2011.
  • Bernard Lippmann (M.S.) in 1968 – 1969, he was a senior research associate at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies. Much of his research during this time is classified.
  • James Fu Bin Lu is an American Internet entrepreneur. Lu received master's degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of Michigan (graduating summa cum laude) and worked as an engineer for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, developing software for the Mars rover.
  • Harriet H. Malitson (M.S.) was an American astronomer. She was a solar researcher, employed at Goddard Space Flight Center and at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
  • Stephen P. Maran (Ph.D.) was an astrophysicist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center for 35 years, from 1969-2004. During this time, he served as a staff scientist, Project Scientist, and Principal Investigator, and was involved in research on a number of missions, including the Hubble Space Telescope.
  • Hu Peiquan (Ph.D.) In 1944, Hu became a researcher at the Langley Research Center of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA, the predecessor of NASA).
  • Samuel C. Phillips (M.S.) (February 19, 1921 – January 31, 1990) was a United States Air Force general who served as Director of NASA's Apollo Manned Lunar Landing Program from 1964 to 1969, the seventh Director of the National Security Agency from 1972 to 1973, and as Commander, Air Force Systems Command from 1973 to 1975.
  • Phil Plait During the 1990s, Plait worked with the COBE satellite and later was part of the Hubble Space Telescope team at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, working largely on the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph.
  • Margaret Hamilton (software engineer) Led a team credited with developing the software for Apollo and Skylab.
  • James Kasting (Ph.D.) is active in NASA's search for habitable extrasolar planets.
  • James Slattin Martin Jr. (B.S.) Martin joined NASA's Langley Research Center in September 1964 as assistant project manager for Lunar Orbiter. The five successful Lunar Orbiter missions provided significant new information about the Moon's surface and a wealth of photographic detail that stood as the definitive source of lunar surface information for years. In recognition of his contribution to this project, Martin was awarded the NASA Exceptional Service Medal in 1967.
  • Rob Meyerson (B.S.) began his career as an aerospace engineer at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) from 1985 to 1997 working [3] on human spaceflight systems, including the aerodynamic design of the Space Shuttle orbiter drag parachute. He is the former President of Blue Origin.
  • Elisa Quintana(Ph.D.) was a member of the NASA Kepler Mission Team at NASA Ames Research Center from 2006 to 2017. She worked as a scientific programmer developing the Kepler pipeline, for which she was awarded the NASA Software of the Year in 2010.
  • Judith Racusin (B.S.) is an American astrophysicist. She works at Goddard Space Flight Center as a research aerospace technologist in fields and particles.
  • William H. Robbins (B.S.) was an American engineer who worked for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). During his long career at NASA, he worked on the NERVA nuclear rocket engine, NASA wind turbines, communication satellites, and the Shuttle-Centaur program.
  • James Russell III (Ph.D.) is an atmospheric scientist who has served as the developer of instrumentation for several NASA probes.
  • Kamal Sarabandi (Ph.D.) is a member of Science Team for NASA Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP).
  • Joseph Francis Shea was an American aerospace engineer and NASA manager.
  • Roy Spencer (scientist) is a meteorologist, a principal research scientist at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and the U.S. Science Team leader for the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on NASA's Aqua satellite.
  • Vaino Jack Vehko (B.S.) In 1960 Vehko became Director of Engineering on the Saturn S-I and S-IB booster rocket program. The Saturn IB boosters successfully launched four unmanned and five manned Apollo missions. They were the forerunners of the Saturn V that launched the NASA Apollo moon missions.
  • Kevin J. Zahnle (Ph.D. is a planetary scientist at the NASA Ames Research Center and a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union. He studies impact processes, atmospheric escape processes, geochemical modelling of atmophiles, and photochemical modelling.
  • Noel Zamot (M.S.) was selected as a member of the NASA Astronaut Training Group 16 and became a semi finalist NASA astronaut candidate.

National Academy Members[edit]

As of 2021, dozens of Michigan graduates have been inducted into various National Academies (inter alia, The National Academy of Engineering, The National Academy of Science...)

  • John Jacob Abel was an American biochemist and pharmacologist. He established the pharmacology department at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1893
  • Edward Charles Bassett (1921–1999)[1] was an American architect based in San Francisco. He was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Associate member in 1970, and became a full member in 1990.
  • Michael Bellavia He was the COO of Animax Entertainment, an animation, game, and interactive content production company. While at Animax, in 2006, Bellavia won one of the first broadband Emmy Awards for a series of animated shorts that were produced for ESPN.
  • John Robert Beyster often styled J. Robert Beyster, was the founder of Science Applications International Corporation.
  • Lyman James Briggs in 1932, Briggs was nominated by US President Herbert C. Hoover to Burgess as director of the National Bureau of Standards.
  • James Brown (ecologist) is an American biologist and academic.
  • John W. Cahn (January 9, 1928 – March 14, 2016) was an American scientist and recipient of the 1998 National Medal of Science.
  • Robert L. Carneiro was an American anthropologist and curator of the American Museum of Natural History.
  • Rufus Cole was an American medical doctor and the first director of the Rockefeller University Hospital.
  • George Comstock (astronomer) He helped organize the American Astronomical Society in 1897, serving first as secretary and later as vice president. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1899.
  • Heber Doust Curtis From 1902 to 1920 Curtis worked at Lick Observatory, continuing the survey of nebulae initiated by Keeler.
  • David DeWitt He was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering (1998) for the theory and construction of database systems. He is also a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery.
  • Allen F. Donovan was an American aerospace engineer and systems engineer who was involved in the development of the Atlas and Titan rocket families.
  • James R. Downing is an American pediatric oncologist and executive. He is the president and chief executive officer of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.
  • Harry George Drickamer (November 19, 1918 – May 6, 2002), born Harold George Weidenthal, was a pioneer experimentalist in high-pressure studies of condensed matter.
  • John M. Eargle was an Oscar- and Grammy-winning audio engineer and a musician (piano and church and theater organ).
  • Kent Flannery is a North American archaeologist who has conducted and published extensive research on the pre-Columbian cultures and civilizations of Mesoamerica, and in particular those of central and southern Mexico.
  • Mars Guy Fontana His contribution at the university was such that in the List of buildings at Ohio State University he has a building named after him - The Fontana Laboratories. He also has a professorship named after him.
  • Donald S. Fredrickson was an American medical researcher, principally of the lipid and cholesterol metabolism, and director of National Institutes of Health and subsequently the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
  • Robert A. Fuhrman was an American engineer responsible for the development of the Polaris Missile and Poseidon missile, as well as President and Chief Operating Officer of Lockheed Corporation. Fuhrman was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1976 "for contributions to the design and development of the Polaris and Poseidon underwater launch ballistic missile systems".
  • Stanley Marion Garn was a human biologist and educator. He was Professor of Anthropology at the College for Literature, Science and Arts at the University of Michigan.
  • Sam Granick was an American biochemist known for his studies of ferritin and iron metabolism more broadly, of chloroplast structure, and of the biosynthesis of heme and related molecules.
  • Sonia Guillén Guillén is one of Peru's leading experts in mummies.
  • George Edward Holbrook was a noted American chemical engineer and a founding member of the National Academy of Engineering.
  • George W. Housner was a professor of earthquake engineering at the California Institute of Technology and National Medal of Science laureate.
  • George Huebner Chrysler reorganized their research department in 1946 and Huebner was made chief engineer.
  • Bill Ivey is an American folklorist and author. He was the seventh chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, and is a past Chairman of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.
  • Kelly Johnson (engineer) He is recognized for his contributions to a series of important aircraft designs, most notably the Lockheed U-2 and SR-71 Blackbird.
  • Lewis Ralph Jones was an American botanist and agricultural biologist.
  • Paul Kangas was the Miami-based co-anchor of the PBS television program Nightly Business Report, a role he held from 1979, when the show was a local PBS program in Miami, through December 31, 2009.
  • Paul J. Kern served as Commanding General of the United States Army Materiel Command from October 2001 to November 2004.
  • Pete King (composer) He was elected president of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences in 1967.
  • Conrad Phillip Kottak is an American anthropologist. He did extensive research in Brazil and Madagascar, visiting societies there and writing books about them.
  • Alexander Leaf was a physician and research scientist best known for his work linking diet and exercise to the prevention of heart disease.
  • Samuel C. Lind was a radiation chemist, referred to as "the father of modern radiation chemistry".
  • Joyce Marcus is a Latin American archaeologist and professor in the Department of Anthropology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She also holds the position of Curator of Latin American Archaeology, University of Michigan Museum of Anthropological Archaeology.
  • Bill Joy William Nelson Joy (born November 8, 1954) co-founded Sun Microsystems in 1982 served as Chief Scientist and CTO at the company until 2003.
  • Isabella Karle was an American chemist who was instrumental in developing techniques to extract plutonium chloride from a mixture containing plutonium oxide.
  • James Nobel Landis He is known as a founding member of the National Academy of Engineering,[1] and as president of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in the year 1958-59.
  • Warren Harmon Lewis He served as president of the American Association of Anatomists and the International Society for Experimental Cytology, and held honorary memberships in the Royal Microscopical Society in London and Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei in Rome.
  • Anne Harris (musician) She has served an elected term on the Board of Governors of the Chicago Chapter of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.
  • Herbert Spencer Jennings was an American zoologist, geneticist, and eugenicist.
  • Digby McLaren he was the head of the palaeontology section of the GSC (the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC))
  • Marshall Warren Nirenberg was an American biochemist and geneticist.[2] He shared a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1968
  • Kenneth Olden He was director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and National Toxicology Program, being the first African-American to head an NIH institute, a position he held from 1991 to 2005.
  • Raymond Pearl was an American biologist, regarded as one of the founders of biogerontology.
  • Samuel C. Phillips was a United States Air Force general who served as Director of NASA's Apollo Manned Lunar Landing Program from 1964 to 1969, the seventh Director of the National Security Agency from 1972 to 1973, and as Commander, Air Force Systems Command from 1973 to 1975.
  • John Porter (Illinois politician) During his chairmanship in the NIH he led efforts resulting in doubling funding for the NIH.
  • Bonnie Rideout is a member of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS), having served on the Board of Governors for the Washington D.C. branch.
  • Eugene Roberts (neuroscientist) was an American neuroscientist. In 1950, he was the first to report on the discovery of gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain, and his work was key in demonstrating GABA as the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system.
  • Elizabeth S. Russell was an American biologist in the field of mammalian developmental genetics
  • Shirley E. Schwartz was inducted into the Michigan Women's Hall of Fame in 1996 for her accomplishments in the field of chemistry.
  • Frank Spitzer was an Austrian-born American mathematician who made fundamental contributions to probability theory, including the theory of random walks, fluctuation theory, percolation theory, the Wiener sausage, and especially the theory of interacting particle systems.
  • Michael Stryker an American neuroscientist specializing in studies of how spontaneous neural activity organizes connections in the developing mammalian brain
  • Kapila Vatsyayan was a leading scholar of Indian classical dance, art, architecture, and art history. She served as a member of parliament and as a bureaucrat in India, and also served as the founding director of the Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts.
  • Mary Jane West-Eberhard is an American theoretical biologist noted for arguing that phenotypic and developmental plasticity played a key role in shaping animal evolution and speciation.
  • Eugene C. Whitney was a celebrated power engineer who designed hydroelectric turbines and generators at Westinghouse Electric Company. The pinnacle of his career was the machinery for the expansion of the Grand Coulee Dam to add the #3 Powerhouse in 1966–74.
  • Henry T. Wright He serves as the Albert Clanton Spaulding Distinguished University Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology, and Curator of Near Eastern Archaeology in the Museum of Anthropology at the University of Michigan.
  • Robert Wurtz is an American neuroscientist working as a NIH Distinguished Scientist and Chief of the Section on Visuomotor Integration at the National Eye Institute.
  • James Wyngaarden served as director of National Institutes of Health between 1982 and 1989.
  • Melinda A. Zeder is an American archaeologist and Curator Emeritus in the Department of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
  • George Zweig is a Russian-American physicist. He was trained as a particle physicist under Richard Feynman. He introduced, independently of Murray Gell-Mann, the quark model (although he named the constituent components "aces").

Newsmakers[edit]

  • Bill Ayers (BA 1968), co-founder of the radical Weathermen
  • Benjamin Bolger (BA 1994), holds what is said to be the largest number of graduate degrees held by a living person
  • Mamah Borthwick (BA 1892), mistress of architect Frank Lloyd Wright who was murdered at his studio, Taliesin
  • Napoleon Chagnon (Ph.D.), anthropologist, professor of anthropology
  • Rima Fakih (BA), 2010 Miss USA
  • Geoffrey Fieger (BA, MA), attorney based in Southfield, Michigan
  • Robert Groves (Ph.D. 1975), 2009 Presidential nominee to head the national census; nomination stalled by Republican opposition to use of "sampling" methodology, which Groves had already stated would not be used
  • Janet Guthrie (COE: BSc Physics 1960), inducted into the International Motorsports Hall of Fame in 2006; first woman to race in the Indianapolis 500; still is the only woman to ever lead a Nextel Cup race; top rookie in five different races in 1977 including the Daytona 500 and at Talladega; author of autobiography Janet Guthrie: A Life at Full Throttle
  • Alireza Jafarzadeh, whistle-blower of Iran's alleged nuclear weapons program when he exposed in August 2002 the nuclear sites in Natanz and Arak, and triggered the inspection of the Iranian nuclear sites by the UN for the first time; author of The Iran Threat: President Ahmadinejad and the Coming Nuclear Crisis
  • Carol Jantsch (BFA 2006), the sole female tuba player on staff with a major U.S. orchestra, believed to be the first in history; at 21, the youngest member of the Philadelphia Orchestra
  • Morris Ketchum Jessup (MS Astronomy), author of ufological writings; played role in "uncovering" the so-called "Philadelphia Experiment"
  • Adolph Mongo (BGS 1976), political consultant
  • Jerry Newport (BA Mathematics), author with Asperger syndrome whose life was the basis for the 2005 feature-length movie Mozart and the Whale; named "Most Versatile Calculator" in the 2010 World Calculation Cup
  • Jane Scott, rock critic for The Plain Dealer in Cleveland, Ohio; covered every major local rock concert; until her retirement in 2002 she was known as "The World's Oldest Rock Critic;" influential in bringing the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to Cleveland[25]
  • Michael Sekora (BS 1977), founder and director of Project Socrates, the intelligence community's classified program that was tasked with determining the cause of America's economic decline[26][27]
  • Robert Shiller (BA 1967), economist; author of Irrational Exuberance
  • Jerome Singleton (COE: IEOR), Paralympic athlete, competing mainly in category T44 (single below knee amputation) sprint events
  • Jerald F. ter Horst (BA 1947), briefly President Ford's press secretary

Not-for-profit[edit]

Pulitzer Prize winners[edit]

As of 2020, 34 of Michigan's matriculants have been awarded a Pulitzer Prize. By alumni count, Michigan ranks fifth (as of 2018) among all schools whose alumni have won Pulitzers.

Pulitzer Prize, U.S. award for achievements in newspaper and online journalism, literature and musical composition

Rhodes Scholars[edit]

Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker

As of 2017, Michigan has matriculated 28 Rhodes Scholars. Some notable winners are linked below.

Science[edit]

National Medal of Science Laureates/National Medal of Technology and Innovation[edit]

Sloan Research Fellows[edit]

  • James Andreoni (born 1959 in Beloit, Wisconsin) is a Professor in the Economics Department of the University of California, San Diego where he directs the EconLab.
  • John Avise (born 1948) is an American evolutionary geneticist, conservationist, ecologist and natural historian.
  • Robert Berner (November 25, 1935 – January 10, 2015) was an American scientist known for his contributions to the modeling of the carbon cycle.
  • Allan M. Collins is an American cognitive scientist, Professor Emeritus of Learning Sciences at Northwestern University's School of Education and Social Policy.
  • Ralph Louis Cohen (born 1952) is an American mathematician, specializing in algebraic topology and differential topology.
  • Michael D. Fried is an American mathematician working in the geometry and arithmetic of families of nonsingular projective curve covers.
  • William L. Jungers (born November 17, 1948) is an American anthropologist, Distinguished Teaching Professor and the Chair of the Department of Anatomical Sciences at State University of New York at Stony Brook on Long Island, New York.
  • Jeffrey MacKie-Mason is an American economist specializing in information, incentive-centered design and public policy.
  • Gaven Martin FRSNZ FASL FAMS (born 8 October 1958)[1] is a New Zealand mathematician.
  • George J. Minty Jr. (September 16, 1929, Detroit – August 6, 1986,[1] Bloomington, Indiana) was an American mathematician, specializing in mathematical analysis and discrete mathematics. He is known for the Klee-Minty cube and the Browder-Minty theorem.
  • Alison R. H. Narayan (born 1984)[1] is an American chemist and the William R. Roush assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Michigan College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.
  • Homer Neal (June 13, 1942 – May 23, 2018[1]) was an American particle physicist and a distinguished professor at the University of Michigan.
  • Hugh David Politzer (/ˈpɑːlɪtsər/; born August 31, 1949) is an American theoretical physicist and the Richard Chace Tolman Professor of Theoretical Physics at the California Institute of Technology.
  • Jessica Purcell is an American mathematician specializing in low-dimensional topology whose research topics have included hyperbolic Dehn surgery and the Jones polynomial.
  • Donald Sarason (January 26, 1933 – April 8, 2017) was an American mathematician who made fundamental advances in the areas of Hardy space theory and VMO.
  • Stephen Smale (born July 15, 1930) is an American mathematician, known for his research in topology, dynamical systems and mathematical economics.
  • Richard Smalley (June 6, 1943 – October 28, 2005) was the Gene and Norman Hackerman Professor of Chemistry and a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University.
  • Karen E. Smith (born 1965 in Red Bank, New Jersey)[1] is an American mathematician, specializing in commutative algebra and algebraic geometry.
  • James Stasheff (born January 15, 1936, New York City)[1] is an American mathematician
  • Chelsea Walton is a mathematician whose research interests include noncommutative algebra, noncommutative algebraic geometry, symmetry in quantum mechanics, Hopf algebras, and quantum groups.
  • Zhouping Xin (Chinese: 辛周平; born 13 July 1959) is a Chinese mathematician and the William M.W. Mong Professor of Mathematics at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.[1] He specializes in partial differential equations.

Sports[edit]

See List of University of Michigan sporting alumni

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kauffman, Bill (May 19, 2008) When the Left Was Right Archived April 30, 2011, at the Wayback Machine, The American Conservative
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on August 23, 2012. Retrieved October 8, 2012.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ Erik Larson. "The Devil In The White City". Archived from the original on August 4, 2012. Retrieved July 14, 2012.
  4. ^ Bench & Bar of Michigan: Nineteen Hundred Eighteen. 1918. Retrieved May 21, 2011.
  5. ^ "Paul Dressel and Family Collection". Michigan State University Archives and Historical Collections. Michigan State University. Archived from the original on January 11, 2017. Retrieved May 29, 2018.
  6. ^ "Alabama State University Faculty Roster Form: Qualifications of Full-Time and Part-Time Faculty" (PDF). Alabama State University. February 22, 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 26, 2011. Retrieved June 19, 2011.
  7. ^ Gordon, Jane (January 30, 2005). "This Actor Has His Own Theater". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved August 9, 2021.
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 23, 2019. Retrieved September 23, 2019.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ Tarvardian, Arthur Norman (1992). "Battle Over the Chicago Schools: The Superintendency of William Mcandrew". Loyola University Chicago. p. 120. Retrieved March 11, 2020.
  10. ^ "Martindale Ousted From Board by 10 to 8, McAndrew Chosen". Detroit Free Press. July 12, 1912. Retrieved February 12, 2021.
  11. ^ Hevesi, Dennis. "Clara Claiborne Park, 86, Dies; Wrote About Autistic Child" Archived March 21, 2018, at the Wayback Machine, The New York Times, July 12, 2010. Accessed July 13, 2010.
  12. ^ "Cindy Hill". wyyr.org. Archived from the original on February 3, 2014. Retrieved July 21, 2013.
  13. ^ deGregory, Crystal A. "JAMES RAYMOND LAWSON (1915-1996)" (PDF). Profiles of African Americans in Tennessee. Tennessee State University. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 12, 2013. Retrieved December 9, 2017.
  14. ^ "Peabody's Former Chancellor Dies. End Comes To Dr. Wm H. Payne At Ann Arbor, Mich., His Home Since 1901". The Nashville American. Nashville, Tennessee. February 16, 1882. p. 2. Archived from the original on April 6, 2017. Retrieved November 28, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  15. ^ "Editorial. Dr. Wm. H. Payne" (PDF). The Peabody Record. 3 (3). Nashville, Tennessee. December 1893. pp. 83–87. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 8, 2015. Retrieved November 28, 2015.
  16. ^ "William Craig Rice named 12th President of Shimer College". Shimer College. March 29, 2004. Archived from the original on April 7, 2004.
  17. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on April 6, 2017. Retrieved September 28, 2016.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  18. ^ a b "About - Sounds Fake But Okay Podcast". Sounds Fake But Okay. Archived from the original on June 19, 2020. Retrieved June 17, 2020.
  19. ^ "Susan "Doc Susie" Anderson". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on June 2, 2014. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
  20. ^ Voight, Sandye (September 22, 2005). "Character reference; Costumed performers bring history forward at Linwood walk". Telegraph Herald.
  21. ^ "Jessica Rickert - Michigan Women Forward". Miwf.org. Archived from the original on December 9, 2019. Retrieved December 9, 2019.
  22. ^ "June 2002 CDA Journal - Feature Article, Copyright 2002 Journal of the California Dental Association". Cda.org. Archived from the original on September 28, 2011. Retrieved August 4, 2012.
  23. ^ "Black History Fact of the Week: Ida Gray Nelson Rollins | Our Weekly - African American News | Black News | Black Entertainment | Black America". Our Weekly. Archived from the original on March 23, 2012. Retrieved August 4, 2012.
  24. ^ "MSU doctor's alleged victims talked for 20 years. Was anyone listening?". MLive.com. Archived from the original on November 21, 2018. Retrieved February 24, 2019.
  25. ^ Schwensen, D: "The Beatles in Cleveland", page 53. North Shore Publishing, 2007.
  26. ^ Sanders, Joshua (September 14, 2010). "Spurring America's Economic Renaissance". Economy in Crisis. Archived from the original on January 26, 2011. Retrieved January 31, 2011.
  27. ^ Wicker, Tom (May 24, 1990). "IN THE NATION; The High-Tech Future". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 17, 2012. Retrieved January 31, 2011.
  28. ^ "History of the Diocese". Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts. Archived from the original on April 21, 2015. Retrieved February 12, 2013.
  29. ^ "Knox, Michael D., PhD". University of South Florida. Archived from the original on December 20, 2018. Retrieved January 1, 2020.
  30. ^ "G. Oppenheimer Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience (CNSR) - UCLA - Division of Digestive Diseases - Los Angeles, CA". Archived from the original on May 24, 2015. Retrieved May 24, 2015.
  31. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on April 24, 2015. Retrieved May 24, 2015.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  32. ^ "Herman 'Duff' Holbrook: Benefactor of S.C. wildlife". The Post and Courier. July 23, 2015. Archived from the original on August 1, 2015. Retrieved August 12, 2015.
  33. ^ "Michigan Women's Hall of Fame: Shirley E. Schwartz" (PDF). Michigan Women's Hall of Fame. Archived (PDF) from the original on June 24, 2016. Retrieved March 15, 2017.
  34. ^ "Biography of Zhu Guangya". China Vitae. Archived from the original on December 13, 2010. Retrieved December 27, 2010.
  35. ^ "Congressional Record". congress.gov. Archived from the original on November 24, 2016. Retrieved November 26, 2016.
  36. ^ "Reaching Beyond What You Know" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on November 24, 2016. Retrieved November 26, 2016.

NOTE: The University of Michigan Alumni Directory is no longer printed, as of 2004. To find more recent information on an alumnus, you must log into the Alumni Association website to search their online directory.

External links[edit]