I Broadcasting Apr14 - American Radio History | Manualzz

I Broadcasting Apr14 - American Radio History

I Broadcasting Apr14 - American Radio History

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Broadcasting Apr14

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HUBBARD

COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

12495 34th St.

N.

St.

Petersburg,

FL

33702

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19E

Why America's Most

Successful

Radio Broadcasters

Demand

The

Research Group

Dick Ferguson

President

Katz Broadcasting

"Over the past

five

years, `our partners' at The Research Group have helped

us see

the radio business not only through the

eyes

of programmers, promoters and

sales

people, but

as

strategists and marketers. This strategic and marketing perspective, com- bined with the information

we

gained from their research studies, has given our stations a tremendous advantage

in

this intensely competitive

field.

The Research Group

really

understands the concept of

`value

added'.

Sometimes

I

think they invented

it.

Their influence at our strategic

sessions is

invaluable... and

it goes

way beyond the information that comes between the

covers

the quality of their thinking, the scope of one of their studies. It's of their experience and their commitment to our company and

its

goals that earns them a place

in

our most

critical

and

sensitive

planning meetings.

We

don't think of them

as

a research company;

we

think of them

as

part of our team. And if you know

us very well,

that's the highest compliment

we

can pay anyone."

In

almost

every field, there is a

company that

has

earned

a

reputation

as the leader.

The

Research

Group

METROPOLITAN PARK, SUITE

1200, 1100

OLIVE

WAY

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

98101

(206) 624 -3888

aaa%/////////////i

I

1947

I

1967

I

1978

U

1986

2010

D`\

United

Broadcasting Company

Cy

1Jrzfrrbag

Innovation

Holding history in a rich

40 year the broadcast in- dustry, United Broad- casting

Company has achieved a trend

-setting tradition of innovation radio programming. in

United established the country's

first

format, the black radio

first

radio format

Spanish and also in- troduced rock to the

FM band

Each format was created to meet the special needs of the com- munity in which

it

was located.

Ibday

/

/_//

//

//_//

Service

Over the years,

United expanded upon formats their that

fulfill

a simple, yet important theme ...ser- vice the communities with each

Urban, Hispanic, Adult has of market's needs.

Be

it

Contemporary, or

CHR,

each station brings to

its

special community the very best in news, infor- mation, public affairs and music.

Vision

The future of radio will un- questionably be dynamic.

At

United

Broadcasting, we believe that those who shape our industry's future will sion of

is

innovation.

United committed to continuing

its

be gifted with the

vi-

trendsetting tradition of originality in many aspects of our industry; programming, research and the incorporation of new technologies. And we are committed to the success of our com- munities as evolve to we meet constantly their changing needs.

/

A

UNITED

COMMITMENT TO

EXCELLENCE,

A

UNITED

COMMITMENT TO

SUCCESS

United

Broadcasting Company

Corporate

Offices /Bethesda,

Md.

KALI WKDM

Los

Angeles

New York

WYST

Baltimore

WYST -FM

Baltimore

WDJY -FM

Washington

KSOL -FM

San

Francisco

WJMO WROC -FM WINX

Cleveland

Cleveland Rockville,

Md.

UNITED CABLE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

Represented Nationally by

Jack Masla

&

Co.

WJMOIWRQC

-FM Cleveland Heights, KALI San Gabriel, KSOL -FM San

Mateo

Vol.

110 No. 15

C

Broadcasting Apr14

At Large with

NBC's Grant

Tinker

Fifth

Estate

PAC tally

NAB

CONVENTION STUDY o NAB to release

convenes in

Dallas studies

on

convention

in

Dallas. The

agenda appears

on

radio

and

television

at

convention. Chief Justice

Burger to be

closing

speaker.

PAGE

39.

PAGE 61. among

HDTV

digital gear and

TV stereo will be

subjects

of

interest

on the

exhibit

floor.

PAGE 78.

A list of

exhibitors begins

on

PAGE 79.

TAKING STOCK o FCC reviews his past

Chairman

Mark Fowler

accomplishments

and ponders his future.

PAGE

42.

PULITZER PROBLEMS o

Taubman

increases

his offer for Pulitzer

Publishing; countersuit filed

by

management

and majority

shareholders.

PAGE 145.

MATSUSHITA COMMITMENT U worth of half -inch video

Matsushita.

PAGE 43.

NBC buys $50 million

equipment

from

EARNINGS RESULTS o Weak

scatter

market

depresses

CBS

earnings.

PAGE 150.

PANAMSAT LINEUP o PanAmSat

signs

Peru for its

proposed international telecommunications

satellite service.

PAGE 44.

CONCURRENT ANALYSIS o

Networks

and NAB ask

Nielsen to

continue diary sampling

in

86 -87, when

people meter

is

introduced.

PAGE 45.

SATCHECK

FCC may

require satellite

users to

conduct performance checks

on

their

satellite

equipment.

PAGE 46.

TINKER YEARS

BROADCASTING sat down with

NBC

Chairman Grant

Tinker on the eve of the NAB

convention, where

he will

receive

the

Distinguished Service

award, to

discuss

his tenure at the network, its

ratings turnaround and

the state of the

entertainment programing

industry.

PAGE 48.

NAB

56 n The NAB

opens

its 64th annual

CARRY -OVER

program production syndicators.

PAGE 154.

MPAA

PLEA o Motion Picture tells

U.S.

financial news broadcast.

1985.

PAGE 158.

Association

of

America

Congress

that

Canada

is

erecting barriers

to

programing.

PAGE 156.

PUBLIC PRODUCTION o CBS News is

joining

with

American

Public Radio to

produce drive time

PAC ROUNDUP

Political action

committees

from the Fifth Estate

contributed over $1.6

million in

FRENCH

Larger firms are

buying

up

smaller

OPPOSITION

PAGE 172.

PAGE 156. o

French

government

asks

for postponement

of HDTV

standardization question.

GETTING DOWN

TO

BUSINESS o NAB's joint

board chairman,

Ted Snider, has

quietly

taken on the task of

building

a

stronger association.

PAGE 201.

INDEX TO

DEPARTMENTS

Business

Business Briefly

Cablecastings

Changing

Hands

Closed Circuit

Datebook

145

18

10

176

7

26

Editorials

Fates

&

Fortunes

Fifth Estater

For the Record

In

Brief

In

Sync

204

Journalism

197 Law

&

Regulation

201

180

The Media

Monday Memo

202 Open Mike

171

Programing

150

158

174

22

34

154

Riding

Gain

Satellite

Footprints

168

148

Stock Index 147

Syndication Marketplace

..

157

Technology 172

Broadcasting

(ISSN 0007 -2028) is published

52

Mondays a year by

Broadcasting Publications Inc., 1735 DeSales Street,

N.

W.

Washington. D.C. 20036 Second -class postage paid at

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Across the

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Postmaster please send address corrections to

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l

INDEX TO

ADVERTISERS:

Accu-

Weather. Inc. 20 D

American Railroads. Assn of 70

-71

0 Ampex Corp. 36

-37 0

Associated Press Broadcast Services

60. 69 u The

Audio

Broadcast Group, Inc. 184 a Barclays American /Business Credit. Inc. 123

D

BASYS. Inc. 131 o

Blackburn

&

Co.. Inc. 176 u John Blair & Co.

Radio Rep. Div

51

0 Blair

Television

6 u

BMI 53 o Bogner 90

D

BrightStar Communications

149 0 CBS Radio Stations News Service

170 o Centro Corp.

111 o Cetec Antennas

114 o Chapman

Associates

140 0 Classified Ads 185 -196 o Claster Television Productions 104-1050 Columbia Pictures Television

8 -9

0 COMSAT General Corp. 75 0 Continental Electronics

168

0

R.C. Crisler

& Co. 179 D

Dielectric

171 o Eastman Radio 89 0 The Federated Press 127

D

Firstmark Financial

173 0 Fleet

National Bank 23 o

Fly by

Light

141 o

Frazier.

Gross

&

Kadlec,

Inc. 138 o Fuji 86 -87 D Gammon &

Ninowski Media Investments. Inc. 175. 180

W

Newsteed 49 0

GTE

Spacenet 27 0

Harris

D Gannett Radio 98 -99 o The Gilmore Broadcasting Corp. Third Cover o

Group

1090 Heller Financial

177 0

Home Shopping Network

15

D

Hubrom

Front

Cover o Ikegami 66 -67.

101 o International Broadcast

Systems.

Ltd. 143 u

Interep Broadcast Financial Services 135

D

Irving

Trust 164

0 Kaman Broadcasting

125

0

Katz Radio Group 169 o Katz Television Group 59 u KTTV 97

0

KYW-TV 32 -33 o

H.B. La Rue 136 0 LNR Communications. Inc. 14

0 MCATV 35.47

0

Media General Broadcast Services,

Inc. 139 0

Motorola Communications

&

Electronics.

Inc. 63 -64 0 Motorola Electronics Corp. 167 o National Assn. of Black Journalists 159 0 National Assn. of

Broadcasters

34 0 NATPE

International

3

0 NBC Radio Networks 24-

25 0 O'Grady &

Associates

151

0 Old Stone Commercial Banking Group

11 o Orban Associates, Inc. 95 0 Orion Television Syndication 55

0

Otari Corp.

16

-17 o

PRO Battery

126 0 Professional Cards 183 0 RCA Broadcast Systems 18 0 The

Research Group Second Cover 0 Cecil

L.

Richards. Inc. 142 0

R

&R Syndications,

Inc. 117. 119,

121

0

Robert W Rounsaville

&

Associates 178 0

Satellite Music Network 73.

81

-93. 107, 129. 137 0 Services Directory 182 0 Shearson Lehman Bros.. Inc. 115 0 Barry Sherman

&

Associates

166 o Sillerman -Magee Communications Management Corp.

172 o SONY

Broadcast 28 -29

D

South Star Communications. Inc.

1550

Studio Six

Productions 1970

Joe Sullivan

&

Associates,

Inc. 38 0 D.L. Taffner

/Ltd.

31

0 TEMPO Enterprises 133 o Thoben

-Van

Huss

&

Associates.

Inc. 174 0 Edwin Tornberg & Co.. Inc.

181 o Townsend 85

Transtar 19.21 o TV Extra

1080

TV Guide 113

D

United Broadcasting Co. 4

0 United Stations Radio Networks

57 0

Victory Television

12

-130

Ward

-Beck Systems Ltd. Fourth

Cover o WCAU

-TV 77

0 WFMT

82-83 0 WNYC

-TV 91

0 World Tower Co. 120 0

Abed Wide Bingo.

Inc. 122 0 WRFA 103

BWCWA

CWO

PAST

Blair is top dog in spot

TV sales

GETS

L

because we never take anything for granted.

Not one sale.

Or one fact. Or even one sales strategy.

We can't take anything for granted because everyone at Blair is accountable for his or her

..performance.

And we don't like to lose.

Neither do our station clients.

That's why they chose

Blair.

The leader in spot TV sales for 38 years.

Badeuni

.ONLYBLAML

Television

C1osedCircuit)

:aIIout

'Jational

Association of

Broadcasters' six - iear -old program tssistance to for providing financial minorities seeking to acquire

)roadcast properties may be in jeopardy. kt least officials of NAB aid program,

3roadcap, see that possibility in decision

)f

Small Business

Administration to terminate so- called "broadcaster exception" o its general ban on providing financial assistance to media applicants. John

Jxendine, president of

Broadcap. said that action applies to individuals, not to v1ESBIC's business

(minority enterprise small investment corporations) like one

NAB established to use private donations

:o leverage

But, in financial assistance from SBA. view

of

Gramm- Rudman-

Hollings, he said, "We can hear the

Footsteps."

SBA's decision to reimpose ban on loans to broadcasters, incidentally, indicates downside to FCC's deregulatory policy.

SBA said that in adopting exception, it had placed great reliance on equal time and fairness doctrine rules, as well as statutory mandate that broadcasters operate in public interest. SBA felt such regulation would insulate it from editorial influence over broadcast product. But with

FCC moving away from content regulation, SBA added, it cannot count on commission to assure broad spectrum programing. In fiscal year 1984,

SBA approved 70 loan applications averaging

$248,861 for radio and

TV broadcasters, cable systems and related industries.

of

Moving

up

Look for Blair Radio President

Charlie

Colombo to be named president of

John

Blair & Co.'s radio representation division, which is composed

of

three rep companies: Torbet Radio, Select Radio

Representatives

(see

(formerly Selcom/RAR

"Riding Gain," this issue]) and

Blair

Radio.

Colombo is expected also to hold position

of

Blair

Radio president until successor is named. James

Hilliard, president of

Blair -owned radio stations, is expected to continue as chairman

of

division.

Communications Inc., with

FG

&K

principal Chuck

Kadlec as chairman and chief executive officer and with eye on major broadcast and cable purchases.

Allstate

will

commit seed capital to finance project; that will be leveraged through joint ventures and bank debt to levels necessary to pursue aggressive acquisition program.

Parties are working toward definitive within next month agreement- anticipated

-with

Northstar structured at arms length

Gross to avoid conflicts from Frazier

of

interest.

Ho

hum

FCC's proposal to drop crossownership rule prohibiting

TV networks from owning cable systems, launched

(BROADCASTING, four years ago

July

19,

1982), was originally shelved when networks started coming under fire with proposal to drop syndication and financial interest rules, according to FCC source. Both proposals, source said, were then perceived as

"network power" issues.

Network

-cable proposal is still on back shelf, but no longer for same reason.

Explained FCC official: "The networks aren't interested, as far as I know."

Pique smoothed over

Law firm of

Dow, Lohnes

& Albertson's dinner honoring

FCC Chairman Mark

Fowler

Sunday evening

(April

13) in

Dallas presumably went off as planned.

But source said it had once appeared as

if

dinner might not happen. That's because guest of honor, reportedly irritated by critical remarks former Commissioner

Henry Rivera, now member

of

law firm, was in quoted as making about him and FCC

March issue

of

Channels magazine, had indicated he wasn't planning to attend.

But Fowler, according to source, was persuaded to change his mind.

Commissioners James

Quello and

Dennis

Patrick were also expected to be in attendance, and Rivera was slated to serve as master of ceremonies.

Double vision

Good hands, deep pockets

Major new communications company is in wings, awaiting final agreement between venture capital division

Allstate Insurance

(subsidiary of

of

Sears) and

Frazier Gross

&

Kadlec, veteran

Washington -based broadcast consulting

- appraisals firm.

Name:

Northstar

Small headache due to ratings business afflict television

will

come with introduction of digital television receivers with split

-screen technology that enables viewer to tune in two or more signals at once. Recent advances in computer chip technology can split screen into different sections so that, for example, viewer can watch baseball game but also put up tennis game on another channel in corner

of

monitor. Problem lies in how programs watched on that split screens will be credited.

Nielsen said technology is in place to measure digitial split- screen viewing and figuring out way to credit dual viewing is one.

"policy matter," not technical

Solution advanced by one network researcher is to credit only picture with accompanying audio signal and to discount second picture without audio.

Agencies and advertisers are not likely to agree to that.

Taking over

Minor reorganization is occurring within

National Association

of

Broadcasters.

Association's television and radio political action committee (TARPAC) which has operated under aegis of government relations department

will

now report to President Eddie Fritts. Fritts wants to oversee fund -raising with departure activities and of

TARPAC director

Robert Carmines last month, opportunity was ripe for move.

International incident

Intelsat executive organ's letter to Israel that seems act

of

defiance of board of governors is being regarded by

U.S. officials with same care rattlesnake would inspire. Statement that coordination of

Israel's domestic satellite,

AMS, may no longer be in effect"

(see page 178) appears to run counter to board's decision rejecting recommendation

of

Director

General

Richard Colino. He had wanted to rescind coordination without further consideration. But U.S. officials say board's action could lend itself to more than one interpretation. That and manner in which letter was leaked to press leads some

U.S. officials to suspect

Colino is trying to set up

U.S. for bruising and possibly losing battle in next board

of

governors meeting over whether Intelsat executive was insubordinate.

And fight, officials say, could force board members to choose between Israel and

Arab countries.

However. issue may be resolved without undue strain.

Director general

of

Israel's

Ministry

of

Communications, Yoram

Alster, plans to be in Washington this week and expects to see

Colino.

Ministry spokesman said

Alster is scheduled to attend conference on

Transfer in

Electronic

Fund

Mexico City and had planned. during visit, to meet with Colino, whom he does not know.

March

28 letter, which was received in Israel only on Friday, provides additional reason for meeting, spokesman said.

Broadcaslmg Apr 14 1986

7

0

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Chicago

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(404)

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Your local books reveal six lucrative reasons to buy "St. Elsewhere."

W18-34. W18-49.

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M18-34. M18-49.

M25-54.

Your

instinct for profit tells you the reasons are very compelling.

services to dish owners within its franchise areas.

With in areas.

Sie

the exception the counties adjacent

of to

the

services, he said, it can also sell

the

two

the

HBO services franchise

disputed the

claim of one reporter

at the seminar that

TCI

systems

were selling

HBO

"I've

services outside

their franchise areas. not heard anything like that," he said.

"I

don't

think it exists."

Although scrambling has hurt sales of home

dishes

and, thus, the livelihood of dish retailers,

Sie said the relationship cable operators in

the

C

between

-band direct busi-

ness and dish

retailers is "not necessarily adversarial." Indeed, he said, it should be a

"symbiotic" one.

In each market,

Sie said,

TCI plans to commission qualified dish deal- ers to

act

as its sales agents.

Confusion among consumers

about scrambling has contributed

to

the abrupt

fall-off in dish sales,

Sie said, and the Satel- lite Television

(SPACE), cipal

the trade

Industry Association home satellite

industry's

prin- association, has contributed to

the

confusion. Because

SPACE is still de- manding a scrambling moratorium, he said, dish dealers are unsure

whether

as good

SPACE members they should stock de- scramblers.

That

some dish owners have been unable to

get

descramblers is not be-

cause they weren't

available from the manu- facturer,

M

/A -Com, he said,

"the dealers

but because didn't

order them."

Showtime

/TMC plans to sell its services directly to dish dealers as well as through its cable operators.

At the seminar, Steve

Schulte, senior vice president, direct broad-

cast

development, said Showtime/TMC,

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COMMUNICATIONS INC. like TCI,

It is

intends

to work with dish dealers.

setting

up a program whereby dish dealers would earn a one -time fee for every order they take for

Showtime or

The

Movie

Channel, he said. Showtime/TMC does not

intend

to make dealers authorized distribu- tors of its services, allowing them to the monthly revenues from

share

in

subscribers,

Schulte said.

Being an authorized distribu- tor involved ers myriad customer -service re- sponsibilities, which none of with whom

he's the want

to collect a fee," he said. dish deal- talked want. "They

Playboy splits with Rainbow

Playboy

Enterprises and Rainbow Program- ing Services last Monday

(April

7) jointly an- nounced the dissolution of their relationship and Playboy said that, effective immediate- ly it will take over distribution and market- ing of

The Playboy Channel from Rainbow, as well as a related pay

-per -view service, hotel programing and The

Playboy

Weekend

"mini- service."

Management

of both firms

expressed pleasure that the separation, which had been

openly

discussed since

last year, was amicable. of

Rainbow had been exclusive distributor

The

Playboy Channel, currently available on 586 ers, systems to

about

680,000 subscrib- since its November

1982 launch.

"We are working closely with Rainbow to insure an effective

and

said Que Spaulding, smooth transition,"

president

of

Playboy

Programing Distribution

Corp. "Our first pri- ority will be to staff ienced sales

and

develop an exper-

and marketing

organization

based

initially in Los

Angeles."

County continuing cable fight

Montgomery county,

Md.,

has

not given up its fight to revoke the franchise of

Tribune

-

United Cable of

Montgomery County, call in a $5- million bond, for

and

to

Tribune's

de- fault on a number of franchise commit- ments. The county petitioned of

Appeals for three -judge panel had ruled in favor of the cable

the

U.S. Court

the

Fourth Circuit for a re- hearing, en banc, of

the case

in which a

The panel, in reversing

U.S.

system

(BROADCASTING,

March

24).

the decision

district court, had held of

the that the

Cable

Communications

Policy

Act of

1984 prohib- its franchising authorities from imposing sanctions on cable

systems

for violations of

agreements

while

requests

to franchise modify those agreements are pending. And

Montgomery county has yet to issue a final order on Tribune -United's

request

for

such

modification.

In its petition for review, Montgomery county says the case is one

"of exceptional importance," since it raises "questions of first impression" regarding interpretation of

the new

cable act. Montgomery

county's

petition says, if it

stands, the panel's

deci- sion

"will immobilize enforcement of all ca- ble tion" franchises within

the court's

jurisdic-

and

will "stimulate a flood of modification

requests."

The petition says the decision creates an automatic stay rule

that

"was not

intended

by Congress." Fur- thermore, it says,

the panel's decision

"al-

ters the letter

of credit law" by eliminating any certainty as to ability of franchising au- thority to collect on has, in effect,

the instituted

letter a of

'litigate credit: now, later' rule for cable operators only."

"It pay

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

14

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These options are another example of Otari's on -going product development program designed to keep your audio systems ready frr the future.

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he

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The

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It gives you features and performance for tomorrow's audio, and is available in half

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The 70 sets the trend for the future: High performance, high quality,

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Otani:

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Otan Corporation,

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recioatv-realt/A44vt:

O

T

A R

I

C

Busi

'essoBrie_ly

L_

1

TV ONLY

A A

&

A Oriental

Rug Co. o Client will advertise in five markets for one week, starting in mid -April, and move to five different markets each week for next three weeks.

In addition, commercials will appear each week in year -round campaign in Los Angeles. Spots will be placed in all time periods.

Target: women,

25 -54.

Agency: Inter Media

Time Buying, Sherman Oaks,

Calif.

Jockey International

Apparel firm will launch campaign on television in

June in five to six markets initially, with expansion planned to other markets.

Initial flight will be two to four weeks.

Including print, Jockey's budget may reach to $8 million by end of year.

Commercials will run in prime, fringe and morning news segments.

Target: adults,

25 -54. Agency: Warwick Advertising,

New

York.

Burlington Industries

o Lees Carpet division has begun campaign estimated to cost

$4 million in television and print.

Advertising began last week and is to continue for six weeks in 15 markets, with possibility it will be resumed in fall.

Commercials will be shown in all dayparts. Target: adults, 25 -54.

Agency:

Warwick Advertising, New

York.

Dillard

Dept. Stores o Advertiser promotes Cacharel perfume in 12 markets including Austin,

Tex., and

Dallas. Spots will be shown in all dayparts.

Target: women, 25 -54.

Agency: Tracey- Locke, Dallas.

Huffy

Corp. o

Advertiser promotes its adult bike, Savannah, in six

-week campaign beginning mid -April. Ads will run in top

35 markets during evening news times.

Target: adults, 24 plus.

Agency: Grey Advertising, Chicago.

I

RADIO

ONLY

I

I

Diamond Shamrock

Co. o Company will promote its convenience stores in six

Texas markets, including

Dallas,

El

Paso and Corpus Christi, in four -week flight starting in early

May.

Commercials will be placed in all dayparts. Target: adults,

18 -34.

Agency: Anderson Advertising,

El

Paso.

Sea

Gallery Restaurants o Three -week flight is set to kick off this week for three weeks in

Portland, Ore.; Denver, and

Spokane,

Wash. Commercials will be carried on weekdays in afternoon and early evening slots. Target: adults, 25-

49.

Agency: Evergreen Media, Edmonds,

Wash.

Kelly Services o

Temporary help company will kick off one -week flight in mid -April in about

12 markets, including

Baltimore, New

York, Portland, Me., and

Charlotte,

N.C. Spots will be carried in drive times.

Target: women,

18 -49.

Agency: Campbell -Ewald,

Warren, Mich.

Phone Mate

O

Advertiser promotes answering machines in five -week campaign beginning today Spots will run in all

Fort dayparts, in

13 markets, including

Lauderdale and Miami, both Florida.

Target: adults,

18

-49.

Agency:

J.

Walter

Thompson,

Los Angeles.

MaxiGuard of America o

Spring campaign for auto security systems is

THANKS

FOR

THE

MEMORIES...

Hard to believe that

it

has been over

60 years. But that's when we started developing broadcast equipment for you. First, radio.

Then, monochrome television.

Then, color.

The end of RCA

Broadcast

Systems marks the end of an exciting era. but certainly not the end of a long friendship.

Many of the people that you've worked with in the past will be continuing in some capacity

in

the broadcast industry.

So it's not good- bye...ifs just "so long for awhile."

Thanks so much for your valued friendship, the memories, and for giving us the opportunity to be of service to you.

So long for awhile.

RCR

Broadcast

Systems

United States Avenue,

R

O.

Box

900,

Gibbsboro,

N. J.

08026

Broadcast rg

Apr

14

1986

18

Why

Go

Transtar?

Because

We'll

Listen

To

Your

Needs.

We'll listen to you to your needs

-

-

and

we'll

help. Our four 24

-hour quality formats

-

Format

41s"

Country, Adult

Contemporary, and

now

The

Oldies

Channel"

-

across America are winning

all

because they solve problems for broadcasters like

you. Call

and tell

us

your situation;

we'll

come through for

you.

Please send more information on

Transtar:

NamelTitle

Station:

Address:

Phone:

L

Send

To: Transtar Radio Network, Inc.

6430 Sunset Blvd. Suite 401

Los Angeles, California 90028

Better

Yet,

Call

Right

Now:

-

--

-

-

-

-

1

-800- 654 -3904

(California

1-

800 -962 -4653)

-

'

-

-

_

IOW

The

Quality.

Satellite Network

Crystal signing.

Raquel Welch has signed two-year contract as spokesperson for General

Food's

Crystal Light powered soft drink mix. Advertising budget of over $24 million for broadcasting and print has been allocated for first year. Two commercials were created by

D'Arcy Masius Benton

&

Bowles, one in which Ablch performs, other using

"I believe in

Crystal Light, because

I believe in me" theme. Spots will run during prime time starting June

1.

Pictured above with

Welch

(I) is

General Foods President

Phil Smith.

O

Pop campaign.

United Brands has unveiled plans for $12- million campaign, heavily in television, to promote its new Chiquita

Fruit and

Juice

Pops and its Fruit and Cream Pops.

Campaign is scheduled to begin today and marks first in series of products being launched under United Brands' program to transform its Chiquita Brands Division from commodities to package goods business

TV advertising will be carried in prime time on three networks and on daytime serials and games shows. Advertising will be flighted for

16 weeks throughout summer.

Agency for Chiquita Pops is Ammirati

& Purls,

New

York.

Accu-

Weather

CAN

4

MAKE

YOUR

WEATHER

A

iQ)

I slated to begin in mid -April for several weeks in

15 to 20 markets, including

Dallas, Houston, Los

Angeles,

Washington and New Orleans.

Commercials will be presented in all day periods.

Target: men, 25 -54.

Agency:

Sharp Advertising, Cleveland.

I

RADIO AND TV

I

Pennsylvania Dairy Group o

Campaign to promote dairy products in state is set to start in late

April for three weeks in four television and

11 radio markets.

Commercials will run in all dayparts.

Target: women,

25 and older. Agency:

HBM /Creamer, Pittsburgh.

10

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AccuWeather costs much less than other services.

It

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Accu-

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814237.0309

619 W.

College Ave. State College.

Pa. 16801

AO,.omAgó ofKt

WKJL

-TV

Baltimore:

To

Katz

Independent

Television (no previous rep).

WFrvçrv) Washington:

To

Independent

Television Sales (no previous rep).

O

WAZY -FM mark,

Lafayette, Ind.:

To Hillier,

New-

Nkchsler

&

Howard (no previous rep).

KHWY(AM)

Folsom, Calif.:

To

Roslin Radio

Sales from Torbet Radio.

WGUL(AM)-

WPSO(FM)

Tampa

-St.

Petersburg:

To

Roslin

Radio Sales from Masla.

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

20

Broadcasting Publications

Inc.

Sol

Founder and

Editor

Willett

(1904 -1982)

Lawrence

B.

Taisho f,

Donald

V.

West, vice president president

David

N.

Whitcombe, vice

Jerome

H.

Heckman, president secretary

Philippe

E.

Boucher, assistant treasurer

The

Fifth

Estate

Broadcastingo

1735 DeSales Street,

N.W.,

Washington

20036

Phone:

202. 638 -1022

Lawrence

B.

Taisho', publisher

Editorial

Donald

V.

West, managing editor

Leonard Zeldenberg, chief correspondent.

Mark

K.

Miller, senior news editor

Kira Greene, assistant to the managing editor

Harry Jessell,

Doug Halonen, Matt

John Eggerton,

Susan associate editor

Stump, Kim

McAvoy, assistant editors

Dillon,

A.

Adam Glenn

(technology).

Scott Fitzpatrick, Jeanne Omohundro, s'a" writers

Anthony Sanders,

Randall

M.

Sukow, systems manager research assistant

Todd

F.

Bowle, Cheryl

L

Miller, production

Senior Editorial Consultants

Edwin

H.

Jantes (Washington)

Rufus Crater

(New York)

Editorial Consultant

Rocco Farnighetti

(New York)

Broadcasting

Cablecasting

Lucia

E.

Cobo,

Yearbook

David Seyler,

Joseph

A.

Esser, manager associate assistant manager editor

Advertising

Washington

Robert (Skip) Tash,

Doris

Kelly,

Southern sales manager sales service manager

Meg Robertle, classified advertising.

New lbrk

David Berlyn, senior sales manager

Charles Mohr, Ruth Vandsor, sales managers.

11m

Hollywood

Thometz, sales manager

Circulation

Kwentln

K.

Keenan, circulation

Patricia Waldron, data entry manager manager

Sandra Jenkins, Debra

De

Zam,

Joseph Kolthoff, Chris McGirr.

Production

Harry Stevens, production

Rick Higgs, manager production assistant.

Administration

David

N.

Whitcombe, ere presidentoperations.

Philippe

E. Boucher, controller

Albert Anderson.

Irving

C.

Miller, financial consultant

Wendy J. Liebmann.

Corporate Relations

Patricia A. Vance. director

Bureaus

New York: 630 Third Avenue, 10017

Phone:

212 -599.2830

Stephen McClellan,

John Lippman, associate editors

Vincent

M.

Ditingo, senior editor radio.

Geoff Foisie, assistant editor.

Scott Barrett, staff writer

June Chauhan, Karen Maynard, advertising assistants

Hollywood:

1680 North Vine Street, 90028

Phone: 213-

Richard

Mahler, correspondent.

Tim Thometz, Nestern sales manager

Sandra Klausner, editorial-advertising assistant

C

International Advertising Representatives onbnentol Europe:

John

J

Lucassen. Jorn Ashore 8

Co.. Akerdgk 150 A.

1171 PV Bad icevedorp. Holland

Phone 02958 -6226

Telex' 18406 harke nl.

United

Kingdom: John Ashcroft 8 Co,

12

Bear St. Leicester

Square. WC2H 7AS London. England. Phone:

0525.

Telex-

895 2387 answer g

01430 ashore. Japan:

Ma- sayuki Harlhan. Hikari

Media

Inc.. Hus Building, 4.21.1-

602,

Nakanoshima,

Kita -Ku,

Osaka Japan. Phare:

06-

448

-5011.

Teter J64400

OHBINBTH.

Founded

1931 in

Broadcasting- Telerooting Introduced

1946 Television acquired in 1961 Cablecaating introduced in

1972

C

Reg

U S

Patent Orrice o

Copyngnt 1986 oy Broadcasting Publications Inc

Great

News

For

Radio!

have

AM and

FM stations all over the country been asking us for it and it's finally

here... don 4,Poist awns*

The greatest

hits of

the

late

1950's, classics from

the

1960's

-

in and the best of the 70's

stereo

-

live 24

hours

a day.

And it's from

the people

known for

quality satellite programming:

Transtar. "The

Oldies

Channel"

has a flexible

spot

load and is built to save you

operating

costs and

personnel headaches,

while it

Channels

targets the

lucrative 25 -54

adult

'

market. is

"The

available

Oldies on a first come, first served basis.

f

Call

and

tell us

about your needs.

We'll listen and we'll help.

But

do it today while

"The

Oldies

Channels'

is still available in your market.

LOVE ME TENDER

ELVIS

HOUND DOG

I

WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND

BEATLES

GET BACK

I

CAN'T

HELP MYSELF

FOUR TOPS

BABY

I

NEED YOUR LOVIN'

SATURDAY

IN

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CHICAGO

BEGINNINGS

YOU CAN'T HURRY LOVE

SUPREMES

STOP IN

THE NAME OF LOVE

CALIFORNIA GIRLS

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CALIFORNIA DREAMIN'

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MONDAY, MONDAY

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SATIS

Please send me

"The Oldies more information on

Channel':

Name!Title

Station:

Address:

Phone.

A

Send To: Transtar Radio

Los Angeles,

Network, Inc.

6430 Sunset Blvd. Suite 401

California 90028

B

C

D

E

F G N

I

2 3

4

5 6

7 8

J

9

Better

Yet, Call

Right

Now:

-

-

-

-

-

--

Whir'

1

1-

800 -654 -3904

(California

1-

800

-962 -4653)

tI-

IMP

-

- -

MilMi

The

Satellite Network

-.

mark

1

-Iranstar k1Ji \u

INUrk.

In..

r

O_ dayYe:

A radio programing commentary from

Bill

Hennes,

Bill

Hennes

&

Associates, Mount Prospect,

Ill.

Fighting copycat syndrome among radio stations

Travel to any city in the country, turn on the radio and you'll probably feel as though you're experiencing "deejay vu." Doesn't that station sound familiar? Haven't you heard it somewhere before? Chances are you have, in another city hundreds of miles away.

It's what

I call copycat syndrome and

I think it's one of the biggest problems affect- ing our industry today.

Assuming that it's easier to copy than to create, it's understandable that broadcasters search out successful stations in other cities and attempt to imitate them. But many do it with little thought.

As

I consult stations of all formats,

I see program directors that

I work with go to another city or a convention, tape recorder in hand, and record the num- music selection, categories, how often the records rotate, where they use their jingles, where they place their news and weather, how they give the time.

In short, they try to dissect the radio station. They then return to their own city and try to duplicate what they've dissected. That's where the problem begins.

I'm

certainly not advocating that you should never borrow a good idea. But,

I caution you not to borrow one at face value.

Simply doing in city X what you heard in city Y isn't the key to success. What makes the station's format work in that particular market?

Too many programers forget to find out why the station they copied is so success- ful. What happens?

They put their "new found" success on the air and it falls short of what's expected. It never achieves the success it experienced at the original station and the programer is left to wonder why it didn't work. After all, it worked in city Y didn't

Let's take the music it? turnover time, for example. This is set up to reflect either the cume, the quarter hour, or both, for a certain city. To transplant this without regard to your market's commute times, different shift times for industries in the area, school dis- missal time and so on could prove to be a disaster.

Jingles are something else that pro- gramers like to copy. A program director must keep in mind how saturated the particu- lar market is with jingles. Jingles can be new and refreshing or old and obnoxious.

If yours is the type of market that is not packed with jingles, they can be a real benefit. How- ever, putting a jingle package on in a market where the dial is cluttered with "jingle -aho- lics" is just asking for trouble.

Bill

Hennes is

Associates, a president of

Bill

Hennes

& broadcast consulting firm in

Mount Prospect,

Ill.

He began his broadcasting career as an air personality in

1961. He a held program director positions at number of stations, including

CKLW(AM)

Windsor. Ont. (Detroit);

WIFI(FM)

Philadelphia;

WMAO(AM)- wKOX(FM)

Chicago, as well as for the

Rahall Communications radio stations, between 1967 and 1981.

Using your station call letters is a very vital part of programing. Some stations give their call letters once between records, some twice and some even more. Some use pro- duced ID's that sound very authoritative, while others use very few call letter produc- tion aids. A programer must make an indi- vidual decision. What is right for the market you monitored may not be right for your market.

If station Z in city

Y is doing news at 20 minutes before the hour, there's usually a reason for that. Maybe in your market you need to do news twice an hour, or do no news at all. The problem with the copycat syn- drome is that programers fail to recognize the

"why" behind the basic principle.

Consider

WMAQ(AM)

Chicago in 1977.

Country music was just starting to gain mass appeal. For the most part, country stations were playing very traditional country. If

I had gone to

Nashville, for example, to mon- itor a top country station there and had brought an imitation back to Chicago, it would have been a big mistake. Chicago is no Nashville and Chicago listeners, at that time, were not big country music fans. In- stead,

I devised a format that relied strongl. on an adult contemporary flavor. In 1980 the

"Urban Cowboy" craze hit, which gay: country stations (including wMA(?) a bi; boost.

Today, however, country has changer again and, although many say country ha died,

I do not believe it.

The audience fo country music is still there and a station cal still pull in some great ratings, if programer keep their individual markets in mind and, i: the case of country, realize that this is 1986 not 1980.

Programers need to understand who makes a radio format work, then translat that to their market. Go ahead and monito successful stations, but do it with a grain o salt.

A certain percentage of the things yo, monitor will remain the same, but it's th expansion of those basics that will make th radio station successful. Expand on thes basics by applying them to the unique as pects of your own market.

Before you monitor any station, analyz the market. Don't just look at the demogra phics either. The mind -set of the market i important. What makes the market tick

Getting a handle on the real pulse of th listener base is the first step to understandin why the station cessful. you're monitoring is suc

Next, listen to the station and try to get feel for how they approach their particula city.

How do they play their music? How d they identify their radio station? How man oldies and currents are they playing pe hour? Look at their on -air personalities

How do they relate to the marketplace

What does the station logo look like? Doe the logo match their audience? Study th outside promotion and image the station ha in the community.

Once you have found out what makes tin radio station tick, then you can come back t your market and take the bits and pieces tht would apply to your station.

I caution you i taking a cookie cutter approach though.

Di<, secting your market and refining those bit and pieces to fit the uniqueness of your audi ence is what will work.

I underline the wor uniqueness because to be truly succesfft you must be unique.

Every eight to

10 years there's a run c copycats in the marketplace.

In

CHR, fc example there was the Drake format

of

th

60's, the Q format of the

70's and the He

Hits format of the 80's.

In

AC there is Soi

Rock, Lite Rock and Magic formats to nam a few.

Every format has its copycats.

But the true leaders in the industry hav expanded upon the basics in a unique wa that responds to their own market. The have created more than a shell. They under stand every facet of the shell's makeup t create a station that is truly one

-of

-a -kind

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

77

Fleet National Bank. that's

For financing right on your wavelength.

the country

There are quite

a

few companies around that offer financing to broadcasters. But none

is

more attuned to broadcasters' needs than

Fleet

National Bank.

One big reason

is

that we've been providing the communications industry with effective financing for more than 20 years.

And we've developed

a

group of financing specialists dedicated to the industry.

Which means we understand cash flow in broadcasting and the special value it can create for you.

So, unlike many other financial institutions, we can put together programs specifically designed to match your needs.

And provide the resources to make the programs work.

More than that, you'll work with people who are sensitive to your needs. We're committed to your long

-term growth. We'll not only help you solve problems, we'll help you take full advantage of your opportunities.

After all, our success depends on your success.

If you'd like to find out more, contact Colin

J.

Claptori,

Vice

President of our Communications Group, Fleet

National Bank,

111

Westminster Street, Providence, RI

02903, phone

(401)

278 -6267.

We'll put you on the wavelength of better business.

leef

National Bank

THE BUSINESS RESOURCE

We can

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With

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we can be the one source to

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NBC

RADIO NETWORK

-

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news plus in- depth,

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Excellent for

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-night talk, Bruce

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their loyal following.

C

RADIO ENTERTAINMENT

-

Lang -form service featuring the biggest names and most wanted sounds in music and ertainment. From country and jazz to

Dr.

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From

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:'

A variety of programs to fit practically any station format.

)king for

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fullrolor"

radio programming that can attract a lot of green? ite to: NBC Radio

Networks,

30

Rockefeller

Plaza. New

York, NY

10112. call

(212) 664

-4444.

For 60 years, tuned in to America.

Ç

Dateboo

This week

April

12-

16-

National Association of Broadcasters

64th annual convention. Dallas Convention

Center.

April

13-

Television

Information Office first general membership meeting, during NAB convention (see above). Dallas Convention Center, Dallas.

April

13-

Association of Maximum Service Telecast- ers membership meeting. Dallas Convention Center,

Dallas.

April 13-

17-

National Public Radio annual conven- tion. Town and Country hotel, San Diego. Information:

Carolyn Glover, (202) 822 -2090.

April

14-

Association of Maximum

Service Telecast- ers engineering breakfast. Adolphus hotel, Dallas.

April

15-

Broadcast Pioneers annual breakfast, dur- ing NAB convention. Anatole, Dallas.

April

15-

Television

Bureau of Advertising regional sales conference. Americana

Inn, Albany,

N.Y.

April

15-

Deadline for entries for National Psychology

Awards for Excellence in the Media, sponsored by

American Psychological Association and

American

Psychological Foundation. Information: (202) 955-

7710.

April

15-

Pennsylvania

Cable Television

Association third annual state legislative conference. Marriott

Inn,

Harrisburg,

Pa.

April

15-

Southern California Cable Association din- ner and meeting. Speaker: Stuart

Karl, president, Karl

-

Lorimar Home Video; founder of

Alternatives and In- tructional Home Video Products, and producer of

Jane Fonda "Workout" tape. Pacifica hotel, Los Ange - es.

Information: Mel Matthews, (213) 684 -7024.

Indicates new entry

April

16-18

-Pratt

Center computer graphic arts con- ference. Mark Hopkins,

San

Francisco. Information:

(914) 592 -1155.

April

16-20-

Society of Professional

Journalists,

Sig- ma Delta

Chi, region

11 conference for journalists and student journalists from California, Arizona, Nevada and Hawaii. Sheraton Princess Kaiulani hotel, Honolu- lu. Information: (808) 536-5510.

April

17

American

Women in Radio and

Television,

Golden Gate chapter, benefit (to place "high quality television programs in

Bay area pediatric wards

"),

"Lights, Camera, Auction

&

Female Comedy Night."

Bimbo's 365 Club,

San

Francisco.

April

17

-Corporation for

Public Broadcasting con- ference. "What Curriculum for the Information Age

?"

Co- sponsors. Teachers College, Electronic Learning

Laboratory, National School Boards Association.

Teachers College, Columbia University, New

York.

April

17

-Ninth annual copyright law conference, sponsored by Federal

Bar

Association's Copyright

Law Committee.

Library of

Congress, Madison Build- ing, Washington. Information: (202) 638 -0252.

April

17-

Philadelphia

Cable Club meeting. Topic:

Growth of independent stations and the must -carry sit- uation. Speakers: Preston Padden, president, Associ- ation of

Independent Television Stations, and Eugene

McCurdy, president -general manager, WPHL

-TV

Phila- delphia. Wlliamsons, GSB Building, Philadelphia.

April

17-

18-35th annual Broadcast Industry Confer- ence, sponsored by

San Francisco

State University s

Broadcast Communication Arts department.

Universi- ty campus, San Francisco. Information: (415) 469-

1148.

April

17-19-Pratt

Center for

Computer Graphics in

Design seminar. Mark Hopkins, San

Francisco.

April

18-

National Association of Telecommunica- tions Offwers and

Advisors regional conference.

American hotel, Atlanta. Information: (202) 626 -3250.

April

18-

Television Bureau of Advertising regional sales conference. Crystal City Marriott (Arlington,

Va.),

Washington.

April

18-

20-

Kentucky Cable Television Association general membership meeting. Ramada

Inn,

Maysville,

Ky.

April

18

-20-

Society of Professional Journalists,

Sig- ma Delta Chi, region two spring conference. Quality

Inn

Commonwealth, Richmond,

Va.

April 18-21-

Presentation of fourth annual Alcoholism and Communications Marketing Achievement Awards, sponsored by

National Foundation for

Alcoholism

Communications. Awards ceremony to be held during

National

Council on

Alcoholism convention.

St. Fran- cis hotel, San Francisco. Information: (206) 282 -1234.

April 18-

21-

Associated

Press

Television-RadioAsso- ciation of California- Nevada

39th annual convention.

Speakers: Bob Moon,

AP

Network News, and Howard

Rosenberg, media critic,

Los

Angeles Times.

Disney- land hotel, Anaheim, Calif. Information: Rachel Am- brose, (213) 746 -1200.

April

18-20,

22 -27

-Global

Village

12th mentary festival. Grants are made by annual docu-

New

York

Council on the Arts and National Endowment

State for the

Arts.

Global Village is nonprofit video resource center.

Public Theater. New

York.

Information: (212) 966 -7526. r I

Also

in

April

April

21-

Telecast of

Academy of Television

Sciences "Television Hall of

Fame." NBC

-TV

Arts

&

April

22-

"Audio Location Recording Techniques,"

April

12-

16-

National Association of Broadcast- ers

64th annual convention. Dallas Convention

Center. Future conventions: Dallas, March 29 -April

1,

1987; Las Vegas,

April 10-13, 1988; Las Vegas,

April 30 -May

3,

1989; Dallas, March 25-28, 1990, and Dallas, April 14 -17, 1991.

April

13-17-National Public Radio annual con- vention.

Town and Country hotel, San Diego.

April 24-29-22d annual

MIP

-N, international tele- vision program market. Palais des Festivals,

Cannes, France. Information: David Jacobs, (516)

364 -3686.

April 27-

29-

Cabletelevision Advertising

Bureau fifth annual conference. Sheraton Center, New

York.

April

27-

30-

Public Broadcasting Service/Nation- al Association al of Public

Television

Stations annu- meeting. Loews

L'Enfant Plaza hotel, Washing- ton.

April

27-

30-

Broadcast

Financial Management

Association/ Broadcast Credit Association 26th an- nual conference. Century Plaza, Los Angeles. Fu- ture conference: April 26 -29, 1987, Marriott Copley

Place, Boston.

May

14-17-

American Association of Advertising

Agencies annual meeting. Greenbrier, White Sul- phur Springs, W

Va.

May 18-

21-

CBS

-TV annual affiliates meeting.

Century Plaza hotel, Los Angeles.

May 21-

25-

American Women in Radio and Tele- vision

35th annual convention.

Westin Hotel Gal

- leria, Dallas.

June

2

-5-

ABC -TV annual affiliates meeting. Cen- tury Plaza, Los Angeles.

June

8-11-

NBC -TV annual affiliates meeting.

Hy- att Regency, Maui, Hawaii.

June

11-

15-

Broadcast Promotion and Market- ing Executives /Broadcast Designers Association annual seminar. Loew's Anatole, Dallas. Future con- ventions: June

10-14, 1987,

Peachtree Plaza, At- lanta;

June

8

-12, 1988.

Bonaventure, Los Angeles,

Ma-or c [email protected]

and June 21

-25, 1989, Renaissance

Center, De- troit.

June 14-

18-

American Advertising Federation national convention. Grand Hyatt, Chicago.

June 19-22

-NATPE

International second an- nual production conference. Adam's Mark hotel,

St.

Louis. Information: (212) 757 -7232.

June 22-

25-Cable

Television

Administration and Marketing

Society annual convention. Westin

Copley Plaza, Boston.

July

23-25-

Eastern Cable

Show, sponsored by

Southern Cable Television Association. Atlanta

Market

Center,

Atlanta.

Aug.

26-29-

Radio

-Television

News Directors As- sociation international conference.

Salt

Palace

Convention Center, Salt Lake City. Future conven- tion: Sept.

1

-4,

1987, Orange County Convention

Center,

Orlando,

Fla.

Sept. 10-13--Radio '86 Management, Program- ing. Sales and Engineering Convention, sponsored by

National Association of Broadcasters leans

Convention

Center, New Orleans. and

Na- tional Radio Broadcasters

Association. New Or-

Sept. 19.23

-11th

International Broadcasting Con- vention, sponsored by

Electronic Engineering As- sociation, Institution of Electrical Engineers, In- stitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers,

Society of Motion of Electronic

Picture Engineers, Institution and Radio Engineers and

Royal

Television Society.

Metropole conference and ex- hibition center, Brighton, England.

Oct.

2-5--

Association of National Advertisers an- nual convention. Homestead, Hot Springs,

Va.

Oct.

14-

16-

Society of Broadcast Engineers na- tional convention.

St.

Louis Convention Center.

Oct

24-29-

Society of Motion

Picture and

Televi- sion

Engineers

128th technical conference and equipment exhibit. Jacob

K.

Javits Convention

Center,

New

York. Future conference: Oct.

30-Nov.

4,

1987, Los Angeles Convention Center; Oct.

14-

19, 1988,

Jacob Javits Convention Center, New

York, and Oct. 22 -27,

1989, Los

Angeles Conven- tion Center.

Oct.

28-30-

Atlantic Cable Show. Atlantic City

Convention Center, Atlantic City N.J. Information:

(609) 848-1000.

Nov.

17-

19-

Television Bureau of Advertising

32nd annual meeting. Century Plaza, Los Angeles.

Future meeting: Nov

11

-13, 1987,

Atlanta Marriott,

Atlanta.

Dec.

3.5-

Western Cable

Show, sponsored by

California Cable Television

Association.

Anaheim

Convention Center,

Anaheim, Calif.

Jan. 7-

11-

Association of Independent Televi- sion Stations annual convention. Century Plaza,

Los

Angeles.

Future conventions: Jan.

6 -10, 1988,

Century Plaza, Los Angeles, and Jan.

4

-8, 1989,

Century Plaza, Los Angeles.

Jan.

21

-25, 1987

-NATPE

International

24th annual convention. New Orleans Convention Cen- ter,

New Orleans.

Feb. 1-4,

1987-

Religious Broadcasters

44th annual convention. Sheraton Washington.

Feb. 6-7,

1987-

Society of

Motion

Picture and

Television Engineers 21st annual television confer- ence.

St.

Francis hotel,

San

Francisco. Future con- ferences: Jan. 29 -30, 1988,

Opryland hotel, Nash- ville, and

Feb. 3 -4, 1989,

St.

Francis hotel, San

Francisco.

Feb. 7-10,

1987-Seventh annual Managing Sales

Conference, sponsored by Radio Advertising Bu- reau.

Hyatt Regency, Atlanta.

May 17 -20, 1987

-

National

Cable Television As- sociation annual convention. Las Vegas Conven- tion Center, Las Vegas.

June

11

-17, 1987

Television

-15th

Montreux

International

Symposium and Technical Exhibition.

Montreux, Switzerland.

Broadcasting Apr 14

1986

26

What could

your

station cover with

News Express?

Sports

Political Events

Fires

Weather

News

Exchange Live News as it

Happens

News Expresss" the

satellite news

-

gathering service

from

GTE

Spacenet, gives your station maximum flexibility for

live,

on-

the

-spot

news coverage and news

exchange networking.

With

your transportable uplink,

you can move fast and maintain news coverage

control

of

-and

"scoop"

the competition. ded

High

quality telephone circuits

are

inclu- for immediate communication

-via

satellite

-

between

your

remote

crew

and

TV station,

for production, engineering

and

coordinating

with

local

talent.

Use

satellite time

as you need it, in feed

increments

as

brief

as

5 minutes. And with news

exchange networks,

News

Express opens

up even more

programming options.

News

Express

is

just

one of the

com- munications services

from

GTE

Spacenet,

a

leader

in

satellite technology.

Let News

Express

give you the

competitive advantage.

Contact our Broadcast Services Marketing

Department,

GTE

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Virginia

22102.

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Spacenet: Getting Down

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Business

®

Spacenet

-

Sony

Broadcast Products Company,

1600

Oueen Anne Rd,

Teaneck,

`4107666 POI) 833-5231 8 086 Sony Corporation of

Americo.

Sony and Betocorn are registered trodemarks of Sony Corporation. et

Be

I'acam

?"

we

The find from

First we took out the trimmed the result startup, such is and the

Of course, excess new Sony

Compare it to its amazingly error holds rock -steady the expect from

CCDs, such as a sophisticated tubes at a miniscule

.05% high resistance to

BVW-105 no and burn has camcorder instant physical shoc other features lag, no put

-in no- nonsense reliability.

Plus one feature you wouldn't expect

-a

in circuitry associated

BVW-105 CCD and low

CCDs. price.

Then with tubes. camcorder. tube

-type cousins and you'll that it's

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Add the virtues of F5.6 sensitivity, and you have the ultimate lean machine for ENG. you microphony resentative.

Or call

Sony Broadcast at

(201)

833

-5231. would and

For more information, contact your

Sony

Broadcast rep-

SONY

seminar sponsored by international

Television Asso- ciation, Philadelphia chapter. Philadelphia Electric

Co.. Philadelphia. Information: (215) 546 -1448.

MET o

April

22-

International Radio and

Television Society newsmaker luncheon. Speakers:

Ted Turner, Turner

Broadcasting System, and Jack

Valenti.

Motion Picture

7mria

A professional's guide to the intermedia week

(April

14

-20)

Network television o ABC:

A Winner

Never Quits (dramatization), Monday

9

-11 p.m.;

"Superman III" (adventure). Sunday

8 -11 p.m. CBS: Dream

West

(three -part mini -series), continuing Monday

9 -11 p.m. and Tuesday

8

-11 p.m.;

Ringling

Bros. and Barnum & Bailey

(circus), Wednesday

8 -9 p.m.; The

Return of

Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer

(detective movie), Friday

9

-11 p.m.;

The,i1st

Horowitz in Moscow (live piano recital), Sunday

9 -11 a.m.

NBC:

Annual

Academy of

Country Music Awards

(live),

Monday

9 -11 p.m. PBS (check local times): The

House of

Ramon Iglesia

(drama), Monday

9

-10 p.m.;

Early

Days (drama),

Friday

9

-10 p.m.

Cable

.

Arts

&

Entertainment:

Tuesday

8

-9 p.m.; The

Anna of the Five Towns* (four -part novel adaptation),

Andersonville

Trial

(dramatic reenactment), Tuesday

9 p.m.

-mid- night;

The

Rise and

Fall of King

Cotton* (four -part documentary), Wednesday 10:30

-11 p.m.; The

Trap (romantic drama),

Friday

8

-10 p.m.; The Passionate Friends (romance),

Saturday

10 p.m.- midnight; The Commodores p.m.; in

Las

Vegas

(1980 concert), Sunday

9

-10

Chick

Corea

& Gary

Burton:

Live in

Tokyo (concert), Sunday

10

-11 p.m. Cinemax:

"The Slugger's

Wife"

(comedy /drama), Saturday

8

-10 p.m.;

Marilyn

Monroe

-Beyond the Leg- end (portrait), Sunday

10

-11 p.m.;

From

Here to

Maternity

(spoof), Sunday

10 -10:30 p.m.

The

Disney Channel:

The Great

Caruso (musical),

Monday

9

-11 p.m.; Toot, Whistle,

Plunk and

Boom (origins of music), Saturday

4 -5 p.m.;

Brady's

Escape (drama), Saturday

9

-10:30 p.m.

HBO:

World Championship Boxing: Michael

Spinks vs.

Larry

Holmes, Saturday

10 -11:30 p.m.; Act of

Vengeance

(dramatization), Sunday

8

-10 p.m. The

Nashville Network: Hank Wil- liams Jr. and

Friends (concert), Wednesday

6-

7 p.m.; Hats Off to

Country

(music special),

Thursday

6 -7 p.m.;

Strait from the

Heart of

Tex-

Circus on CBS as

(concert), Saturday

9 -10 p.m.; Mesquite

Championship

Rodeos (series), Sunday

6

-7 p.m.

The Playboy Channel: Hugh M.

Hefner-

A Conversation

(interview), Friday

8

-8:30 p.m.

Showtime: Tom Petty and the

Heartbreakers

"Pack

Up the

Plantation"

(concert),

Friday

8 -9 p.m. WTes(rv)

Atlanta:

Cancer Today (health special), Saturday 10:15 -10:45 p.m.

Play

It

Again o CBS: Not My Kid

(drama), Wednesday

9 -11 p.m.

Museum of Broadcasting

(1

East 53d Street, New York) o James

Dean: The

Television

Work, screenings of 25 live television performances, through April

29.

Information: (212)

752 -4690, ext. 33.

Association of

America. Waldorf- Astoria, New

York.

April

22-

Wooten in Communications. New York chapter. meeting. Topic: "Power Through Presenta- tion." Women's City Club of New York.

April

22-

24-

Television Bureau of Advertising man- agement seminar, "Marketing

Your

Station for Suc- cess."

TVB headquarters. New

York.

April

22-

25-

"Videographics" seminar, sponsored by

Poynter Institute, nonprofit educational institution. In- stitute building.

801

Third Street South,

St.

Petersburg.

Fla.

Information: (813)

821

-9494.

April

23-

Presentation of fourth annual Lowell Thomas

Award for excellence in broadcast journalism, spon- sored by

Marie

College, Poughkeepsie, N.Y.

Helmsley

Palace, New

York. Information: (914) 471

-3240.

April

23-27

-Fourth annual National Hispanic Media

Conference, sponsored by

National Association of

Hispanic Journalists.

Omni International hotel, Miami.

April

24-

Illinois

Broadcasters Association seminar at

Southern Illinois

University.

Carbondale,

Ill.

April

24-29

-22nd annual

MIP

-TV, international tele- vision program market, Palais des Festivals, Cannes,

France. Information: David Jacobs. (516) 364 -3686.

April

25-

27-

National Federation of

Local

Cable

Pro

- gramers Southwest regional conference. Sheraton

Crest hotel, Austin,

Tex.

April

25-27

-Texas AP

25th annual awards banquet and convention. Marriott, Corpus Christi,

Tex.

April

26-

National

Hispa nic Media Conference. spon- sored by Hispanic Academy of

Media Arts and Sci- ences, National Association of

Hispanic Journalists,

National Association of

Hispanic Publications and Flor- ida Association of

Hispanic Journalists. Omni Interna- tional hotel, Miami. Information: (818) 509 -1066.

April

26-

Presentation of ninth annual Boston /New

England Emmy Awards. Host: Ted

Knight, actor. Pre- senters of news awards: INN's Morton Dean and CBS

Nightwatch anchor Charlie

Rose. Boston Marriott Cop- ley Place.

April

26-

"Is Television

Network News Dying/ihe

Fu- ture of

Local Television News." seminar sponsored by

Graduate School of Journalism. University ofCalifo- nia, Berkeley Keynote speaker: Jeff Greenfield, ABC media critic. Other speakers include: George

Watson,

ABC News:

Tom

Vblzien, vice president. NBC News:

Stanley Hubbard, president Hubbard Broadcasting and Conus; John Corporon, president, Independent

Network News, and Peter Herford. producer.

CBS..un- day

Morning.

North Gate Hall. University of California,

Berkeley.

Information: (415) 642 -3383.

April

27-

29-

Cabletelerision

Advertising

Bureau fifth annual conference. Sheraton Center. New York.

April

27-

30-

Public Broadcasting Service/National

Association of Public

Television Stations annual meet- ing. Loew's L'Enfant Plaza hotel, Washington.

April

27

-30-

Broadcast

Financial

Management Asso- ciation /Broadcast Credit Association

26th annual con- ference. Keynote speaker: Brandon Tartikoff, presi- dent, NBC Entertainment. Century Plaza, Los Angeles.

April 27-30-Telecommunications Policy

Research

Conference

14th annual meeting. Airlie House, Airlie,

Va.

Information: (212)

431 -2160.

April

27-

30-

Washington State Association of

Broad- casters annual meeting. Pan Pacific Vancouver hotel, at

Canadian Pavilion, Vancouver hotel, Vancouver, B.C.

April

28

-May

2-Ohio

University's Communications

Week.

Theme: "Communication, Gender and Society"

Keynote speech: Charlayne Hunter -Gault, reporter

- commentator,

PBS.

Memorial Auditorium, Ohio Univer- sity,

Athens, Ohio. Information: (614) 594 -6885.

April

30-

Broadcast Pioneers.

Philadelphia chapter, presentation of the "Person of the Year" award to

Dick

Ykrmeil, CBS sportscaster. Adam's Mark hotel, Phila- delphia.

Act of

Vengeance on

H80

II

May

May

1-

Academy of

Television

Arts and Sciences fo- rum luncheon. Speaker: Frank G. Wells, president and chief operating officer, Walt

Disney Co. Sheraton Pre- miere hotel, Universal

City,

Calif.

Information: (818)

763 -2975.

May

1-

Illinois

Broadcasters

Association sales man-

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986 an

1/NEW

#1

YORK in the time period...

+

67% over previous week!

SAN FRANCISCO

+

27% over

Feb. time period!

'86

V

HOUSTON

#1

in the time period!

CHICAGO

+23°/o over

Feb. time period!

'86

LOS

+

ANGELES

43% over lead

-in!

V

MIAMI

+

360% over time period!

May

'85

OVERNIGHT

RATINGS,

4%51186,

4%6/86

,D.L.,èAFFNERILTL.

New York

(212) 245

Atlanta

Chicago

Los

Angeles

-4680

(404) 393 -2491

(312) 529

-0074

(213)

937 -1144

Today's kids think about a lot more than rock 'n roll or what to wear.

Just ask them.

They talk about things like nuclear war and worry that it might happen. They talk about prejudice and why it has to be.

They want to know why some people live on

*me

the streets and why there is hunger and poverty in the world.

They think about their future, going to college, getting a job,

aid

getting married.

All of these things and more are on the minds of children today.

That's why it's important for us to take the time to listen,

we

to care, and to recog- nize children for what they really are: our future.

KYW -TV

3

/Phila- delphia is doing that with a year

-long public service campaign called

"For

Kids'

Sake."

With news, special programs and public service announcements,

KYW

-TV's "For Kids'

Sake" campaign will celebrate the opportu- nities and investigate the issues facing young people today.

KYW -TV is com- mitted to this special effort to nurture our children and help all of us make the most of the time we spend with them.

Along the way, we hope to shed some light and share some love and laughter with our most precious resource

-our

children.

KvW

-T1/

3

U111

«'

KYW -TV wishes to acknowledge

The

Association of

Professionals for their support.

agers seminar. Pere Marquette, Peoria,

III.

May

1-Connecticut Broadcasters Association spring sales and management seminar. Sheraton Waterbury,

Waterbury, Conn. Information: (203) 775 -1212.

May

1-JVC

Co. of America banquet honoring win- ners of its

1985 Pro Awards, professional video compe- tition. Grand Hyatt hotel, New

York.

May 1-

2-

"Teleconferencing: Steps to Take. Moves to

Make," sponsored by

:National University

Teleconfer- ence Network.

George Washington University, Wash- ington. Information: (405) 624 -5191.

May

1-3--National Translator Association conven lion. Capri Hotel Plaza, Denver. Information: Fern Bi- beau, (505) 243 -4411.

May

3-

Michigan Associated Press Broadcast

Associ- ation annual convention and awards banquet. Shera- ton hotel, Lansing, Mich. Information: (313) 965 -9500.

May 4-

5-

Minnesota Broadcasters Association spring convention and sales seminar. Thunderbird motel,

Bloomington, Minn. ing. HBO Media

Center, New York.

May

4-7-

Central Educational

Network annual con- ference. Presentation by

FCC Commissioner James

May

7-

George Foster Peabody Awards luncheor

Quello. Amway Grand Plaza hotel, Grand Rapids, sponsored by

Broadcast Pioneers. Plaza hotel,

Nei

Mich.

York.

May

6-Women in Communications,

New York chap-

May

7-

Caucus for

Producers, Writers and Director ter, annual Matrix awards luncheon. Waldorf- Astoria, second annual general membership meeting.

Che

New York.

Information: (212) 370 -1866. sen's restaurant, Los Angeles. Information: (213) 65;

May

6

-Women in Cable, New York chapter, meet-

Ope-

0222.

amVie

Privatization praise

EDITOR:

Congratulations on the piece, "The

Privatization

of

Europe" in the March

31

Presidential

Recognition

Of

Broadcasters'

Commitment to Public Service

issue.

Clearly it was one and of the more comprehensive articles thoughtfu on the rapidl; changing media and marketing landscape it

Europe today. As your equally thoughtfu editorial suggested, this is nothing short

of

e megatrend "with benefits to be reaped or both sides of the

Atlantic."

It is indeed glad that you an important story brought it and

I to the attention an o your readers. Looking forward to more it future issues.

-John

M.

Eger, senior vio president, Worldwide

Enterprises,

CBS

Broadcast

Group. New York.

On ehr appointment o?

National Association to lice

Chairman Of the Presidential Board of

Broadcasters President

Eduard

O.

Fritts of Adt isors on

Pritate

Sector

Initiarisrs.

Separate but equal

EDITDR:

I've

always been a bit ahead of my self in proposing industry change. Hopeful ly, las that is not the case in suggesting the Dal

National Association

of Broadcaster

convention might be the last for radio.

The "merger" finally came while somt folks are talking about a national AM associ ation (God forbid). The Radio

Industry is bil and diverse enough to conduct its own annu al convention, probably the present fai

"event."

My vote is to seriously conside next year's spring meeting as the annual

T\

convention only.

Part ing a

of

the proof

-of- the -pudding for hav fairly autonomous

NAB Radio Divi sion might be such a separate affair.

-Bil

Sims,

chairman

-chief executive officer, Clas sic Media

Inc., Santa

NAB board member.

Fe, N.M.,

and forme

"An example of community service of which we can all be proud

is

that of the National Association of Broadcasters.

NAB has been deeply involved in programs to counter drug and alcohol abuse. They use their medium to build the community in a wide variety of ways, from voter education to producing

Public

Service

Announcements aimed at improving productivity.

For all this, and for agreeing to serve as Vice

Chairman of this

Advisory Board,

I'd like to thank NAB

President Eddie Fritts."

Kill off trade -offs

EDITOR:

How many times have

broadcaster

received a

"trade" offer from a circus o: similar operation? Wouldn't your station

Ix better off refusing their "trade" in favor o paid advertising? If you really need thost circus tickets for promotion, why not bit; them as you do most everything else you: station requires? Of course, not being tht owner makes it easier to accept the

"trade' since in most cases it does not affect you personal compensation. Let's correct this in equity that broadcasting has had for years.

-

Ben Dickerson,

WPXE

-AM

-FM

Starke,

Fla.

e.

January 21,

1986

Backe Communications, which sold two

TV's to Young

Broadcasting last week

(

"Changing Hands." April

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Danville,

Ky.

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R A

D

I

O vol. 110 No. 15

T

E L E V

I

S

I

O N

C

A B L

E

a©Ee

G1

-

TOP OF THE WEEK

L

S A

T

E L

1

L

I

T

E

NAB's big fling in

Big

D

Nearly 40,000

Fowler expected annual event: Burger speech, Reagan

for 64th

appearance, among highlights

of

four -day new radio,

TV

studies videotape stand: highlighted

The National Association

of

Broadcasters kicks off its 64th annual convention Satur- day, ter.

April

12, at the

As

Dallas Convention Cen- many as

38,000 broadcasters are ex- pected to attend the four -day meeting which will focus on many of the financial, legisla- tive, regulatory and technological chal- lenges facing the industry as it showcases its commitment to serve the public.

A major thrust of the meeting, whose theme is

`Tuning in

America," will be the release of two key research projects aimed at enhancing broadcaster operations.

On Mon- day, April 14, radio broadcasters will hear the results

of

a study called "MegaRates:

Getting

Top

Dollar for

Your Spots." The study examines management techniques and sales strategies used by some

of

the most successful radio stations in the country. For televisions broadcasters, "Great Expecta- tions: plores

Making

It

Happen," a study that ex- changes in the industry and looks at economic trends for the future, will be re- vealed during a

Monday morning session

(see below).

Other highlights

of

the convention agenda include an address by Chief Justice

Warren

Burger day during a champagne brunch

Wednes- morning,

April

16.

FCC Chairman

Mark Fowler will also speak that morning.

A videotaped message by

President Reagan will be aired during the opening session,

Sunday, April

13, following the "state

of

the industry" address by NAB President Eddie

Fritts.

The NAB's Distinguished Service

Award, the association's highest honor, will be presented Sunday afternoon to Grant Tin- ker, chairman and chief executive officer of

NBC.

A panel on the prime time access rule scheduled for Monday was canceled last week,

NAB said, because the panelists agreed there was little interest in the subject.

Also, the three TV networks and their affili- ates had

( pressured

NAB to drop the session

"Closed Circuit,"

March 31).

On Saturday, April

12, a series

of

radio programing sessions are scheduled, includ- ing a radio production workshop, a panel on subcarrier opportunities and a session called

"Surviving in AM

Radio." Also that day,

NAB will present McKinsey

&

Co.'s

"Radio in Search

of

which, as at last

Programing Excellence,"

year's

session, will examine strategies used by successful radio stations.

A panel discussion will follow the presenta- tion.

Several panels for radio broadcasters are scheduled on

Sunday morning, April

13, in- cluding a session on political advertising and two daytimer forums.

The Television Infor- mation Office is holding a general member- ship meeting Sunday morning from 8:30 to

10 p.m. in

East Ballroom

C in the conven- tion center. Television broadcasters can also attend sessions Sunday morning on multi- channel sound and another on "People Me- ters and Sole Source Measurement."

The radio luncheon is

Tuesday, April

15, with Stan Freberg as keynoter. star Don Johnson, who had

Miami

Vice been scheduled to make a special appearance at the radio luncheon to promote the "Hands Across

America" fundraiser, has canceled. The tele- vision luncheon speaker on Monday, April

14, will be author George Plimpton.

FCC Commissioners Dennis

Patrick and

James Quello will participate on a panel called "What's New at the FCC" on

Monday morning and FCC Commissioner Mimi

Dawson moderates "Examining the Public

Interest Standard," on Tuesday.

A "Iitesday morning satellite teleconfer- ence with FCC Mass Media Bureau Chief

James McKinney from the Regional Admin- istrative Radio Conference in Geneva on

AM band expansion is on the convention agenda.

More than

30 members expected at the meeting.

of

Congress are

Other activities include workshops spon- sored by the Radio Advertising Bureau and the Television Advertising Bureau, on Mon- day and Tuesday, respectively. The Broad- cast Education Association's three

-day meeting during the convention features a

Saturday luncheon address by Gene Jan- kowski, president

of

the CBS /Broadcast

Group.

The convention exhibit floor will be open

Sunday through

Tuedsay,

9 a.m. to

6 and on Wednesday from

9 a.m. to

2

p.m.,

p.m.

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

39

TOP OF THE

WEEK

Radio, TV studies to highlight

NAB convention

Separate

TV and radio studies preview future challenges and suggest ways broadcasters can make sales, management improvements

Changing demographics, competition from new technologies and spiraling program costs are just a few

of

the problems facing television broadcasters down the road, ac- cording to

"Great Expectations: Making It

Happen," a study prepared by Browne,

Bortz

&

Coddington.

"MegaRates: How

To

Get Top

Dollar for

Your

Spots," conducted by the The Research

Group, is based on interviews with

51 gener- al managers and sales managers

of

radio sta- tions with reputations for getting high rates for their advertising time.

(Copies of both reports are available at the convention.)

A formula for achieving high rates in ra- dio is outlined in the MegaRates report. The three principles: "Price is only a function of supply and demand.

..not

what other sta- tions charge; test the 'demand ceiling' ag- gressively and review grid rates daily, and work constantly to increase the demand for your limited supply."

Some

of

the

"outstanding. characteristics

of

MegaRate managers" were also reviewed:

"An organized, well- thought -out ap- proach to going beyond the ratings and com- municating value.

"Commitment to continually train and retrain sales people to develop them into knowledgeable marketing consultants

-not

spot peddlers.

"Commitment to the needs

of

the client through use of the counselor sales approach. push

"The wisdom and

'guts' to consistently for higher and higher rates and not al- low agencies or other radio stations to set limits.

The MegaRates station is one that continually gives good challenges to its salespeople to bring their rates to the highest possible level

...even if

it means losing some orders."

Great Expectations examines some

of

the likely marketplace trends and offers advice on keeping up with them.Among the trends cited in the report was slower

TV household growth and changes in spending patterns.

"A

1.6% annual rate

of

increase in televi- sion households expected for the latter half

of

this decade is only 80% of the rate exper- ienced

As from

1980 to 1985," the study said. for spending patterns, it reported that na- tional retail sales per

ADI TV household grew 5.5% annually from

1979 to 1984 or slightly below the inflation rate, and is ex- pected to grow at an annual rate similar to or approximately

I

% above the rate of infla- tion.

As for competing technologies, the study predicted that advertising on cable

will

play an

"increasing but still proportionately small role in the

TV advertising

market..."

and that the revenues could reach $2 billion by

1990.

Television viewership ience change,

will

also exper- according to the report.

"Prime time, three- network household audi- ences in 1990 are expected to remain rela- tively steady, increasing a few percent

if

a

70 share is obtained by the networks and declin- ing modestly at the 65 share level, the range

BBC [Browne, Bortz about 60%

&

Coddington] be- lieves will likely encompass network prime time performance." Also, the firm believes the three- network affiliate share

will

be of total weekly household view- ing compared to the current

67

%. Basic ca- ble- originated programing is expected to grow from an 8 share to about a 13 share

of

total weekly household television viewing by

1990.

Among some

of

the advertising trends, the study expects the largest growth in local sales, potential future

"with projected annual increases in the 10% to

13% range to

1990."

Over the rest of this decade, total station time sales are expected to grow from

9% to

12% annually and national spot sales should increase 8% to 10% annually.

Perhaps one of the most serious chal- lenges facing the industry will be program- ing costs. The study said that program syndi- cation expenses have more than doubled since 1980, reaching close to $1.7 billion in

1985.

"By

1990, program spending by sta- tions could nearly double again lion by one estimate

-to

$2.3 bil-

-and

with similar growth for barter revenues to syndicators, the total syndication marketplace could con- ceivably double," it said.

The number of independent stations is likely to increase and intensify competition.

"New audience measurement techniques

NRBA merger,

The on a

National Association of

Broadcasters is roll.

With its house in order, the

NAB kicked

off

1986 with several key accom- plishments to its credit

-mainly

a merger with the

National Radio Broadcasters Asso- ciation and a compromise with the cable in- dustry on must carry. The view from the top of the association is that

NAB and the indus- try it represents

will

continue to make strides.

On the eve

of

NAB

's annual convention in

Dallas

(see story, page

Eddie Fritts shared

39), NAB President with

BROADCASTING some of the association's legislative ambi- tions, his own internal agenda and his views on the industry at large.

"I

think this has been a fabulous year for

NAB,"

said Fritts.

It started off, he noted, with the announcement

of

the proposed

NAB -NRBA unification, followed by a

"historic" compromise with the

National

Ca- ble Television Association on must carry.

"I

think part

of

our role is to facilitate those things and make things happen for the bet- terment

of

the industry, and I think we are really pulling that together." have the potential to impact advertising strategies and pricing. With access to more current, detailed viewing information in more markets, advertisers hope to fine

-tune campaign strategies. For example, market segmentation and targeting may be more fre- quently used

if

the new measurement tech- niques are successful," the study found.

Competition for spectrum, particularly from land -mobile services, is also expected to continue. As for government regulation, the study noted that although there has been some ing deregulation, "other issues are pend- or lie just beneath the surface regarding topics such as program content and editorial discretion and copyright."

To meet these challenges, the study sug- gests, station managers should "integrate the efforts

of

individuals across all depart- ments." Management training should be im- proved, the study said.

To attract more busi- ness, the broadcasters study recommended that work closely with advertisers in developing innovative marketing and ad- vertising approaches.

Being technically prepared, the report said, is also essential to

Budgeting future survival. for new equipment "more than ever requires the development ment

of

an equip- plan." Also, station managers should develop a program strategy to deal with es- calating programing costs.

Promotion is also a key.

"Promotion in television broadcasting is still in a relatively primitive state and yet, in a time

of

increasing competition and esca- lating program prices, it may represent the television broadcaster's best investment."

must

-carry deal top NAB's year:

Fritts

Entering his fourth year as president,

Fritts sees a bright future for NAB and the industry. For

NAB, the merger represents a major step toward dustry. solidifying the radio in-

"When the unification was an- nounced there was a sigh

of

relief among all radio broadcasters," he said.

Moreover, since then

NAB's radio membership has shot up.

"At

the time

of

the announcement we had about 4,550 radio members. Today we are at

4,700, the highest it's ever been."

(The merger could be completed as early as next week following an

NRBA membership meeting

April

21, at which time a final vote on the merger will be taken.)

As for the must -carry compromise, Fritts continued, many pressed

TV broadcasters have ex-

"relief and satisfaction."

There were many who thought it would be impossible to do, he said.

(The compromise is pending at the FCC as part

of

its rulemaking proceeding on must carry. Despite industry support for the compromise, it is unclear whether the

FCC

will

adopt it.)

Right now, he explained, NAB ing under the assumption that is operat- it can get at

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

40

I

TOP OF THE

WEEK

Fritts east three votes at the commission, either br this compromise or one that is very close o it.

"If

we don't get that accomplished, hen all bets are

off

and we'll have to do whatever we have to do. hat will be resolved."

But

1 am confident

Absent that potential conflict,

Fritts pre- licted the cable and broadcasting industries were entering a new age of "peaceful co-

:xistence." Nor did he see any significant rew competitors on the horizon.

"A

lot of those new technologies (DBS for me) rpon that we anticipated could impact greatly local television or radio markets have izzled. Some have changed shape and some ire moving along. In terms

of

competition, rroadcasting is still extremely healthy, and air projection for the future is that it is going o continue to be healthy."

Fritts's prediction is backed up by data rom the

Television Bureau of

Advertising and

Broadcast

Advertiser

Reports that howed television advertising billings rose

..5% in

1985 to $19.95 billion

-local

ad-

'ertising contributed $5.7 billion, national

- egional spot $5.95 billion and network

$8.3 zillion. According to estimates by the Radio

Wvertising

Bureau, total advertising rev

- nues

.n for radio in

1985 were

$6.563 increase

of

11.5% over

1984. billion, s

Although broadcasting's financial outlook good, the acquisition of broadcast proper

- ies by investors and nonbroadcasters is a rend rack that has

NAB's attention. "We plan to it and spot new trends in it, but we're of alarmed by fter a period it.

I think it will settle down

of

time,"

Fritts said.

"I

suspect it's all going to shake out when

II is said and done. There are more entre- ireneurial skills coming into the broadcast adustry than ever before. That is not to take way what has been there before." Addition

-

Ily, the

NAB president noted that anybody iho buys stations

will

have to have broad

- asters run them.

There are some in the industry, Fritts said,

ho

say there should be a return to the FCC's three -year rule (the rule to keep stations requiring licensees for at least three years).

"But

I don't think we should turn back that clock."

Nor did Fritts think repeal

of

the three -year rule itself changed the financial condition of the industry. Things

"really took

off,"

he said, when the FCC passed the 12- station rule (the FCC amended its broadcast station ownership rules to permit licensees to own

12

TV's,

12

AM's and 12

FM's). "There wasn't much action before that because most groups were up to their limit.

Now you see groups going after groups. Minnows swal- lowing whales."

But does the character

NAB president think the

of

broadcasting

will

be affected by this change in ownership?

"The flavor of the traditional broadcaster who believes in of- fering service to the community as the best way to generate profits and a solid base

of

support for that station in that community is being people diluted. But

I don't know that these would offer less service than the next company." And from what Fritts can see,

"it's a new ball game. There are different players; there are different rules; as a trade association we have to adapt and look at the long -term implications."

Despite that concern, Fritts is confident there are

"enough good broadcasters like the

Dudley

Tafts

]of

Taft Broadcasting], Wilson

Ray of

Weams

]of

Multimedia] and

Jim Dowdles

[of

Tribune]. who are expanding their own organizations, and these rule changes have allowed them to expand."

On the legislative and regulatory front.

NAB is in

"good shape." The organization has a full agenda, with issues like must carry, music licensing and scrambling leading its list.

But perhaps the greatest challenge fac- ing the association

will

be to protect the in- dustry's "bottom line," advertising. Efforts by citizen groups to ban beer and wine ads on radio and television, and passage

of

legis- lation banning smokeless tobacco ads, and efforts to regulate political advertising have contributed to

NAB's concerns.

"We've seen more threats to advertising then ever before,"

Fritts said. Broadcasters have to realize that as the focus

of

Washing- ton changes from red tape and regulation, it moves to something else. "Beer and wine are not a hot ticket item but it's an example

of

the kind

of

attacks on advertising we an- ticipate more

of."

On music licensing the

(NAB has joined with

All-

Industry Television

Station Music

License Committee to seek legislative repeal

of

the blanket license for music rights in syndicated programing), he thinks it's un- likely the bill will become law in this session of

Congress. He views this year's activity on the issue as a time for positioning to find out

"who your friends are, and where your strengths are and where your opponents are."

Broadcasters back home, he contin- ued, can

"work on the soft spots and then we can go full bore on it in the next session."

NAB,

Fritts noted, is moving into the

Mo- tion Picture Association

of

America's terri- tory when it comes to dealing with the copy- right subcommittees that have jurisdiction over the music licensing matter. They are committees

NAB has not traditionally worked because it has not had big issues before them, he explained. "So we are in a developmental stage on that issue, working with the all- industry committee.

I would like to see it passed this year, but it is not cally feasible." politi-

Internally, the past two years, in large part, were devoted to putting NAB's govern- ment relations department in order and beef- ing up its grass -roots lobbying. It's an area, said

Fritts, in which the association has made significant progress. He would also like to see

NAB's political action committee

(TARPAC) develop into a more significant fundraising force.

hope

Last Friday (April

11) Chief

Justice

Warren

E.

Burger for the first time revealed there is a crack in what had appeared his fierce resistance even to the thought of television coverage of the

Supreme Court. He said that an assurance of gavel -to -gavel cover- age of the court's oral arguments "might open things up." Burger, responding to questions during his appearance at a meeting in

Washington of the American Soci- ety of Newspaper

Editors, indicated that his principal concern with television cover- age of the court was that it would be edited to brief snippets for the evening news.

"We're not in show business," he said.

It was then he was asked if he would "object to something like

C -SPAN" and its typical full -text coverage of events that he suggested what it would take to

"open things up."

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

Al

TOP OF THE WEEK

Mark

Fowler at the crossroads

FCC chairman,

still

undecided whether to remain

for another

term, reflects on where he and commission have come over past five years

FCC Chairman Mark Fowler has good rea- son to be distracted these days.

His term is coming to its end. After almost five years as the agency's head, he is ap- proaching a crossroads, and what to do come

June

30 must be weighing heavily on his mind.

Still, in an interview with

BROADCAST-

ING, the vision chairman said that the luster

of

his

of

a truly liberated industry

hasn't

faded. Although he intends to focus on com- mon carrier issues for the time being, he also said that there are still important things to do in the mass media field. Whether he will be the one seeing to it that those things get done is not clear, however.

Fowler has been turning aside inquiries on his future plans.

He either asserts that he has not made up his mind or declines comment.

There's circumstantial evidence suggest- ing he's on his way out. His two chief mass media aides, Daniel Brenner and Thomas

Herwitz, have found jobs outside the agency.

But conflicting evidence suggests that he is hoping to stay on, at least for a while.

Some

of

the furniture in his office has been reupholstered lately; he says he is not dis- cussing job possibilities with prospective employers in the private sector, and, at a recent FCC meeting, he appeared to commit a classic slip of the tongue in announcing that he was "looking forward" to working with a telephone regulatory board made up of federal and state officials this summer.

That group is not scheduled to meet until

July, a month after Fowler's term ends. But

Fowler insisted that nothing should be read into any

of

those signs.

In an interview, Fowler shared some in- sight into his current thinking. First

of

all,

Fowler said he doesn't enjoy being chair- man. "But

I find it very satisfying," Fowler said, "to get a lot of things done in the image of the

President's philosophy, and take a lot

of

the fear out

of

operating businesses in telecommunications. Those are two very good things to

do."

Fowler also implied that there was more for him to think about than purely personal considerations.

"I've

had some words

of

en- couragement from members

of

the

cabinet,"

Fowler said, "and the President himself en- couraging me to think about what

I want to do, and applauding what

we've

done here.

That's something you have to treat very seri- ously and give very heavy weight to. a

"We have had a different agenda than

just

business

-as -usual agenda," Fowler added.

"There is an obligation on the part

of

the

President's appointees to serve longer than normal.

I have believed that."

In his next breath, however, Fowler took pains to point out that he has already served for almost five years. "This will probably be one said.

of

the longer terms served," Fowler

At another point, Fowler also appeared to betray a desire to be the one who shepherds the industry into a world where the electron- ic cal media will be unchained of all but techni- regulation, a vision he said is still several years from becoming reality.

"If

I could stay here for a while,

I think

I could get us there,"

Fowler said.

He declined comment on the persistent rumor that he will stay on at least through the elections this fall. But he also seemed to put an outward limit to his service.

"I'm

not contemplating serving eight or nine years, believe me,"

Fowler said.

On other issues before the commission,

Fowler offered a few choice words on the concept of imposing new must -carry obliga- tions on cable. On the surface, "you have to say that the argument they

[the National As- sociation

of

Broadcasters] are presenting isn't consistent, essentially, with the idea of the print model for television, however de- livered," Fowler said. "But we

don't

expect everybody to always be totally consis-

tent....

We try to

be."

Fowler declined comment on the industry must -carry compromise itself. "But

I would

just

observe that anyone would agree that the idea

of

a print model for broadcasting and fastening must -carry obligations on cable do seem to be operating at other," he said. odds one with the

There are other mass media matters on the chairman's mind. Among them, accordin to Fowler, are those raised in the staff's

An report

(BROADCASTING,

April 7).

Fowler

ar

pears to be particularly interested in the re port's proposal to rethink the AM duopol rule. "And

I think the idea

of

buying an selling interference rights is something that very innovative and could very well sery the public interest,"

There also are he said. pending proceedings t streamline the comparative license renews process and to clarify comparative renews policy "to provide a higher level

of

renews expectancy consistent with the law," Fowl( said. In addition, there's the question c whether noncommercial VHF operator should be permitted to swap their channel with commercial UHF operators witho( having to face competing applicants, whic is still pending, "although on a back burner,

Fowler said. "And from the statutory stanc point, we have got to eliminate this notio that you can file a competing application r renewal time and, in effect, confiscate broadcaster's property."

On a fresh note, the chairman also sai there was a need for the commission to ree) amine its local ownership rules. "It's sill that you can own an AM and an FM in market, but you can't own two

AM's,

Fowler said. "In fact, probably in a larg market, it's particularly silly to say you can own several

FM's or several AM's.

Yo might have much better programing as a

n

suit of common studios. And you clear) would not be duplicating yourself. So, fror a diversity standpoint, there would be a k of diversity.

There may be a lot of very goo efficiencies as a result."

Fowler said he didn't know whether h would look at the duopoly rule during hi chairmanship. But he asserted that th rule

-and

the commission's other local owr ership prohibitions

-should

be reviewec

He also said that if he were around for ar other "three years or

so,"

one doing the looking. he would be th

Approaching his crossroads, Fowler ma be torn over personal plans.

But his hope fc the industry's future remains steadfast. "Br sically, we want broadcasting to be treate just like any other business,

period-jut

like newspapers and magazines," Fowl( said. "There should be no religious aura, n religious mystery.

It's a means

of

commun cation; it's one of many. Because a lot c people do rely on it, it's all the more reason think we should leave it in private hands

E free as we can devise

....

I keep repeatin myself over and over, but

I think that's th world

we're

moving toward.

I think we'r beginning now to see many more choices ft the people out there in the video area i particular as a result of the some of the stet

we've

taken in the early years. And that good, and it's going to continue. The far that

we've

taken down an incredible amour of the paperwork requirements and the rule: and all

of

that stuff has been

junked,

and th world works, and in fact works better, seems to me is volume

A

of

the exhibit the suggests that getting the government out the broadcaster's hair is truly in the publi interest."

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

42

TOP OF THE WEEK

I

NBC bets

$50 million on

M

-ll

Sale is big boost to

Matsushita half -inch system competing with Sony Ampex

NBC last week revealed plans to purchase

$50- million -worth of half -inch videotape equipment from Matsushita and over the next five years convert videotape facilities in all its divisions to the Japanese manufactur- er's newly developed

M

-Il

format.

The move could dull the edge gained ear- lier this month by Sony's competing half

- inch Betacam format after that company an- nounced it would be joined by Ampex in designing and manufacturing the current Be- tacam systems and an enhanced Betacam

SP product to be shown in prototype at the

Na- tional Association

of

Broadcasters' annual equipment exhibit in Dallas this week

(BROADCASTING,

April

7).

Sony and

Ampex together are believed to control as much as

80% to 90% of the video- tape recorder market, and

CBS last year made a gear, commitment to purchase Betacam with ABC also thought to be leaning that way.

But Matsushita. through its U.S. arm,

Panasonic, hopes to build a considerable stake in the small- format recorder market with the

M

-II line, scheduled for debut at the

NAB. M -II's applications, say both Matsu- shita and

NBC, go beyond newsgathering, and could replace studio one -inch recorders and compete composite with the new generation

of

digital machines in planning from both

Ampex and Sony.

According to

Michael

J.

Sherlock, execu- tive vice president of

NBC Operations and

Technical Services, NBC's $50- million, five

-year agreement with Matsushita has es- sentially been completed and covers system delivery, pricing, features and electronics.

A final written agreement should be reached in several months, he added.

The five

-year delivery schedule calls for

1,200 to

1,500 M -II units, including cam- era- recorders, field and studio recorders and newly designed video cart machines. to be delivered to

NBC starting within the next

15 months. A satellite newsgathering field edit package has been targeted

July 1987, or before. for delivery by

The

NBC

News division's conversion from the current three

-quarter -inch

U

-matic systems to

M-II would be completed domes- tically by the end

of

1987, according to

Sherlock, so the total system would be avail- able before the start of the 1988 presidential election year.

NBC's network operations will convert to M

-II during

1987 as existing

Type C one

-inch videotape recorders be- come obsolete, with the changeover to be completed when machines it

NBC brings back the

M

-II will use in South

Korea for the

1988 summer Olympics. he said.

Sherlock said the network's first delivered unit

will

be used in the on

-air playback of a new, as

-yet- unannounced delayed feed to the mountain time zone beginning next

Septem- ber. far

NBC's planned expenditure grew from a smaller number to $50 million after it began its investigation two years ago, he said. because network tests showed that

M-

II not only could replace electronic news- gathering gear but also approached the qual- ity of studio one

-inch machines for a much lower price.

The

M

-II studio recorders are expected to cost

Type C machines

NBC one

-third less than with similar features.

Sherlock also said the nate the format may elimi- network's need to use composite digital recording systems such as those de- veloped by is

Ampex for a digital spot player it introducing in Dallas this week. Another advantage of

M

-II,

he added, is that the for- mat stone provides the network with a stepping into the component digital domain. In a speech on the said that topic in

February. Sherlock with NBC's scheduled move from

30

Rockefeller

Plaza in New York, the new technical plant would be dominated by com- ponent digital by

1993 because of mat's multigenerational capabilities, that

of

for- great use in post- production applications.

Steven neering

Bonica, vice president of engi- for the Operations and Technical

Services

Department, noted the performance"

"superior

of

M -II is based on its use of metal particle videotape in place of currently used metal oxide formulations. Although

Bonica acknowledged Sony is also the benefits applying of

MP tape to its prototype

Beta- cam

SP,

Bonica believes Matsushita has the

"advantage

of

not having to force MP into a previous format. It was able to generate the right engineering compromises and good op- eration features."

Sony's Betacam

SP is ble essentially compati- with existing

Betacam products, while

M

-II is not compatible with M- format half

- inch products already in the field. While that may provide some psychological advantage for

Sony, Sherlock believes "when broad- casters delve into the facts and the inherent value

of

metal particle tape as it is used in the

M

-II format. and compare that to prices they can get for either the like anticipated formats

[Betacam

SP] or existing

Beta tape," they will be convinced of the superiority of

M

-II both in quality and price.

Sherlock in recent weeks has repeatedly stressed pricing what NBC views as the superior

of

M

-II,

but noted that Matsushita would still be selling the equipment to

NBC at a profit, and not eliminating margins in order to gain the product's first U.S. sale.

Sony and

Ampex unquestionably are still more dominant in their

U.S. marketing pres- ence, that

Sherlock acknowledged, but he argued

"no amount of marketing is going to change a broadcaster's attitude. Broadcast- ers are very sophisticated.

Marketing is not truly going to affect real sales." Matsushita has also made commitments to expand its marketing and servicing operations in the

U.S.

, he said.

"I'm

fully convinced"

of

Mat

- sushita's commitment to

U.S. broadcasters, he noted, adding: "We have visibly exper- ienced their commitment in the engineering design and production end of this.

We have the greatest has confidence that what in the past not been full participation in broadcast- ing

will

be turned into full participation."

NBC has not officially informed affiliates

of

its choice, but it has kept station chief engineers informed

of

network testing

of

M-

II and other small formats, and although

Sherlock stressed affiliates would make their own choices of future formats, recent

NBC surveys have shown that an number

"overwhelming"

of

affiliates have been waiting to see what choice the network made.

"This is a pioneering move for

Sherlock commented.

NBC,"

"It's analogous to Ku- band and

TV stereo. Neither was just a dive into the water. They were well studied, well thought out plans to improve our economic position and at same time to improve quality.

We want to make sure ly." we're doing it correct-

Cable interests,

solicitor

general file in pole attachment case

They ask Supreme Court to overturn appeals court ruling

The tives

U.S. solicitor general and representa- of the cable television industry last week urged the Supreme Court to overturn an appellate court declaration that the Pole

Attachments

Act is unconstitutional. The

U.S. Court of

Appeals for. the

I lth

Circuit held that the law that since 1978 empowered the

FCC to regulate the rates that utility com- panies may charge for cable attachments to their poles violates the

Fifth Amendment prohibition against the property

"taking"

of

private for public use without just compen- sation

(BROADCASTING,

Oct.

14).

The gov- ernment and the cable industry representa- tives, in separate briefs, argue that the appeals court decision has no sanction in precedent, law or the

Constitution.

The appeals court acted on an appeal by

Florida Power Co. from a decision of the

FCC ordering a sharp reduction in rates that the utility had imposed on

Cox Cablevision

Corp., Teleprompter Corp. (later taken over by Group W Cable) and

But the appeals

Acton CATV Inc. court, rather than passing on the reasonableness der

-and

of the commission or- in the absence of such a challenge

-struck

down the act as unconstitutional. It said that the determination

of

"just compen- sation" is solely within the jurisdiction of the courts.

Both the government and the cable indus- try representatives

-the

National Cable

Television Association, Group W

Cable and

Cox Cablevision

-argue

that the appeals court erred in its reliance on a Supreme

Court decision in

1982 that struck down a

New York law permitting the state to compel the private owner of an apartment house to accommodate a cable system's the facilities on property's roof. That decision, the briefs say, does not apply to a case involving utility companies that permit the use of their poles

Broadcasting

Apr

14

1986

A,

l

J TOP OF THE WEEK

I by cable systems, and whose only complaint is the rates they are allowed to charge. For the Pole

Attachments Act, the briefs note, applies only when utility companies agree to the access sought by cable television sys- tems.

Even if the appeals court were correct in ruling, as it did, that the commission's rate order in the case is a

"taking"

of

the power company's property, the briefs say, the Fifth

Amendment requirement for "just compen- sation" is satisfied by the law as implement- ed. They note that the commission allows

Florida Power to recover its fully allocated costs, and that the law provides for judicial review

of

the commission's order.

The court of appeals' theory that only courts may de- termine just compensation, the government says, "finds no support in the constitutional language or in the decisions"

of

the Supreme

Court.

The cable industry representatives' brief contends that the appeals court's "unprec- edented refusal" simply to review the com- mission's order and statutory formula under- lying it

"improperly handcuffs Congress, and might require the federal judiciary to become a ratemaker in the first instance for hundreds or even thousands of pole attach- ment disputes

"

-as

well as in all other cases that effect a taking

of

property. Nothing in the takings clause or in the high court's deci- sions, the brief adds, "requires this anoma- lous result."

CNN becomes latest player in

SNG

Newsbeam service will offer stations vehicles, backhaul and

distribution for

$10,000 a year plus

story

fees; it will use

transponders

on both

Satcom

K -2 and GSTAR

II satellites

Ted

Turner's

CNN is entering the increasing- ly competitive satellite newsgathering field, offering independent and network -affiliated television stations a comprehensive SNG networking and communications service.

Newsbeam, as the service is called, will make its debut at the National Association of

Broadcasters convention in

Dallas this week.

As part

of

its turnkey SNG service,

CNN will also offer stations two SNG vehicles, one from Midwest Communications and one from Dalsat Inc. The vehicles, which start at around $175,000, were designed to fit the budgets of most television stations, accord- ing to

Paul

CNN.

Amos, CNN vice president, said

Newsbeam will operate at or below cost.

The idea to is not to make money, he said, but strengthen CNN's broadcast affiliates

-

those stations that feed coverage of local and regional news events to CNN in exchange for material that appears on CNN and its short-form companion service,

CNN Head- line

News. (it's not an even swap; stations also pay CNN for the use of its material.)

By facilitating the entry

of

news affiliates into SNG and its broadcast improving their ability to cover the news, Amos said, CNN believes it will also be improving itself. By

CNN's latest count, about

140 stations now exchange news with CNN.

Using its dedicated satellite capacity,

Amos said, Newsbeam will provide simple backhaul (transmitting a feed from an SNG truck to the home station) and distribution

(transmitting a feed from a station or vehicle to however many stations wish to receive it).

The networking operations will be coordi- nated from a desk in

Altanta, which will be a day, he said.

Newsbeam will also provide two -way voice and IFB satellite links for SNG vehi- cles and interconnection with the telephone system, Amos said.

The Midwest Commu- nications and Dalsat vehicles that CNN will market will be equipped with Wegener Com- munications' digital communications sys- tem, he said. But since other vehicles use other systems, he said,

Newsbeam's ground facilities will be equipped to handle not only the Wegener signals, but the others as well.

Newsbeam will charge stations wishing to use its services $10,000 a year, Amos said.

On top of that, he said, it will charge them each time they use one of the services. The

$10,000

-a

-year entry fee applies to every station regardless of the size

of

its market, he

SNG signing.

L

-r:

Terrence

McGuirk, VP special projects, TBS; David Barnes, president, Mid- west Communications; Andrew Hospodor, president,

RCA

Americom;

Dr.

C.J. Waylan, presi- dent, GTE

Spacenet Corp.; Turner; Charles Willingham, president, Dalsat; Heinz Wegener, chairman, Wegener

Communications; Burt Reinhardt, CNN president, and

Amos. said.

Unlike other SNG services, Amos said,

Newsbeam will allow its client- stations tc retain complete control

of

their

SNG vehi- cles and will impose no restrictions on which stations may downlink their signals.

Al- though Newsbeam won't force any station tc cover an event it doesn't want to, he said, i1 hopes that Newsbeam stations will cooper- ate with one ive coverage another by providing cooperat-

of

events. "For it to reall) work, everybody is going to have to chip it and make it work," he said.

The heart lite of any SNG service is its satel- time, and

Newsbeam has lined up plenty.

It has leased capacity

of

two new medium

- power Ku -band satellites, RCA Americom's

Satcom

K

-2 and GTE Spacenet's GSTAR

II. the latter was launched

just

three weeks ago.

Amos said. On Satcom

K

-2, he said, News. beam will have one full -time transponder and a two

-hour block (5 -7 p.m. NYT) on t second each weekday. On GSTAR II, he said, it will have two full -time transponder! and a two -hour block (5:30 -7:30 third seven days a week.

p.m.)

on t

Since Newsbeam plans to transmit twc television signals over each transponder

Amos said, it has the ability to send six sig. nais simultaneously at any time and

10 sig. nals simultaneously during the evening new: hours when many stations like to go live.

": call it the

6:01 crunch," Amos said.

Although CNN ing

hasn't

yet begun market

Newsbeam in earnest, Amos said it al ready has two customers: wTV](TV)

Miami, t

CBS affiliate, and

KCRA

-TV

Sacramento. Ca lif., an NBC affiliate.

E

PanAmSat signs

Peru as

first

partner

It feels

confident association will

insure needed

financing

to begin competing satellite service with Intelsat

The PanAmerican Satellite Corp. ha

! achieved a breakthrough in the efforts of

American companies to obtain a foreigr partner with which to begin competition with the International Telecommunications

Satellite Organization in providing interna- tional communications satellite services.

The government

of

Peru, in a diplomatic note delivered by its embassy in Washing- ton, invited the U.S. to join it in consulta- tions with the

Intelsat, under Article XIV(d) agreement, for use of the PanAmSat of sys- tem.

The question being raised last week wat which country will follow Peru's example ir joining with PanAmSat or with any of the other four companies that have received con- ditional authority from the FCC to establish separate systems.

(A fifth,

RCA

Americom, has decided against proceeding with its con- ditional authority.)

PanAmSat Chairman Rene Anselmo, whc had visited Lima and several in other capitals

Latin America in efforts to button down

Broadcasting Apr 14 1986

a'

1

TOP OF THE WEEK

I agreements, was jubilant.

We are extreme

- y pleased with the decision of the

Peruvian zovernment." he said in a statement.

With a oreign government's

ìtates. we joining the

United will proceed with Article XIV(d)

:onsultations, and expect a fair. rapid and

'avorable finding by

Intelsat."

Ambassador Diana Lady Dougan, the

ìtate Department's coordinator and head of he

Bureau

of

International Communications and ittle

Information, indicated

Peru would have difficulty in gaining U.S. cooperation.

ìhe said she

"welcomes the added:

The Department initiative" of

State

will

and con-

;tilt with other interested U.S. government agencies but fully expects to be able to give he government of

Peru a positive response."

The announcement that the first country to xeak what had seemed a boycott of

Ameri-

:an separate systems was

Peru came as a

;urprise. Word had leaked that

Colombia was on the verge of concluding an agreement with PanAmSat

(BROADCASTING,

31). It was learned last week that

March commit

-

:ees that had been established by Colombia's

Ministries

of

Communications and

Foreign

4ffairs had made recommendations in favor

3f an agreement. and a

State

Department

3fficial said it was only a last- minute bureau

-

:ratic

"hitch" that had prevented the govern-

milt

from going forward. Anselmo, howev-

:r. in a letter to Richard Colino, Intelsat

Jirector general, last week, blamed "the

,lowdown in

Colombia" on the leaked infor- mation: it was in the leaded form

of

a document

"Colombia Communications

Garn-

,le.

An Interesting Partnership." PanAmSat

3elieves Intelsat was behind production and release of the document:

Colino says it was lot.

In any case. State Department officials elieve the

-bureaucratic hitch" stalling ac- ion in

Colombia will be dissolved soon.

Intelsat had nothing to say about the Peru- vian move. "We have no comment," said an

Intelsat spokesman. For three years, ever since

Orion Satellite Corp. filed the first ap-

)lication for a separate system, Intelsat had been orchestrating the opposition

of

Intel

-

;at's members to the establishment of such

;ystems. Resolutions have been passed call- ing on

In a members to separate refrain from participating system, and scores

of

letters apposing the were authorization of such systems written to the State

Department and the

FCC. Intelsat's expressed concern has been

:hat competition would have an adverse eco- lomic impact on the global system, draining

3ff revenues and rices. forcing

Intelsat to raise

On the other hand, the U.S. policy paving he way

;ystems for the establishment of separate

-a

presidential determination is-

;tied on Nov. 28, 1984, that they are required n the national interest

-specifies

that the

;ystems authorized be nto prohibited from tying public switched services. which gener- tte most of

Intelsat's revenues. The aim is to

)rotect Intelsat's viability. And the Peruvian rote inviting the

U.S. to join in consultation with Intelsat for the use

of

the PanAmSat

;ystem specified that the services to be pro

-

¡ided via the satellite

-to

be named

Simon

3olivar, after the man described as the liber- ator of

Latin America

-would

not be inter- connected with the public switched net- works.

Fred

Landman, PanAmSat president, expects the system to be used services. "We have letters for a variety

of of

intent from companies pacity planning to use our satellite ca- for everything but public switched services," he said. He talked of private and public applicants for video distribution with- in Peru and a desire for the transmission of such signals from the U.S. He also said

"some outside multinational companies" want to use the system for high -speed data transmission to small aperture earth stations.

And

PanAmSat clearly plans to offer ser- vice beyond the borders

of

Peru.

"We expect more and more Latin American countries to come on board," Landman said. Besides Co- lombia, he said likely candidates are

Argen- tina, Chile, Ecuador and

Brazil

(even though the last has its own communications satel- lite). Indeed, Landman said, the next coun- try to declare itself a partner

of

PanAmSat might be in Europe.

That could happen as a result of

PanAmSat's agreement with Cyg-

Networks,

NAB

nus

Satellite Corp., another ies that have received

of

the compan- conditional authority from the FCC to share the orbital slot at

45 degrees west.

Cygnus, which becomes a general partner in PanAmSat, is authorized to provide service to

Europe in the Ku band, while

PanAmSat's authority to operate in the western hemisphere contemplates service in the C band. The PanAmSat satellite

will

be a hybrid, operating in both bands.

Securing a moved a foreign correspondent major barrier to PanAmSat's re- initi- ation of service. But the applicant faces an

April

30 deadline to demonstrate to the FCC it has the financial ability to launch a satellite and operate it mates it for one year.

PanAmSat esti-

will

need close to

$100 million, a figure

PanAmSat officials feel is in reach now that the Peruvian connection has been made.

But beyond that, there is the need to meet an

October deadline for launching the satellite aboard an

Arianespace vehicle.

And the Intelsat coordination process is not known for its speed.

urge dual measuring

Broadcasters want diary system to continue running when new people meters go to work in fall

The three television networks and the

Na- tional Association Broadcasters are petition- ing the

A.C.

Nielsen Co. not to abandon its diary

-based

National Audience Composition

(NAC) sample in favor

of

people meters next fall to measure national television audi- ences.

June

Nielsen is scheduled to decide this about switching to its electronic people meter system method. from the manual diary-based

People meters electronically record how many and what type

of

persons are watching a particular television program.

Once the full people meter sample is up and running it is expected to deliver overnight demogra- phic ratings, thus rapidly advancing their de- livery time. Demographic ratings at present are measured by the

NAC diary system, which is published biweekly. Nielsen is planning, at least for the time being, to maintain its 1,700

NTI household system, equipped with traditional

Nielsen meters, which delivers overnight household ratings

of

network programs.

If

Nielsen goes forward with full people meter service, it plans to simultaneously withdraw from the manual diary-based sys- tem. The people meters would then be the sole source of demographic ratings for the

1986 -87 prime time season.

But the net- works would like to see

Nielsen continue operation of the

NAC system alongside a full people meter sample for at least a year while validation tests continue for the people meter service.

One of the problems, as the research chiefs at the networks see it, is whether the people meter

will

receive the proper level of cooperation within its sample. Diaries are generally maintained by one person in the household but people meters require specific individuals to punch buttons on the set

-top device. Network researchers worry that the cooperation rate would be lower and that could affect lower

-rated shows that have loy- al followings and good demographics.

The networks are also concerned that

Nielsen may be moving ahead too rapidly without proper validation of the people me- ter.

That worry is causing

ABC to propose making a

"significant financial contribu- tion" to support Nielsen's experiment with the 1,000 people meter sample while it con- tinues to operate the tem

NAC diary-based sys- for the 1986

-87 season.

Marvin Mord, vice president of marketing and research ser- vices at

ABC, said that he is hopeful the other two networks will go along with finan- cial support that could keep both systems running through the 1986

-87 season.

Mord's gravest reservation

-which

is shared the by his counterparts at

NAB

CBS, NBC and

-is

that the people meter is being validated with an insufficient sample which could distort the ratings.

At present only about are half the

1,000 planned people meters installed, and

Mord said a

January test

of

prime time demographics yielded ratings that were noticeably different from collected from the

NAC diaries. those

Mord and his colleagues at the other net- works said continuing both the

NAC diary and the people meter test would encourage further evaluation and comparisons of the two systems.

Mord added that

ABC is sup- porting methodological research through telephone coincidentals conducted under the auspices

of

the

Committee on

Network

Tele- vision Audience

Measurement (CONTAM).

The purpose

of

telephone coincidentals is to compare the diary-based data and the people meter -produced data against the industry standard, as defined by CONTAM and ac- cepted by the industry.

Mord said that a peo- ple meter test conducted in January differences yielded

of

between 25% and

50% be-

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986 dr.

TOP OF THE

WEEK r tween it and the

NAC method for some tele- vision series with ratings of 20 or less. are

In a in letter to the three ratings services that various stages of developing and test- ing people

meters-

Nielsen, AGB Televi- sion Research and

Arbitron

-NAB

research vice president John D. Abel said that the

NAB does not believe that a proved, valid and reliable people meter service system can be operational by September

1986." Abel pointed out that the

CONTAM validation study will not be completed until mid

-1987 and that people meters should not be intro- duced before that time.

David Poltrack. vice president of research for the

CBS /Broadcast Group, also feels that

Nielsen should not switch from the

NAC system to people meters for measuring de- mographic ratings this that fall. "Our feeling is parallel systems should be maintained for the 1986 -87 season, which would allow for a complete validation

of

the people meter system in early 1987 when the people meters sample is at an acceptable level."

CBS. in a statement. said that it wanted to see the continuation of the

NAC and

NTI systems

"in their present form."

According to

Poltrack, Nielsen originally intended to merge the people meter system with the

NTI system and have the

NAC system run on a stand -alone basis. But Poltrack said that since the people meter has not been fully validated it should not be merged with the

NTI but, instead, operate on a stand

-alone basis.

"This is the critical difference," he emphasized. He said

CBS would be willing to help fund continued experiments with th1 people meter, but that the cost should b1 shared with Nielsen's other major clients such as ad agencies. rather than placing thi burden entirely on the three networks.

Bill

Reubens, vice president

of

research of

NBC, pointed out that the

NTI householc ratings collected during the February sweeps and those collected later by the

NAC diaries were only fractions apart.

"That's validatior

if

I've ever seen

it."

he observed. But he saic it is not possible to validate the people mete] service based on an incomplete sample.

Reu- bens fears that the people meter understates multiperson households since it require, each viewer's active participation. The peo ple meter, he than the said, diary."

"requires more attention

L

FCC satellite spacing group wants performance checks

Group makes number of suggestions to

FCC, which plans to reduce spacing between geostationary satellites

The FCC may require broadcasters and other satellite users to conduct performance checks

of

their transportable uplinks, includ- ing the new breed of satellite newsgathering uplinks, every time they use them to insure against interference with other satellite sig- nals.

That is among the key recommendations of the industry advisory group on two -de- gree satellite spacing, formed last year to advise the FCC on implementing its plan to reduce the spacing between geostationary communications satellites from four or three degrees to two degrees to make room for more satellites. The advisory group plans to meet

April

29 to finalize its recommenda- tions.

It is unclear which recommendations of the advisory group's will be transformed into

FCC rules.

According to Ron

Lepkowski, chief of the FCC's satellite radio branch, the

FCC

will

review all of the advisory group's recommendations, many of which it re- ceived last some fall, and propose incorporating of them into FCC rules by the end of the summer.

According to industry group officials, the group is also recommending other measures that insure uplinks

of

all kinds meet the

FCC's dards. existing satellite transmission stan-

Jim Cook of

Scientific- Atlanta, chair- man of the advisory group's working group on earth stations, said the group is proposing that test all satellite equipment manufacturers uplinks and send certification that they meet FCC standards to the FCC. Before granting any application to use an uplink,

Cook said, the FCC would check to see it had received the manufacturer's certifica- tion.

Under the group's proposal, Cook said. operators that they would run on -site receive -pattern and transmit -pattern tests soon as they are put of all uplinks as into operation to verify perform as certified by the factory.

Operators would record the results

of

the

Downbeat meeting

If the stock market was any indication on the day after the Capital Cities /ABC Inc. meeting with securities analysts last Thursday, news from the meeting was worse than an expected. Friday morning (April 11) trading was delayed one hour because of excess of sell orders. The stock opened at 220, down

81/2

(it was already down four points at the close Thursday).

At the Thursday afternoon meeting, Capcities Chairman Thomas Murphy and

President Daniel Burke confirmed pessimistic projections that CC

/ABC would report net income per share of $7 -$8, unless ratings and /or sales improved. Murphy and

Burke said that the operating results of

ABC Inc. were worse than initially when the $3.5- billion anticipated acquisition began a year ago, and that ABC's continuing operations posted operating income in

1985 of $300.8 million, down 20%. Positive notes were that the acquisition has put little burden on the company's balance sheet and that ABC Video enterprises "continued to improve its

Prepared remarks also profitability" indicated that the ABC TV network lost money in the first quarter, contributing to a probable

"small" net loss before "extraordinary" items. One person who attended the meeting said the remarks indicated that the company will evaluate whether certain functions currently handled at the corporate level might more properly be handled by the divisions, with possible restructuring especially affecting the ABC Network Division.

And last

Friday, mac-Tv New York said it will lay off 95 employes by year's end. tests and keep them on file at the uplinks foi inspection by FCC field agents. he said. Op- erators of transportable uplinks used in SNC and in remote broadcasting would have the additional responsibility of conducting transmit -pattern and receive -pattern tests once a year, he said, and. just as important, transmit

-pattern or receive -pattern test prior to each use.

Receive -pattern and tests, transmit

-patter which are made while the uplink's dist scans a energy portion of the orbital arc, Cook said confirm that the dish is directing most

of

th(

of

its signal toward the intended sat ellite and not interfering with the signals o: adjacent satellites.

Jay Ramasastry, chief scientist, satellite technology, CBS /Broadcast Group, and vice chairman of the advisory group, said the earth station working group had considere( making transportables conduct transmit -pat tern tests before each use, but, in the end opted to give them a choice of making the fa simpler receive -pattern test.

Ramasastry said the receive checks,

-patter while less onerous than transmit pattern tests, will still be a burden to

CBS. and uplink operators, but CBS is reconcile( to performing them as part

of

the price i must pay to use the satellites.

With the prop er equipment and trained operators, the tes should quickly become routine and take onl; about

IO minutes, he said.

And

if

the re ceive -pattern tests become commonplace he said, the necessary equipment

will

b] available in kits and eventually included i( all SNG vehicle and fly

-away systems.

According to Leo Torrezao,

of

GTI

Spacenet, transportables were singled out u perform the per -use test because it's believe( they cause much of the interference. As thi transportables are moved from place t( place, he said, the dishes are likely to be come

"misaligned."

Nonvideo satellite users and satellite op erators in the advisory group were united it cracking down on transportables to mitigate interference among satellite signals, Rama sastry said.

Digital signals transmitted ove

SCPC satellites are particularly susceptible to interference from stray video signals.

E

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

An

(AtiiLorqe)

Revolution isn't

Grant Tinker's strongest suit.

Success is.

Five years after he took over an

NBC that was flying on little more than a wing and a prayer he has effected a turnaround that is little short of miraculous. And in the true professional's style, he made it look easy. This week, during the

Broadcasters

National Association of annual convention in

Dallas, Tinker will receive one of the

Award. industry's highest honors, the

Distinguished

Service

In anticipation of that occasion,

BROADCASTING debriefed

Tinker on the

NBC years electronic and his outlook media at large. on the

The

more

things change

When we asked in 1981 how next different things were going to be in the five years, you said not very. And you said you were putting aside other technologies and were just going to do your job and not worry about those things.

Can you answer the same way now?

Yes.

What about the revolution in programing arrangements, like a

Ted

Turner buying an MGM.

That probably will sink him, you know.

He'll sink slowly in the west instead

of

in the east.

But Ted

Turner's buying MGM doesn't change anything, except for some folks who are working at MGM maybe.

Why would that change anything?

Because suddenly you have a major production company, a motion picture development company, owned by the cable business.

What's "major" about MGM as a production company? Nothing.

Universal getting into the station business

-I

think that's a legitimate subject to talk about.

There are people sort of coming from the other direction into oui business. We're not allowed to do certain things, but apparently

they're

allowed to do all kinds

of

things. But

I

don't

see that as z major revolution.

Probably the one with the brightest gleam in his eye is Barry

Diller

-and

Rupert Murdoch en what

-at

Fox.

There is the opportunity, giv-

Murdoch has bought and the stations they now own, foi

Broadcasting Apr 14 1986

48

ri

"The

NEWSFEED

Network delivers when the others can't come through."

-Mark

H.

Pierce,

WCSC

-TV

Executive

Vice-

President and

General Manager,

Charleston, South Carolina

"Recently,

The

NEWSFEED

Network supplied

Live

5

News with the first video of a court arraign- ment from Los

Angeles. This story held particular interest to the

Charleston community. The arraign- ment was of two alleged killers of two employees from a local fast food restaurant."

"This is not the first time this has happened.

Time and time again,

The NEWSFEED

Network has pro- vided

Live

5

News with the pictures

FIRST, when we needed them most.

NEWSFEED ers delivers when the can't come through." oth-

The

NEWSFEED

Network.

America's Television News Service.

Contact your Group

W representative or call

Productions

(213)

850 -3800.

THE

NEWSFEED

NETWORK

86

Westinghouse Broadcasting and Cable Inc

AT

LARGE them to get together kind with a bunch of other people and form some

of

a coalition that may look like a network. or be an important nucleus.

Would you factor into that the growth of the VCR market and the competition for television time?

I can't deny that people who are looking at something on a

VCR are spending that time they might be spending looking at us, but the research

I've seen would indicate that so far it's additive, it's bonus viewing. A person who has taped something looks at off a network and later it is someone we would not have had, had he not had his

VCR in order to do the taping. Now, to the extent that he stops

off

on the rental place at a way home on Friday night and gets a movie, then you can consider that something of a threat,

I suppose.

Well, actually

I don't think anything has changed there either. Since television began, some shows have not happened because they were too expensive, and somebody wasn't our end

of

it, that's the buying end. willing to pay the $2. That's on are

Now, right now

-and

this is a change from four years

ago-we

seeing the studios saying,

"OK,

we're not going to deficit finance any more.

You guys have got to step up and make us whole for the two runs that you buy."

That won't hold true.

I think that's too tough a position for them to take, and that we

will

wind up somewhere in the middle. Deficits,

I've always thought, including when

I was in their business, are the price of poker. That's the ante.

There may be some other things

-barter

shows, first -run syndica- tion, whatever

-that

are also in that ball game now, and I think there is a lot

of

business to be done. But what I think has happened is that for the moment, the half hour is in vogue, and working, and people trace that to the Cosby success and a few other things. Stations are tending to make their commitments in favor

of

the half hours as opposed to the hours, and some windfall

of

the hours are not enjoying the

off

network profits that were anticipated.

But as has always happened, we, the networks, the production community, and we satisfactory to everybody.

will

sit down with

will

work it out in a way that is

I'd like to move away from the change aspect to some

NBC questions.

How close is NBC to being what you want it to be?

Well, it's very much what

I want it to be, because I think

of

it in term:

of

people, and the team that runs this place about a

-and

I'm

little exclusive senior management team not

-is

talking jus pretty mud running in the same direction now, which is something that warn' true when we last talked.

As to

And I am very happy about that.

NBC's other constituencies

-the

agencies, the advertisers the affiliates relate to and all very well those groups that we care

-I

think we're pretty a lot about and have tc much also what we shoulc be now.

Well, what are the areas that have not come up to speed as fast you'd wish? a<.

VCR penetration is expected to rise from

30% now to

60% or 70% in the next six years.

And yet, buying one doesn't mean forever using one. There are all kinds

of

things

I think we don't know.

I am more inclined to be the ostrich here,

if

you

will,

and to think absolutely about this business, and not

I worry that much about all mean, sure, there of these encroachers.

will

be some loss; we know those players are here and they're going to be here. But my answer

-and

this may sound

1981. like the needle is stuck

-is

pretty much what you said it was in

If

I were to look out another five years,

I may not be sitting here; somebody else may be sitting here, but the business be what it is.

And hopefully NBC will be preeminent.

will

largely

But

1985 was a year unlike any other in the industry, as all three major networks were either sold or went through some sort of major finan- cial had restructuring.

I think five of the studios

-and

that's not unusual

-

major management changes. What sort of impact will the volcan- ic eruptions in mergers and acquisitions that happened over the past year have two, three, four. five years down the road, relates to you? especially as it

I don't see in that short a time frame anything changing particularly.

But

if

you ask me about the year 2000, I don't know, and probably no one else does.

Look what happened within

NBC in the last five years

-the

changes that were made.

Our competitive position changed, but the business hasn't changed.

I certainly didn't forecast that we wouldn't have achieved some suc- cess.

Four or five years ago, would a network have declined to pay steep license fees to help cover production costs of shows in development, as NBC did with Universal's Great

Adventure Company?

The daytime schedule is our most glaring business problem. There'! no denying that. But we keep addressing it and we'll get it right; just haven't done it as we have been able to do it elsewhere.

But

if

you look at the we other dayparts, beyond prime time, whicl everybody knows about, a lot from of good things are happening, righ

Sunrise

and Today through

Carson

and

Letterman.

If

you take out daytime and late night, we're doing great.

And

I'm very happ' about all that.

How did you help the

7udg1 show? Nothing really changed in ingredients, all the ingredients term: of were there years back. and nov suddenly that show is a completely different animal.

I don't think it's any black magic or mystery as to why it happened. think a bunch and and better at their jobs team

-Steve

the faces that we see. I

of

some of people kind just think you could compare them to an athletic

-people

got together

Friedman who, just became more proficient. and got, over time, and his production three years ago, team didn't bette: an have t winning team, and now are winning, because they all worked hart

It's the same thing that is true about all those shows that ticked

I have

off

in the past, that took a long time to find their audiences it prime time. It's true about everything else in television a hell

of

a long time.

-it

just take!

The show,

Letterman or whatever.

Is it a good show? And then only thing that you have to do is make a judgment about the whatever just leave it there and do all those things you do for shows promote them and feed them and water them

will

succeed. it

is-

whether it's the Today show

if

-and

or Cheers or you decide it eventually is.

-

they

And it's not really magic. It just works. It probably works in every business and in every walk out

of

life.

If

it's not a good show, then get

of

there and do something else.

That's really what we get paid

do-is

make those judgments about is it good or is it not good. it to lot

And

if

we're bad at making those judgments,

if

we decide that a

of

bad things are good and we leave them there and they never succeed, then we should all get fired and another group should take over.

I'll ask you to put on an industry hat for a similar question.

How close

Is the broadcasting medium, the network system, to being what it ought to be?

It has sort

of

evolved and it is what it is, and maybe it should have evolved in a very different way, but

I'm

not creative enough to know what that way might be.

I think it's pretty good.

If

you use it the way we use everything else, wisely and prudently and sparingly and selectively, it's just fine.

There's nothing wrong with television that turning it

off

won't cure. the

That's the way we talk about children's television. And maybe only thing wrong with television is that it is so pervasive, and so available, that we all tend to look to it and at it too often.

Do you think that news or information programing is going to occupy a greater part of the broadcast day?

I hope so. I don't know

if

it will or not, because we are in a business and it's a matter

of

what the traffic

will

bear commercially. But speaking just about

NBC

-I

think we are out

of

balance; that we don't have enough reality and we have a can address that little too much fiction.

-or

redress that balance to some extent

If

we

-it

would

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10

1986

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AT LARGE be fine.

How would that take place?

Well, it would take the form

of

a one -hour show.

Almanac,

which we have been sort of stumbling with, and will come back possibly with a different title and it may look quite different.

But it will be in our schedule, and that will be step number one, and then when

we've

successfully negotiated that, we will take another one. Or maybe

we'll

find other dayparts in which we can do other things. Or maybe the Today show will be on weekends.

I

don't

know.

But yeah,

we're

deficient and we need more, and we should have it.

If it were an opportunity, we would have pursued it with more verve than we have.

I call it a deficiency, and the trick is to turn it into an opportunity, and then realize that opportunity. Hopefully, that will happen.

But does it make fiscal sense for you to do that?

If it

doesn't,

we won't do it. You're right

-this

isn't a charity

we're

operating here.

So we have to figure out how to make it a good business move. to add reality into the mix.

This goes back to the question of where the three networks are going.

Do you think there's any chance that one of the three might fail?

No,

I

don't

-not

as far as

I can see. Again, if

you're

talking about

2000,

I have no idea. But no,

I think all three networks are quite healthy now. Each

of

us has certain problems that

we're

trying to fix.

But there's room

-and

even need

-for

all three.

On the flip side of that, do you think there is room for a so- called fourth network?

If

you hooked up a bunch of independent stations and you could get sufficiently into those major markets, conceivably.

I would guess you would begin to stretch it a bit

-and

I

don't

say that in a competi- tive or jealous sense.

I

just

am not sure as a practical matter whether there are enough customers for four, but think customers for three.

We all live profitably now, and there's some- thing kind

of

cyclical about what happens between us competitively.

We were down, and now

we're

up, and presumably the other guys have plans to be up again.

But now that we have the bit in our teeth, we would like to open up some daylight between NBC and its competition

-get

farther ahead than we are, in all dayparts.

We find succeeding a heady matter.

We like it.

It's fun.

Obviously there is a way to increase that margin.

Is it to do what NBC has done, for example, on

Thursday night, where it's famous for quality shows?

Or is it to exploit the mass medium aspect of the equation, to be all things to all people?

Hopefully, you can cheat over into the area

of

more so- called

"qual- ity" all the time and the audience will come to you. But maybe they won't.

We do have that department store situation to deal with as opposed to boutiques.

We do have to have something for everybody, and not everybody wants Thursday night, so you can't have seven

Thursday nights.

But hopefully the appetite for quality

isn't

yet satisfied, and may- be we can do some more. Part of the problem is not

just

the audience and what it will accept or what it won't many good

-it's

the creative input. How people who can turn out quality programing are there?

And there are never enough.

Where are the programs you acquire and put on NBC going to come from in the future?

Some will come from within. particularly in the news area. There may be in the future some slightly more liberal allowance as far as producing entertainment shows for ourselves

-and

I

don't

know that, but it's possible. And the bulk of our entertainment programing will be from the outside;

I would presume particularly from the creative Hollywood community and maybe other sources that we really haven't tapped yet.

But given the economy of things in

1986 compared with

1980, or whatever base you want to work from. are we going to be other sources? looking at

I think the thing that

you're

assuming is that it is written in concrete forever that the programs that are done out there in

California, where we look for most

of

our programing, have to cost as much as they do.

I sort of agree with something

I read, that a lot of this goes to excesses within the production community

-the

sum

of

all the parts that go to make up a television show, whether it's inflated salaries for the performers or those guild and union levels

of

pay.

And

I would think that if suddenly there isn't anybody making shows out there because

they're

too expensive, somebody would say,

"Hey, wait a minute, let's rethink this and let's all cut back a little bit and do it differently and for less, and then

we'll

go back and do business with the networks." It's

just

crazy to think that

they're

going to willfully drive their business out

of

Los

Angeles.

It

doesn't

make any sense.

I'm

not saying it's easy. Going back is always less, tightening your belt

difficult-

taking

-but

I think that all has to happen. It's ridiculous that they have priced themselves out and that's really what has happened.

of

the marketplace,

How are costs escalating?

Can you lay that out for us in specific terms?

If you took a budget of a show, an hour show made in 1980, and compared it with one made in 1986, you would see that in ever) category, above and below the line, there were increases, some of them just startling.

And

I

don't

have those budgets in front of me, but it's easy to say that because it's true.

Most

of

those people about for a variety

of

are obscenely overpaid. And reasons. One

of

them is the harsh it has come competition that is out there.

You want X star and

I want

X star, and so a bidding war results, and one of us gets that star at a very high price. And you multiply that times all the other elements that go to make up a show and pretty soon the show itself costs too much.

CBS has budgeted its growth in costs to

4 %. Have you done that?

Well, we haven't got a percentage yardstick: we don't use a number.

That seems to me, without being critical of the way they do it, a little artificial.

I think what

we're

doing is making judgments on a show

- by

-show basis, but obviously the pressure is intense to keep those numbers in the ball park, because we are in the business, too.

The end

of

our business obviously is the advertiser.

We are very much aware that his budget and his patience have limits. He

just won't

take these double -digit increases forever. And those double

- digit increases

don't

come out

of

our simply being greedy and avari- cious; they come out of what we have to buy, the programs that we have in our schedule

I

don't

want to turn this into an antiunion or antilabor kind of answer, but

I think only part

of

the problem is in inflated star salaries that go far beyond scale levels of pay

-$60,000;

$80,000; $100,000 an episode.

It doesn't only go to the faces you see; it goes to those names you

don't

see, those multiple producers and executive pro- ducers and many writers. The business has changed a lot since

Sidney Sheldon sat down and wrote every episode

Jeannie,

batting them out in two days per episode.

of I

Dream

of

Look at the credits on the shows, and you know that all

of

those people not only get paid, but they get paid very well.

You get down below the line, and every guild and every union that's come in over time has demanded its share in this burgeoning production economy.

And now we all have to finally look at this thing and say,

"Wait a minute, this has become swollen beyond all affordability"

-and

then deal with it. And it's very hard to do that, as we all know. It's hard in

Detroit and it's hard in

Hollywood.

But you've been on the line in

Hollywood

-is

it possible to argue, if you were a producer, that it is this very burgeoning in terms of people and talent and expertise, that has created the new breed of television that you want?

You mean that they make better television? They are better shows in a way, but there is a lot of fat and luxury and shorter hours.

I think we

Broadcasting Apr 14

1986

52

We handle the business of negotiating.

So you can concentrate on the business of broadcasting.

If you had to negotiate for the use of every song on your playlist, you'd never have time for anything else.

Every songwriter's con- tract has its special problems. And its special lawyers. And their lawyers.

That's why there's

BMI. We negotiate the copyright contracts for over

48,000 songwriters, putting today's most popular music at

BMI your fingertips. And the legal hassle off when we take your hands, you've got time to do what you do best help your station grow.

-

Wherever there's music, there's

BMI.

©1986

BMI

AT

LARGE can all work harder and we can all work longer and we can all work for less.

I think all those things are truc.

Did NBC underspend its programing budget last year?

No.

I

don't

think so.

I don't think we overspent.

Normally, you tend to spend up to the levels did it. If we you've allocated, and

I think we probably

didn't,

it was a mistake, it was

just

a lucky accident.

But

I think we have been fiscally responsible, and we are trying to operate this whole thing like a business.

Given this situation, that they can't afford to make it for what

we're

willing to pay, and we're not willing to pay what it's costing them to make it, and so soft on, and the crunch that's exacerbated by the marketplace in hour syndication

-all of

that is going to shake out to some hard judgments and conclusions, and high time. We've all done it occasionally.

I can remember in one case at MTM when

I just wouldn't pay the

$2 pay for a lady in an ongoing series and the chance was that if

I didn't the $2,

I would lose the lady, and since she was an integral principal in a show, will not pay the that the show would go down. And

I just said, "I

$2."

And lo and behold, she said, "OK,

I'll

work for what

you're

offering." as

I think that if we bite that bullet more often than it has been bitten lately, we will finally star negotiations

-and

I mean this in labor negotiations as well

-shrink

this thing down to a manageable size.

But are these costs threatening your network viability?

Sure. That's why we just can't endlessly keep increasing what we pay for programs.

And charge for advertising?

Yes, because there's a limit to it. And finally, it will not become a good advertising buy if we let it go on forever.

Let's talk about what you sion think is going to happen this year in televi-

-how

is the competitive posture going to evolve among you and the other two networks in

1986? What have you got on the drawing board to change the face of NBC this next year?

Not very much.

We have a couple of things that

I can't mention that aren't that dramatic,

I'm

but things sorry to report. we're thinking we version and title, whatever that turns out to be; we have certain obvious holes in prime time that we will repair. And nothing that will startle you, might do some- what differently in certain dayparts.

We have

Almanac, or its new

The news wheel concept?

Homework. Just in- the -building homework, which got out

News] and his people are trying to look a little into the future to see how news might be presented, and that is one way that the building, which you no doubt heard way too early; in fact, it may never materialize at all. But Larry Grossman

[the president

of of

NBC

they're

exploring. There are so many things having to do with the affiliates and their interests that have to be to considered, even know where that'll come out. that it's much too early

Can you tell us how you turned NBC around in the last few years?

Damned if

I know how

-except

that we live by that

Golden Rule of having patience. Getting the good people, helping them, supporting them and then having great patience with the product that they turn out. And it that doesn't sound like all that impressive of a formula, but works, and as

I say, you can apply that not

just

to prime time.

Beyond that, we have here at

NBC some very capable people.

That's understating grating the folks at the other networks, particularly people

I don't know, the best it.

I think we have, hands down, without dene

- broadcast team available. There are people who have been in training here for a long time, who

I think maybe, because they went through that period lot of losing, have a lot of scar tissue and a

of

determination that they might not have had without that losing period.

One of these days get out

I'm

going to decide that

I ought to pack it in and

of

here, and

I will never look back because

I will know that this place is just going to zip right along without me.

You almost seem to be setting the stage.

I

don't

want to sound like a guy who is going to die here in this chair, but nobody should stay forever. Particularly in kind our business, which

of

tends to move pretty fast, people should get up and get out after a while, and not too long a while at that.

And also,

I'm

a Californian whose

job

at the moment happens to be in

New

York. Physically

I can be in Burbank and a lot same as being here in the building where the

of

people could come visit me and

I could be on the phone, but it is not the headquarters

of

the company is.

It's just not the same.

Well, aside from the forbearance and patience you bring to this job, what else do you bring to the party? What do you contribute uniquely yourself?

Nothing!

I thought you'd say that.

Well, it's true. If

I art

Well,

I'll

tell you one thing

I bring that

I haven't mentioned

of

delegating, if indeed it is an art.

The willingness to delegate, to have people talk about that as if it were a great favor people

-and

in could think

of

something,

I'd

be happy to tell you. truth, it is a very selfish act to allow a

I'm

lot

-the

doing of other people to do the work that

I might be asked to do if they weren't around.

I am very their good at that.

I'm

very good not only at letting people do

jobs,

but virtually saying to them,

"You decide," and that works.

As you analyze the company, somebody someplace has contributing the vision to NBC. got to be

Well, whatever "vision" there is, it came from General Sarnoff or somebody, and the rest

of

it is just repetitive.

People and programs are the same in this regard that

we're

talking about: If you have a good program, put it on, leave it on, and it will ultimately succeed.

RCA Chairman Thornton Bradshaw, who asked me to come back here, said, "You've got two things to do"

-and

this is not an original speech on his

part-

"Do the job and prepare your succession." Just

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

54

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LARGE those two simple things. And it turns out both have been done.

Who is your successor?

We've got so many good people here, you could put several names in the hat and take out any one or two and there wouldn't be any choice.

And are you going to be a party to that decision?

Well,

I anticipate being asked, and having an opinion; but no, it obviously won't be my choice because

I'll

be out of here.

Are you prepared to be any more specific about when you're going to leave?

No

How long can you stay in this job when you tantalize people with the thought that you're leaving?

Well, it's not

"tantalizing" them.

I just don't want anybody to think that my feet are in concrete here. I would say that

I feel the job that

I came here to do better or help do is kind

of

done, that the company is a lot

off

than it was when

I arrived, and that therefore it's probably

OK for me to go back to California and leave this job and the company in other hands that are, as

I've been saying at boring length. more than up to the job.

What are the chances that

It would be somebody from the outside?

No chance, no need.

As

I say, it won't be my absolute decision to make, but I would be stunned

if

anyone suggested an outsider be- cause we don't need an outsider.

We've already got all the good people here at NBC inside. No need to look beyond 30 Rockefeller

Plaza.

I discern a greater strength and sense of purpose in you than the last time we spoke

(BROADCASTING,

Sept.

28, 1981).

I think many of the things you're saying are the same, but you're saying them in a differ- ent way, and

I think that strength and that sense of purpose must somehow have changed

NBC.

Well,

I think you're right, there is a difference, but you're wrong about what it is.

The difference is that you were talking then to a guy with a job to do and now you're talking to a guy who feels that he has done a job

-and

THE job,

if

you will

-and

to that extent, things have changed a lot.

If

I had said to you then,

"I'm

thinking

of

getting out of here," you would have said, "You just got here and you haven't done anything."

Now it's a little later and

I think I have been part

of

doing something, and I don't know why I feel obliged to keep tantalizing, to use your word, people with my imminent departure. I don't mean it that way, except I want people to get used to the idea.

If

General

Electric had not come along, who knows? I might have alrready decided that I ought to get out

of

here by such and such a date. But obviously, with GE arriving, that's a much more important matter than where

I am, and so

I sort

of

postponed my thinking about and deciding on when.

If

I had suddenly, two weeks after the General

Electric deal surfaced, said, "Well,

I think

I'll

leave," it would have looked as though

I was leaving for that reason, which wouldn't have been true.

Tell us about Hollywood. How is the production community chang- ing?

Can you do that in terms of company -by- company and person

- by- person? Who are these people upon which the television industry has to depend for most of its creative product?

I don't think those people have particularly changed.

I mean, some come and some go, and there are new faces and what not.

But I don't know that that's changed particularly. I think the changes occurred some time ago really, when the business, or the buying

of

program- ing, changed

-when

it left the agencies and the advertisers, roughly in

1959 -60, and became

I think virtually all network buying. it changed then because you saw a lot of companies that were once very important in the business

supply-

Screen

Gems, Official Films

-that

over time.

The major studios took up most

of

television program just sort

of

faded out

of

the slack, and then along came a variety. few upstart independents

And yet, of the

MTM or Lorimar

if

anything,

I think what happens is that people begin to think that companies make shows, as opposed to people.

And they don't, as I have often said. I didn't make those

MTM shows; the Bumses and the Brookses and the Paltrows and the

Bochcos made the shows.

And

I always think it's wrong that people who work for the networks, whether they're

Fred

Silverman or Brandon Tartikoff of

Bud Grant or Harvey Shepherd, talk in terms

of

having not createc shows, but "generated" them somehow. They said to somebody

"Why don't you make a cop show along the lines

of

an

MTV thing

?' as

Brandon did, and

I've got to give him credit for doing. That's ar important suggestion to have made, but it should not be confusec with making the show.

And similarly,

I don't think

(MCAs]

Sic

Sheinberg makes business

Miami

Vice, either. The business, to me, is t of people

-going

to those creative people who, as

I've already said, are usually overpaid because there are too few

I suppose, and getting them to make the shows.

And

I don't think that's ever changed. They may be a

of

little them. more coddled and spoiled these days than they used to be. They are not working as hard as

Sidney Sheldon worked on but they are the soldiers who fight that war.

I Dream of

Jeannie.

I'd

say that.

Will there be a multiplicity of producers and broadcasters in the future?

Will somebody create a medium out of VCR's one of these days that might look a lot like broadcasting?

There are factors that work against what you're talking about.

Part of it is the need to be there at the moment and to have that shared experience, even though you don't necessarily have to be in a theater.

But to know that you're watching the

Today show at the same time

I'm watching the

Today show and we're hearing the same things at the same time.

All

that I think is hard to be very specific about, but it's real.

But that's a live news show. What about a programed show?

It's the same.

When you go to an audience thing, you can't substitute just you and your family and your dog looking at even a movie for a theater experience.

But look at the movies. Perhaps, arguably, the most powerful enter- tainment experience you've got is the movies. Movies used to be

In the theater and then they went on live, network television.

Then the pay TV window opened up, and the movies went from the theater to pay

TV to television. Now the home video window is in there, and

I think they're going from theater to

VCR to pay

TV and then to network.

Or not network at all.

Or not network at all, right.

So you come up with made

-for

-TV movies.

But all of these competitive forces changed the business in dramatic ways, and changed the medium.

It changed the movie business.

It didn't change television.

Because you couldn't get the theatricals any more. you created your own kind of new programs.

But that's the point exactly. Just playing a theatrical is money on television. It's OK and you can sell the spots and you make money and everybody is in business.

But the fact that those stops made along the way took the luster

off

theatricals really forced us to create the television movie, which is a different breed altogether, as we know.

They do different kinds of material that would not get made

if

people were just making movies very positive result for theaters.

Now that's actually a of the process that you're talking about.

Are you going to make another run at cable news?

It's not on this desk as we speak, but yes, we are expensively in the news business, and there seems to be no other way to be in it other than expensively. And it struck us that there were a lot

of

efficiencies in the combination of what we do now and cable news. There may also be a good business, as

I guess Ted

Turner is discovering, to be in, in and of itself.

We have already everything it takes to be in that business, and it's another way to utilize what we have.

That seems to me to be natural.

And as you know, it didn't prove out this time, for reasons that have

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AT LARGE been well documented.

But I would think we would be, and for sensible reasons.

On a stand -alone basis?

Well, stand alone in terms of the product, the service; but not stand alone in terms of the input.

I just meant whether you would make another pass at buying.

Oh, I don't think we care.

As you know, we did make an offer to

Ted

Turner, and

I'm talk with him

if

sure

if

CNN he came around again we were available, or we would sit down and might grow our own.

Is your interest in cable confined to news?

Yes.

For one business thing,

I think that would run right up against the we're in now, and a lot

of

people, including the affiliates, perhaps most

"Why the hell are you doing that? Why are you competing with

So I particularly the affiliates, might very well ask us, don't see a reason to get beyond the news business.

I us

?" think there is a very good reason to lot

of

me as these things try to, in effect, amortize and utilize a that we already have just good sense. available to us.

That strikes

In our

1981 interview, you said the word "service" has marginally disappeared from broadcasting.

You spoke of it with regard to infor- mational programing, for example, and having more of it. But

I got another sense out of it, that you were also speaking about putting service into everything that you did. For example, the quality of enter- tainment programing, like

Cheers.

I do think to the extent we can viably present more news, even more sports, that sounds to me like more service and useful and proper service. But

I think that this show is a it gets to be presumptuous and arrogant to say higher quality than another, and therefore of greater service than the

The way show to be

I've always thought of it

-and

I usually use a

Lorimar disdainful

of

for no particular reason the audience wants to see

-but

that

if

40% of

Dallas,

then they damn well ought to be able to do so. other show.

And just because

I'm

not interested in watching Dallas doesn't mean that they shouldn't have that opportunity.

You used the phrase "a little less sizzle and a little more substance."

Well, yes, but I don't know that I would say that in terms would just talk in terms

of

service.

I

of

programs.

I don't know whether

I did say that in terms

of

service.

But most of the audience won't watch

S'l.

Elsewhere. even though a very desirable piece of the audience will watch those shows.

There is a limit, that's right.

You can't get them all that way.

But you can't even get necessarily a lot of them.

Well,

I don't know.

I would call

Cosby a quality show, and there we are getting an inordinate number

of

viewers, and you can pick other examples, too.

But you're right, there is a eclectic schedule, something limit.

And you do have to have an for everyone.

And that's the way it should be in our democratic society.

I think the way television has grown up in this country is very much in keeping with the country itself

-the

way we behave and the way we think and in terms

of

our tastes.

But wouldn't it be possible to have one network, any network, that would have, say,

CBS's Monday night schedule and a piece of ABC's lliesday night schedule and NBC's Thursday night schedule, and patch it all together?

You're absolutely right. But then you're talking popularity because you're naming nights that we already know do well, nights that are popular.

But no network so far has been quick enough and smart enough to corral all of those.

One of the good wants a things that's happened is that now every network

.tlooalirhlhif

instead of the hakes of Hazzard or a

Beverly

Hillbillies or something.

Well it's not easy.

That chemistry is very hard to arrive at, what

Moonlighting has achieved. There are infinite combinations that g. to make up television shows, and successful ones.

But you're right

if

you cherry pick them after they were successful you could pu together a start night. But unfortunately, that's not the way it happens.

Yo from ground zero with all

of

these things.

And there isn't any different way to approach the development pro cess?

There's a way.

If

you want to find something that

I used to holle: about that I used to didn't make come true. Before

I came back to NBC, talk about the waste and inefficiency in the network progran development process. They made all of these pilots from all thost script commitments, and wound up with so few that went on the air and mostly failed.

It always struck me as very wasteful.

So when

I came back here, somewhere in my that we would go get the creative mind people that we saw was the as idea the mos desirable, and give them large series commitments which woulc obviously go on the air, and pay for themselves, in effect, and we wouldn't have to spend all those millions to make series yourself to live with your failures

of

It would probably belie some failure, dollars

if

not a on lot development.

And then as

I got into it, as opposed to just on the outside critical way.

of

it, I began to realize that you couldn't just live your life tha commitments, put them on the air and sentenct

-the

ones that

of

failure, jus didn't being become shows that you had dreamed about.

Simply because there was no guarantee that Stephen Cannell's next project would be a hit.

Well, let's use

Bay City

Blues. There was the guy

[Bochcoj making the and hottest show in television and we gave him a series commitment. it went right into the ground.

I was only considering the upside of those series commitments.

But the downside is that instead effect

of

being a pilot that you ate in

-that

you made, paid for but never had any value to you

-

now suddenly you're paying a double penalty. You've got to put the damn thing on

if

you go the series commitment route.

So the old way may be clumsy.

Well, the truth is that it's a mix you wind up with, and you do give

Jimmy Burrows and the Charles brothers a series commitment be- cause they've earned it and because they do the best work, or whoev- er.

And that's good, because they are the best suppliers we have. But they don't always succeed.

So to cover their occasional lack some sons,

of

success, you've got to make pilots. And the development thing is what it is it turns out. for good rea-

It's called "art is waste."

Yes. to

But even though our batting average is not very good compared other areas, Broadway and movies in particular, it ain't bad.

What kinds of issues are you going to address in your Distinguished

Service Award speech at the National Association of Broadcasters' convention?

Unlike the traditional recipient broadcaster.

of

that honor,

I am not a

"pure'

I'm

a little bit

of

a lot

of

things;

I'm

a programer and s broadcaster and a producer, and so

I have trouble speaking to that audience about what is more their business than mine.

I think you are "of them," and

I think they need you, and what you've brought to this. The three networks are pivotal to the broadcasting

Industry. There might be no industry absent those three networks.

And NBC has its own legacy,

60 years' worth, which was always very important. Sarnoff began the business. But

NBC was always stodgy and bureaucratic and a lot of other things.

You've made magic out of somebody else's mountain here, and' it has a profound effect or everything that happens here from now on.

I am beginning to get a sense that because you of that. and as much as I sort don't want to get too big for

of

your britches, resist what you're talking about is probably what is going to somehow get said.

If

I always felt a little bit like

I only had one foot in the business of broadcasting, then I accepted member feel, through this award, that

of

the club.

I'm finally an

0

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986 co

NAB

Pi

1986

Radio, TV broadcasters 'Tuning in

America' at

64th annual convention

Katz

American Television

representing major market affiliates

Katz

Continental Television

representing medium and smaller market affiliates

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Television

representing independent stations exclusively

Katz Television Group.

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NAB

NAB

86

86

86

The

Fifth Estate's biggest convention, the

660

The exhibitors are expected to be on hand topics on the exhibit gress toward digital video recording. A rundown begins below.

A listing of hospitality suites appears on page

76.

And

NAB will release on

Monday the floor is expected to annual the

National Association of Broadcasters, is under way at the

Dallas

Convention Center.

Some 38,000 broadcasters and over for be the results of cerning radio and television broadcasting.

One the gathering of five of of

-day the the event. surveys continued con- hottest pro- agenda a product review of the exhibit floor begins on page

79.

The daily agenda for

NAB

Saturday,

April

12

RADIO SESSIONS

Ten concurrent one-on -one sessions.

11 a.m.

-1 p.m. Rooms W116 -117.

Engineering

KVOG(AM)

for

Managers and Programers.

Panelists: Larry White,

Tulsa, Okla., and Al Resnick, WLS(AM)

Chicago.

Doing Your Own Research. Panelists: James Fletcher,

University of Geor- gia; Joey Reagan, Washington State University; Richard Ducey, NAB.

Program Consultants. Panelists: Donna Halper, Donna Halper Associ- ates; Steve Warren,

Programing Co-op; Kent Burkhart, Burkhart,

Abrams,

Michaels

&

Douglas Associates; John Stevens, Surrey Broadcast Group.

Minority Employment Opportunities. Panelists: Claryce M. Handy, NAB;

Bill Shearer,

KGFJ(AM)

Los Angeles; David Balor. PBS; Don Chaney,

KTBB(AM)- KNUE(FM)

Tyler, Tex.;

Cliff Webb, NBC Radio News.

Legal Answers

&

EEO Workshop. Panelists:

James

Shook, FCC; Barry

Umansky, NAB; Eugenia Hull, NAB.

Instant Rating /Book

Analysis.

Rip Ridgeway,

Arbitron; Bill Livek, Birch

Radio; Steve Elliot,

KOZY -FM

Dallas.

Ask NAB Services. Panelists:

James Hulbert, NAB; Peggy

Lambert; NAB.

Ask the FCC. Panelists:

Albert Halprin, FCC; Diane Killory, FCC;

Larry

Eads, FCC; Robert

Cleveland,

FCC.

Subcarrier Opportunities. Panelists: Harry Pappas, Ethnic Radio Net- work; Bob Switzer, Switzer System Technology;

Tom

Barket, Spantel Corp.

Radio computer showcase.

11 a.m.

-1 p.m. Rooms W108, 109, 115.

Radio production workshop

I.

11 a.m.- 1-p.m. Room W111. Presenters:

Tyree Ford, production consultant;

Don Elliot,

Kus -AM

-FM

Los

Angeles; Julie

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

61

Broadcasting contingent.

BROADCASTING'S advertising and edi- torial staffs will be headquartered at the Plaza of the

Americas during the NAB convention. Attending will be Dave Berlyn, Vince

Ditingo,

Geoff Foisie,

Adam

Glenn, Kira Greene, Harry Jessell,

Kwentin Keenan, Kim McAvoy, Charles Mohr, Larry Taishoff, Rob- ert (Skip) Tash, Tim Thometz, Don West, David Whitcombe and

Len Zeidenberg.

NAB 1988

SMPTE

D

-1

Digital

Television Recording Standard.

9:15 a.m. Bernard

Dickens, CBS Television. The

Broadcaster's Need

for

the

Digital

Televi- sion

Tape Recorder. 9:40 a.m. William Nicholls, CBS Television.

User

Requirements

for

Small Format

Broadcast

Video Recorder. 10:05 a.m.

Peter Smith, NBC Television.

Magnetic Media

for

the

Digital

Television

Tape Recorder and Small Format

Systems. 10:35 a.m.

Arthur

Moore. 3M

Co

Amato, talent director.

Radio in

Search of

Excellence. Presentation:

1

-2:15 p.m. Rooms W101,

103. Welcome: David Parnigoni, NAB.

NAB. Presenter: Sharon Patrick,

Introduction: Bernadette

McKinsey

&

McGuire,

Co. Panel: 2:30 -3:45 p.m.

Room W107. Panelists:

Sklar, Sklar

Jack

Swanson,

KGO -AM -FM

San Francisco; Rick

Communications;

Wayne Vriesman and

Dan Fabian,

WGN(AM)

Chicago;

Wally

Clark and Gerry DeFrancesco,

KIIS -AM -FM

Los Angeles;

John Irwin and Lee Stewart,

KOSI(FM)

Denver.

Two concurrent sessions.

2:30 -3:45 p.m.

Small Market Radio Pro- graming.

Rooms W105, 106.

Moderator: Ray Lockhart,

KOGA -AM -FM

Ogal- lala, Neb. Panelists:

Cary Simpson,

WTRN(AM)

Tyrone,

Pa.;

Donna Halper,

Donna Halper Associates;

Chuck

Denney,

KBZZ(AM)

LaJunta, Colo.; Nor- man Protsman,

WNER(AM) -WOHO(FM)

Live Oak, Fla.

The Whole

Brain

Approach to

Radio Programing.

Rooms W102,

104,

110. Presenter: Harry Nelson, Personality Workshop.

Three concurrent sessions.

4

-5:15 p.m.

Making

$

With Your Mouth.

Rooms W102,

104, 110. Moderator: Jerry Johnson,

Voice Craft. Panelists:

Larry King, Mutual Radio Network; Jim French,

KIRO(AM)

Seattle; Sally

Jessy

Raphael, NBC Talknet;

Pat

Rogers, wOAI(AM)

San

Antonio,

Tex.

Building on Basics

'86. Rooms W105, 106. Presenter: David

Klemm,

Klemm Media.

Surviving in AM

Radio.

Rooms W101,

103.

Moderator:

Rick

Sklar, Sklar

Communications.

Panelists: Judy Karst,

KDBS(AM)

Alexandria,

La.; Bruce

Marr, Bruce Marr Associates;

Tim Pecaro, Frazier,

Gross

&

Kadlec; Gary

Michiels,

WBND(AM)

Biloxi, Miss.

Television Multichannel Sound.

Noon -3:45 p.m. East ballroom

B.

Ses- sion chairman:

Harry Owen, wovM

-Tv

Washington. Transmitting

Data

Over

TV Audio

Subcarriers. 12:25 p.m. Robert Unetich,

ITS Corp. Testing the

BTSC MTS

Stereo

System. 12:40 p.m. Eric Small,

Modulation Sci- ences.

Demystifying TV

Stereo

Equipment Performance Specifications.

1:05 p.m. tance

James Carpenter, Broadcast Electronics. FCC

Type Accep- and Compliance

for

TV -MTS Transmission

Systems. 1:30 p.m.

Ralph Haller,

FCC.

Maintaining

Mono Compatibility with TV

Stereo

Pro- graming. 2:05 p.m. Randy

Hoffner, NBC. Production &

Post

Production

for

TV

Multichannel

Sound

-Part

2.

2:30 p.m. Robert Liften, Regent

Sound Studios. sion

Advanced Acoustic Design

for

Stereo

Broadcast Televi-

Facilities.

2:55 p.m. Peter D'Antonio,

RPG Diffusor Systems.

CAS: Vertical

Internal Multichannel Audio

System. 3:20 p.m. Basil

Pinzone, Pinzone Communications;

Robert Broad,

IRT

Electronic

PTY

Television Graphics.

3:45 -5:40 p.m.

East ballroom

B.

Session chairman:

Dave Rabinowitz, NBC Television. Adding Quality and Dimension to

Television Graphics and Effects.

4 p.m. Richard Thorn,

Post

Group Inc.

Integrating

Weather Data into Station Graphics

Systems. 4:25 p.m.

Dr.

Joel Myers,

Accuweather

Inc.

Big City

Graphics on a

Medium Market

Budget. 4:50 p.m. Michael Huitt,

KAKE

-TV

Wichita, Kan. The

Image

Importance of

Quality in

Television Graphics. 5:15 p.m. Dave Smerier, NBC

Television.

Sunday,

April

RADIO MANAGEMENT

13

Radio get- together reception.

5

-6 p.m. Rooms W116,

117.

Welcome:

David Parnigoni,

NAB.

RADIO ENGINEERING

AM technical improvement.

9 a.m. -12:50 p.m. East Ballroom

D. Session

Chairman:

The

Charles Morgan, Susquehanna Broadcasting

Co.

NAB

Improvement Project: A Status Report. 9:15 a.m. Charles

Morgan, Susquehanna

Broadcasting

Co.;

Michael

Rau, NAB.

National

Radio

Systems Committee: A Status Report.

9:40 a.m. John Marino, Katz

Broadcasting;

William Gilbert, Delco Electronics.

Novel Antenna

Design

Reduces Skywave Radiation.

10:05 a.m. Richard

Biby, Communications

Engineering Services A New Dimension

for

the Design of Medium

Wave

Antennas.

10:30 a.m. Ogden Prestholdt, A.D. Ring

&

Associates. Improv- ing AM

Broadcast

Service by Means of

Synchronous Transmitters.

11 a.m. Oscar Reed, Reed

&

Associates. Broadbanding

Higher Fidelity

Sou lid.

11:35 a.m. William Ball, Carl

T.

AM

Antennas

for

Jones Corp. How

Electrical

Devices are Tested to

Determine Interference

Levels. Noon.

Edward Marrie, Joint ence, NEMA.

Sections Committee on Electromagnetic

Interfer-

How the

FCC Controls Interference.

12:25 p.m. Thomas

Stanley,

Acting Chief

Engineer, FCC.

Radio broadcast engineering.

1:15 -4:40 p.m. East Ballroom

D. Session chairman, George Capalbo,

RKO Radio, Boston.

FM

Antenna with Modi- fied Interbay

Spacings

Solves

Downward Radiation and Other Problems.

1:30 p.m.

Joseph Semak,

KZBT(FM)

San Diego.

FM

Short Spacing

Inter- face Study

Uses a

Microcomputer. 1:55 p.m. Jon Banks,

WLTT(FM)

Bethes- da, Md. Combining Networks

for

FM Transmitter Multiplexing.

2:20 p.m.

D.S. Collins, Shively Labs. Designing Antenna

Systems

for

the

VOA

Based on Broadcast Area

Coverage Requirements.

2:45 p.m. George

Lane, VOA.

Sideband

Analysis of

Medium

Wave

Antenna

Systems. 3:25 p.m. Jerry

Westberg, Harris Corp. Assessment and Suppression of

Rera- diation from

Steel

Power Lines

Into Directional

AM

Patterns. 3:50 p.m.

Christopher Trueman, Concordia

University.

Microcomputer Applications in AM

Antenna

System

Adjustment and

Analysis. 4:15 p.m.

Karl

Lahm,

A.D. Ring

&

Associates.

TELEVISION ENGINEERING

Television Recording and

Tape Technology.

9

-11 a.m. East ballroom

B.

Session chairman:

Steven Bonica, NBC Television.

An

Overview of the

Five concurrent sessions.

Noon

-2 p.m.

Public Domain

Software.

Rooms W108,

109, 115.

Moderator: Richard

Ducey, NAB. Panelists: Dave

Biondi,

Broadcasters Database;

Mark Cunningham, Americom Radio

Brokers Inc.; Scott Marcus,

KFMI(FM)

Arcata, Calif.

Legal Workshop:

Political

Advertising.

Room W106. Moderator: Julian

Shepard, NAB. Panelists: Kenneth Howard

Jr., FCC;

Milton Gross, FCC;

Irving Gastfreund,

Finley,

Kumble

& Wagner; Richard

Zaragoza,

Fisher,

Wayland,

Cooper

& Leader.

Radio Acquisition-

-So...

You

Want to

Buy Your

First

Station? Rooms

W101, 103. Moderator: Erwin Krasnow,

Verner,

Liipfert, Bernhard, McPher- son & Hand. Panelists: Robin Martin, Deer River Group; Susan Ness,

American Security

& Trust Bank; Randy

Jeffrey,

Chapman Associates,

Orlando, Fla.

Radio Production Workshop

II.

Room W111. Presenters: Tyree Ford, production consultant;

Don Elliot,

KIIS -AM -FM

Los

Angeles; Julie Amato, talent director.

Working Profitable with Your

Rep. Room W107. Moderator: Jerry

Fen

- iger, Station Representatives Association.

Sales

Development

-Small/

Large Markets. Chuck

Chackel,

KUGN -AM -FM

Eugene, Ore.; Karen Wald,

Blair Radio;

Paul

Jacobs,

KRCx(AM)- KZEW(FM)

Dallas;

Ira Wechsler, Hillier,

Newmark, Wechsler

&

Howard, Los

Angeles; Charles Crawford, Caballero

Spanish Media. Rep Evaluation.

James Smith,

KFRC(AM)

San

Francisco.

Mike Bellantoni, Torbet Radio, New

York; Ellen

Hulleberg, McGavren-

Guild.

Budgeting.

G.

Michael Donovan, wKOx(FM)

Chicago; Dave Recher,

Eastman Radio; Peter Moore, Jack Masla

& Co. News

& Sports. Joseph

Abel,

KIRO(AM)

Seattle; David Halberstam, Katz Radio;

Ed Kiernan, CBS

Radio Reps.

Daytimer's forum.

Noon -12:45 p.m. Part

1-

Update. Room W102. Mod- erator:

NAB;

David Palmer, wwTH(AM)

Athens, Ohio. Panelists: Barry Umansky,

Gregg

Skall, Baker & Hostetler; Larry Eads, FCC.

Part

2-

Audience

Retention, Achieving Greater

Sales. 12:45 -2 p.m. Room W102.

Modera- tor: Jay Asher,

WJDA(AM)

Quincy, Mass. Panelists:

Gary Capps, Capps

Broadcasting;

Dave

Walker, wKFI(AM)

Wilmington, Ohio; Bill Saunders, wPAL

(AM)

Charleston.

S.C..

Gerald Robbins.

WCMP -AM -FM

Pine

City.

Minn.

Broadcasting

'86: Women

&

Minorities at the Crossroads. Noon -2

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

62

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PHONE (

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Motorola

1986

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POSTAGE WILL BE

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Otter expires July 31. 1986.

All requests subject to approval.

Respondents must be

18 years

D.M. Room

W105. Moderator:

NHAS -TV

Dwight Ellis,

NAB. Panelists: Donna

Zapata,

Louisville, Ky; FCC

Commissioner James

Quello: Representative

Al

Swift (D- Wash.);

Dorothy Brunson, Brunson Broadcasting.

TELEVISION MANAGEMENT

Three concurrent sessions.

11 a.m.

-12:15 p.m.

People Meters and

Sole

Source Measurement. Room S411.

Moderator: Charles Sherman, wHOi(rv)

Peoria,

Ill.

Panelists: Marvin Mord, ABC; David Poltrack, CBS Inc.; William

Rubens, NBC; Thomas

McClendon,

Cox Communications; Barry Kaplan,

Ted

Bates

Advertising.

Multichannel Sound:

A Year Later. Room S412.

Moderator: David La- chenbruch, Television Digest.

Panelists:

Arnold Chase, writ

-ry Hartford,

Conn.; David Layne,

KCNC -TV

Denver; Hal Protter,

WNOL -TV

New Orleans.

News

Director...

caster, Pa.; Bill

Policymaker or Journalist?

Wayne Godsey, wISN -TV

Milwaukee. Panelists: David Dodds,

WGAL

Goodman,

KPRC -TV

Houston; leans; John Spain, wspz -ry

Baton Rouge,

La.

Ed

Quinn,

WVUE -TV

NAB 1986

What's

New

Panelists: at the

FCC.

Room W105.

Moderator:

Jeff Bauman, NAB.

Commissioner James Quello, FCC;

Commissioner Dennis

Pat- rick, FCC; Edward Hummers,

Fletcher, Heald &

Hildreth; Eugene Mullin,

Mullin,

Rhyne, Emmons

&

Toppel.

Room S413. Moderator:

-N

Lan-

New Or-

7Wo concurrent sessions.

11 a.m. -12:15 p.m.

Fitting

Yourself

for

the

Libel

Tom

Suit. Room 5411.

Moderator: Steve Bookshester, NAB. Panelists:

Leatherbury, Locke, Purnell, Boren, Laney

&

Neely; Bruce Sanford,

Baker

&

Hostetler; Ernie Schultz, Radio- Television News

Directors Associ- ation; Carl Solano, Schnader, Harrison, Segal

&

Lewis.

The

Role of Broadcasters in the

Political Election

Process.

Room W102.

Moderator: Wallace Jorgenson, wervfrv) Charlotte, tors James Exon (D- Neb.), Spark

N.C. Panelists: Sena-

Matsunaga (D-

Hawaii),

Ted

Stevens (R-

Alaska) and Edward Zorinsky

(D- Neb.);

Representatives

Silvio Conte (R-

Mass.), Mike Oxley

(R

-Ohio) and Lawrence Smith (D- Fla.); Gary Capps,

Capps Broadcasting; Paul

Davis,

WGN -TV

Chicago.

Radio Sales and Winning with the p.m. Theater.

"Theory of

21."

11:15 a.m. -12:45

Introduction: William Stakelin, President, Radio

Advertising

Bureau. Speaker:

Chuck Reaves, XXI

Associates.

Joint opening general session.

2:30 -5 p.m.

State of the dress. Arena. Edward

O. Fritts,

NAB president.

Industry

Presentation of the

Ad-

Distin- guished Service Award to

Grant Tinker, chairman of the board and chief executive officer, NBC.

MegaRateS: Getting More for Your Spots.

1

-2:15 p.m. Theater. Repeat of

Monday, 8 -9:15 a.m. sessior

RADIO ENGINEERING

TELEVISION MANAGEMENT

Radio Station Maintenance.

9:30 -11:30 a.m. East ballroom

D.

Session chairman: James Hoke. Edens

Broadcasting.

Making the Best Use of

Engineering Talent.

9:45 a.m.

Michael Callaghan,

Kiis(FM)

Los

Angeles.

Increasing Transmitter Reliability

Through

Failure

Analysis. 10:10 a.m. Jerry Whitaker,

Broadcast Engineering magazine.

Panel on Radio

Station Maintenance. 10:35 a.m.

Michael Callaghan; Jerry Whitaker;

Timothy

Bealor,

Broadcast Electronics; David Chenowith, Continental

Electronics; John Sullivan, Econco

Broadcast Service; Douglas Gratzer,

SG

Communications.

TELEVISION ENGINEERING

TV

System Maintenance.

9 a.m. -noon. East ballroom

B.

Session chair- man: Otis Freeman, Tribune

Broadcasting.

Quality Control Systems in

Broadcast Television Operations. 9:15 a.m. John Prager, PBS.

Keeping the Video

Cart Machine on the

Air and

Other Maintenance Procedures.

9:40 a.m.

Roy

Trumbull,

KRON -TV

San Francisco.

Engineering Management of Radio and

Television Tower

Structures. 10:05 a.m. Ramon

Upsahl,

Skilling- Ward

-Rogers -Barkshire Inc.

New Techniques in Controlling and

Documenting Ice

WNEV

-TV

Boston.

Buildup on Tall Towers. 10:30 a.m. Karl Renwanz,

Panel on Television Maintenance.

Trumbull; Renwanz;

Upsahl; Gregory

Best, Harris

Broadcast; Gene Faulkner,

KDNL-TV

St.

Louis.

Monday,

April

14

RADIO MANAGEMENT

MegaRateS: How to Get Top Dollar for Your Spots.

8

-9:15 a.m. Theater.

Introduction: David Parnigoni, NAB. Presenter: Bill Moyes, The Research

Group. (Session repeated at

1 p.m. Monday. Question and answer ses- sion at

9:15 a.m.

Tuesday)

TV

Music Licensing. 7:45 -9:15 a.m.

Room S412. Moderator: Donna Za- pata, wHAs

-TV

Louisville,

Ky.

Panelists: Senators Dennis

DeConcini (D-

Ariz.), Charles Mathias (R

-Md.) and Strom

Thurmond (R- S.C.), and Rep- resentatives Frederick Boucher

(D -Va.),

Carlos Moorhead (R- Calif.),

Henry Hyde

(R -III.) and Patricia

Schroeder

(D- Colo.).

Two concurrent sessions.

8

-9:15 a.m.

LPTV in

1986. Room S413, Mod- erator: Constance W dlinger,

Vibdlinger Broadcasting Co. of

Texas. Panel- ists: John Kompas, Kompas -Biel

&

Associates;

Roy

Stewart, FCC; Lee

Shoblom,

KFWJ(AM) -KBBC(FM)

Lake Havasu City,

Ariz.; Randy Swingle, pact Television Group.

The

Im-

Power of Positive Management.

Room S411.

Presenters: Pam

Lontos, Pam Lontos Inc.;

Chuck Reaves, XXI

Associates.

Great

Expectations: Making It Happen. 9:30 -10:45 a.m., Theater. Wel- come: John Abel, NAB.

Introductions: Peter Kizer, NAB convention co- chairman. Presenter:

Paul Bortz, Browne, Bortz

&

Coddington.

Five concurrent sessions.

11 a.m. -12:15 p.m.

The

Role of Broadcasters in the The

Political Elections Process.

Moderator: Wallace Jorgenson, werv(rv) Charlotte, N.C. Panelists: Senators James Exon (D- Neb.), Spark

Matsunaga(D- Hawaii), Ted

Stevens (R-

Alaska) and Edward Zorinsky

(D-

Neb.); Representatives Silvio Conte (R-

Mass.), Mike Oxley (R

-Ohio) and

Larry Smith (D- Fla.); Gary Capps,

Capps Broadcasting;

Paul

Davis,

WGN- ry Chicago.

J

Fitting Yourself

for

the Libel

Suit. Room S411.

Moderator: Steve Book

- shester, NAB. Panelists: Tom

Leatherby, Locke, Purnell, Boren, Laney &

Neely;

News

Bruce Sanford, Baker

&

Hostetler; Ernie Schultz, Radio- Television

Directors Association; Carl Solano, Schnader, Harrison, Segal

&

Lewis.

Planning

for

Your

Broadcasting Facility's Future. Room S412. Present- er:

Frank Rees

Jr., Rees

Associates

Inc.

Broadcasters: Joe Jerkins,

KVUE-

Fresno, Calif.

Tv

Austin,

Tex.;

Duffy Sasser, NBC; Ken Preston,

KSEE -TV

Syndicators Semi

-Annual Breakfast.

7:30 -9:30 a.m. Rooms W116,

117.

Five concurrent sessions. 9:30 -10:45 a.m.

Are

You

Teaching Your

People to

David

Fail

...Enough?

Room

Richardson Associates.

W101. Presenter: David Richardson,

Broadcasting Opportunities Overseas. Room S413. Moderator: John

Eger, CBS Inc. Panelists: Vittorio Boni,

Radiotelevisione Italiana;

Antoine de Clermont Tonnerre, Editions Mondiales; Walter O'Brien,

J.

Walter

Thompson, New

York.

Agencies...How to Sell Them on Your Station.

Rooms W102, 104, 110.

Moderator, Wayne Cornils, RAB. Panelists:

Jouette Travis,

Tracey -Locke

Advertising; Kathy

Meloy,

WMAL -FM

Washington; Eddie Leeds, McGavren-

Great Expectations Q &A

Room.

Room S414. Participants:

Paul Bortz,

Mark Wyche and James Trautman, Browne, Bortz

&

Coddington; John

Abel, NAB.

Guild.

Increasing

Revenues Through Community Promotions.

Room W103.

Moderator: Jay Mitchell, Jay Mitchell Associates.

Panelists: Jim Chaplin, wiRA(AM)- wow(FM) Fort

Pierce, Fla.; Jon Quick,

WCCO -AM -FM

Minneapolis;

David Rudat,

WHO(AM)

Des Moines, Iowa; Robert Putnam,

WLAD -AM -FM

Dan- bury,

Conn.

What

You

Need to

Know About

Retailers to

Sell Them on

Radio.

Room

W107. Presenter: Christo

Jackson, consultant.

Television luncheon.

12:15 -2:15 p.m. Arena. Call to order by William

F.

Turner,

KCAU -1V

Sioux City,

Iowa, and chairman of NAB Television Board.

Presentation of Grover C.

Cobb Memorial Award to Representatives Thom- as Tauke

(R

-Iowa) and Billy Tauzin (D -La.).

Four concurrent sessions. 2:30 -3:45 p.m.

What

Are

We Doing to

Help

GSMs Meet

Station Revenue Goals? Room S411.

Moderator: Blake

Byrne,

LIN Broadcasting. Panelists:

Paul Hughes,

Viacom; Robert Kunath, Group

W;

Robert Lefko,

NB;

Gary Lieberthal, Embassy Telecommunications;

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

65

Ikegami

Electronics

(USA),

Inc.

37

kegami

Maywood,

Brook Avenue

NJ 07637

NAB 1988

Thomas

Oakley,

Quincy Newspapers.

Scrambling, Must Carry and

Cable Copyright.

Room S412.

Moderator:

John Summers,

NAB. Panelists: Representatives John Bryant

(D- Tex.),

Michael DeWine

(R- Ohio), Hamilton Fish

(R-N.Y.),

Bob Kastenmeier (D-

Wiis.),

Mickey Leland

(D-

Tex.), Romano Mazzoli (D -Ky), Billy

Tauzin (D-

La.

).

What Works in Children's Programing.

Room S413. Moderator: Greg

Stone, wsoc

-Tv

Charlotte, N.C. Panelists: Phyllis Vinson, NBC; Rick Gitter,

NBC; Lou Schiemer, Filmation Studios; cil for Families and

Television; Alvin

Nicholas

Ferleger,

Van

Taft

Dyck, National Coun-

Entertainment.

What's a

TV

Station Worth Today?

Moderator: James Dowdle, Tribune

Broadcasting

Co. Panelists: Peter Desnoes, Burnham Co.; Daniel Gold,

Knight -Ridder Broadcasting; George

Lilly,

Montana Television Network;

Marvin Shapiro, bhronis Suhler

& Associates.

Three concurrent sessions.

4

-5:15 p.m.

Financing the Acquisition.

Room S414.

Moderator: Martin

Pompadur, Television Station Partners.

Pan- elists: George Castell, Viacom International; David Croll,

T.A.

Associates;

Gerald Hassell, Bank of New

York;

Fred

Seegal, Shearson, Lehman Broth- ers.

The Home Team Advantage.

Room S413. Moderator:

Roy

Danish, Televi- sion Information Office.

Panelists: Fred Barber, wTAE

-TV

Pittsburgh; Gary

DeHaven, wisc -ry Madison,

Wis.; Dixon Loworn, wis -ry Columbia, S.C.;

John Suder,

KWGN -TV

Englewood, Colo.; Donna Zapata,

WHAS -TV

Louisville,

Ky.

News Networking Systems.

Room S412.

Moderator: Jim Snyder,

Post

-

Newsweek Stations.

Panelists: John Greene,

WRAL -TV

Raleigh, N.C.;

Anita

Klever, Conus; Mel Martin, Florida News Network; Brent Stranathan, ABC,

New

York.

RADIO ENGINEERING

AM -FM Allocations.

8:30 -10 a.m. East ballroom

D.

Session chairman:

James Wulliman,

WTMJ

-TV

Milwaukee.

Recent FCC Activities Regarding

AM -FM Allocation Matters.

8:45 a.m. William Hassinger, FCC.

How Re- cent CCIR Technical Decisions

Affect U.S. AM -FM Broadcasting.

9:10 a.m. Ralph

Justus, NAB. Solutions to the

FM Radio /Aeronautical Inter- ference Problem.

John

F.X.

Browne, John

F.X.

Browne Associates.

Radio Subcarriers.

10:15 a.m. -12:10 p.m. East ballroom

D.

Session chairman: Dennis

Snyder, wJOV(AM)- wcoR(FM)

Burlington,

Vt.

A Systems

Approach to

Improving FM Subcarrier Performance.

10:30 a.m. Geof

Frey

Mendenhall, Broadcast Electronics.

Optimizing FM Audio

Program

Subcarrier Performance.

10:55 a.m. Richard Shumeyer,

Modulation Sci- ences.

Radio Data System

Permits

Receiver Adjustments and

Special

Signalling by the Broadcaster.

11:45 a.m. Dietmar Kopitz, European

Broadcasting

Union.

High

Speed

Data Transmission

Over

Broadcast

AM and

FM Subcarriers.

11:20 a.m. Gary Robinson, Bonneville International.

Broadcast Auxiliary.

2:30 -5:30 p.m. East ballroom

D.

Session chairman:

Robert Denny,

WBT(AM)

Charlotte, N.C. Modern Developments in ENG

Antenna

Systems. 2:45 p.m. Sujay berme, M/A -Com. Narrow Deviation

Aural

STL Systems Relieve Broadcast Auxiliary Frequency Congestion.

3:10 p.m. Michael Callaghan,

KIIS(FM)

Los

Angeles. How Broadcasters Can

Use the

18

NAB. A and

23 GHz Microwave

Bands.

3:35 p.m. Edmund Williams,

National

Policy

for

Broadcast Auxiliary Frequency Coordina- tion. 4:10 p.m. Jerry Plemmons, Outlet Communications. Panel on the

Future of Broadcast Auxiliary Bands.

4:35 p.m. Plemmons;

Thomas

Stanley, FCC; Ralph Haller, FCC; Richard Rudman,

KFWB(AM)

Los Angeles;

Michael

Rau, NAB.

TELEVISION ENGINEERING

Television Engineering

& New

Technology.

8:30 a.m. -12:05 p.m. East ballroom

B.

Session chairman: Richard Streeter, CBS Television.

System

Lighting

for

In- the -Round Television Production.

8:45 a.m. Norman Rus- sell, Cercone

-Vincent Associates.

Composition

SPOT: An Automated Station Break and Playback System.

9:10 a.m. Guy Beverlin, Robert

Murch,

WPlx(rv)

New

York.

Component Video

-Where

Are

We

Going?

9:35 a.m. Merrill Weiss, NBC Television.

The Component Digital Studio

-A

Progress Report.

10:30 a.m. Christian Tremblay,

Canadian Broadcasting

Corp.

Equipment

for

the All- Digital Studio.

10:25 a.m. Max Artigalas,

Thompson Video. High Quality

Solutions to Television

Fiber

Transmission

Optic Systems Provide Unique

Problems.

10:50 a.m. Peter Mon- tanos, Grass Valley Group.

SMPTE Remote Control Interface

11:15 a.m. Thomas Meyer, Dynair Electronics.

New ENG

Bebe McClain,

Clive Hawkins,

PAG

America

Ltd.

Standard.

Camera Battery

Interface

System with

Accompanying Universal Charger.

11:40 a.m.

Advanced Television Systems.

2 -5:35 p.m.

East ballroom

B. Sessior chairman:

Dr.

Robert Hopkins.

Advanced Television Systems Commit.

tee-

Status

Report.

2:15 p.m.

E.

William

Henry, chairman;

Dr.

Robert Hop- kins,

ATSC.

ATSC

Technology Group Reports.

2:45 p.m. High Definitior

Television: Renville

Systems: tems:

Dr.

Kerns Powers, David Sarnoff Research Center, RCA Laborato- ries. The

McMann,

CBS Technology Center.

Daniel Wells, Satellite Television Corp.

U.S.

Proposal to the CCIR

for

a

Enhanced

Improved NTSC

High Definition

525 -Line

Sys-

Television

Worldwide

Uses 8

Production Standard.

3:30 p.m. Laurence Thorpe,

Sony

Broadcast Products.

High Quality Compresses HDTV Transmission mhz Bandwidth.

3:55 p.m.

Dr. Takashi Fujio, NHK. Compatible

Terrestrial

HDTV System.

4:20 p.m.

Dr.

William

E.

Glenn, New

York

Institute of Technology.

Status Report of the

Joint

NAB /MST Demonstra- tion Project

for

HDTV.

Various Proposals

for

4:45 p.m.

Audio

for

E.B. Crutchfield, NAB. Comparing

High Definition Television.

Georg Plenge, Institut fuer Rundfunktechnik.

5:10 p.m.

UHF Television Systems.

2

-4:20 p.m. East ballroom

C. Session chair- man: George DeVault,

WKPT

-TV

Kingsport,

Tenn. The

Multiple Depressed

Collector Klystron Project:

A

Progress Report.

2:15 p.m.

E.W.

McCune,

Varian. Using Klystrode Technology to

Create

Efficiency

UHF -TV Transmittters. a

New Generation of

High

3:05 p.m. Kerry Cozad, Harris Corp.

Klystron Operating Efficiencies: Is

100%

Realistic?

3:30 p.m.

R.

Heppin- stall, EEV Ltd. Circular

&

Cross-

Polarization UHF

-TV Transmitting

Antenna

System. 3:55 p.m. Geza Dienas, Andrew Corp.

Broadcast Auxiliary.

2:30 -5:30 p.m. East ballroom

D.

Session chairman:

Robert

Denny,

WBT(AM)

Charlotte, N.C. Modern Developments in ENG

Antenna Systems.

2:45 p.m. Sujay berma, M/A -Com.

Narrow Deviation

Aural

STL Systems Relieve Broadcast Auxiliary

Frequency Congestion.

3:10 p.m. Michael

Callaghan,

KITS -TV

Los

Angeles.

How Broadcasters Can

Use the 18 and

23 ghz Microwave Bands.

3:35 p.m. Edmund Williams,

NAB. A

National

Policy

for

Broadcast Auxiliary

Frequency Coordina- tion.

4:10 p.m. Jerry Plemmons, Outlet

Communications.

Future of Broadcast Auxiliary Bands.

4:35 p.m.

Jerry

Panel on the

Plemmons, Outlet

Communications; Thomas

Stanley, FCC; Ralph Haller, FCC;

Richard Rud- man,

KFWB(AM)

Los Angeles; Michael

Rau, NAB.

Tuesday,

April

RADIO MANAGEMENT

15

Six concurrent sessions.

7:45 -9 a.m.

E%ambling the

Public Interest

Standard.

Room W116. Moderator: FCC

Commissioner Mimi Dawson.

Using Direct

Mail to Promote Your

Station and Make Money.

Room

W101. Presenter: Jerry Bobo,

KVIL -AM -FM

Dallas.

Teaming

Up with Sales to

Reduce Credit

Room W105. Presenters: Mark Matz,

WGN(AM) and

Collection

Headaches.

Chicago: Linda Stephens,

LIN Broadcasting.

Getting to Your Local Advertiser through Research.

Room W103.

Moder- ator: Nancy

Vaeth,

WFMS(FM)

Indianapolis.

Panelists: Myriam Lopez,

WPIx -FM

New

York;

Harvey Gersin,

Reymer

& Gersin Associates; John Ryman,

KOZY-

FM

Dallas.

Small Market Radio Management.

Rooms W102, 104,

110.

Moderator:

Donald

Kirkley,

University of Maryland. Panelists:

Alan Andrews,

WCLI(AM)

Corning,

N.Y.;

Mike Gummer, wcA(AM)- wcuL(FM)

Culpepper,

Va.;

Marie Riv- ers,

WSWN- AM -FM,

Belle Glade,

Fla.

Secrets to

Selling and

Maximizing

Combo

Rates.

Room W106. Panelists:

Richard BremKamp,

WRCO(AM)- WRCH(FM)

Farmington, Conn.; Larry Ed- wards.

WMT-AM.FM

Cedar Rapids. Iowa.

Are You Playing With a Full Deck?

9:15 a.m. -noon.

Managing Yourself and Others.

Rooms W108,

109, 115.

Presenter: George Glover,

George

Glover

&

Associates.

TWo concurrent sessions.

9:15 -10:30 a.m. The

Big

Co -op

Bucks: Manu-

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

68

Í

I.

il

,

I t

¡

r r particularly important to your

ADI,

as

well

as

all of the world's top news.

AP delivers the news

If

you have more reporters over two

1,200- word -per- minute circuits, via state

-of- the -art printers or computer

Something else.

Every news item that

AP TV delivers

is

backed with than anybody else, and you selectors. AP's 138

-year -old reputation have them

in

more places, then you can do

a

better job

One circuit for world for getting stories right.

And if that's what of covering the news.

That's one reason

300 and national news, features and advisories. you're looking for

in

news

The other circuit delivers programming, call Jim

Williams of the nation's top news- regional news and sports. of

AP Broadcast Services at rooms use the

AP TV Wire.

AP TV

is

designed

1-

800

-821 -4747.

And ask

AP

TV gives you access so that you can select the to more than 2,800 news that's actually de- about the

AP

TV

Wire.

Because when it reporters, strategically livered to your newsroom.

It

comes to providing fast, spread throughout all

50 states, and

in

83 foreign reliable, and unabridged news bureaus. enables you to manage the flow of information

easily.

And

AP TV ensures reports from around the world,

AP wrote the book.

Which explains why that you get

all

of the we routinely get to the big stories first.

There's another for using AP TV

AP

reason regional events

°°

that are

Piss

Without

Broadcast

A

Doubt.

Services

"We must all hang together, orassuredlywe shall

all

hang separately."

Benjamin

Franklin,

July

4,

1776

America's railroads and farmers always have had a special relationship, some- times stormy, always interdependent.

Railroads helped make the establishment of agricultural communities in the west- ern states possible, but farmers came to fear the economic power of the railroads and became the driving force behind ini- tial government rail regulation.

That early regulation was intended only as a means

of

curbing rate abuses.

Over time, it became a controlling web that grew more and more pervasive, intruding in virtually every facet

of

rail- road operation and, ultimately, restrict- ing the railroads' ability to provide the services upon which farmers and other shippers depended.

Unable to adjust rates rapidly to meet changing business or competitive condi- tions and hampered even in decisions as to the use of equipment, rail service de- teriorated and farmers suffered. Grain shipments rotted on the ground as rail car shortages became an annual occurrence.

By 1980, it was apparent that some- thing had to be done. Congress recog- nized the need and passed the Staggers

Rail Act, partially deregulating the rail system.

This legislation allowed railroads to conduct business in an orderly, logical manner and to negotiate contracts with farmers and other shippers.

Now, after five years of partial deregu- lation, it's obvious that Staggers has pro- vided real benefits both for railroads and farmers.

During this five -year period, nationwide grain shipping rates declined by 26 percent. A study conducted jointly by the

Department

Kansas

State of Agriculture and

University found

"...a sig- nificant decrease in rail rates in Kansas..." and called deregulation

"...an important contributing factor in a market which made these decreases possible."

Deregulation is working for farmers as well as railroads and the timing couldn't be better because farmers currently need all the help they can get. Yet a few special inter- est shippers operating under the misnomer,

Consumers United for

Rail

Equity

(C.U.R.E.), have asked

Congress to modify the

Stag- gers

Act: in effect, legislating a subsidy for their own industries to the disadvantage of farmers and other satisfied shippers.

The

Association

of

American Railroads is prepared to provide journalists with more information on this subject, includ- ing rebuttals

of

the charges C.U.R.E. has made.

These include charges dependent shippers are that rail

- subsidizing those less dependent (the reverse is more accurate); that deregulation has allowed coal rates to rise too fast

(they have risen much less since Staggers than before); and that the

Interstate

Commerce

Commission is protect unwilling to

"captive" shippers from unrea- sonably high rates (actually, the Corn- mission just has adopted new rate guidelines that have been overwhelm- ingly endorsed by the nation's leading economists).

There's a story here, but you need facts, not assertions, to tell it properly.

To get them, write: Media Information, Dept.

607. Association

of

American Railroads,

50

F

Street,

N.W.,

Washington,

D.C.

20001.

Or,

if

you're on a deadline, call us at

639 -2550.

(202)

ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROADS

NAB

1986 facturing, Distribution

&

Vendors.

Room W103. Presenters: Lois Weiss, co-op consultant;

Louise Heifetz,

KIIS-AM-FM

Los

Angeles.

MegaRate$:

Panel

Discussion.

Room W101. Moderator:

Bill Moyes, The

Research Group. Panelists: Larry

Campbell and Jim Wbodward, The

Re- search Group,

Seattle; Steve Marx, Katz Radio Inc.,

Bridgeport,

Conn.;

Bob Green,

MVAY(FM)

Gainsville, Ga.; Perry

Ury, wnC

-AM -FM

Hartford, Conn.

Radio Allocation:

From Expanded Hours to Expanded Band.

9:15

-11 a.m. Room W107. Moderator: Barry Umansky, NAB. Panelists: Larry Eads,

FCC; Robert Pettit, FCC;

Jules Cohen, Jules Cohen and Associates; Wil- liam Potts

Jr., Haley,

Bader

& Potts,

Washington; James McKinney, FCC;

Wallace Johnson, Moffett, Larson

& Johnson, Washington.

Station Acquisition.

9:15 -10:30 a.m. Rooms W102,

104, 110. Moderator:

Barry

Skidelsky, Barry

Skidelsky

&

Associates. Panelists: Larry

Justice,

WCIB(FM)

Falmouth, Mass.;

Paul Raeder,

ComCapital Group; Charlie

Earls,

George Moore

&

Associates.

Five concurrent sessions.

10:45 a.m. -noon. Telephone Cost Manage- ment.

Room W106. Moderator: Marcia

DeSonne, NAB. Panelists: Jerry

James, ClayDesta Communications; Julian Shepard,

NAB; Mark Duren- berger, Hubbard Broadcasting;

Walt Suski,

AT &T

Communications; Jeffrey

Sudikoff, IDB

Communications.

Vendor Money: New Advertising Dollars

for

Radio.

Room W101. Pre- senters: Karen Wald, Blair Radio; Steven Strauss, Strauss

&

Associates.

Common

Traits of Successful Managers.

Rooms W102, 104, 110. Moder- ator:

Bernadette McGuire,

NAB. Panelists: Mickey Luckoff,

KGO(AM)

San

Francisco; Cindy Shepard,

WNYR(AM)-WEZO(FM)

Rochester,

N.Y.;

Robert

Fox,

KVEN(AM)

Ventura, Calif.; Stuart Brotman, management consultant; Jim

Tas

- zarek, Radio Sales Systems.

Seven concurrent 'Night

Court' sessions.

8 -9 p.m. All in

Loews Anatole hotel.

What

You MUST Know About Employe Conflicts sorship ID,

Payola

&

Plugola.

Madrid room. of Interest,

Moderator:

Spon-

Jeff Bauman,

NAB. Panelists: Thomas Carroccio, Santelli, Smith, Kraut

& Carroccio;

Gordon

Coffman, Wilkinson, Barker, Knauer

& Quinn; Barry Friedman,

Weiner & Scheiner; Ramsey Woodworth, Wilkes, Artis,

Radio Allocations: New

Stations, Opportunities and

Hedrick

&

Lane.

Challenges. Man- chester room. Moderator: Barry

Umansky, NAB. Panelists: Larry Eads,

FCC; Dennis Kahane, Pillsbury, Madison

& Sutro; Fred Polner, Rothman,

Gordon,

Foreman

&

Groudine; Lisa Stevenson, Koteen

&

Naftalin. Getting the Edge with Your Satellite Dish.

Ming room. Moderator: Valerie Schulte,

NAB. Panelists: Albert Halprin,

FCC; Robert Mazer,

Chadbourne, Park,

Whiteside

&

Wolff;

Marvin Rosenberg, Fletcher, Heald &

Hildreth; Gary

Epstein, Latham,

Watkins & Hills.

Political

Advertising

Primer.

Morocco room. Moderator: Steve Bookshester, NAB. Panelists: Milton Gross, FCC;

Craig

Blakeley, Schnader, Harrison, Segal

& Lewis; Bill Green, Pierson,

Ball & Dowd; Lewis

Paper,

Grove

&

Engelberg. ing

Monitoring YourAdvertis-

Practices Post

-Deregulation. Miro room. Moderator: Julian

Shepard,

NAB. Panelists:

John Crigler,

Haley,

Bader

& Potts;

Edward Hennenberry,

Howrey

& Simon; Thomas Keller, Verner, Liipfert, Bernhard, McPherson

&

Hand; Christopher Reynolds, Dempsey

&

Koplovitz.

Wrongs

Copyrights and

(and Trademarks,

Too). Milan room. Moderator: Eugenia

Hull,

NAB. Panelists: Michael

Berg, Miller

& Young;

David Leibowitz, Wiley &

Rein;

James

Popham,

Fawer, Brian,

Hardy

& Zatzkis; John Stewart,

Crowell & Moring.

The

Fair

Labor Standards

Act

-What

It Means to You.

Lalique room. Moderator: Catherine Grant,

NAB. Panelists:

Michael

Zinser, King, Ballow

& Little,

Nashville; Brian Farrington,

U.S. of Labor; John

Rose,

NBC; Alan

Serwer, Haley,

Bader

Department

& Potts.

Stop the Madness: Abuse in the

Station.

Room S414. Panelists: Al Jack- son, NBC; Wade Williams,

Group

W.

The Seven Step Formula

for

Doubling Small Market Sales.

Room W103.

Presenter: David Gifford,

RAB.

Radio luncheon.

12:15 -2:30 p.m. Arena. Introduced by

David Parnigoni,

NAB. Toastmaster: Bev Brown, radio board vice chairman. Induction into

Radio Hall of Fame of Mel Allen and

Earl

Nightingale.

Five concurrent sessions.

2:45 -4:00 p.m.

Fred Palmer on

Manage- ment.

Rooms W108,

109, 115. Presenter: Fred Palmer,

NATH(AM)

Athens,

Ohio.

Operating

a

Small Market Radio Group.

Room W106. Moderator:

Paul

Hedberg, Hedberg Broadcast Group.

Panelists: Cary Simpson,

WTAN(AM)

Tyrone,

Pa.;

Glenn Olson, Kowc

-AM -FM

Webster

City,

Iowa; Russ Withers,

WMix

-AM -FM

Mt. Vernon,

III.;

Galen Gilbert,

KDNT(AM)

Denton,

Tex.

Packaging

for

Profitability.

Room W101. Moderator:

Tom Rounds, Radio

Express, Los

Angeles.

Panelists:

Tom Holiday,

WERE(AM) -WGCL(FM)

Cleve- land; Bill Battison, Westwood One; Bob Fish,

WHJJ(AM)- wHJY(FM)

Provi- dence, R.I.; Joshua Feigenbaum,

MJI.

The Radio

Way vs. The IBM System.

Rooms W102,

104, 110.

Presenters:

Robert Heckman,

M Tech; Jim Taszarek, Radio Sales Systems.

Hiring

&

Firing.

Room W105.

Moderator: Valerie Schulte, NAB. Panelists:

Henry Rivera,

Dow,

Lohnes

& Albertson; James Shook, FCC;

Jason

Shrinsky, Shrinsky, Weitzman

&

Eisen; Michael Zinser, King, Ballow

&

Little.

Seven concurrent 'Night

Court' sessions.

9:15 -10:15 p.m.

All in Loews

Anatole. Dealing with the

FCC: Tips From Commissioners' Legal Assis- tants, FCC

Lawyers and

Key Personnel.

Madrid room. Moderator:

Jeff

Baumann, NAB. Panelists: Kenneth Howard, Diane

Killory, James Shook and

Roy Stewart, all with

FCC; Scott Johnson, Gardner, Carton

&

Douglas.

Improving AM Radio: A

Government

-Industry

Resolution.

Manchester room. Moderator: Barry

Umansky, NAB. Panelists: Ralph Haller, FCC; Rob- ert duTreil, duTreil Rackley

Consulting Engineers;

Mark Prak, Tharrington,

Smith &

Hargrove; Richard Swift, Tierney

& Swift. to

Prevent Talk

Shows

Troublesome Talk:

How form

Generating Libel Suits and FCC Violations.

Morocco room. Moderator: Steve Bookshester, NAB. Panelists:

Matthew

Leibowitz, Leibowitz, Spenser

&

Freedman; Jeffrey Malikson, Bahakel

Communications; Harold McCombs

Jr.,

Marmet

&

McCombs; David

Ol- ive, Donrey Media Group. Acquisition Fever: Strategies

for

Success.

Miro room. Moderator: Julian Shepard, NAB. Panelists:

George Bosari, Bosari

&

Paxton; Janice

Hill,

Arier

& Hadden; Peter

O'Connell, Pierson, Ball

&

Dowd; Zave Unger, Law Offices of

Zave Unger.

Winning Within the

Law:

Contests, Lotteries, Promotions.

Milan room. Moderator: Eugenia Hull,

NAB. Panelists:

Tom

Davidson, Sidley

&

Austin; Harry Martin,

Reddy, Beg- ley

&

Martin; John Quale, Wiley

& Rein; James man & Eisen. Unions

Weitzman,

Shrinsky, Weitz-

-What

to Do After

You've Lost the Election.

Lalique room.

Moderator: Catherine Grant,

NAB. Panelists: Stanley Brown, Arent,

Fox, Kintner, Plotkin

&

Kahn

:.

Joseph

Gerstner, Westinghouse Broadcast- ing

&

Cable; Richard Marcus, Reuben

&

Procter; Frank Stewart,

Taft,

Stettinius

& Hollister.

TELEVISION MANAGEMENT

Five concurrent sessions.

7:45 -9 a.m.

Examining the

Public Interest

Standard.

Room W116. Moderator: FCC

Commissioner

Mimi Dawson.

Five concurrent sessions.

4:15 -5:30 p.m. Shaking Up Your Market.

Room W102.

Moderator: Bernadette McGuire,

NAB. Panelists: Bud Werth- eimer,

WVOR -FM

Rochester,

N.Y.;

Bart Walsh,

WKYS -FM

Washington; Bob Zim- merman,

WRSC(AM)

State

College,

Pa.;

Rick

Sklar,

Rick Sklar

Communica- tions

Inc.; Charles Jones, wis(AM) Columbia, S.C.

For

New

Owners-

What's Next?

Room W107. Mark Kassof, Mark Kassof

& Co.

Station Promotions that

Work.

Rooms W102, 104, 110. Presenter

Beryl

Spector, president, Broadcast Promotions and

Marketing Executives,

WMHT -TV -FM

Schenectady,

N.Y.

The Exciting New Retail Research.

Room W101. Moderator: Robert Ga- len, RAB. Panelists: Edith Hilliard, Leigh, Stowell Co.; Benny Griffin, Great

Empire Research.

Radio Music Licensing:

Where Are

We?

Room W105. Moderator: Robert

Henley, All- Industry Radio Music

License Committee. Panelists: Wncile

Pearce, Radio South Inc.; Alan Weinschel,

Weil,

Gotshal

&

Manges.

Getting Along with Your Cable Operator.

Room S411.

Moderator:

Burt

Harris, Harriscope Broadcasting.

Panelists: Michael Berg, Miller

& Young;

Gail Brekke,

WNOL

-TV

New Orleans; John Evans, Metro

Cable; Robert

McRann, Cox Cable of San Diego; Paul McCarthy, Broadcast Cable Asso- ciates.

Forecasting

-A

Tool

For

All Managers.

Room S412.

Moderator: Mark

Wyche, Browne, Bortz

& Coddington. Panelists: Michael

Conly, wrLV

-Tv

Jacksonville,

Fla.;

Charles Kadlec,

Frazier,

Gross

&

Kadlec;

Robert Wbrm- ington,

KSHB -TV

Kansas

City, Mo.

Naturally

Effective.

..The

Best Possible

You. Room S413. Presenter

Peter Giuliano, The Executive Communications Group.

TV

Music Licensing -1986:

Where's the Beef?

Room S414.

Moderator:

Leslie Arries, wive

-Tv

Buffalo,

N.Y.

Panelists: Jack Zwaska, All- Industry

Television Station Music License Committee; M.N. Bostick,

Kwrx

-Tv

Waco,

Broadcasting

Apr

14

1986

72

14-irtaleGy°11,

0

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Country Coast-to-Coast is proven-successful country radio!

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cities nationwide,

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25-54

with an exclusive, extensively researched combination of current country hits and high-testing classics.

News, features, and specials make Country

News

Network, live on the hour with world and

Coast-to-Coast national news, easy hours a day.

Ninety-second features like

"Business Today," to sell. offers local

"Sports

"Hollywood Insider," and more are fed closed-circuit five days a week. Country full schedule of weekend and event specials, live,

Satellite avails

Coast-to-Coast's exclusive live Top a

30

Countdown airs every Sunday.

24

Beat,"

And there's year-round.

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While increasing your revenue,

Country

Coast-to-Coast will also reduce your overhead.

Operating costs in both money and time will drop immediately and dramatically when you sign on with

Country Coast-to-Coast, yet you'll keep the competitive rr:4. advantages of live personality radio and complete local

4111i"%;;" flexibility.

-

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Bob

Bruton right now at

1-800-527-4892,

for complete information and a demo tape of Country Coast- to-Coast.

In

Texas, call Bob at

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Country

Coast-to-Coast. Proven-successful live country radio from

Satellite Music Network.

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Satellite

Musk

Netwatk

'.wYoRK

4

A

to

410

COAST COAST

NAB 1986

Tex.;

Tv

Marvin Grieve,

Association of Program

Distributors; Neil Pugh,

WHIO-

Dayton. Ohio

The

Outlook from

TVB. 9:15 -10:30 a.m. Theater. Presenters: Blake

Byrne,

LIN

Broadcasting and

NB

chairman;

Roger Rice,

NB

president.

Three concurrent sessions.

10:45 a.m. -noon. TV

Critics.

..Friend

or

Foe?

Room S411. Moderator: Deborah McDermott,

WKRN -TV

Nashville.

Panelists: Ann Hodges, Television

Critics Association;

Bill Carter,

Balti- more Sun;

Jerry Nachman, wNBC -Tv

New

York;

George Keramidos, Capital

Cities/ABC; Jeff

Fosser,

WNEV

Boston; Tom

Goodgame, wez -ry Boston.

News

Promotions: Your Best Foot Forward.

Room S412. Moderator:

Mike McCormick, wrMJ

-TV

Milwaukee. Presenters: Doug Clemenson,

CBS.

Inc.; Peter Hoffman,

Associates.

McHugh

&

Hoffman Inc.; Don

Wells, Frank Magid

The

Crisis in Funding

for

Public Broadcasting.

Room S413.

Moderator:

Ralph Baruch, Viacom International. Panelists: William Baker, Group

W;

William McCarter, wnw-Tv

Chicago; FCC Commissioner James Quello;

Martin Rubenstein, Corporation for Public Broadcasting; Representative

Harold

Rogers (R-Ky.); Thomas Rogers, House Telecommunications Sub- committee.

RADIO ENGINEERING

Radio New Technology.

9-11:45 a.m. East ballroom

D.

Session chairman:

Russell Pope. Signal Processing

for

FMX Broadcasts.

9:40 a.m.

Emil

Torick, CBS Technology

Center.

Transmitter

Remote Control via Dial

-up

Telephone. 9:40 a.m. John Leonard, Gentner

RF

Products Division.

Off

-

Premise Remote Control of a

Radio Station Using a Personal Computer.

10:05 a.m. Wesley Becker, Family Stations Inc. Novel Remote Control

System Uses Packet Radio to Conserve

Broadcast Auxiliary

Spectrum.

10:30 a.m. Harold Hallikainen, Hallikainen

&

Friends.

Panel on Remote

Control

&

ATS.

10:55 a.m. John Leonard, Wesley Becker, Michael

D.

Callaghan,

Klis

-AM -FM

Los

Angeles; John

Reiser, FCC.

Engineering luncheon.

12:30 -2:15 p.m. Hyatt Regency, Reunion ball- room. Presentation of

Brown, retired RCA

Engineering Achievement Award engineering executive. to

George

Speaker: George Waters,

H. di- rector, European Broadcasting Union Technical

Center.

Radio Production.

2:30 -5:50 p.m.

East ballroom

D.

Session chairman:

Dan Lacy,

KIXO -FM

Durrango,

Colo.

Setting up a Regional Sports Network.

2:45 p.m. Robert Smith

Jr., WRKO(AM)

Boston.

On

-Air Computerized

Tele- phone System

for

Broadcasters.

3:10 p.m. Jacques Coutellier, Normex

Ltd. The WLS

Radio Remote Vehicle.

3:35 p.m.

Edward Glab, wLS(AM)

Chicago. The New ABC

Radio Network Broadcast Center.

4:10 p.m.

Richard Martinez, ABC

Radio. Unique

Features of the New NBC

Radio

Networks.

4:35 p.m. Warren Vandeveer, NBC Radio Networks. Designing

Cost Effective,

Good

Sounding Production and Air

Studios.

5 p.m. Rob- ert Hansen, Robert Hansen

&

Associates.

Building a Cost Effective,

Format Flexible, Competitive Radio Facility.

5:25 p.m. Paul Donahue,

Gannett Radio.

Non

-Ionizing Radiation.

3

-5:45 p.m. East ballroom

B.

Session chairman:

Jules Cohen. Jules Cohen

& Associates.

Radio Frequency

Radiation and

FCC Requirements Under the

National Environmental

Protection Act.

3:15 p.m. Robert Cleveland, FCC.

Real -Time mining Human RF Exposure.

Data Averaging

3:40 p.m. Richard

Tell,

fo-

Deter-

Environmental

Protection Agency. Controlling Occupational

RF

Energy Exposure on the Mt.

Inc.

Sutro Broadcast

Tower.

4:05 p.m.

Donald Lincoln, Sutro Tower

Antenna

Sidelobe Control to

Reduce Occupational

RF Energy Expo- sure. 4:30 p.m.

G.W.

Collins.

Panel on Meeting the New

RF

Guidelines.

4:55 p.m.

Tell; William Hassinger, FCC; Lincoln; Barry Umansky, NAB.

AM

Stereo.

4

-5:30 p.m. East ballroom

C.

Session chairman: Michael Rau,

NAB. Convincing

Station Management of the

Potential of

AM Stereo.

4:15 p.m. Ronald Frizzell,

WLAM(AM)

Lewiston, Me. Words of

Wisdom in

Making the Conversion to

AM Stereo. 4:40 p.m.

James Stanley, Stanley

Broadcast.

AM Stereo

Conversions: Reducing ICPM in

AM

Transmit- ters.

5:05 Dominic Bordonaro,

WAAF(AM)- WGTO(FM)

Wbrchester, Mass.

Tuesday evening workshops.

7

-8:30 p.m. Hyatt Regency. Radio Contact

Engineers.

Lattimer room. James Loupas, James Loupas Associates;

James

Stanley, SBE: Thomas

Osenkowsky, Radio Engineering Broadcast;

Barry

Victor,

Victor Group. Studio Acoustics. Brisbane room A. Peter D'An- tonio,

RPG

Diffuser Systems; Chips Davis, LEDE Designs; Russel Berger,

The

Joiner -Rose Group; William Ryan,

KVIL -FM

Dallas. AM

Antenna

Tun- ing. Brisbane room

B. Karl

Lahm, A.D. Ring

&

Associates; Alan Gearing.

Jules Cohen

&

Associates;

Ronald Rackley, duTriel -Rackley Consulting

Engineers; John

Reiser, FCC.

Non -Ionizing Radiation Measures. Duncar

Room. Richard

Tell, EPA;

James Hatfield, Hatfield

&

Dawson; John Kean,

Connecticut Educational

Telecomm.; Reed Holaday, Holaday Industries

Inc.

TELEVISION ENGINEERING

Television Satellite Systems.

8:15 -11:45 a.m. East ballroom

B. Sessior chairman: Max Berry, ABC Television.

New Techniques in Duplex

Voice

Services

for

SNG Operations.

8:30 a.m. Sidney Skjei, GTE Spacenet

ABSAT:

The ABC

Satellite

News Gathering System. 8:55 p.m. Ber

Greenberg, ABC

Television.

RADET:

The CBS News

Gathering System

9:20 a.m.

Jayaram

Ramasastry, CBS Television.

Second Generation Fly.

Away SNG

System.9:45 a.m. William Walisko,

Spectra Communications

Digital Techniques

Solve SNG

Communications Problems.

10:10 a.m

Heinz Wegener, Wegener Communications. ture Satellites

SNG, The

Ka Band and

Fu for

Broadcasters.

10:35 a.m. Bramwell Flynn, Dalsat.

Pane on Satellite Interference and Uplink Operator Training.

11 a.m. Johr

Bowker, RCA Corp.; David Baylor, PBS; Russell Summerville,

WNOU -Tt

South Bend, Ind.; Chris

Summey,

Midwest Communications; Ralph Haller

FCC

Non -Ionizing Radiation.

3

-5:45 p.m. East ballroom

B.

Session chairman

Jules Cohen, Jules Cohen

&

Associates. Radio Frequency

Radiation ant

FCC Requirements Under the

National Environmental Protection

Act

3:15 p.m. Robert Cleveland, FCC.

Real

-Time

Data Averaging

for

Deter mining Human RF

Exposure.

3:40 p.m. Richard

Tell,

Environmenta

Protection Agency. Controlling Occupational

RF

Enetyy Exposure o1 the Mt.

Inc.

Sutro Broadcast

Tower. 4:05 p.m. Donald Lincoln, Sutro Towe

Antenna

Sidelobe Control to

Reduce Occupational

RF Energy Expo sure.

4:30 p.m.

G.W.

Collins.

Panel on Meeting the New

RF

Guidelines

4:55 p.m.

Tell;

William Hassinger, FCC; Lincoln; Barry Umansky, NAB.

1Gesday evening workshops.

7

-8:30 p.m. Hyatt Regency.

Radio Contac

Engineers.

Lattimer room. James Loupas, James Loupas Associates

James Stanley, Stanley

Broadcast Engineering; Thomas Osenkowsky,

Ra dio Engineering Broadcast; Barry

Victor,

Victor Group. Studio Acoustics

Brisbane room

A.

Peter D'Antonio, RPG Diffuser Systems; Chips Davis

LEDE Designs; Russel Berger, The Joiner -Rose Group; William Ryan,

KVIL

FM

Dallas. AM

Antenna Tuning.

Brisbane room

B.

Karl Lahm, A.D. Ring

8

Associates;

Alan Gearing, Jules Cohen

&

Associates;

Ronald Rackley duTriel- Rackley

Consulting Engineers; John

Reiser, FCC.

Non- Ionizim

Radiation

Measures. Duncan

Room.

Richard

Tell, EPA;

James Hatfield

Hatfield

&

Dawson; John Kean, Connecticut Educational Telecommunica fions

Corp.; Reed Holaday, Holaday Industries Inc.

Wednesday,

April

16

RADIO MANAGEMENT

Three concurrent sessions.

8:30 -9:45 a.m. NAB

Radio Swap Shop

Room W103.

Moderator: David

Parnigoni, NAB. Panelists: Bob Flotte

KPSA(AM)- KUUX(FM)

Alamogordo, N.M.; Zane Roden,

WOKJ(AM)- WJMI(FM)

Jack son, Miss.;

Ron

Ostland,

KoH(AM)

Reno; Harold Segal, wNEB(AM)

Worcester

Mass

George Allen,

KLGA

-AM -FM

Algona, Iowa.

Acquisition Financing:

Where to Get

It and

How to Get

It with a Professio al Business Plan.

Room W101.

Panelists: Matthew Leibowitz, Leibowitz

Spencer

&

Freedman;

Tom

Buono, Broadcast Investment Analysts; Davit

Schultz,

ComCapitol.

Making It Happen in Spanish Radio.

Room W114.

Moderator: Georg(

Hyde,

WOBA -AM -FM

Miami. Panelists: Raul Alarcon,

WSKO(AM)

Newark, N.J.

Nathan

Safir,

KcoR(AM)

San

Inc.

Antonio,

Tex.; Carlos Aguirre,

Radio Centra

FCC

Engineers Forum.

8:30 -10 a.m. East ballroom

B.

Session chairman

Warren Happer, Scripps Howard Broadcasting. FCC Technical

Regula tion Panel.

Ralph Haller, assistant chief, Policy and Rules Division; Willian

Hassinger, engineering assistant, Mass Media Bureau; Thomas Stanley

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

74

fast-breaking news location events,-

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Ser us at

N.A.B. Booth A'2482

NAB 1986 acting chief engineer, and Robert Cleveland, physical scientist, Office of

Engineering

&

Technology; John

Reiser, assistant chief, Engineering

Poli- cy Branch; Clark

Poole, electronic engineer, Field

Operations

Bureau.

Joint closing general session.

10 a.m.

-1 p.m.

A

Message to

Broadcast ers About the Bicentennial of the Constitution. Arena. Closing remarks

Chief Justice Warren Burger and FCC

Chairman Mark

Fowler.

Related

Events

Saturday,

April

12

BEA meeting.

8 a.m. -5 p.m. Loews Anatole.

National

Association of

Black

Owned

Broad- casters (NABOB) meeting.

9 a.m. -5 p.m.

Loews Anatole, Cardinal rooms A

& B.

Lun- cheon, 12:30

-2:30, Plum Blossom room.

NAB /American

Bar

Association communica- tions law forum.

9 a.m. -5:30 p.m. Loews Ana- tole, Miro room. Luncheon, noon,

Morocco room.

Sunday,

April

13

BEA meeting.

8 a.m. -noon.

Loews Anatole.

NABOB brunch.

11 a.m. -2 p.m. Loews Ana- tole, Fleur de Lis room.

Association of Maximum

Service Telecasters

(AMST) meeting. 12:30 p.m. Dallas Conven- tion Center, east ballroom

C.

TARPAC

Red, White and Blue Club recep- tion. 1:30 p.m. Convention Center, room N401.

Society of Broadcast Engineers annual mem- bership meeting.

5 p.m.

Convention

Center, east ballroom

D.

Monday,

April

14

Broadcasters Christian Heritage prayer breakfast (interdenominational).

7:30 a.m. Hy- att Regency hotel, Duncan room.

Syndicators/Program Producers breakfast.

7:30 a.m. Dalias Convention Center, room

W116.

AMST engineering breakfast. 7:30 a.m. Adol- phus hotel, grand ballroom

A.

Ham radio operators reception.

6

-7:30 p.m

Hyatt Regency. ballroom

A.

Tuesday,

April

15

Broadcasters

Christian Heritage praye breakfast (interdenominational).

7 a.m. Hyat

Regency,

Duncan room.

Broadcast Pioneers breakfast. 7:30 a.m

Loews Anatole, grand ballroom

A.

International visitors reception.

5

-6:30 p.m

Hyatt Regency. ballrooms

A,

B

& C.

Wednesday, April

16

Broadcasters

Christian

Heritage praye breakfast (interdenominational).

7 a.m. Hyat

Regency, Duncan room.

NAB hospitality suites

Alias Research

American Radio Brokers

Americom

Radio Brokers

Arent,

Fox, Kintner, Plotkin &

Kahn

Toby

Arnold

&

Associates

Arter

&

Hadden

Asaca/Shibasoku Corp. of America

Associated

Press

Aurora Systems

Automated Business Concepts

Loews Anatole 423

Loews Anatole 5182

Loews Anatole 610

Sheraton -Dallas

Loews

Anatole

623

Fairmont 1100

Hilton 1604

Loews Anatole 1053

Sheraton -Dallas

Marriott Market Center 612

Basys Inc.

Birch Radio

Blackburn

& Co.

Hyatt

Blair Radio

Bonneville Broadcasting

System

Robert Bosch Corp.

Bridal

Fair

BROADCAP

Broadcast Investment Analysts

Broadcast Marketing Associates

Broadcast Microwave

BROADCASTING

Magazine

Broadcasting and the Law

Bryce Video

BSM

Broadcast

Systems

Burkhart/Abrams/Michaels/Douglas

Hyatt Regency 2628

Loews Anatole 2082

Regency 2217, Loews Anatole 810

Loews Anatole 823

Loews Anatole 434

Loews Anatole 434

Hyatt Regency 618

Loews Anatole 772

Fairmont

Plaza of the

2100

Adolphus

733

Fairmont

1501

Americas

Loews Anatole 472

Sheraton -Dallas

Sheraton -Dallas

Loews

Anatole

1689

Capital Cities /ABC

Radio Network

TV

Network

Plaza of Americas

1524

CBS Inc.

RadioRadio, Radio Network and Representatives

Television Network

Loews Anatole

1134

Fairmont

1901

Century

21

Programing

Chapman Assoc.

Chester Cable div.

Churchill Productions

Loews Anatole 27th floor

Loews Anatole 1172

Loews Anatole

923

Fairmont 1800

Loews Anatole 1189

Hilton 1146 Chyron Corp.

Donald

K.

Clark Inc.

CNN Radio

Coleman Research

Comark Communications

Comedy Network

Loews Anatole 1789

Loews

Anatole 523

Loews Anatole 372

Hyatt Regency 1418

Loews

Anatole

2682

Communications Equity Associates

Otis Conner Cos.

Continental Electronics

Conus Communications

Convergence

Corp.

R.C. Crisler & Co.

CSI

Electronics

Custom Audience Consultants

Data

Communications

Digital Broadcast Systems

DiversiCom

Dow,

Lohnes

&

Albertson

Drake -Chenault

Durpetti

&

Associates

Eastman Radio

EEV

Elcom Bauer

Encom Telecommunications &

Technology

William

A.

Exline Inc.

Fidelipac

Corp.

Film House

FirstCom Broadcast Services

Firstmark Financial Corp.

Norman Fischer

&

Associates

Fisher, Wayland, Cooper

&

Leader

Fletcher,

Heald

&

Hildreth

Milton

O.

Ford &

Assoc

Frazier, Gross

&

Kadlec

Gammon

&

Ninowski Media Investments

Gray Communications Consultants

Grumman Electronics

Bob Harper's

Co.

HEDCO

Jhan

Hillier,

Hiber

&

Associates

Newmark, Wechsler

&

Howard

Holt Corp.

ITS Corp.

Jamar -Rice Co.

JAM Creative Productions

Fairmont

1101,

Loews Anatole 753

Loews Anatole 1672

Grenelefe

1115

Fairmont

1021

Sheraton -Dallas

Hyatt Regency 2117

Loews

Anatole

5172

Loews

Anatole 4165

Hyatt

Regency

111E

Best Western-

Hacienda

11G

Loews Anatole

31C

Fairmont

1801

Loews Anatole

121C

Loews Anatole

784

Loews Anatole

7172

Hilton

202E

Hyatt

Hilton 1667

Regency

191E

Loews Anatole

71C

Loews

Loews

Anatole

672

Anatole

1282

Loews Anatole

1872

Loews Anatole 718g

Loews Anatole 101(

Adolphus 52:

Hyatt

Regency

51E

Loews Anatole 176:

Loews Anatole 95:

Hyatt Regency 617

Hilton 2067

Fairmont

801

Loews Anatole 1589

Hilton 1904

Loews Anatole 6189

Loews Anatole 1272

Loews

Anatole

653

Fairmont

150C

Loews

Anatole

1165

Loews Anatole 9172

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

76

OWA

CHRISTMAS

SPECIAL

BROUGHT

RUE

F

THE

MEANING

TELEVISION

TO

HILADELPHIA.

t started as a television program.

But for thousands of viewers, it became a connection between friends and neighbors.

And between neighborhoods and entire communities.

At WCAU TV, we're proud to have received the Ohio State Award for our origi- nal production of "Once

Upon A

Holiday."

Just as we're proud of the

55 other special television programs we last year, produced including:

"1985

Mummer's

Parade," "Rock on Philadelphia,"

"Black

History: A Celebration of

People,"

"Caught Between

Two Lives,"

"School

Vote,"

"The Sound of

Philadelphia," "Youth

Fit- ness,"

"Fit

-In," "Be

Somebody" and

"Dreams?'

But while it's nice to remember what we accom- plished in

1985, at

Channel

10, we're just as excited about

Air something else. 1986.

WCAU-TV

NAB 1966

Kadison, Pfaelzer, Woodard, Quinn

& Rossi

KalaMusic

Kalil

& Co.

Katz

Communications

Kline Iron & Steel Co.

Koteen

&

Naftalin

Lake Systems Corp.

H.B. LaRue

LeBlanc

& Dick Communications

Leibowitz, Spencer

&

Freedman

Listec

TV Equipment

Listec Video Corp.

The

Mahlman

Co.

Major Market Radio

Management Solutions

Computer Systems

Reggie Martin &

Assoc.

Masla

Radio

McGavren Guild Radio

Ralph

E.

Meador

&

Associates

Media General

Broadcast Services

Midwest Communications Corp.

George Moore

&

Associates

Motorola

AM Stereo

Al Ham's

"Music of

Your

Life"

Mutual Broadcasting

System

Westwood One

National Black Network

National Broadcasting

Radio Network

Co.

Television Network

Nightingale- Conant

Co.

Norpak Corp.

O'Grady

&

Associates

OPV

Systems

PAG

America

Paltex

C.R. Pasquier Associates

Pepper

& Corazzini

Peters Productions

Philips Television Systems

Pierson,

Ball

&

Dowd

Fairmont 1600

Loews Anatole 1982

Loews Anatole 1682

Loews Anatole 1472

Hyatt Regency 1218

Fairmont

621

Hyatt

Regency

1017

Loews Anatole 1489

Hilton

2066

Loews Anatole 472

Hyatt Regency 1617

Fairmont

501

Loews Anatole 723

Loews Anatole 553

Loews Anatole 2282

Loews Anatole 710

Loews Anatole 872

Loews Anatole 734

Loews

Anatole 8189

Loews Anatole 8172

Hyatt Regency 818

Loews Anatole 1582

Loews

Anatole

484

Loews

Anatole 1772

Loews Anatole 1034

Loews

Anatole 934

Loews

Anatole 1234

Fairmont 2500

Loews Anatole 334

Sheraton

-Dallas

Wyndham 2914

Sheraton -Mockingbird

Sheraton -Dallas

Hyatt Regency 2018

Plaza of the

Americas

601

Adolphus

931

Loews Anatole 9165

Adolphus 920

Loews Anatole 584

Pioneer Electronics

Jeff Pollack Communications

Ward

L.

Quaal Co.

R

&R

Syndicators

Radiation Systems

Stan Raymond & Associates

Resort Broadcasters

Cecil

L.

Richards

Thomas

L.

Root,

P.C.

Robert

W.

Rounsaville

&

Assoc

Satellite Music Network

Selcom/RAR

Shane Media Service

Sheridan Broadcasting Corp.

Barry Sherman

&

Associates

Burt Sherwood

Inc. /Mesa Broadcasting

Shrinsky, Weitzman

& Eisen,

P.C.

Jon Sinton

Associates

Society National Bank

Stainless Inc

Strategic

Radio Research

TA

Associates

Telerep

Thoben

-Van

Huss

&

Associates

Thomson -CSF Broadcast

TM Communications

Torbet Radio

Edwin Tornberg

& Co.

Townsend Associates

Transtar Radio Network

Unidyne Direct Mail

United Stations

Radio Networks

USA Radio Network

Wall Street

Journal

Report Radio Network

Weiss

& Powell

Jim West Co.

Western Union

Ronald blooding

&

Assoc

Adam

Young Inc.

Hyatt

Regency

1718

Loews Anatole 1465

Hyatt

Regency

1618

Loews Anatole

572

Fairmont

521

Loews Anatole

1889

Wyndham

Hyatt Regency 1018

Plaza of the

Fairmont

821

Americas

833

Loews

Anatole 2072

Loews Anatole 384

Loews

Anatole

1565

Loews

Anatole

834

Loews

Anatole

1665

Loews Anatole 1265

Adolphus

425

Loews Anatole 353

Loews Anatole 684

Adolphus 435

Loews Anatole 1989

Loews Anatole 1882

Fairmont

921

Loews Anatole 510

Hilton 2004

Loews Anatole 2272

Loews

Anatole

1782

The Mansion

Hyatt Regency 1518

Loews Anatole 2172

Loews Anatole 1123

Loews Anatole 2372

Loews Anatole 1572

Loews Anatole 2189

Loews Anatole 984

Loews Anatole 1772

Sheraton-Dallas

Loews Anatole 453

Fairmont

901

NAB's technological cornucopia

Annual equipment

exhibition will offer first glimpses of

many

products;

high interest expected

for

HDTV and

digital

gear, small formats,

TV stereo,

FMX and

SNG

If

the

National Association tion, opening in Dallas

Sunday,

Technical types on hand

April

13, is smaller than last year's show in Las Vegas, the thousands know it since they

will

of still

Broadcasters' 1986 roam and more than 660 exhibitors to half day exhibition. equipment exposi-

of

attendees expected may never have more than 300,000 square feet to visit during the three- and -a-

will

also have their choice of more than

90 broadcast engineering papers presented as part engineering conference, beginning

Saturday, ing through

Wednesday,

April

16.

April

of

NAB's

12, and on -site continu-

The broadcast equipment exhibit, the world's largest, will spread across both a show's largest pex

200,000 -square-foot upper level dominated by the exhibitors-Sony

(with

15,000 square feet) and Am-

(with

9,000)

-along

with square-foot lower level that some 240 others and a

100,000

-

will

house several hundred more corn- panies. Show hours run

Tuesday,

The ward digital video duction from

9 a.m. to

6 p.m. Sunday through with

Wednesday hours talk

of

the exhibit could well be recent developments in digital and small -format video recording.

The long- developing trend to-

will of

take its leap

9 a.m. to

2 p.m. toward maturity with the intro-

of

new recorders from

Sony, which

will

introduce the first component digital recorder at the show, and from Ampex, which is taking its first step into the field with its new composite digital commercial spot player, a controversial move that may be vindicated by Sony's recent agreement to license the technology from Ampex.

Small -format video has had its own dramatic news in recent weeks, with Ampex agreeing to reenter the market after its initial flop with Matsushita -manufactured

M- format gear, now to sell and eventually manufacture Sony's Betacam and a newly announced metal

-particle tape version dubbed Betacam

SP.

Matsushita has its own improved, metal -particle tape format,

M

-II,

first shown last year but now in full gear with a family products, and with the support

of

field and studio recorder

of

NBC

(see story,

"Top

of

the

Week

").

Radio

will

have some exciting news with development of FMX, a

CBS

-NAB extended stereo transmission technology, which

will

be exhibited in the form

of

prototype

FMX stereo generators for broad- casters.

Other news in the audio field centers on enhancements made available by new digital recording techniques and formats, although at least one company,

Dolby,

will

show the remaining possibilities for analog audio with a newly developed mastering technique called

Spectral Recording.

Satellite newsgathering, which has become increasingly impor- tant for TV broadcasters since making its debut with Hubbard Corn

- munications'

Conus at

NAB two years ago, should have a major presence at the convention. With several dozen SNG vehicles al-

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

78

ready in use, and dozens more to be spurred by ABC and NBC financing programs for affiliates, the field of suppliers has grown dramatically, with at least ready

-a

-dozen companies joining those al- established in supplying SNG technology and services.

Another burgeoning market is that for TV stereo, with 20% -plus

of

TV stations needing equipment for their new multichannel sound services. Much interest is expected for products such as stereo gener- ators, test and monitoring gear to evaluate the signal and stereo synthesizers to provide pseudo -stereo when the real thing is not available. Stereo versions of existing products are also making their way onto the floor, such as new stereo VTR's, transmitters and transmitter upgrade kits, consoles and mixers.

Those viewing the video graphics portion of the exhibit will find more products than ever from an ever -larger group of companies.

On the high -end, the show is expected to be dominated by

Grass

Valley

Group's new Kaleidoscope, along with Ampex's top

-selling ADO and other $100,000 -or -more systems. Ampex is also making a grab for the lower -cost- product market, with its

just

-announced agree- ment to buy 20% interest in

Cubicomp, whose

PC -based three

- dimensional PictureMaker system has attracted a good deal of atten- tion from broadcasters in recent months. Also on the floor with graphics products will be Quantel, Colorgraphics, Aurora, Artron- ics, Chyron and others.

The television camera business will show clear signs

of

having been reshaped in recent years, with marked changes at this show being the absence

of

RCA Broadcast and the growing dominance of

Japanese manufacturers such as

Ikegami, Hitachi

(both with new studio cameras this year) and Sony, which will introduce its new

CCD version

of

Betacam.

West Germany's

Robert

Bosch and Philips

of

the Netherlands will each have new camera products and will likely field questions about their new joint broadcast equipment venture, European

Television Systems, which is expected initially to focus on camera developments.

Transmitters and antennas have also witnessed major marketplace shifts with the dissolving

of

RCA Broadcast. Numerous manufactur-

ers-

Harris, NEC America, Comark,

Townsend and

others-can

be

NAB

1986 expected to move into RCA's former markets, as well as bolstering their own with new products. One area drawing attention will be the push for increasing efficiency from UHF antennas, exemplified by the continuing experimental development of multiple- depressed -col- lector high- efficiency klystrons by Varian

Associates and others, as well as by Comark's introduction this year

of

a new UHF transmitter using high -efficiency klystrodes. Other highlights

of

the exhibit in- clude new test gear for component video, automatic set -up monitors and several new routing and signal processing products.

Off the floor, in a special 10,000 -square -foot there will be a technology suite, demonstration of high- definition television, with some two dozen companies contributing HDTV products for display.

NAB will also have its new technologies demonstration room throughout the show, with displays on advanced terrestrial broad- casting, AM technical improvement, FMX, high efficiency klys- trons, a radio data system and

SMPTE's remote control standard.

For those who can draw themselves away from the exhibit, NAB's engineering staff has prepared a comprehensive group

of

technical papers for its 40th annual Engineering

Conference, which runs Sat- urday through Wednesday. Among the

18 radio, TV and special engineering sessions are more than

51 hours

of

technical papers and panels, with more than

100 broadcasters, manufacturers, consulting engineers and FCC staff members participating.

Headline sessions are expected to include those on AM technical improvement, TV stereo, video graphics, satellite news gathering and the video recording, as well as the traditional FCC engineering panel on Wednesday. For those unable to attend some sessions,

63

of

papers have been reprinted by NAB in a

400 -page volume,

"Proceedings," available at the show, with audio tapes also sold on- site.

Another event for engineers will be

lìresday's

annual engineering luncheon, this year honoring retired RCA engineering and research executive George H.

Brown

(

"Fifth Estater," April 7). The luncheon speaker will be George Waters, director of the

European Broadcast- ing Union's Technical Center in

Brussels, and former director of the

Irish broadcasting system. D

What's on display on the exhibit

floor

The following is a list

of

exhibitors for the NAB convention at the Dallas

Convention Center.

An asterisk de- notes a product new to the market.

Abbott

& Co.

2479

loll

Cascade Dr.,

Marion, Ohio 43302

Abekas Video Systems 3527

353A Vintage Park Dr., Foster City,

Calif.

94404

A62 digital disk recorder, A42 digital still store system, A52 digital special effects and digital effects combiner.

Staff:

Yesh- want Kamath, Junaid

Sheikh, Phil

Ben- nett, Martha Lash, Lance Kelson, Harris

Rogers, Bill Ludwig,

Mark Pinkel, Art Shi

- frin.

Accu -Weather

619

W.

2529

College Ave.,

State

College,

Pa.

16801

Graphics, color satellite images

*, color radars', database, WeatherMate 350'.

Staff:

Dr.

Joel Myers, Lee Gottschall,

Gordon MacMillan, Jeff Bertram, Jess

Goodman, Evan Myers, Maria Myers.

Acrian Inc.

490 Race St.,

San

Jose,

Calif.

95126

2458

Acrodyne Industries

3521

516 Township

Line Rd., Blue Bell,

Pa. 19422

Externally diplexed high power VHF tele- vision transmitters from 20 to 60 kw',

UHF television transmitter,

1 kw UHF transmitter.

Staff:

Marshall Smith, Tom

Creighton, Dan Traynor, Tim

Hulick, Joe

Wozniak,

Ron

Briggs, Bill Barrow.

Adams -Smith

34 Tower St., Hudson, Mass. 01749

2495

2600

A/V double- system audio

/video edi- tor', 2600 CC compact controller', 2600 time code, tape synchronizer and trans- port control products for production and post -production. Staff:

H.

Adams,

J.

Junker,

G.

Lester,

A.

Simon,

S.

Strass

- berg,

H.

Williams.

ADC

Telecommunications

4900

W.

78th St.,

Minneapolis

55435

2819

Patch kit and S.A.I.L.S. kit, audio and vid- eo patchbays, coaxial components, patching accessories. Staff:

Mike Hop- kins, Lonnie

Pastor, Joan Pastor, Lloyd

Mitchell, Frank Glass, Greg

Shane, Terri

Pettit, Dave Grady, Rick Jahnke,

Pat Gal- lagher, Larry Johnson, Bruce

Bailey, Paul

Berendes,

Sue Saltarelli.

ADM

Technology

3266

1626 E.

Big

Beaver Rd.,

Troy,

Mich. 48084

Audio console with personal computer control. Staff:

Robert Bloom, Murray

Shields, Larry Mandziuk, Rick Fisher,

Dennis Bennett, Gordon Peters,

Chuck

Ross, Gene Swope, Dave Wills, Lee Ni- cola, Jim Wright.

Advanced Designs Corp. 2419

924

W.

17th St., Suite 3,

Bloomington, lnd.

47401

Doprad

II doppler weather radar sys- tem', Doprad

Il high resolution display unit, RCD

-1000 remote color weather ra- dar display unit, Doprad

I retrofit system.

Staff: Martin Riess, Brian Frederick.

Advanced Music Systems

2919

AMS Industries

Park,

Billington Rd., Burnley

Lancs, UK

Digital audio processing systems, DMX

15

-80S dual channel digital delay line pitch changing system with keyboard in- terface, RMX 16 digital reverberator, A/V sync audio

/video delay compensator.

Timeflex stereo time compression /expan- sion device, AMS audiofile digital record- ing and playback system demonstra- tion'. Staff:

Stuart Nevison, Jeremy

Bancroft, Harry Harris.

AEG

Bayly

167

Hunt

St.,

Ajax,

Ont.

LIS

1P6

2700

100,

500 and 1000 w FM transmitters sol- id state,

RF coaxial changeover unit, pro-

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

79

fessional audio tape recorders, shortwave transmitters. Staff:

Allan Proc- tor, Bill

Jones, Mike Nolan, Jurgen Graaff,

S.

Malow, Roger Alexander, Doug Carl,

Rainer Zopty, Larry Lamoray.

A.F.

Associates

3141

100 Sronehurst Ct., Northvale, N.J. 07647

Pegasus systems commercial presenta- tion system*, Marconi

63410 line array telecine

*,

Pegasus 5100 commercial compilation system, Audix access digital intercom, assignable audio console

A.F.A. turnkey systems and mobile units, standards converters, cameras,

VTR's and studio products. Staff: Arnold

Fero

- lito, Louis Siracusano,

Tom

Canavan,

Richard Lunniss, Marc Bressack, Meryl

Altman, Bud Pearson, Rick Gross, John

Dale.

Agfa- Gevaert

275 North St.,

Teterboro, N.J. 07608

2815

PE 616/816 bulk audio cassette tape', half -inch VHS studio performance'. audio cassette, mastering, and video- tape, Broadcast

Plus

U

-matic videocas- settes, tapes packaged and in bulk, and duplicators. Staff:

Maria

Curry,

Andrew

DaPuzzo, Joe Tibensky, John Matarazzo,

Teri Sosa, Bob Zamoscianyk,

Peter

Jen- sen, Bob McNabb, Chris

Emery,

Mike Ca- puto, Barry Biddell, Mark

Barrows, Ste- ven Leader, Elaine Mosera, John Palma.

AKG Acoustics

2521

77

Selleek

S7..

Stamford, Conn. 06902

Alamar Electronics

2582

36 Railway Ave.. Campbell, Calif.

95008

Low end kart system',

TL -2500 tape li- brary control system',

SC

-2000 random access controller',

MC -1050 six

-channel automation system'. Staff: Douglas

Hur- rell, Joe Hering, Dana Gilliam.

Alden Electronics

40 Washington St., Westboro, Mass.

2759

0/58/

C2000M color weather radar display sys- tem, satellite

/graphics system and dis- play system, single -picture color weather radar display system.

Staff: Michael

Por- reca.

Alexander

1511 S.

Mfg. 2924

Garfield Pl.,

Mason City, Iowa

50401

Alias

Research

2497

III

Queen St., East. Toronto. Ont. M5C

152

3D computer graphic design work sta- tions. Staff: Stephen Bingham,

Art Bell,

Dave Springer, Martha MacDonald,

Nigel

McGrath, Wade Howie,

Tom

Burns.

Allen Avionics

224 E. Second St.,

2724

Mineola,

N.Y. 1/501

Video and pulse delay lines, video filters, hum eliminators.

Allied Broadcast Equipment

625

S.

E St.. Richmond, Ind.

47374

3414

Staff:

Roy

Ridge, Dave Burns,

Judy

Spell,

Tony Mezey

Jr.,

Walt Lowery, John

Grayson, Pat Hurley, Tom Lewis, Peter

Koenig.

NAB 1986

Allied

Tower

3432

12450 Old

Galveston Rd.,

Webster, Tex.

77598

AM/FM,

TV, microwave towers, portable utility buildings. Staff:

Bud Duvall, Jeff

Philippe,

V.G. Duvall

Jr.,

Rich Jessup,

Da- vid

Little, Mike Lancaster, Ronnie Miller,

Doug Moore, Bill

Parker,

Patrick

Feller,

Carol Duvall, Gail Feirrno, Manuel Cam

- posano, Joan Camposano.

Alpha Audio

2049

W.

102

Broad St., Richmond,

Va.

23220

Acoustical treatment products. Staff:

Da- vid

Walker, Eric Johnson, Kathy Fitzger- ald, Mike Binns.

Alpha Automation

203

2049

W

Broad St.,

Richmond,

Va.

23220

TEH tem.

John boss automated audio editor sys-

Staff:

David

Walker, Bob Tulloh,

Harlow

Alpha Electronics

/365

39th St.. Brooklyn,

N.Y. 11218

153

Alpha Video

28 E.

&

Electronics

2524

Mall

Plaza, Carnegie,

Pa.

15106

Wide band direct color

U

-matic

VTR with onboard

TBC, plug

-in time code gener- ator for VO -6800 and type

5 VTR's.

Staff:

Henry Lassige, Terance Lassige, Vince

Ferry, Dan Reynolds, Len Laabs, John

To- mini, Gary Craig, Brian

Conley.

Alta Group

535 Race St., Suite 230, San Jose,

95126

150

Calif.

Digital production systems.

Alternative Programing

2493

2501 Oak Lawn. Suite 365, Dallas

75129

Altronic

Research

Box

249,

Yellville. Ark. 72687

146,47

Omegaline

RF coaxial load resistors.

Staff:

John Dyess, Ann Dyess, Tim

Rop- er,

Debbie

Roper, Ken

Hemphill, Keith

Parry,

G.C. Melton,

Teresa

Johnson, Alice

Milligan, Marc Milligan, Russ Hensley,

Jerry Villneff, Linda Markle.

Amber Electro Design

2741

4810 Jean Talon

West,

Montreal H4P 2N5

5500 programable audio measurement system, stereo phase and

DC volts mea- surement, application software', distor- tion and noise measuring system. Staff:

Dennis Dolan, Wayne Jones. Guy

Le- mieux.

Amco Engineering

3801

N.

Rose St.. Schiller

Park,

3426

Ill.

60/76

Communications consoles, styling op- tions, computer desks and desk -top cabinets,

EMI cabinet, aluminum struc- tural system,

Floyd Johnson. blowers and fans. Staff:

Amek Consoles

Co. 2558

10815 Burbank Blvd., N. Hollywood, Calif.

9160/

APC 1000 assignable production audio console,

BC2 broadcast console. Statt:

Bob Owsinski,

Tim Wilson, Toby Sali, Ar- nold

Toshner, Lynn

Mazzucchi,

Peter Har- rison, John

Penn,

Greg Hogan, Nick

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

80

Franks, Graham Langley, Julie Wood

Ameritext

2789

108 Westlake

Dr., Valhalla,

N.Y. 10595

World system teletext system, origination and receiving equipment.

Amherst Electronic Instruments

107

Box 201.

132

Main St.. Havdenville.

Mas.v.

0/039

AMP Products Corp.

Box /776,

Valley Forge,

Pa. 19399

2764

AMP connectors, electric wire and co- axial cable strippers, taper technique.

Staff:

Jim Chase, Charlie Connor, Mary

Beth DiEleonora, Dan Filipow,

Pat

McKin- ley,

Kathy O'Keefe.

Amperex

2600

Providence Pike,

Slatersville, R.I. 02876

Plumbicon television camera tubes, high efficiency klystrons, tetrodes and cavities for

N

AM and

FM broadcasting. Staff:

Jeff Brooke- Stewart, Bob Carlin,

Ed

Cirri,

Pete Fochi, Kent Holston, Ed Feinberg,

Greg Gambill,

Tom Laury,

Lee Nowell.

Kipp

Rabbitt, Jim Robinson,

Greg Mur- phy, Tom Perry, Vasanth

Rao, Greg Smith,

Cor Weyer.

Ampex

3108

401 Broadway, Redwood City, Calif.

94063

ACR -225 digital cart spot player', stereo upgrade for

VPR -2 VTR, creative corn

- mand center demonstrating post -pro- duction applications,

VTR's, video pro- cessors, switchers, editors, still store, graphics and digital effects systems.

Statt:

Roy

Ekrom, Charles Steinberg,

Mark Sanders, Mark

Gray, Jock Dier- mann, George Merrick, Mike D'Amore.

Bob Natwick, Phil Ritti, Don

Bogue,

R.A.

Antonio, Robert Wilson, Arne Bergman.

Donald

Kleffman,

Al Fisher,

Willie Scul- lion, Ridley Rhind, Joe Williamson,

J.

Cripps,

M. Candelier, A. Buhlmann, W

Bjorklund,

R.

Cripps,

J. Major, O.

Luna,

J.

Lazano,

W.

Lilley,

P.

Burns,

H.

Okochi.

Roger Miller, Dick Coomes,

Frank Rush,

Rollin Stanford, Paul Hansil, Frank Nault,

Tom Nielson, Dave Detmers, Karen

Schweiker, Bob Schwartz.

Amtel Systems

2820

33 Main St.,

Suite 303. Nashua,

N.H. 03060

Soundmaster audio editing system, soundmaster tape synchronizer', VITC/

LTC time code products. Staff:

Mark

Wronski, Peter McDonnell, Gary McKoen.

Peter Moore, Shawn Carnahan, Bill

Tay- lor,

Andrew

Staffer,

Robert Predovich,

Doug MacKenzie, Mike Martin,

Ed La- banowicz, Allan Leon,

Tom Oliviero, Don

Herring.

Anchor Audio

913

W.

2426

223d St., Torrance,

Calif.

90502

Powered and unpowered broadcast monitor speakers, durable headset inter- coms, hi- fidelity portable public address systems, battery powered sound system.

Staff:

Jim

Van Waay, Jon Peirson.

Andrew

Corp.

10500

W.

I53d

St.,

Orland

Park,

3098

Ill.

60462

Health Club facilities provided by

Landmark Club of

Dallas

The stars listen to

StarStation

The stars of the demographic show

are

the

25-49's,

Call

Bob

Bruton now at

1-

800

for informa- affluent adults who live

a life

of style and success and sociability. Make adult contemporary radio!

StarStation tested

...

with

a

track record of success in over

200

cities. them

yours

with StarStation live

...

extensively tion and

a

demo tape. In Texas, call

1-

214

-991

-9200.

StarStation

... star -quality live adult contemporary radio from Satellite

Music

Network.

The cost of running your radio station, in money and time,

will

be substantially reduced the day you switch to

StarStation.

Yet you retain control, complete local flexibility, and the competitive edge of live personalities.

Sta rSta tb nX*

StarStation's

"Rock

`n'

Roll Saturday

Night"

live

weekly oldies show and live weekly "Top

30

Count- down" are opportunities for premium

sales.

There's

a

yearly calendar of live specials, Monday- through- Friday lifestyle features,

plus

Satellite News Network's live round- the -clock world and national news coverage.

Dallas New York

Chicago

Los

Angeles

More

this

people should hea

man

s music.

Close to a thousand stations broadcast some classical music. But a few only hundred really specialize in the classics.

Those who feature concert music find it attracts loyal, responsive listeners like no other format

... plus top

-

quality, long -term sponsors. And, for public stations, it also brings maximum listener contributions.

Classical demographics are the best there are!

But why don't more stations focus on fine arts?

One reason, we're convinced, is that's it's so hard to program well.

After all we're not talking about a playlist of current hits. These are the greatest hits of the past

500 years.

You need a library the size of a racquètball give court to your program director the musical depth that's needed. Not to mention finding a program director, and announcers who know the music and can handle a dozen languages.

You get the picture.

This is why

WFMT

is

forming The Beethoven

Satellite Network:

a

live, fully- packaged,

24- hour classical format delivered through

Westar

IV.

Programming will originate in our state

-of- the -art

Chicago studio complex, offering sound quality to please the most avid audiophile.

Daypart segments created for this brand new satellite service will

Loyal, responsive listeners draw on the considerable resources of our award

-

winning station.

WFMT's library, for instance, has more than

40,000 records, compact discs, and tapes

-music we've been collecting for

35 years.

But the sound will be

yours,

depending on how much local programming you wish to include.

If you need 24 hours of non -stop classical music, fine.

If you want to cut away for local drive -time programming, problem that's no either.

And if a local bank wants to underwrite

a

midnight to

5

am classical strip, just set up your carts, lock it the door, and leave to us. From total automation to a self

-

contained weekend block,

Beethoven

is

A live,

24

-hour classical format

We'd like to help.

Flexible to meet your needs flexible to meet your station's individual needs.

The Beethoven

Satellite Network will be live and lively.

Not recycled canned tapes and announcements.

No pompous and disembodied voices.

If it's Bach's birthday or the first day of

Spring, you'll know it.

We'll even have national and international news headlines.

Spontaneity, consistency, professionalism

Spontaneity, consis- tency, professionalism.

That's what makes

The

Beethoven Satellite

Network different from any previous classical music service. And more enticing to listeners and sponsors.

One

We'll other "first." share with you our research and marketing know -how to help you sell classical radio locally.

Advertisers are willing to pay

a

higher cost

-per- thousand to reach this exclusive, upscale audience. We'll show you how to persuade them.

There's even

a

national sales representa- tive exclusively for classical stations.

Of course we know that to get your attention we have to reduce your costs and provide superior quality.

If you're not already playing the classics, we've also got to help you attract solid audiences, attractive revenues, and strong community acceptance.

If you're interested, let's talk. We'll be at both the

NAB and

NPR conferences.

And at our telephones.

Beethoven and all of his colleagues are ready to be heard in your market. The profit can be yours.

How classical

listeners

compare

CI..ASSICAL LISTENERS

College graduates

Professionals

Income

$35,000+

Own mutual funds

Own a

Peugeot

Drink

Kirin

beer

For

Average adult

=

100

SOURCE: MRI, Spring 1985

more

INDEX

CLASSICAL LISTENERS

INDEX

332 Buy cross

-country skis

390

362 Use

4711 perfume 642

330

Own a sailboat

258

Use

Westin hotel

664 Have visited England

604 Use

KLM airlines

535

323

311

683

information

call:

1800USAWFMT

EFTHOVEN

SATELLITE

NETWORK

WFMT fine arts radioThree

Illinois

CenterChicago,

IL

60601

Broadcast antennas and antenna sys- tems, circular waveguide for broadcast, coaxial cables and waveguides, earth station antennas and antenna systems.

Staff:

Vern Killion, Joe Moscola, Jim

Li- manowski, Barry Cohen, Carl

Van

Hecke.

Angenieux

7700 N.

3020

Kendall Dr.,

Suite 303,

Miami

33156

State of the art in optics for cine and broadcast television,

14x7

F

/1.6 super wide angle

ENG/EFP*, 14x8 F/1.6 nonro- tating focusing element',

15x9

HP studio

% broadcast

BVP

-360 Sony

*,

40x9.5

F/

1.3 outside broadcast

2/3 inch`. Staff:

Tony Martinez, Gordon Tubbs, Bernard

Angenieux, Joe Abbatucci,

Dick

Scally,

Jacques

Durand, Jean Michel Durand,

Greg Reilman, Gerard Corbasson,

Pat- rick

DeFay, Tang Sum, Charles Stampfli.

Ann d'Eon Incentives

224

8777

E. Via De Ventura, Suite 225, Scotts- dale. Ariz.

85258

Media promotional trips, incentives.

Statt:

Ann d'Eon, Malena Albo, Jeff

Pordes, Beverly Ginsberg.

Anton /Bauer

One

2706

Controls Dr.,

Shelton, Conn. 06484

Portable battery and lighting for cameras,

VTR's, monitors. equipment

Anvil

Cases

2706

4128

Temple City Blvd., Rosemead, Calif.

91770

Staff:

Ralph Hoopes,

Tony

Edwards, Bill

Polivg,

Marge Murphy.

Apert- Herzog

2931

7007 Realm Dr., B3,

San Jose,

Calif.

95119

H and H2 frame/TBC synchronizers,

VDA§, video switcher,

AN stereo switch

- er, video line driver, satellite feed video delay.

Staff:

W.

Herzog,

W.

Nichols,

R.

Atchison,

M. Alley

Aphex Systems

2816

/3340 Saticoy St., N. Hollywood, Calif.

91605

Studio dominator tri

-band peak proces- sor, high definition

FM stereo gener- ator, compellor dynamic range control- ler, aural exciter

-psychoacoustic audio enhancer. Staff: Marvin Caesar, Jon San

- serino, Donn Werrbach, Jim Martindale,

Johnny Garcia, Paula Lintz.

Apollo Audio

-Visual

142

60 Trade Zone

Ct., Ronkonkoma,

N.Y. 11779

Stage and lamps. studio lamps, protection

Staff:

Lee \lestrich,

Harry Charl- ston.

Applied

Research

&

Technology

236

2/5

Tremont St.,

Rochester, N.Y. 14608

Microprocessor- controlled digital signal processing equipment including digital reverberation units, time delays, graphic equalizers, pitch transposer package.

Staff: Philip Botette, Richard Neatrour,

Tony

Gombacurta, John Langlois, Peter

Beverage.

Arben Design

600W. Roosevelt Rd.,

W.

154

Chicago,

Ill.

60185

NAB 1986

Arbitron

1350 Avenue

3103 of the Americas. New

York

10019.

Staff:

Ted

Shaker, Rick Aurichio,

Rhody

Bosley, Pete Megroz, Jon Nottingham,

Les Tolchin, Janet Baum, Susan

Din

- gethal, Jay

Guyther,

Scott Herman,

Ka- ren Kolvek, Marvin Korach, Barbara

McFarland, Marge Meyer, Jim Mocarski,

Debbie

Priore, Rip Ridgeway, Maddy

Schreiber,

Bill Shafer, Dick Sheppard,

Mark Stephan, Chris

Werner.

Aries Industries

W229 N2494A

8

Hwy

164, Waukesha,

Wis.

53186

Communications mast*.

Staff:

Jim Kunz,

Bill

Huelsman, Rick Dresang, Jerry

Eales, Pete Utecht.

Arrakis

Systems 2742

2609

80525

Riverbend Ct., Fort Collins,

Colo.

Audio consoles, routing switchers, studio furniture.

Staff: Michael

Palmer, Gloria

Palmer,

Roderic Graham.

Arriflex Corp.

500 Route 303, Blauvelt,

N.Y. 10913

3553

Camera, editing and lighting equipment.

Artel Communications

2920

Box 100,

West Side Station, Worcester, Mass.

01602

SL3000 fiber optic video /audio/data communications system

*,

T134 fiber op- tic system

*, SL2000 LED

-based video/ audio /data system.

Staff:

Gene Bidun,

Dave Monk, Steve Mariuz, Steve Jack- son, Rich Stucky, Ron Pretlac,

Tad

Witkowicz, Verne Zugenbuhler, Janet

An- dersen.

Artronics

300

216

Corporate Ct., Box

408, South

Plain- field. N.J.

07080

VGA -3D video graphics animator', VPU video paint library*. Staff: Timothy

Cunha, Trent

McFadden, Paul

McDonald,

Anthony Asch, George Uibel,

Peter

Sauerbrey, Sue Cornejo.

Asaca/Shibasoku

3278

12509 Beatrice

St., Los Angeles 90066

Video and audio test equipment.

Associated

Press

Broadcast Services

1825

K St.,

NW, Washington 20006

3395

AP

Election Wire*, AP Business Watch',

AP NewsPower

1200, NewsCable, News

-

Plus,

Network

News,

TV Wire,

Radio

Wire,

Texas

Network, Laserphoto, Photo Color,

Music Country

Radio Network,

Ed

Busch

Talk Show,

American Know-How. Staff:

Jim Williams,

Roy

Steinfort, John

Reid,

Sue Cunneff, Lee Perryman, Mary Clunis,

Jim Hood, Rosie Oakley, Kim Price, Brad

Kalbfeld, Matthew

Hoff,

Jim Spehar,

Daryl Staehle, John Harris, Doug Kienitz,

Ed Busch, Sydney Busch, Dave Alpern,

Brad Krohn, Greg Groce, Rob Dalton,

John

Lumpkin.

Associated Production

Music

2650

888 7th Ave., New

York

10/06

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

84

Music library representative,

Trade

- winds'. Staff:

Phil

Spieller, Cassie Gor- ieb.

Aston Electronics

531 N.

212

Mur

-Len East. Olathe, Kan. 66062

Character generators.

AT &T

Communications

3212

295

N. Maple Ave., Room

5219F2, Basking

Ridge. N.J. 07920

Athans Manufacturing

2332

Gravel. Fort Wirth.

76118

173

Auburn Instruments

2836

107 Church St., Watertown, Mass. 02172

Audico

219 Crossen Ave., Elk

Grove,

2720

Ill.

60007

Videocassette tape loaders, reloaders, timers and rewinders for Umatic, VHS and Beta, tape length verifier, videocas- sette cycler

*.

Staff:

Bill

Hinkle, Norm De- letzke.

Audi -Cord

/845

W.

Hovey Ave., Normal,

3433

Ill.

61761

Models

E and

S series record /reproduc- ers and TDS series reproducer.

Staff:

Carl Martin, Duane Martin, Carol Wil- liams.

Audio

&

Design Calrec

2708

E4480 Hwy., 302. Betfair.

Wash. 98528

Audio processors, mixing consoles, mi- crophones.

Audio Broadcast

Group

2581

2342 South

Division. Grand

Rapids,

Mich.

49507

Pre

-wired studio system, custom etry. cabin-

Statt:

Dave Howland, Scott Ho- molka, Dave Veldsma, Dave

Bob Bont.

Spoelhof,

Audio Developments

1101

2933

A

Airway, Glendale, Calif.

91201

Statt: Anthony

Levesley, Ron Fuller, Dale

Burkett.

Audio Engineering

2769

1029 N. Allen Ave.. Pasadena, Calif.

91104

MS stereo technology

*, line level active matrix, battery powered stereo mixer.

Staff:

Wes Dooley.

Audio Kinetics

1650 Hwy. 35, Suite 5,

07748

2506

Middletown, N.J.

Eclipse, timelink, mastermix, pacer, pac- er pad, 4.10 synchronizer.

Staff:

Paul

Duncan, Ian Southern, Sid Price, David

Neal, Chris Brackik, Kyle Ellison,

Jerry

Mahler, James Lucas, Peter Kehoe.

Audio Precision

Bay 2209, Beaverton, Ore. 97075

2560

Audio

-Technica

1221 Commerce Ave.,

Stow,

2407

Ohio 44224

Broadcast microphones, studiophones, phono pickup cartridges, recorder

-mix- ers, direct boxes, active and passive mi- crophone stands, booms and cables.

Statt:

Mark Taylor, Greg

Silsby,

Ken Rei- chel, Jon Kelly,

Jeff White, Steve He- brock, Rock Vikhrmann, Don Kirkendall,

Bob Herrold.

TOWNSEND.

An

American

Pioneer in

Television

Transmitters.

Since

1963.

When

You

Do

For Over

Just

One

Thing

20 Years...

You

Get

To

Do

It

Very Well.

Booth

#3418

.he

Television Transmission Specialists.

TOWNSEND

79

Mainline Drive, Westfield, MA

01085 413 -568 -9581

When it comes to choosing the video recorder we're that works best with our videotape, not biased. We prefer them all.

That's because we constantly use them all to test and perfect and retest and refine our videotape. That way we know our tape will work flawlessly on your video recorder, no matter what brand of machine you own.

Take our latest tape, for instance.

The picture quality is higher and the background noise is lower than on the tape we were making less than a year ago.

In fact, the improvement is so obvious, you your can see it monitor as well as our spec sheet. the word "dropout" on you

Thanks to our new base and backcoating, can virtually drop from your vocabulary.

And besides constantly improving our tapes, we're also constantly improving our service

-from staying on top of your orders tc helping you get to the bottom of your tech- nical questions.

One

tape

is designed brand of equipment.

1-11

001264.111,00 14

OUT 0012::+`.::,

-

o -

Panasonic

So if you're considering a new line of deotape, consider one that isn't new to your and of video recorder.

Call your nearest regional representative id talk with him about

Fuji, the videotape

:signed to make everyone's equipment look

)od.

Even our competitors'.

011986 Fuji

Photo Film U.S.A., Inc., Magnetic Products

Div.,

350 Fifth Avenue,

NY NY 10118 theast

Region

1-800-526-9030

W201-935-6022) theast Region 1-800-241-6005 oA

404-441-2222) west

Regio

312-569-3500)

323 -4826

Southwest Region

1.

800 -527.0804

(in

TX 214

-243 -2537)

Western Region 1-800-241-7695

(in

CA

213-636-0101)

FUJI

VIDEOTAPE

xcIusiueIv

for this

ATI

-Audio Technologies

328

W.

2508

Maple

Ave.,

Horsham, Pa.

/9044

Vanguard series broadcast consoles', in- terfaces, amplifiers, mike, line and turnta- ble amplifiers, monitor amplifiers, micro- phone processor.

Staff:

Edward Mullin,

Samuel Wenzel.

Audttronics

3750

3310

Old Getwell Rd., Memphis,

Tenn.

38118

On -air control consoles, production con- soles, accessory system, 310 series audio console. Staff:

Welton Jetton,

Steve Sage, Stovall Kendrick, Bob

Jones, Jeff Paullus,

Duncan Fuller, Jerry

Puckett, Betty

Kee.

Aurora

185

Systems

104

Berry

St., Suite 143, San Francisco

94107

220* and

75 tern. digital videographics sys-

Staff:

W.

Torn

Beams, Richard

Shoup, Sheila Ross, Marty Frange, Butch

Fadley, Damon

Rarey,

Nancy Burnett,

Richard

Sloss, Robin Sloss, Robin Stell- ing, Lisa Zimmerman, Chuck Kozak,

Tom

Hahn, Mike Mages, Mike Buettner.

Autogram Corp.

631 J Place, Plano,

Tes.

75074

2702

20

R/TV console,

LC -10 console,

IC -10,

AC -8, AC -6 and microgram audio con- soles, autoclock, autocode. Staff:

Ernest

Ankele

Jr., Jim Laird, Neva White, De-

Lores Ankele, Don Klusmann.

AVS

148

Davis Rd.,

Chessington, Surrey KT917T

England

NS

6500 digital standards converter and signal processor.

Staff:

Nigel Spratling,

Mike Ransome, David Beanland. Richard

Murray.

B

&B Systems

28111

91355

Avenue Stanford, Valencia,

2665

Calif.

Stereo audio phase verification systems models

AM -1, AM -2, AM -3, MP -4,

Phasescope and Imagescope,

AM -1B and AM -2B Phasescopes

*.

Staff:

William

Burnsed John Bradford,

Ramon Patron,

Brenda

Robley.

BAF Communications

228 Essex

St., Salem, Mass. 01960

2544

BAF 340T SNG vehicle, digital

SCPC sys- tem, two duplex, one simplex,

1

2400 baud data channel. Staff:

Kenneth

Brown, Dudley

Freeman, Charles Ange

- lakis, James

Vautrot, Joseph

Eicher, Wil- liam Kavanagh

Jr.,

Gregory Smith.

Barco Industries

2577

Sevens /aan 106, B -8500,

Kortrijk,

Belgium

Barcus -Berry

Elect.

5500 Bolsa Ave., Suite 245,

Beach, Calif.

92649

2485

Huntington

BBE model 202 professional audio com- ponent designed to correct phase and amplitude distortion. Staff:

William Matth- ies, Jeanne

Vasta.

Bardwell

&

McAlister

2746

7051 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood, Calif.

90038

NAB 1986

Modulight line of convertable softlights, lighting kits, B &MC lighting and grip equipment. Staff:

Bill

Norman, Bernie

Gibbs, Bruce

Belcher, Sharon Evans, Bill

Hines.

Barrett Associates

3205 Production Ave., Oceanside,

92054

2654

Calif:

Solar powered transmission', portable tape testing unit

*, full trade

-in equipment concept

*.

Staff:

W.

Barrett

Mayer, Derri

Stanley, Dennis Nelson,

Dr.

Ronald Bar

- reto,

Michel Merger, James

Rowles.

Basys

2685

2913

Marine

Way,

Mountain

We

Cali(.

94043

Basys Parallel, Dec

Vax, Onyx, and PC systems.

Staff:

Dave Lyon, Ed Grudzien,

David Simmons, Tina Harrison,

Roy

Terry.

Ham

Soper, Jim Cundiff, Jim Romeo,

Mike

Casserly, Rich Pierceall.

Bayly Engineering

167

Hunt

St.,

Ajax,

Ont.

LIS !P6

2700

Beaveronics

2703

8 Haven Ave., Port Washington,

N.Y. 11050

Favag OMS series of modular master clock systems, DSK

-4

-DLB downstream keyer, video production switching sys- tems, FM broadcast transmitters from En- ergy- Onix

*, video hum stop coils. Staff:

John Busharis, Bob Striker, Bernie

Wise.

Belar

Electronics

3347

!foc

76, 119 Lancaster Ave., Devon.

Po.

19333

BTSC stereo

TV reference decoder /moni- tor, stereo TV program monitor, precision

TV aural demodulator

/monitor.

Statt:

Arno Meyer, Harry Larkin, Dwight

Ma- comber, Mohammad Olama, Manuel

Krangel, Lynd Meyer.

Belden Communications

534

W.

25th St., New

York, N.Y.

2926

1000!

Lee filters color effect, color correction and diffusion materials distributor. Staff:

Michael Sheppard,

Patrice Sutton,

Paul

Nielsen. Damian Vaudo.

Belden Electronics

2651

22(X) U.S. Hwy., 27 South, Richmond, Ind.

47374

Broadcast cables,

TV camera cables.

Staff: Chuck

Parker, Jeff Latek, Dave Bil- lish, Frank Stone,

Turn

East, Mike

Ma- succi.

Mike Kipper, Jerry

Dorna.

Bencher

.133 W

Lake St., Chicago 60606

2568

M3 graphics stand, copymate camera stand. Staff:

Jere

Benedict,

R.C.

Locher

Jr., Michael List.

Benchmark

Media

Systems

2470

3817 Brewerton Rd.. N.

Syracuse,

N.Y

13212

Audio processing and distribution sys- tern with Stereo DA card, Mia-4 mic preamp

*, differential interface amplifiers. peak/program meter retrofit. Staff:

Allen

Burdick, Glenn Burdick, David

May.

Beyer Dynamic

2823

5 -05 Burns Ave., Hicksville,

N.Y. 11801

Broadcasting Apr 14 1986

88

BGW Systems

13130

S.

Yukon Ave.,

9025!

2825

Hawthorne, Calif.

Audio power amplifiers, model 2242

*.

Staff:

Brian Wachner,

Barbara

Wachner,

Dan Lasley, Dean Norquist,

Chuck

Prada, Mike Schmitt, Barry Evans, John

Pearson, Frank laconis,

Brian Scott,

Mordy

Foodym, Sye

Mitchell, Chuck

Ran

- cillio, Ken Simons.

BHP Inc.

1800 Winnemac Ave.,

Chicago,

2795

Ill.

60640

Envision videotape editing systems.

Staff:

John Ehrenberg, George Darrell,

Bruce

Rady,

Jack Behrand,

May Beh- rand.

Bird Electronic

30303 Aurora Rd.. Cleveland 44139

3472

15 kw and 25 kw load test equipment',

FM resistors',

STL RF broadcast filters and filters/couplers, plug -ins for Thruline wattmeters,

RF measurement compo- nents,

RF wattmeters, heat exchanger loads, line terminations, digital calori- meters,

RF power analyst, calorimetric self

-cooled load system. Staff:

R.

Bosler

Sr., L.

Lesyk,

L.

Kuklinski,

G. Waltz,

W.

Kail.

BIW Cable Systems

65

Bay St., Boston 02125

3493

Cable, connectors assemblies and re- pair services for broadcast cameras,

VTR cable assemblies.

Bogen Photo

17 -20

2405

Willow

St., Fairlawn, N.J.

07410

Tripods, fluid heads, dollies, light strands, caddies, video lights, lighting rail system, gaffing equipment and

TSE cam- era cases.

Bogner Broadcast Equipment

3406

401 Railroad Ave., Westbury, N.Y. 11590

Low -cost, low- wide -load, tower -leg- mounted (panel) version

BUI UHF series antenna

*, high power

UHF TV transmit- ting antenna, low- and medium -power

VHF and UHF slot and dipole transmitting antennas, circularly polarized

FM trans- mitting antennas,

MDS and

ITFS transmit- ting antennas, LPN transmitters, 800 mhz and 900 mhz base -station antennas.

Staff: Leonard King, Richard

Bogner,

Robert Piano, Steve Weinstein.

Bonneville Telecommunication

2440

6430

Sunset

Blvd.,

Suite 908, Los Angeles

90028

Boonton Electronics

791 Route

10,

Randolph, N.J.

07869

156

Robert Bosch Corp.

2907, 3170

2300 South 2300 W, Salt Lake City 84130

3D illustrator, video and audio distribu- tion amps*, sync pulse generator, rout- ing switcher,

KCM -125 camera`, graph- ic off -line modeling system`, switcher control panels',

X -Y zoom for film -to -tape transfer`, other transfer equipment, color corrector, grain reducer, computer graphics image system, quarter -inch camera and recorder system and play- back recorder unit,

TAS/TVS

2000 audio/

Why

Edens Broadcasting chose a rep instead of a conglomerep.

By

Gary, D. Edens.

President

and

Chief Executive.

Edens

Broadcasting

i!

Gary Edens

(left). shown with Jerry

Schubert.

President, Eastman Radio

We

pride ourselves

on

broadcasting quality programming. and needed a rep knew how to sell more than that just numbers.

Eastman captures the unique character of our stations

-without statistics

in

a ratings reducing them

book. to

mere

Eastman tells the whole story.

We've got nothing against numbers. but our award -winning stations have personalities and formats statistics. that stand out

in

a sea

of

KQYT

in

Phoenix pioneered the easy listening format.

KOY,

Phoenix. has won more news station. Tampa's WRBQ launched the most

is

awards than any other Arizona

Morning

Zoo:'"

becoming one of

America's

10

admired stations.

In

Richmond, WRVA celebrating its 40th year with the same morning man. And Richmond's WRVQ dominates the contemporary format with its

200,000 watt signal.

These are stories worth telling. and

Eastman makes sure they're told.

Eastman sells radio.

Only radio.

A lot of

reps use radio sales as a ground for

TV.

Not

so

at Eastman.

Their reps specialize

in

radio training

-only radio.

They take the time to get to know our stations. earning a high share of national dollars by selling the quality reach.

In

Tampa, for example. that that station's numbers history. alone can't

Eastman just produced the highest single month of national billings

in

Eastman treats us like family.

Eastman's never let us down by treating radio time as commodity trading. They're big. but they don't

sell

"supermarket- style" like those keep conglomereps.

They

We've grown with them. and we're growing because of them.

As long as they that momentum

Eastman forever. treat going,

it's

us like family.

Edens and

®

EASTMAN

-

=-

=J

_

video distribution switcher, master con- trol switcher, custom control panels, pro- duction switchers, videotape recorders, video monitors. Staff:

Erich Zipse, D.K.

McCauley, Barry

Albright,

Dave Spindle,

Ron Ferguson,

Al

Jensen,

K.

Jayaraman,

Jeff Davis; George

Crowther, Jerry Jump- er,

Steve Sedoff, David Brack, Robert

Wal- ters, James Skupien, Clay Selthun, An- thony Magliocco, Stephanie

Bailin, Larry

Riddle.

Bowen Broadcast Service

8343 Lynn Haven Ave.,

2522

El

Paso 79907

Bradley Broadcast

Sales

2663

8101 Cessna Ave., Gaithersurg, Md. 20879

Telos 10 digital telephone hybrid, echo

NAB 1986 digital voice storage /retrieval system'

Staff:

Art Reed, Neil

Glassman.

Bridal

8901

Fair

2562

Indian Hills

Dr., Omaha,

Neb. 68114

Local retail sales and marketing tool.

Staff: Bruce Thiebauth, Sherry Thie- bauth, Dick Lewis,

Cary Kruger, Jim

Pear- son, Mark Nielson, Justina Sears.

BrightStar Communications of

America/BrightStar

Comm.

2488

1801 Avenue of the Stars, Suite 345, Los An- geles 90067

Global satellite television network distri- bution system. Staff: Ernest Samuel,

Gary North,

Ian Joseph,

Bill Page, Max- ine

Goodless,

Ruth Macy.

over

1000

Bogner

TV

-20 years, transmitting antennas and still climbing!

In

the twenty years since we innovated a remarkable slot array design we have succeeded

to

a leadership role

in TV

broadcast anten- nas.

We had

to

be better than the competition. We

still

are.

Today there are over

1000

Bogner

TV

transmit- ting antennas

in use,

more than from any other single manufacturer. Antennas with a long history of trouble -free performance and unequalled coverage.

Bogner antennas come in every power range and with the largest num- ber of standard patterns

in

the

industry. In

addition,

Bogner offers hundreds of custom patterns plus special designs

to

meet particular requirements.

Find out more.

Call

or write:

Bogner Broadcast

Equipment

Corp.,

401

Railroad Avenue,

Westbury, New

York

11590, (516)

997 -7800.

When you need us we'll

be there.

BOGNER

WE MAKE THEM

SMARTER

See us at

NAB, booth

3406

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

90

Broadcast Audio

11306 Sunco Dr.,

Rancho

Cordova,

95670

2615

Calif.

Stereo audio consoles, BA 10T/BA

1OR aural studio transmitter links', modular console with six mixers, amplifiers, pas- sive phono preamps, premium

DPS.

Staff:

David Evans, John Fernandez, Ad- die Fernandez, Gary Maggiore, Sonnie

Maggiore.

Broadcast Automation

2697

4125 Keller

Springs. Suite 122,

Dallas

75244

Broadcast Electronics

3226

4100 N. 24th St., Box 3606,

Quincy,

111.

62305

35 kw and

10 kw

FM transmitters', AM- stereo modulation monitor,

6 khz re- sponse solid state digital recorder, sin- gle- and multideck tape cartridge ma- chines, audio mixers, FM transmitters, exciters, stereo and SCA generators, AM stereo exciter studio equipment,

TV ste- reo generator, microprocessor program automation system and studio turntables and tonearms. Staff: Lawrence Cervon,

Curtis Kring,

Bill Harland,

Tim Bealor,

Dave Evers, John Burtle, Mac McEa- chern, Kirk

Walker, Geoff Mendenhall,

Rick Carpenter, Ed Anthony, Jim Tucker,

El

Corujo, Gil Housewright, Kevin Clymer.

Broadcast Engineering

Box 12901,

143

Overland

Park, Kan. 66212

Staff:

Tom

Cook, Miguel Chivite,

Jerry

Whitaker, Paula

Janicke, Brad Dick, Carl

Bentz, Stephanie

Fagan, Duane Hefner,

Cameron Bishop,

Tom Nilsen, Ann Belle

Rosenberg, Joe Concert, Josh Gordon,

Herb Schiff,

Jason Perlman.

Broadcast

Management Plus

2646

Box 5708. Auburn, Calif.

95604

Broadcast Microwave Services

3578

7322 Convoy Ct.,

San

Diego

92111

Portable microwave equipment- trans- mitters, receivers and antennas

-for

heli- copters and vans.

Broadcast Music Inc.

320

W 57th St.. New

York 10019

2632

Staff:

Larry Sweeney, Bob

Warner, Len

Hensel, Paul Bernard, John Alves,

011ie

Henry,

Ted

Joan Yazmir, Ed Cramer, Al

Smith,

Chapin.

Broadcast Supply

West

2743

7012 27th

St.

W,

Tacoma, Wash. 98466

Prodecor studio furniture', cabinets, con- sole table, audio processing equipment.

Staff:

Iry Law,

Bernice McCullough, Tim

Schwieger, Pat Medved, Jon Ferren, Bob

Crawford.

Broadcast Systems

2418

8222 Jamestown Dr., Austin.

Tex.

78758

DC -80 automatic video cart machine',

DC -BE/P automatic video cart machine',

BJ -800 stereo audio distribution system

*, prewired audio jack panels', custom master control console', turnkey televi- sion systems design and construction service and field technical support.

Staff: Donald

Forbes, Sarah Salsbury,

Byron Fincher, Les Hunt, Chuck Balding,

AUTIE

E

r---1

F

U

Buy an hour or two or three a week to run your programming

-

lease air time at attractive rates on

WNYC

-TV

/31 to reach six million households in the New York

ADI.

For information, call

Michelle Hodges at

(212)

669 -7738.

W

NY7TV31

Cable

3 in

Manhattan,

One

Centre Street, New

York,

NY 10007

Jim Zeiner, Art Smith, Mike Brunsky, Lisa

Whitten.

Broadcast

Video Systems

2730

1050

Ont.

McNicoll

Ave., Unit

15.

Agincourt.

MIW

2L8

Component downstream keyer with fade to black`, composite and component col- or correctors with scene store and time code control`,

RGB

/component transla- tors

*, miniature video filter*, zero loss variable video delay',

20 mhz video de- lay lines', waveform monitor with line se- lector, combo calendar, clock and source dent unit`, video filters, studio and portable sale area generators, corn

- ponent to NTSC encoder. Staff:

Bert

Ver

- wey,

Randy Conrod, Erle Swadron,

Tony

Frere,

Eric Vavasour, Derek Newport, Bri- an Elliot,

David

Bryan, Allan

Taylor.

Bryston

Ltd.

57

Westmore Dr.,

Rexdale, Ont.

2406

MW

3)6

Amplifiers.

BSM

Systems

Box

19007. Spokane,

Wash. 99219

2668

Down -sized version of routing modula system switcher, remote control units', audio distribution amplifiers', small appli- cation video and audio routing switchers.

Staff: Bruce

Morse, Mike Fitzsimmons,

Dick Myers, Dave Poppe, Wayne

Barring- ton, Marceen Zappone, Jay

Turkovsky,

Richard Hartman,

Ernie

Tanner,

Thomas

Thuling, Maribeth

Morse, Helen Fitzsim- mons, Cecelia Barrington.

BW Lighting Systems

Box 470162. Tulsa, Okla. 74145

2922

1K and 12K tems, softlights

*, curtain track sys- track switcher, dimming equip- ment, fixtures, distribution, grid and mis- cellaneous equipment. Staff:

Wally

Whaling, Blair

Powell, Chuck

Parker, Jim

Freeman,

J.

Michael

Freeman.

Cablewave Systems

3489

60 Dodge Ave.. North Haven. Conn. 06473

Antenna and transmission line system products, low -loss foam coaxial cable.

Staff:

William Meola,

Margie Barneschi,

Ken Robinson, Wally Brooks, George Gi- gas, Sherry Rullman, William Sirvatka, Sol

Esocoff, Jack

Nevin, Steven Aldinger.

Calaway Engineering

149

49

S.

Baldwin

Ave., Sierra Madre, Calif:

91024

Calvert Electronics

(see

Richardson)

2503

Calzone Case

2502

832 N. Victory Blvd.. Burbank, Calif

91502

Travel eo, and shipping cases including vid- camera, rack mount, camera, moni- tor, lighting and editing systems, record- ing, audio and broadcasting.

Cambridge Products Corp.

244 Woodland Ave.,

2731

Bloomfield.

Conn.

06002

Flush- mounted wall plates, BNC's and

TNC's.

Staff:

Alan Horowitz, Joyce

John- son.

NAB 1986

Camera Mart

456

W.

55th St., New

York

10019

3040

Video production and post- production equipment. Staff:

Samuel Hyman,

Paul

Meistrich,

Shimon Ben -Dor, Jeffrey Wohl.

Leo Rosenberg, Shelly Brown, Herb

Browning.

Canare Cable

832 N.

2523

Victory Blvd., Burbank. Calif.

91502

Star quad microphone cable, single and multichannel cable configurations, cable reels, BNC prepackages double shield- ed video cables*. Staff: Motomi Ebara,

Barry Brenner, Kinya Osaka.

Canon U.S.A.

One Canon

3300

Pl.,

Lake Success, N.Y. 11042

Broadcast lenses and support equip- ment. Staff:

Jack Keyes, Jim Wolfe, Bob

Low, Tom Miller.

Capitol Magnetic Products

3345

6902 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood, Calif.

9002.5

AA-4 audiopak broadcast cartridge.

Staff:

H.J. Jackson, Edward

Khoury.

Larry Hockemeyer, Larry Krutsinger, Dick

Dunlavy, Dennis ford,

Schleich, Gordon

Staf-

Jack Jackson, Joe

Kempler.

G.A.

Carley

2649

4424

W.

Mitchell

St..

Milwaukee,

Wis.

53214

Screen process printer of outdoor adver- tising.

Staff:

Peter Gray, Stan Hessel- grave.

Cascom

707 18th Ave. South, Nashville

37203

248

Staff:

Ronald

Ellis,

Victoria

Ellis,

Simon

Pollack, Wayne Smith.

CAT

Systems

401 E.

74th St., New

York

10021

3333

Computerized remote control system. multisite cable monitoring and control system*, version

4 software. Staff:

J. M.

Soll,

T.

J.

Vaughan,

T.

Sullivan.

Cate! Telecomm.

2585

4800 Patrick Henry Dr.,

Santa Clara,

Calif

95050

Dwight Cavendish

2662

2117 Chestnut Ave., Wilmette,

Ill.

60091

Videocassette duplicator, Copymaster

.250*, Copymaster

OC station for quality control testing*, video/stereo audio mod- ular routing switcher. Staff: Marshall

Ruehrdanz, Jim

Dow,

Carter Ruehrdanz,

Brian Flynt, Dave Jones.

CBS Radio Stations News Service2178

2020

M

St., Washington 20036

Byline magazine with news/information features

(12).

Staff: Allen Balch, Jerome

Navies, Nancy Johns.

CO /Commercial

Comm.

2484

7353 Lee

Hwy,

Chattanooga.

Tenn.

37421

Ceco Communications

2115

Avenue X, Brooklyn

11235

3383

Electronic, transmitting, camera, receiv- ing and industrial tubes, transistors and

IC semiconductors.

Staff:

Anthony lanna, Hugh Mullins, Lew Levenson.

CEL

Brabury

&

Electronics

5925 Beverly, Mission. Kan. 66202

2429

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

92

Celco Inc.

262 A Eastern Pkwy.,

11735

155

Farmingdale,

N.Y.

Central Dynamics

/47

Hymus Blvd., Pointe Claire, H9R

3080

IG!

Total integration of signal distribution sys- tern into display controlling signals dis- tributed to master control and production switchers. Staff:

Peter

Brackett, Jim Bas- tien,

Richard Williams,

Roy Holmes, Ross

Ivett, John Boland, Joe

Ryan, Jim Morri- son, Robert Smith, Steve Broom,

Emil Lur- ion, Patrick

Manning, Pietro Censi,

Charles Mynott,

Graham

Pugh.

Central Tower

2799

8200 Roberts Ridge

Rd.. Newburgh. Ind.

47630

Centro Corp.

3181

9516 Chesapeake

Dr..

San

Diego

92123

Design, engineering and construction for post production, production and broad- cast facilities: design, engineering and construction of mobile production, equip- ment enclosures, satellite news gather- ing truck'. Staff:

Darrell Wenhardt, Fred

Powers, Ken Tondreau, Vince Jakimsak,

Rex Reed.

Century Precision Optics

2422

10713

Burbank Blvd.,

N.

Hollywood, Calif.

91601

Lenses.

Century

21

Programming

4340 Bellwood

Pkwy:,

Dallas

75234

3452

Staff:

Dave Scott, Richie Allen, Sam

Tay- lor, vis.

Stuart McRae, Allen Collier, Eddie

Da-

Cetec

Antenna

6939 Power

3587

Inn Rd.,

Sacramento, Calif.

95828

TV version of Broadband cavity backed dipole antenna,

FM CP antennas,

CP TV spiral. Staff:

Jim Olver, Bill Cunningham,

Ali Mahnad, Mark Cunningham.

Cetec Gauss

9130 Glenoaks

91352

3394

Blvd.,

Sun Valley,

Calif.

Single point source studio monitor

*.

Cetec Vega

3394

9900 Baldwin Pl.. El Monte, Calif.

91731

Models 66B and 67B pro plus portable wireless microphones receivers'. Staff:

Paul

Baughman,

Ken

Boume, Gary Stan- fill, Stan Fowler.

Channelmatic

821 Tavern Rd., Alpine,

Calif.

92001

2548

Totally integrated random access multi

-

VCR commercial break automation sys- tern, PC- controlled operational software and traffic software package,

Broad- caster

I

Automatic videocassette chang- er system, turnkey versions of five -VCR break sequencher, four -channel ROS break inserter, audio follow switcher unit, stereo switchers, time and /or tone acti- vated VCRNTR controllers/switchers.

Staff:

Bill

Killion,

Vern Bertrand, Dwain

Keller, Al Taylor, Roger Heidenreich,

Wes

Hanemayer.

Satellite

Music

Network ir

-

Cv r'

CIO

'by

w,

v

;

rwar

Stardust

programming

is great music

...

great artists.

It may have

been recorded yesterday

... or

years ago. And it is delivered live, via satellite

in stereo

by

on

-air

personalities

who feel

and understand the emotions

involved. Because

they

lived it. Music

that

carries

the

sophisticated Stardust

listeners on

a live

sentimental journey

from

the

big

band hits of the

40's

...

to

the

fabulous pop sounds

of the

50's

...

to

the

most

popular adult hits of the

60's

...

to selected sounds of today's classics. Stardust offers more

than

just

the

music you

remember

but also live

hourly

newscasts 24

-hours a day. Plus special

90-

second features designed for

local

sponsorships

-

Automotive

Digest,

Healthwatch, Speaking

Spotlight Specials

of

Relationships and more. Then,

there

are

the

weekly live Saturday Night Dance Party

and

Sunday

... and

live holiday weekends and year -'round specials. It's

the

profitable, proven way to reach the affluent adult listeners,

35 +.

Stardust is

an

easy format to sell. It can provide

the

fmancial responsibility that will improve

your

lifestyle. For

information and

a demo tape of Stardust, call Charlie Strickland at

1

-800- 527 -4892 right now.

In Texas, call Charlie at

1-

214

-991.9200.

Memories and money are made

of

Stardust, live,

24

-hours a day, exclusively from Satellite Music Network.

DALIAS NEW YORK CHICAGO LOS ANGELES

Chisan Photron Wading

2494

Jinguame 6-

12

-15, Shibuvaku, Tokyo, 150

Christie Electric

20665

Manhattan

Corp.

3324

Pl..

Torrance, Calif.

90501

CASP charger /analyzer /reconditioner, bulk -tape degausser, nickel -cadmuim batteries. Staff:

Tom Christie, David

Christie, Fred Benjamin, Alan Augusta,

Betty Trenberth, Diane Church,

Ray

White, Howard Durbin.

Chyron Corp.

265 Spagnoli,

Melville,

N.Y. 11747

3072

Chyron 4200 with motion, high resolution graphics system with digital graphic ef- fects, ultra high resolution text generator, graphics and titling systems, high resolu- tion low prices paint system, low price graphics and character generators.

Staff:

A.

Leubert,

J. Scheuer,

L.

A iss- man,

D.

Buckler,

R.

Witko,

W.

Hendler,

W.

Reinhart,

T.

Finnin, A. Rudden,

L. Mincer,

M.

Ahern,

S.

Stanco,

R.

Cerbone,

R.

Ben- incasa,

J.

Mauro.

Cine

60

630 Ninth

Ave., New York 10036

3428

Air-cooled on- camera batteries', sun

- gun kits', battery analyzer, battery belts, packs, batteries, charging systems, sun

- guns and sun -gun kits. Staff:

Robert

Kabo,

Paul Wildum, Don Civitillo, Richard,

Jenkins, Paul Wildum

Jr.

Cinema Products

140

2037 Granville

Ave., Los Angeles 90025

Mini-

VObrrall continuous pan cable drive geared head

*, mini- Abrrall super

*,

CP-

35E

*,

Steadigate film gate conversion',

Steadigate TC', insight vision system, se- ries 75B&W broadcast camera, image in- tensifier and zoom lens

*,

Steadicam

Uni- versal model Ill camera stabilization system, mini -mote remote controlled pan and tilt head for film cameras, wireless lens control system, portable prompting systems for film and video cameras, joy- stick zoom control. Staff:

Ed DiGiulio, Ed

Clare, Jesse Garfield,

Chuck Jackson,

Robert Auguste,

Bern

Levy,

Susan Lewis,

Ian Love, Natalie Samuels.

Clnemllls

Corp. 2777

3500

W.

Magnolia Blvd., Burbank, Calif:

91505

Staff:

Wally Mills, Sandy Mills, Linda

Rob- erts,

Danny Davis, David Holmes, Haydn

Edwards, Eddy

Ruffell, Lynn

Reiter,

Rich

Schafner, Steve Mule, Bob

Roller,

John

Melvin, Ralph Young,

Pat Holmes, Kim

Mills.

Cipher Digital

2605

10

Kearney Rd.,

Suite 2B, Needham, Mass.

02194

Vertical interval time code products, high resolution character displays

Circuit

Research Labs

2522

W.

Geneva, Tempe.

Ariz.

85282

2538

Audio processing equipment, stereo and

SCA generators. Staff:

Ben Van

-

Benthem,

Ron Jones, Chuck Adams,

Stan Salek, Dee McVicker, Ray

Updike,

NAB 1986

James Woodworth, Hank Langlinais.

Clear -Corn

1111

17th St.,

San

Francisco

94107

3352

Single /multichannel rack, custom, porta- ble intercoms, multiple channel

IFB and

ISO systems. Staff: Robert Cohen, Peter

Giddings,

Michael Goddard,

Ed

Fitzger- ald, Bob

Tourkow, Bill Fluster, Emil Matig- non, Sharon Krentz.

CMC

Technology

2650 Lafayette St., Santa

95050

3340

Clara.

Ca /I/.

Replacement video head for

C- format

VPR lel series machines with dynamic paral- tracking video head, Videomax TD-

800 bulk tape demagnetizer, quad video and audio head and

VTR accessories

Staff:

Bill Fitts, Tony Mlinaric, Fred

Koehler, Tommy Thompson,

Bill borski.

Zirr

CMX/Orrox

2230

Martin

Ave., Santa Clara, Calif.

3232

9500

Computer -assisted editing systems

Staff:

Gary Hinderliter, Sam

Goodman,

Larry

Weiland, Dick Sirinsky, Russ John- son,

D ck DeBeradinis,

Ed Bolger,

Tom

Harmon, John Shike, Christin Hardman,

Howard Thayer,

Dwight MacPherson,

Don Niederhauser, Stan Becker, David

Orr.

Coaxial Dynamics

2766

15210

Industrial Pkwy. Cleveland

44135

Peak and

C.W. reading portable watt- meter', frequency counter /wattmeter combination, low and high power direc- tional

RF wattmeter,

RF loads and filters, power sensors.

Staff:

Robert Scott, John

Ittel, Joe Kluha, Art Dinicola,

Ron Or- lowski,

Al Prinz.

Coherent Communications

2675

13756 Glenoaks Blvd.,

Sylmar. Calif. 91342

SMPTE time code readers', generators' and inserters

*, time code on film equip- ment', miniature video transmitters, radio microphones, portable audio mixers.

Staff:

Ivan Kruglak, Steve DeFeo, Harry

Howard.

Colorado

Video

Box 928, Boulder, Colo. 80306

3447

Time division video multiplexer

*, vertical blanking interval freeze -frame communi- cations', sync stripper, freeze -frame

TV broadcast communications systems.

Staff:

Glen Southworth, Jim Dole, Larry

McClelland.

ColorGraphics

Systems

3144

5725

Tokav

Blvd., Madison,

Wis. 53719

Artstar

III

-D' paint system, 3D animation automation, vector type character gener- ator, weatherline 256 color weather dis- play

/animation system',

NewStar com- puter system, ADP NewsStar's relational automated database add

-on system.

Colortran

1015

Chestnut St., Burbank,

3598

Calif 9/506

Fresnels.

Columbine Systems

3405

Seven

Jackson Bldg.,

Golden, Colo. 80401

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

94

Fixed assets and traffic system for IBM

PC', newsroom management system', music, traffic and accounting software.

Staff:

Mark Fine, Martha Freeman, Mari- lyn

Decker,

Larry Christofaro,

Pete

Callaway,

Gary

Renfrew,

David Wipper,

Murray Goodman.

Comark Communications

Box 506,

Colmar, Pa. 18915

3561

60 kw klystrode UHFamplifier', high pow- er klystron transmitters, medium power tetrode transmitters,

30 kw high band

VHF transmitter from Marconi, coax and waveguide transmission lines and com- ponents.

Staff: Richard

Fiore

Sr.,

Nathan- iel Ostroff, Stuart Kravitz,

James DeSte- fano, Richard Fiore

Jr.,

David

Smith,

Raymond Kiesel, Andrew Whiteside,

Mark Duclos, John Molta,

Tom

Tomkins,

Mark Aitken, Alvin

See.

Comex

1645 NW

79th

Ave.. Miami 33/26

2829

MMDS products. Staff: Jack

Rickel, Be- verly Chester,

Paul VanDerLoo, Vivian Fer- nandez, Jim Clark, Gary Brotherson,

Dale Hemmie.

Communication Graphics

Box 54/10.

Tulsa. Okla. 74/55

2423

Promotional items

-bumper stickers, window decals,

T- shirts, jackets, hats and credit cards, media or sales folders'.

Staff:

Donna Allbright, Richard Law- rence, Sandra Berkshire, Vickie Barefoot.

Communication Microwave

Corp. 139

Box 69. Mountaintop,

Pa.

18707

Solid state

ITFS

/MDS transmitters, ampli- fiers, data repeaters for video, audio and

-10

w,

30 w,

50 w,

100w.

Staff:

Steve

Koppelman,

Bill Price, Jim Fisher, Bob

Greenfield.

Comprehensive

Video

Supply

3593

148 Veterans Dr., Northvale, N.J. 07647

Display racks, video supplies, computer cables, lighting systems and accesso- ries.

Comprompter

3340 N. Pine Creek. LaCrescent,

55947

2630

Minn.

Compuprompt

2630

940 N. Orange Dr.. Los Angeles 90038

CompuSonics

Corp. 226, 227

1355

S.

Colorado Blvd., Suite 60Z Denver.

Colo. 80222

DSP

-1500 digital disk broadcast record- er

DSP

-2002 hard disk based computer audio systems.

Staff: David

Schwartz, Hamilton Brosious,

Peter

Roos, John Stautner,

David Clementson.

Computer Concepts

2801

8375 Melrose Dr., Lenexa, Kan. 66214

Broadcast computer systems.

Computer Graphics Lab

405

Lexington Ave., New

York 10174

2929

Staff:

Bill

Taylor,

Anne

Conroy, Mark Mill- er,

J.J. Larrea, Randy Wiggins, Louis

Schure, Audrey

Fleisher, John McMahon,

V.

Cavanagh,

K. Ritshie,

Bruce

Perens.

CATCH

THE EXCITEMENT AT

NAB BOOTH

3444

ORBAN

DAZZLES

DALLAS

Stereo Television

*

NEW

Model

275A

Automatic Stereo Synthesizer:

Orhan introduces

the Missing Link for quality Stereo Television

-an outstanding

package to

complete your

Stereo

TV system.

Mono /stereo

recognition and recognition of audio

on only

one channel. Smooth crossfades. Improved Orban stereo synthesis

effectively

centers

dialog. Reverse -polarity

detection corrects out

-of -phase

problems automatically and unobtrusively.

Noise

reduction reduces

hiss

and hum on mono

material by up to

I

OdB.

Optional

full

Remote Control. Priced at

SI895.00

* The Orban Stereo Television

System: Over 200 systems in the field

-more than all other makes combined!

OPTIMOD

-TV

Audio

Program

Processor

(single

or

dual chassis

configuration)

TV

Stereo

Generator

Separate Audio

Generator

Pro

Channel Generator.

FM

Radio

*

NEW

Model 8150A

FMX®

Stereo Generator:

With the new

FMX

receivers, your stereo coverage

area is

improved

up to four times! And the

Model 8150A is

Orban

Model

8150A

adds the

special

FMX

subcarrier to your

FM

stereo

signal

with

no loss

in

loudness

designed

to

work with

OPTIMOD-FM Models 8000A,

8100A, 8100A/1

and other audio processors, and

is

compatible

with

our

8100A/XT

Six

-Band Limiter. When

coupled

to Model 8100A

conventional stereo performance and loudness

capability.

/l,

the Model

8150A also

improves

*

NEW

Model

ACC -22

SCA

Filter Card for

Model

8100A:

For

enhanced

SCA

protection. Provides

25dB more

protection

to 67kHz

SCA than

provided

by the

standard

8100A

or

8100A /1. Also increases average

modulation

capability by

0.6413

-about

the same increase as

provided

by a

composite

clipper, but

without

the trash!

AM

Radio

*

Model 9100A OPTIMOD standard

for

forward -looking

AMs

who

realize that the adult

demographic

is

turned

off by

the squashed, distorted

"loud

-at

any-

-AM

Audio Processor: cost" sound of yesterday's "competitive"

AM

Loud, yet

open and dynamic, processors.

OPTIMOD -AM's this

processor

is

becoming the superior balance between loudness, brightness, and

fatigue is ideal for

AM

mono,

Motorola

C -QUAM

Stereo, Kahn Stereo, and

short

-wave

broadcast.

I

NIX'

,.J,.RI

Orban Associates Inc.

645 Bryant

St,

San Francisco,

CA

94107 (800) 227 -4498 or

(415) 957

-1067, Telex:

17

-1480 traal

(JP,li'a

Computer Prompting Corp.

1511

132

K

St.. Suite 831, Washington 20005

CPC -1000 computerized teleprompter.

Staff:

Sidney Hoffman.

Comrex

60 Union Ave..

Sudbury, Mass. 0/776

3460

Two-line frequency extender /sports con- sole*, diverta broadcast coupler, fre- quency extenders, cue systems. Staff:

John

Cheney, Lynn Distler.

Comsat World Systems

2482

950 L'Enfant Pl.,

SW, Washington 20024

Comtek Inc.

2653

357

W.

2700

South, Salt Lake City 84115

MR -182 wireless microphone system for field and studio use, M

-72 wireless micro- phones, off -air audio monitoring personal receivers, wireless communication sys- tems for cueing and IFB, wireless full di- plex communication systems. Staff:

Ralph Belgique, Dana

Pelletier,

LeeAnne

Rickards.

Comtronix

Box 388, Westfield, Mass. 01086

Comwave

Box 69, Mountaintop,

Pa. 18707

2487

139

Concept Productions

1224 Coloma

Way,

Roseville,

3334

Calif.

95678

Adult

Contemporary,

Contemporary Hit

Radio, Album Oriented

Rock, Country and Comtemporary

MOR automated or live assist formats. Staff: Dick

Wagner,

Mary Wagner, Dave Nelson, Renee Mon

- tero, Larry Anderson,

Elvin lchiyama.

Connectronics

Corp.

2403

652 Glenbrook Rd., Stamford, Conn.

06906

Mixing consoles audio signal proces- sors.

Connolly Systems

100 Water

St., New

York, N.Y. 10005

2915

Conrac

600 N. Rimsdale Ave., Covina,

3124

Calif.

91722

Monitors.

Continental Electronics

Box

270879, Dallas

75227

3200

AM transmitters

(from

1 kw to 50 kw),

FM transmitters (from

2.5 kw to 60 kw), FM antennas, AM and

FM stereo exciters.

Staff:

J.

Vlkldon,

B.

Watson,

Tom 'Angst,

W.

Mitchell,

Vernon Collins, J.D. Rogers,

E.L. King,

R. L.

Floyd, Steve

Claterbaugh,

Bob Dunkin,

Paul Kittenbacher.

Control Concepts

Corp.

2652

328

Water St.,

Box

1380, Binghamton, N.

Y

13901

Conus Communications

3385

3415 University

Ave., Minneapolis 55414

Satellite -delivered, national and regional news service via

Ku band transponders, daily news feed, live and tape coverage of Washington events, portable

Ku SNG system.

Staff:

Charles Dutcher Ill, Anita

Klever,

Ray

Dennis Herzig,

Daniel Webster,

Conover

Convergence Corp.

16,41

11((1,

61.,

Irvine, Calif. 927/4

3252

NAB 1986

Corporate Communications

Consultants

4250

Veterans Memorial

N.Y.

1/74/

2753

Hwy,

Holbrook,

System BM color correction system'.

Staff: Armand Belmares- Sarabia,

Stan- ley Chayka, Kenneth

Dutton,

Huldtgren, Donald

Jerry

Keller,

Mike

Ellis.

Corporate Leasing

2413

1710 N.

Tower, Plaza of the

Americas, Dallas

75201

Countryman Associates

2425

4/7

Stanford

Ave., Redwood City.

Calif

94063

Statt:

Carl Countryman, Kevin Dolby,

Alan Marzoline, Carolyn Countryman,

Greta Lunde, Joan Lewin.

Crosspoint Latch

95

Progress St., Union,

N.Y. 07083

3533

6129 AHK compact switcher, 8200 dual time base corrector. Staff: Michael Molin- aro, Tony Grosboll, James McKay, Don

Imbody.

Crown International

2927

1718

W.

Mishawaka Rd., Elkhart, Ind.

465/7

Power amplifiers,

PCC, PZM and GLM microphones,

TEF 12 audio analyzer.

Staff: Preskel Gayheart,

Tom Szerencse,

Brute

Bartlett, Jim Beattie, Herman

Mack, Guy Braden, Don

Eger,

Jim Bum

- gardner,

Torn Lininger, Larry Shank, Bill

Raventos,

Chuck

Gushwa,

Tony Satar- iano.

Cubicomp

Corp.

3478

3165 Ade line

St., Berkeley,

Calif.

94703

Enhanced version of

PictureMaker

3D video animation computer graphics sys- tem.

Staff: Harry

Taxin, Peter

McBride,

Stephen Crane, Chuck O'Daniel,

Jim

Hudman,

Henry

Lasch, Rick

Tears,

Amie

Slate, Jan

Hendricks,

Chris Laskey, Hen- ry

Dryovage,

Carol Byram. Leslie Evans.

Custom Business Systems

Box

67,

Reedsport, Ore. 97467

2517

Radio business computer system.

Staff:

Steve Kenagy, Jerome Kenagy, Bob

Lundstrom, Mike Povlo,

Abs Lockard.

Barbara

Simon,

Ira

Apple.

Dago Cases

6945

174

Indiana Cr.. Suite 600,

Golden, Colo.

80403

Daiwa Manufacturing

Box 170, Yokohama 231

-91 Japan

2792

Peter Dahl

5869 Waycross, El

Paso,

Tex.

79924

222

Three -phase

5 kw plate transformer,

1 and

5 kw modulation transformers and reactors, high voltage rectifiers. Staff:

Peter Dahl, Gary Komassa, Ozzie

Jaeger.

Dalsat

1205 Summit, Plano,

Tex.

75024

2424

SNG -25, -10,

-8, -6 satellite news gather- ing vehicles. Staff:

C.M.

Willingham,

P.

Zilliox,

J.

Moore,

B.

Flynn.

Bill Daniels

9101

Bond,

2631

Overland Park, Kan. 66214

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

96

Illustrated trade references, dealer cata- logues, manufacturer's catalogues, lit- erature management, super ads, yellow pages for broadcast'. Staff:

Bill Daniels,

Kathy Daniels, Patricia Hibbs, Charles

Wildberge, Patricia Braymer, John Mor- gan, Jo Kirkham.

Data Communications

3000 Directors

RON;

Memphis

38131

3204

BIAS

PC radio computer based sales/ traffic

/billing systems, Buyline electronic contract,

PC cable for cable ad systems sales, AOS for more processing power.

Staff: Norfleet

Turner, Polly Bolin,

Doug

Rother, Skip Sawyer, Doug Domergue,

Greg Calhoun, Marshall

Clark, Cindi Mar- shall, Dick Dortch, Bob Livingston, David

Heckel, Steve

Weaver,

Dick Bruce, Mi- chael Hunter, Susan Whalen, Robert An- derson, John Schultz, Jerry Eskridge, Mi- chael Bower, Jamie McMahon.

Datatek 3547

1121

Bristol

Rd., Mountainside, N.J. 07092

Video and audio routing systems, moni- toring switchers and

DP's, machine con- trol data matrices, source

ID systems.

Staff:

Robert Rainey

Sr.,

Mervyn Davies,

Robert Rainey

Jr.,

Richard

Rainey, Mi- chael Davies, Daniel Antonellis,

Skip Mal- ley,

Allen Witheridge.

Dataworld 2779

4827 Rugby Ave..

Suite 201, Bethesda,

Md.

20814

Broadcast database including AM,

FM,

TV,

LPN, translators, allocation studies,

FCC data, population data base,

TV six interference program

*.

Staff: Bob

Kircher, Shirley Ostmann,

Jack Neff,

Hank Brandenburg.

Datum 2408

1363

S.

State College

Blvd.,

Anaheim,

Calif.

92806

5300

ITP microcomputer -based time pro- cessor, video data encoders and read- ers.

Staff:

Randy Smith, Mike Coffin,

Gary Geil.

Davis

&

Sanford

2496

24

Pleasant St., Box 102, New Rochelle,

N.Y.

10802 dbx

71 Chapel St., Newton, Mass. 02195

2740

Digital microwave transmission system for STL applications, audio modular sig- nal- processing systems, audio tape noise reduction systems.

Staff: David

Kennedy, Stan Peters, Scott Berdell, Joe

Lemanski, Gregory Green, Gary Sopra- no, Leslie

Tyler,

Richard caro, Barb Bennett.

Frank, Paula

Pol

-

Delcom Corp.

3580

60/9

S.

66th

E.

Ave., Tulsa, Okla. 74145

Custom consoles and rack units, com- puterized system cable and tracing pro- gram, turnkey video systems.

Staff:

Sam

Pate, Tom Roberts,

Martin Brown,

Gerald Whitworth;

Buddy

Swartz, Jerry

Koerner,

Pate,

Nancy Johnson, Cherridah

Chris Robinson.

ThankYou.

To the Greater Los

Angeles

Press

Club for declaring

KTTV Best

Overall News

Coverage

Los

Angeles television of all stations in

1985, thank you.

To the

Los

Angeles

Chapter National Academy of Television Arts and

Sciences for

Best

Independent

News

Emmys in

1983 and

1984, thank you.

To our advertisers and viewers who can be assured the proud news excellence tradition of will continue, thank you.

CHANNEL11NEWS

C

LOS ANGELES

VP /Gen. Mgr.

KTKS -FM

Pres. /Gen. Mgr.

WDAE/WIOI -FM

.

92

96 100 104 108

88

,,

IIIIIIIIII

I I

II

I I

54 60

II

IIII

I I I

II

IMIIIIIIII

I I I

IIIIII

I

IIIIIII

70

80

100 120 140 160

MEAE`oNSE."

,

Pres. /Gen. Mgr.

KUSA /KSD -FM

VP

/Controller

Gannett Radio

Div.

The Gannett Radio Division introduces our 1986 All -Star

Team! These are the professional broadcasters who have played such a significant role in bringing the Gannett Radio

Division to the forefront of the USA broadcasting industry.

In each major market this management team is the reason that, from the first pitch, to the bottom of the ninth, Gannett ends up the winner. Gannett...Major League Radio.

GA1NE'TT

RADIO

Del

Compu -Cable Systems

2449

31

-1736 Quebec Ave., Saskatoon S7K 1V9

Character generators and titlers.

Staff:

Dale Lemke, Bob Hodgins.

Deloitte, Haskins

&

Sell

28

State St., Boston 02109

2542

Brodcast financial consulting services.

Delta

Electronics

5730 General Washington

3488

Dr., Alexandria,

Va.

22312

AM stereo exciters and modulation moni- tors, RF instrumentation products,

RF ammeters, impedance bridges, coaxial transfer switches, remote control sys- tems, power and modulation controllers.

Staff:

Bob Bousman, Joe Novak, Mike

Hotchkiss, John Wright.

DeSisti

Lighting

/Desmar Corp.

2796

328 Adams St., Hoboken, N.J. 07030

1k, 2k, 5k, 10k spotlights, 575 -1200-

2500 -4000 -6000 -12000

-w HMI spot- lights, venture lighting international stage and studio lamps. Staff: Mario DeSisti,

Frank Marsico, Fred Costantini, Wally

Mills, Jorge Montero.

De

Wolfe Music

Library

25

W.

45th St., New

York

10036

Production music library.

2712

Dielectric Communications

3294, 3436

Tower

Hill

Rd.,

Raymond, Mass. 04071

Transmission line filters, es, coaxial switch- combiners, isolation unit, dehydra- tors, circularly polarized antennas, termi- nations /loads, diplexers, UHFNHF

TV antennas and shifter system, wave

- guides and components. Staff: Pattiann

McCann, Richard Broadhead, Howard

Acker, James Beville, Stan Thomas, Noel

Luddy, Lauris Waterhouse,

Jim

Kelly, Dan

Schulte, Max Ellison, Chuck Koriwchak,

Spencer

Smith, Bob Winn, W Warren.

Digital Broadcast Systems

170

184

Mechanic

St., Southbridge, Mass. 01500

Digital Services

3304

3622 N.E. 4th St., Gainesville, Fla. 32609

Staff:

John Davis, Jim Seipp, Ann Meri- deth, Hugh Gillogly, John Barker, Morrell

Beavers, Mike Barsness, Gene Sudduth,

Chuck

Wacker.

Digivision

2527

4980 Carrot

Canyon Rd., San

Diego 92/21

Ebcoder /decoders, video engineering services, enhancers, video noise reduc- tion, security systems.

DI

-Tech

3567

48 Jefryn Blvd., Deer

Park.

N.Y. 11729

Audio follow video routing switchers, audio /video /pulse distribution amplifiers, video equalizers, audio only routing switchers, audio monitor amplifier.

Dolby Laboratories

2705

731 Sansome St., San Francisco 94/11

380i

*,

390* and 280* spectral recording module, 360 series,

XT multichannel noise reduction series, adaptive

Delta modulation

DT85 encoder.

Staff:

Ray

Dolby, Bill Jasper, Gary Holt, Elmar Stet-

NAB 1986 ter,

Mark Yonge,

Bill

Mead, Robert Cavan- augh, Stacey

Rehm,

David Robinson,

Ke- vin

Dauphinee.

Dorrough Electronics

5221

2602

Collier Pl.,

Woodland

Hills,

Calif.

91364

Loudness meter, discriminate audio pro- cessor for stereo television. Staff:

Mike

Dorrough.

Droid Works

3572

Box CS 8180, San Rafael, Calif.

94912

Staff:

Mary

Sauer, Don Stutz,

Andy

Moorer, Rob

Lay,

Morgan Martin, Jim

Guthrie, Ken

Yas,

Craig Sexton, Augie

Hess, Jeff

Taylor,

Leigh

Yafa,

Dorothy

Land, Michael

Rubin,

E.

Titherington,

Charlie Keagle, Kate

Greenfield.

Dubner Computer Systems

3110

158

Linwood

Pl.,

Fort

Lee,

N.J. 07024

Video graphics generators, color correc- tor computers, character generators.

DX Communications

2693

10 Skyline Dr., Hawthorne, N.Y. 10532

Dynair Electronics

5275

Market

St.,

San

Diego

92114

3409

System 23 SMPTE/EBU ESbus, series

1600 ultra wideband switching for graph- ics and

HDTV, audio /video routing switch- ers, computer coritrols,

AN distribution equipment. Staff:

Phyllis Lynch, Jim

Meek, Garry Gramman, Bob Vendeland,

Bob Jacobs,

Tom

Meyer, Rich Smith,

Al

Wilson, Ellie Jett, Bob Wincentsen.

Dynascan

6460

W.

Cortland, Chicago

60635

2464

Dynatech Corp.

5725 Tokay

3144

Blvd., Madison,

Wis. 53719

Eastman Kodak

343 State St., Rochester, N.Y. 14650

Videotapes, imaging products.

3208

ECD

Industries

2773

5034

Armacost

Ave., Los Angeles 90025

Echolab

2827

175

Bedford Rd., Burlington,

Mass. 01803

Color special effects generators, audio switchers.

Econco Broadcast Service

2578

1318 Commerce Ave., Woodland, CaliJ.

95695

Rebuilt transmitting tubes.

Staff:

Bill

Barkley,

John Canevari, Dave Elliott,

Ray

Shurtz, John Sullivan.

Editron Australia

2442

1900

S.

Sepulveda Blvd.,

Suite 354.

W.

Los

4ngeles 90025

EECO

Inc.

1601

(2702

E. Chestnut Ave., Santa Ana,

3540

Calif.

VES

Il desktop postproduction editing system with new additions and enhance- ments, EMME computerized editing sys- tem with interchangeable editing work- stations, time ment. code peripheral equip-

Staff:

John Ludutsky, George

Swetland, Eloy Chairez, Robert

Yab- lon ski.

100

EEG

Enterprises

1

Rome St.,

Farmingdale,

N.Y. 11735

2802

Line

21 to teletext transcoder, teletext vid- eo data bridge and inserter. Staff:

Murphy, Bill Posner, Mike Doller.

Ed

EEV

7

2626

Westchester

Pl.,

Elmsford,

N.Y.

10523

Camera tubes, amplifier klystrons for

UHF transmitters, CCD's and CCD cam- eras, power tubes for AM and

FM trans- mitters. Staff:

Tom

Soldano,

Paul

Plurien,

Mike Kirk, Vijay Patel, Ann Sayers, Walter

Bielinski, Dennis Baker, Harry Kozicki,

Jim Comella, Don

Rose, Tim

Sheppard,

Dave Farrar, Dave Wilcox, Kees

Van

Der

Keyl, Roy Heppinstall,

Ed

Sondek, Geoff

Clayworth.

EG &G

Electro- Optics

35 Congress St., Salem, Mass. 0/970

2612

SS

-125 "owl" flashhead,

SS

-122 control- ler, SS

-124 photocell,

LS -159 medium in- tensity flashhead Staff:

Tom Attain,

George Mandeville, Steve Wanstall.

Elcom Bauer

6199 Warehouse

Way, Sacramento,

95286

3414

Calif.

ET portable

FM transmitter

*,

1,000 w sol- id state FM

10,000 w

FM transmitter

*,

FM exciter

*, transmitter. Staff:

Paul

Gregg, Richard Notemarj.

Elcon Associates

133

1450 O'Connor Dr.,

Toronto, Ont.

M4B 2T8

1200 videotape cleaner /profiler fór one

- inch broadcast videotape,

EA

750 video- cassette evaluator for three -quarter uma- tic cassettes.

Staff:

Bill

Walters, Marilyn

Walters, Mike Warren, Dick Baker.

Electro

Controls 2710

2975

S.

300

West,

Salt Lake City

84115

Studio lighting and control equipment.

Electro Impulse Laboratory

116

3431

Chestnut St., Box 870, Red Bank, N.J.

07701

Dry, forced air cooled FM dummy loads,

RF calorimeters, attenuators and watt- meters. Staff: Mark Rubin, Carol John- son.

Electro-Voice

3430

600 Cecil

St., Buchanan,

Mich. 49107

Staff: Michael

Leader, Jim Holt,

Michael

Miles, Rob Boatman, Jim Starin,

Paul

McGuire.

Electronic Research

2576

108

Market

St., Newburgh, Ind. 47630

FM panel antennas, side mount

FM an- tennas, diplexers, field service.

Electronic

Systems Lab 2640

120

S.W.

21st Terrace. C -104,

Fort Lauder- dale, Fla.

33312

EELA broadcast, location, film and post production mixers, reportophones, hy- brids, preamps, compressors/limiters, balancing units, phasemeters and re- corder test sets, Barth signal processing equipment,

Haase hum -killer, Giese com- plete ADR systems and synchronizers,

TC generators, readers, video burn -in

Alone

At

The

Top!

IKEGAMI'S TELEC

I

N

E

SYSTEM

STANDS

ALONE AS THE BEST

TKC -990

COLOR FILM CAMERA

TKC-1170 ro,o,

,u u.e41.

The one and only name in Tele- cine Camera Systems is

Ikegami. And now Ikegami offers complete Telecine systems including two photoconduc- tive telecine cameras, optical multi- plexer, 35mm slide projector, 16mm motion picture projector as well as au- dio

/tally interface panels and machine controls.

Both cameras, the TK -970 and

TKC -990 utilize photoconductive

1 inch

Vidicon tubes

(Saticone

are optional) and provide consistent highest quality performance and reliability in on

-line applications such as local viewing or direct on

-air broadcast; and off

-line where the video signal is recorded.

The TKC -990 features computer

- controlled automatic set -up of the cam- era operating parameters, as well as automatic set -up of registration level, shading and detail correction for up to three input projectors.

Both

cameras utilize

a large image field lens, neutral

built

-in density disc for automatic light control and au- tomatic color balance circuitry.

The FPH

-16

16mm telecine pro- jector, SPR -35 35mm slide projector and MPK -3V optical multiplexer round out a system that stands alone in the industry.

For a complete demonstration of

Ikegami Telecine Systems as well as our cameras and monitors, contact us

Ikegami

or visit your local Ikegami dealer.

r

Electronics

(USA), Inc. 37

Brook Avenue Maywood,

NJ

07607

kegámi

East Coast: (201) 368

-9171

West Coast:

(213) 534

-0050

Southeast:

(813) 884 -2046

Southwest:

(214) 233 -2844

Midwest:

(312) 834

-9774

units and incremental

TV generators,

Graff high -speed four -channel in cas- sette duplicators,

CC and videocassette loaders and supplies, cassette duplica- tor, broadcast on -air console,

S

100

B

Staff:

Lutz Meyer, Pieter

Bollen,

Vlblfgang

Giese, Heinz

Schleusner.

Elicon

940

S.

2784

Leslie St., La Habra. Calif.

90631

Remote pan /tilt head, boom arm, gantry.

Staff:

Peter Regla, Elizabeth Regla, Wil- liam Lee, Carol Contreras, Eric

Ratliff,

Ron

Scrivner.

EMCEE Broadcast Products

Box 68, White Haven,

Pa. 18661

3032

MMDS and

LPN transmitters, ITFS trans- mitter and repeaters, UHFNHF medium power transmitters. Staff:

Bob Nash,

John Saul, Frank

Trainor,

Bob Luka, Perry

Spooner, Phil Curtis, Jim Jarick.

Emcor

2402

1600 4th Ave.. Rochester,

Minn.

55901

Modular electronic enclosure systems, computer support furniture, chassis slides, instrument cases,

EMI /RFI emis- sion control cabinets, packaged blow- ers. Staff:

John Horton,

Tom Regnier, Jim

Upchurch,

Pat Gibson, Dave Blair, Don

MacLaughlin, Bob

Crafts, Frank Salmick.

ENG

Corp.

3308

2930 Cloverdale Ave., Concord, Calif.

94502

Mobile news vans and cars.

Environmental Satellite

Data 2786

5200 Auth Rd.. Suitland, Md. 20746

Weather graphics and production sys- tems.

ESE

142 Siena St.,

3470

El

Segundo,

Calif.

90245

Digital clocks, timers, time code gener- ators and readers, master clock systems, programable timers.

ESS

2469

7838 N. San Fernando

Rd.

,

Sun Vallee,

Calif.

91352

Ethereum

7641

Scientific

Corp.

207

Clarewood,

Suite 336, Houston,

Tex.

77036

Satellite uplinking services, transponder time, videoconferencing services and transportable uplinks in C and Ku- bands, satellite news gathering vehicles'. Staff:

Becky

Coyne, Stan

Mod,

Michael

Cor- dell, Marci King,

Dick

Wilkie.

Eventide

One Alsan

Way,

2830

Little

Ferry, N.J. 07643

Broadcast delays

*, new effects software for SP2016 effects processor /reverb,

H949 and H969 harmonizers.

Staff: Joe

Shapiro, Suzanne Langle, Gil Griffith,

Jeanne Meade, Richard

Factor.

Evertz

Microsystems

3515 Mainway,

201

Burlington,

Ont.

L7M

1A9

Chaser time code -based chase synchro- nizer for audio for video postproduction facilities, emulator intelligent audio trans-

NAB

1988 port interface, ev

-bloc modular time code system, VITC readers, generators and character inserters.

Staff: Dieter

Evertz, Rose Evertz, Alan

Lambshead,

Carter

Lancaster.

Excalibur Industries

2637

12427 Foothill Blvd.,

Lake View Terrace, Ca- lif.

91342

Standard, custom and shock absorber cases.

Fairlight Instruments

2460

2945 Westwood Blvd.,

Los Angeles 90064

Faroudja Laboratories

946

3408

Benicia

Ave., Sunnyvale, Calif.

94086

Ferro-Washington

70 Weil

Wo',,

2782

Wilmington, Ohio 45177

Transport carts for field production.

Staff: Gordon

Shields, Dan Williams, Jim

Peeler.

FGV- Panter

2507

Routbuchen Strasse

1,

8 Munich 90 FRG

Fiberbilt

Cases

60/

W 26th St., New York 10001

2910

Fidelipac

Box 808, Moorestown,

N.J.

08057

3092

Dynamax

CTR10 series cartridge ma- chines

*,

CTR30 series three -deck car- tridge machines,

ESD10 eraser /splice detector

*,

CTR100 series tape cartridge machines featruing cartscan and vary speed, other tape cartridges, bulk tape, cartridge accessories, studio warning lights and bulk tape erasers.

Staff:

Roger

Thanhauser, Dan McCloskey, Scott Mar- tin,

Art Constantine, Mike Sirkis, Amy

Wel- ton, Gary Gresham,

Fred Buehler, Bill

Franklin, Ray Teabo,

Rosemary Jukes.

Film House Inc.

2781

24 Music

Square

West,

Nashville

37203

Television commercials for various for- matted radio stations. Staff:

Eric Hahn,

Curt Hahn, Mike Watson, Tony Quin, Peter

Natalie, Rob Gorstein, Denise Scott,

Phil

Hahn, Eric Hahn.

FilmNideo

Equipment Service

2803

1875

S.

Pearl Sr., Denver 80210

Wide

Eye

I and

II wide angle attach- ments, portable energy products, sealed lead -acid and

Ni

Cad battery systems.

Staff:

Jane

Swearingen,

Dean

Schneider, Jerry Schneider,

Ron Cotty.

Flash Technology

55 Lake St., Nashua, N.H.

03060

3454

High and medium intensity lighting for marking tall towers, beacon and power converters

*, controller for remote control operations'. Staff:

Stan

Kingham,

Fred

Gronberg, Lew

Wetzel, Denis Buckland,

Rick

Sullivan.

John

Fluke

Mfg.

100

6920 Seaway Blvd., Everett,

Wash.

98206

Focal Press

2541

80 Montvale Ave.. Stoneham, Mass. 02180

Books on television and radio.

Staff:

Su- zanne Oesterreicher, David Guenette,

Ar- lyn Powell.

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

102

For -A Corp.

3599

49 Lexington St.,

West Newton, Mass. 02165

Video switchers, TBC's encoders.

Fort Worth Tower

190/

E.

Loop 8205, Box 859Z Fort

76124

3360

Worth

Towers and equipment buildings. Staff:

Tommy Moore, Betty Moore, Fred Moore,

Cheryl Moore, Carl Moore, Valinda

Moore.

Forte)

2985 Gateway

3044

Dr.,

Suite 600. Norcross, Ga.

30071

Time base correctors, synchronizers, im- age correction systems.

Fostex

15431

2579

Blackburn

Ave., Norwalk, Calif.

90650

Audio to video and video to audio syn- chronization systems, audio editing us- ing computers,

E series mastering re- corders with center track

SMPTE'. Staff:

Mark Cohen,

Y.

Abe, Fred Huang, Bob

Hunt, Allen Wald,

Maggie Hughes, Sandy

Golightly,

Jacqueline

Dispoto.

Frezzolini Electronics

5 Va/ley St., Hawthorne. N.J. 07506

2716

Super no memory high capacity rechar- gable nickel cadmium battery packs',

RPS -4 AC adaptor', lightweight location lighting kit

*, portable power and lighting equipment and accessories. Staff:

Jim

Crawford. Jack Frezzolini,

Jack Zink.

Fuji Photo

555 Tarter Rd.. Elmsford, N.Y. 10523

3240

Videotapes,

VHS and Beta videocas- settes. Staff:

S.

Bauer,

B.

Kuczik,

B.

Frie- drich,

G.

Brill,

T. Daly,

J. Hegadorn,

T.

Ko- bayashi,

K.

Kurokawa,

G. Kern,

T.

Shay.

Fuiinon

3410

672 White Plains Rd.,

Scarsdale, N.Y. 10583

A18x8.5

ERM ENG lens'. Staff:

John

Newton,

M.

Kawamura, Jack

Dawson,

Mark Schurer, Reno

Morabito, Dave Wad- dell, Jorge Casteneda, Bruce

Wallace.

G

-M

Power Products

943 N. Orange Dr., Los Angeles,

90038

2790

Calif.

Battery belts and ries. packs and accesso-

Staff: Gideon

Ben -Akiva,

Gerald

Meisel,

Avi Yaron.

Garner Industries

2648

4200 N. 48th St., Lincoln,

Neb. 68504

New 2700 continuous duty degausser for eraser, other audio, video and computer tape. erasers. Staff:

Phil Mullin, Bruce

Alderman, Brian Boles.

General

Electric

Nela Park -4033, Cleveland 44112

Lighting equipment.

2717

Generic Computer Systems

357 N. Main St., Butler,

Pa. 16001

2818

Software for traffic and billing on the Ap- ple and IBM personal computers.

Gentner Engineering

2669

540

W.

3560 South. Salt Lake City 84115

820

WRFA serving all

Florida!

of i-10

LAHASSEE

I-10

0.5 mV/m

01 mV/m

Scheduled on -air date

-

May

30

Twenty-two million tourists drive to Florida every year, and 820 Radio rides with them from the port of entry

all

the way to their final destination. WRFA also reaches

a

year

-round audience of ten million

Florida residents at home or

in

their cars.

Discover this vast audience of potential buyers.

Call us today. WRFA, the only station that can

be

heard from one end of Florida

to

the other.

RFA

RADIO

FOR

AMERICA

FIFTY THOUSAND WATTS

800 S.E. 8th

Avenue, Largo, Florida

33541

813/581-7800

NEWS SPORTS

TALK

MUSIC

ource: FWSON report week ending arch

76,

1986.

/properties herein are trademarks of

Hasbro, Inc.

I Rights Reserved

Hasbro,

Inc.

© Sunhow Productions,

Inc.

Telephone interface equipment", audio routing systems, program switchers, in- tercorfl system, remote control unit.

Staff:

Russ Gentner, John Leonard,

Bill

Gillman, Elaine Jones, Brooks Gibbs, Da- vid

Pedersen, Chris Gentner, Keldon

Pax

- man, Karen Bump.

Gerstenslager

Co.

1425 E. Bowman

St.

,

2510

Box390,

Wooster,

Ohio

44691

Mobile

TV vans and trailers.

Giese

Electronic

2785

Klaus- Groth-

Srrasse 84 -86, Hamburg 26,

West

Germany 0

Time code equipment, synchronizers, generators.

Staff:

Wolfgang Giese, Hel- mut

Sket.

Global Systems Corp.

15

Hale St., Haverhill,

Mass.

01830

2788

GML Inc. 2546

2323 Corinth Ave., Los Angeles 90064

Staff:

C.J. Flynn, Bruce

Jackson, Betty

Bennet.

GML

America Inc.

241

8150 Leesburg Pike, Suite 910, Vienna,

Va.

22180

Dual channel, synchronizing digital vid- eo effects unit with

NB mixing capability.

Staff:

Gary Glover, John Coffey, Tony Stal- ley,

Paula Bowen.

Gold Nugget 2772

/0602 Lands Run,

San

Antonio,

Tex.

78230

Alan Gordon

1430 Cahuenga

Enterprises

3435

Blvd., Hollywood, Calif.

90028

Fax animation equipment,

EOS /Fax video animation controller, computer motion controlled fax animation stand.

Gorman -Redlich

6

Curtis

St., Athens,

Ohio 45701

2715

EBS encoders -decoders, NOAAweather receivers, digital AM antenna monitors.

Gotham Audio

1790 Broadway, New York 10019

3354

Staff:

Russell Hamm, Jerry Graham,

Juergen Wahl,

George Johnson, Bernie

Berry.

Graham -Patten Systems

Box

/960.

Grass Valley,

Calif. 95945

2528

Eight -input edit suite audio mixer, other edit suite audio mixers, video keying sys- tems, distributions amplifiers, universal equipment control system.

Staff:

Merv

Graham, Mike Patten, Bill

Borden, Tim

Prouty,

Laurie Lewis.

Graland

Distributors

Box 45134. Baton Rouge, La. 70895

2696

Grass Valley Group

Box

1114,

Grass Valley,

Calif. 95945

3112

Kaleidoscope DPM

-1 digital effects sys- tem',

EZ

-Link series 85 fiber optic sys- tem, production and postproduction switchers, routing switchers, timing

/pro- cessing /distribution equipment, Wave

- link fiber optic video /audio /data commu- nication systems, master control/ automation systems, editing systems,

NAB 1986 computer graphics systems. Staff:

Dan

Wright, Bob Cobler, Birney Dayton,

Ran- dy Hood, Bob

Webb, Peter Challinger,

Doug Buterbaugh, Louis Swift,

Tom

O'Connor, Chuck Coovert, Gail Clason,

Lee Frisius, Jay Kuca,

Pete Mountanous,

Bob Johnson.

Gray Communications

404 Sands Dr., Albany, Ga. 31705

3402

Broadcast television equipment, sys- tems installations, mobile production ve- hicles. Staff:

Steve Litterest, Norman

Schroth, Cliff Scott, Doug Pritchett, Jim

Carlisle, Jerome Hoffman, Travis Carter,

Harold Cole,

Pat Long, Steve Reynolds,

Dick Scott, Stan

Abadie, Cecil Wood, Jeff

Wall,

Kevin McDuff, Karl Lester, Perley Ep- pley

Sr., Ray

Collins, Kenny Shewmake,

Richard Brown, Emerson

Ray,

Fred Mc-

Coy, Russ Abernathy, Russ Thom,

Todd, Susan Boyett, Dick Schmidt.

Linda

Gray

Engineering Labs

2428

504

W.

Chapman

Ave.

,

Orange, Calif. 92668

Designs and manufacturers

SMPTE lon- gitudinal and vertical interval time -code products, video assisted film editing pro- ducts and safe title generator equipment.

Great American Market

2714

826 N. Cole Ave., Hollywood, Calif.

90038

Grumman Corp.

2481

Mail

Stop

839 -05, Bethpage. N.Y.

11714

Sync generator and video processing amplifier machine control system.

James

L.

Grunder

&

5925 Beverly,

Assoc.

Mission, Kan.

66202

2429

GTE Spacenet Corp.

2573

1700

Old Meadow Rd., McLean,

Va.

22102

Multisatellite system providing transpon- der time on

C and

Ku

-band, NewsEx- press, turnaround service. Staff:

Dr. C.J.

Waylan, Ivan

Riley,

Michael Caffarel,

Har- ley Shuler, Harry Mahon, Rick Boylan,

Su- san Kalla,

Marianne

Wight.

GTE

Sylvania

3393

100 Endicott

St., Danvers, Mass. 01923

Staff: Robert

Shay, Pat

Basile, Paul Berry,

Mike

Skerry, Steve

McClenaghan, Arnie

Weslund, Don Richardson,

Tim Fohl, Bill

Meyers, Ward Powers, Cal

Gungle.

Hallikainen

&

Friends

2925

141 Suburban Rd., San Luis Obispo, Calif.

93401

Transmitter remote control and logging equipment, audio mixing equipment with audio follow video.

Staff:

Harold Halli- kainen, Ric

Turner, Rita Kinnear, Betsy

Ehrler, Frank

Calabrese,

Rick Smith, Eric

Dausman, Gerry

Franke, Len Filomeo.

Harris Corp.

Box 4290, Quincy,

Ill.

62305

3136, 3238

35 kw FM transmitter, portable uplink package for satellite newsgathering

",

2/

2.5 ghz ENG central microwave receiv- er*, model 640 synchronizer

*, sentinel 48 remote control system

*,

ESP

II still store

*, model

634 synchronizer*, 4.5 meter

Ku band satellite antenna

*, program auto- mation`, model

560 time base corrector

*,

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

106 model W.3 synchronizer, model

AC 20 dual channel time base corrector",

UHF and VHF transmitters, challenger

6w wideband microwave transmitter, Iris

C still store, TV RF switching and antennas,

Sentinel

16 remote control system,

SX se- ries

1 kw,

2.5 kw

5 kw AM transmitters,

7ghz microstar hot standby

STL,

50 kw

AM transmitter, R/-40 modulation shelf with

SSB subcarrier and ardax telephone orderwire and UDL -634 telephone multi- plex, 3.5 k and 25 k

FM transmitter, Med- alist

8, 10, 12 and gold audio consoles,

TC -85C TV camera,

PX -91 turntable pre

- amp, phase fixer encoder and decoder,

HDE 200D digital effects, AÚ75 and

AÚ220 graphics, model

6541 satellite re- ceiver and other satellite equipment, time base correctors. Staff: John Delissio,

Gary Thursby, Ronald Frillman, Wilfred

Bone, Robert

Hallenbeck,

S.

Hawkins,

E.

Lowder, James Marwood, Mitchell Mont- gomery, Ivey Raulerson,

Donald

Taylor,

Arthur

Silver,

Marvin Bredemeier,

T.

James Woods, Barry Huntsinger, Christo- pher Kreger,

C.

Wayne Schuler, Curtis

Lutz, Warren Bottorff, Richard Chalk,

Roy

Giles, John Klecker,

Paul

Thomas O'Hara,

Raymond, Thomas Schoonover,

John Borger, James

Burger,

Shawn Un- derwood, Gary Johnston.

Harrison Systems

Box 22964, Nashville 37202

3412

Television stereo /mono audio production system, audio routing switchers, video switcher /editor interface, other mixing consoles and production equipment.

HEDCO

Box 1985, Grass Valley,

Calif.

95945

2751

GSC

-101 general purpose switching controller*,

HD -12 video and stereo audio routing*,

HDF

-50 video and audio routing switcher", other audio switchers, distribution amplifiers, video switchers, small routing switchers, intermediate routing switches Staff:

Peter

Hughes,

Sherri Douglas, Ross Shelton, Gary

Carter, Dave Swartzendruber, Steve Mill- er,

Mike Carter.

Heie Engineering

2480

S.

52d St., Acala, Fla.

32671

2452

Karl Heitz

34

-11

62d St., Woodside, N.Y. 11377

2900

Gitzo video

/cine and photo tripods, level- ling balls, fluid and counterbalanced heads', dollies, monopods, microphone fishpoles, lightstands, Gitzo mini tele stu- dex tripod with levelling balls*, Gitzo compact micophone fishpole. Staff:

Karl

Heitz, Sylvia Dellamula, Debbie Thoma- son, Laval Fuller, Chris Salmon.

Hipotronics

Rt. 22, Brewster, N.Y. 10509

Automatic voltage regulators.

2728

Hitachi Denshi America

3160

175 Crossways Park West, Woodbury, N.Y.

11797

Computacam auto set -up cameras in- cluding the

Z31

P',

HR -230 one -inch type

C

VTR, CV

-ONE,

8 mm small format ENG/

i i

Satellite

Music

Network w

-i

Straight from till

Heart and

Sou

From

the

late fifties to

the mid

-seventies, a

generatioi

grew

up

to a rock

`n'

roll

beat. Today,

successful, busy,

they're

th,

mainstream adults

25-44,

the

mos

sought -after audience

in

the

history

of radio. An they're

yours

with

Heart and

Soul,

the

live hear

of the

sixties

and seventies, the soul of th golden

years

of

rock

Heart and

Soul is

the ultimate audience building

live

radio network, explodin,

on

the radio

scene in

markets

lik

Milwaukee, Atlanta, Charleston

Chicago and New Orleans. Witl ontinuing nationwide

music testin, by

Strategic Radio Research,

Hear

and Soul's playlist

is always

tightl focused

to

capture and

hold_

th urhbers and the demos

you want

You'll

also

reduce

your cost o

operation

in

both time

an money with

Heart and

Soul

Jr

comes to you live,

complete with selected and thoroughl tested

music,

top

live pet

sonalities, Satellite

New

Network

live

world an national

coverage aroun,

the

clock,

and

a

sensations

year

-round lineup of

liv

weekend and holiday

special:

Yet Heart and

Soul's

exclusiv

Flex

Clock leaves

total

contrc

and flexibility

in

your hand:

For

complete information and demo tape of Heart and

Soul, ca.

Bob

In

Bruton right

now

at

1-

800 -527 -4892

Texis,

call

1

-214- 9891 -9200. most

It's th exciting, most

successful liv

etwork

in

radio

.

Heart and

elusively from Satellite

Music

Soul

Net

vurk

mP

G

Gw

Hany

*

S

Trou,

Mac.

®C

G

KFYs

6:30 lr

(

c/yews

Brave

But the

talk

Ito fact

is that

T tittle ad pack abepuTRA

listings ment those say is

That hewhoerreason messagewere editorial

all appear papers

over environ-

a in

TV

of he choice cast

your

TV

70%

of all

when the broad- don't

EXTRA

Message. read

d sa trail

to be

bola the complete

212.692;3g5? your

Sources

Nielsen

Si

Home

Video

9e et

Research. r98a

TV

EXTRA

200 PARK AVENUE NEW YORK. NEW YORK 10166

SCRIPPS HOWARD

COYYIJIY

5rcaacas'Rq

Aor

'4

1986

108

NAB 1986

EFP VTR system'. Staff:

J.

Tosaka, Ber- nard Munzelle, Jack Breitenbucher,

S.

Hotta, Gino

Nappo, Robert Russin,

James Fadely,

Samuel Wright, Karen

Sawyer, Fred Scott,

Tony Delp,

Ed Wrona,

Ross DeLacruz, Henry Fukushima.

HM

Electronics

2619

9675 Business Park

Ave.,

SanDiego

92131

Wireless microphones, intercoms and cabled intercoms, BH720 single channel cabled intercom belt pac headset sta- tion',

BI-1721 two- channel cabled inter- com

*,

RL742 two

-channel rack mounted loudspeaker intercom station

*.

Staff:

John Kenyon, Tonnia Sills, Dan

Taylor.

Hoffend

&

Sons

34 E.

Main St., Honeoye,

N.Y.

14471

2641

Engineers, manufacturers and installers of stage and studio equipment, Micro

Commander

I I computerized control sys- tem for motorized studio rigging`,

Omni motorized scenery/lighting batten hoists

*,

Lighting Hoists for individual lighting fixtures*.

Staff: Donald Hoffend,

Thomas

Young, Robert Watson, Donald

Hamilton.

Holaday

14825

Industries

2737

Martin

Dr.,

Eden Prairie,

Minn.

55344

Broadband meters for measuring

RF ex- posure, Hl- 5000SX system'. Staff:

David

Baron, Burton Gran, Reed Holaday

Home Shopping Network

2648

1529 U.S. 19 South, Clearwater, Fla. 33546

Shop -at -home service: hart, David

Frey.

Staff: Chuck

Bo-

Horizon Intl.

2491

3837

E. Wier Ave., Suite

1,

Phoenix 85040

Hotronics

2531

12/0

S.

Bascom Ave., Suite 128, San Jose,

Calif. 95128

Time base corrector and TBC /frame syn- chronizer with optional freeze frame/ field, pixel by pixel drop out compensator and digital

SMPTE color bar.

Lo,

Staff: Linda

Andy

Ho, Ed

Manzo, Kenneth Ou.

Howe

Audio

/BCP

2832

2300 Central

Ave., Suite E, Boulder, Colo.

80301

Modular and nonmodular audio con- soles, phase chaser audio time base cor- rector'

Staff:

Lee Edwards,

Terry

Sweeney,

Bill

Laletin.

Hubbard

Communications

12495 34th St., NW

St.

3286

Petersburg, Fla.

33702

Satellite news gathering systems.

Staff:

Alan Jester, Bud Henley,.Tom Kidd, Cliff

Benham, John

Terhar, John Figley,

Mike

Haskell, George Orgera.

Hungerford,

&

Carter

Aldrin, Nichols

2534

678 Front St.,

NW

Grand

Rapids, Mich.

49504

Broadcast accounting services.

Clifford Aldrin.

Staff:

Introducing the all

-new

35 kW

FM transmitter by Harris.

Much more than just new paint.

You want long -term reliability, maximum operating efficiency and superior audio performance in your high power

FM transmitter.

With the all

-new Harris

FM

-35K, you get it...and more!

Representing the latest in FM broadcast technology,

the

FM

-35K uses a highly advanced single tetrode tube design to give you unbeaten 80 percent

PA efficiency over a broad power range of

14 through

35 kilowatts.

This translates into longer tube life and

AC power cost savings of thousands of dollars over the life of the transmitter!

Because the FM -35K provides output power from

10 through

35 kilowatts, you're free to select tower height, antenna power gain and power levels that best meet your coverage goals

-

using a single transmitter.

Peace-of-mind is important, and you get it with the

FM -35K.

The automatic VSWR foldback circuit gives you confidence of continued safe operation under heavy antenna icing conditions, and the built

-in

Flex -Patch feature can bypass the

RF preamplifier,

IPA, or even the final

PA for continued on -air operation in an emergency.

You

won't find a high power

FM transmitter that's easier to operate, maintain or service.

Harris' exclusive

Color

-Stat

Signal

Flow Diagram alerts you to operating problems at a glance.

When detailed operating information is required, Harris' Status

-Plus

Alpha

-

Numeric Display gives you precise operating values

-including

the actual date and time an overload occurred!

Backed

by

a solid 63 year tradition of quality radio products and a ser- vice department with record a proven of exceptional assistance

day or night, the FM -35K is the logical choice for high power FM broadcast operators who want more than new paint on their next transmitter.

For more information,

contact Harris

Corporation, Broadcast Group,

P.

0.

Box 4290, Quincy, IL 62305, or call

1-

800 -4-

HARRIS, extension

3001.

FOR

YOUR

INFORMATION,

OUR

NAME

IS

HARRIS

ap

e-ukRFu$

1CM

Video

Box 26330, Oklahoma City 73/26

2711

Video enhancer /processors, video /audio distribution amplifiers, satellite receivers, downconverters and accessories, char

- acter generator. Staff:

Mike Janko,

Judy

Dahlquist, David

Broberg, Mike

Schueder,

As

Crenshaw, Churchill

Mill- er,

Kodo Kawamura, Chuck

Prada, Keith

Holznagel, George

Larkin, Joan Miller,

Ron Dewell.

IGM

282

Communications

W.

3378

Kellogg Rd.. Bellingham,

Wash.

98226

IGM -EC broadcast systems controller,

IGM -SC IBM -PC

-based systems control- ler`, Instacart 48 -tray cartridge play- back',

G

-cart, 24 -tray cartridge play- back

*.

Staff:

Jim

Wells,

Nick Solberg,

Rick

Sawyer, Carl Peterson, Fred Hark- ness.

Ikegami Electronics

37 Brook Ave., Maywood, N.J.

07607

3150

HDTV telecine and projection systems',

HK -323 % -inch and one -inch studio cam- eras',

PM 9 -5 black and white monitor

*,

HL -95 ENG /EFP color

TV camera, HL -79

ENG/EFP camera, ITC -730A

ENG/EFP camera,

SC -500 studio and field color camera,

TKC -990 high performance tele- cine system with computer control. Staff:

Nick

Nishi, Greg Stoner, Sam La Conte,

Yukimitsu Sato, Sam

Arnold, John

Lynch,

John

Chow, Harvey Caplan, Thomas Ca- labro, Frank

LoCascio, Mike Aiello, Rob- ert Schindler, Mark Adams, Oscar

Wil- son, Glen Smith, Kevin Goetz, Bob

Johnston, Bud Mills, Frank Heyer,

T.

Ka- zuma, Jerry Kraus,

S. Yana, N.

Narumi,

Howard Winch, Robert

Estony, Carlos

Contreras, Victor

Luengo Jose Cada- vieco, Walter Nygaard,

M. Sakamoto.

Image Video

2636

705

Ont.

Progress Ave.,

M/H

2X1

Unit

46, Scarborough,

Staff:

A. A. Vanags,

Joseph Gerkes,

Bri- an Mitchell, Jeff Balmer, Murray Porteous,

Craig Congrady.

Information Transmissions

Systems

2535

/6

E. Water St.. Canonsburg.

Pa. 15317

UHF and VHF exciters, stereo compatible

UHF transmitters, MMDS transmitters.

Innovative

Television Equipment

3258

Box 681, Woodland Hills,

Calif. 9/367

Camera tals, support dollies, tripods, pedes- pan/tilt heads and accessories for studio,

ENG /EFP applications,

ARO:P2 pedestal

*, combination

T50 and H50

ENG tripod and fluid head'. Staff:

Bert

Rosenberg, Stanton Hollingsworth, Mi- chael Rosenberg,

Rick

Low,

Mark Rosen- berg, Vivien Burrows, Kevin Rynne, Eu- genio

Borganti,

H.

Takaoka, Grant

Clementson.

Inovion

Corp.

195 E.

2445

Gentile, Suite 7C, Layton. Utah

8404/

Inovonics

1305

2434

Fair

Ave.. Santa Cruz, Calif. 95060

NAB 1986

Audio recording, signal processing, and instrumentation and equipment for broadcast recording, audio processing for ste- reo AM and

TV

Integrated Media Systems

1552

2476

Laurel

St..

San Carlos, Calif. 94070

Integrated Technologies

2758

3716B

Alliance

Dr,

Greensboro, N.C. 27407

3D graphics, animation, weather, news- maker, image- maker*, ani- maker*, ani- maker plus* and tems. weather -maker* sys-

Staff:

Michael Gold, Anthony

Watts, Robert McAll, Michelle Simpson,

Jack Crutchfield, Kenneth McAll,

Rich- ard

Wlucci,

Gordon Peters,

Grady

Young, Robert Whitton,

Ray Balbes, Sean

McAll.

Interactive Motion Control

2771

8671

Hayden Pl.. Culver

City, Calif.

90232

IMC3565 motion control computer, video slide image system

*, camera lifter

*.

Staff: Bill Bryan, Joe

Parker, Ed Rathbun,

Margot Hottum.

Intergroup

Video

Systems

3312

2040 NW 67th

Pl.,

Gainesville, Fla.

32606

9310 and 9410 production switchers' with

10 input, 9420 production switcher with 20 input, 8000 master control se- ries

*,

1100 routing switcher, suite 16 vid- eo only routing switcher (analog compo- nent version)', matrix wipe generator, downstream key edger, mini master con- trol switcher, distribution amplifiers.

Staff: Robbie Majors, Doug Akers, David

Stanley,

Richard

Melvin, Steve Dorman,

Steve Ingram, Mary Ann Lewis, Fred

Fey,

Bill

McClancey,

Ed

Miller,

Vern Pearson,

Jim Moneyhun, Bob Cooper, Gregg

Smith, Roy English, Connie Dodd, Kevin

Kelly

International

Tapetronics

/3M

2425

S.

Main

St., Bloomington,

3052

Ill.

61702

99B, Delta and Omega cartridge ma- chines, dubbing from compact disk, test equipment,

ESL

V eraser

/splice locator* and ScotchCart

II broadcast cartridge

*.

Staff: Jack

Hanks, Bill Parfitt, John

Schaab, Mike Bove, Dave Larimore, Bob

Bomar,

Chuck

Kelly, Tom Becker,

Chris

Downing,

Bill

Kidd, Dick Lund, Dave

Montgomery, Mark Hill, Charlie Bates.

Itelco USA

2765

1620 W

32d Pl., Hialeah, Fla.

33012

ITS

Corp.

2535

375 Valley Brook Rd.. McMurray,

Pa.

15317

VHF exciter, UHF back -up system

1 kw transmitter, 10 w MMDS/ITFS transmitter,

ICPM corrector, aural

IF modulator for multichannel sound. Staff:

Robert Une- tich, Jeffrey

Lynn,

Ronald

Kenneth

Foutz.

Zborowski,

J &R Film

Co. 3450

6820 Romaine St., Hollywood, Calif.

90038

Lokbox, video to film hard lock synchro- nizer, video moviola film to tape transfer machine, post production equipment and supplies, three

-quarter -inch video- cassettes cases

*.

Statt:

Ron Powell, Joe

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

110

Szwieg, Joe Paskal, Jim

Reid, Jim Frank,

Kate Reynolds,

Austun Green, Brent

Keast.

J-Lab

Box 6530, Malibu, Calif.

92064

2828

JBL/UREI

2727

8500

Balboa Blvd., Northridge, Calif.

91329

6215 one -rack space amplifier

*,

JBL stu- dio monitors', broadcast consoles, stu- dio monitors. Staff:

Ronald Means, Ken

Lopez, Neil Conley, Bill

Hamilton,

Tom

Walter.

Jefferson Pilot

Data Systems

3440

501

Archdale Dr., Charlotte, N.C.

28210

$ally PC -based productivity system for

TV sales and research

*,

JDS Core call

- out research system for radio',

JDS 1000 sales/traffic /billing system*,

JDS 2000 and JDS 500 sales/traffic /billing systems, financial management system, music ro- tation system, electronic news process- ing equipment, program management system. Staff: John McDonald,

Dan Phil

- lippi, Steve Jones, John Pearce, Jeff Grif- fin,

Barry Roach.

Jensen Tools

7815

S.

46th St., Phoenix 85044

2721

Tools, tool kits and test equipment, shock mounted electronic enclosures

*.

Staff:

Tom Fenzel, Patrick Kennedy.

Johnson Electronics

3451

4300 Metric Dr..

Box 4728, Winter Park,

Fla.

32793

SrCA ries. equipment and related accesso-

JVC Corp. of America

3180

41 Slater Dr., Elmwood Park,

N.J. 07407

M1000 mindset titter`, M2000 mindset ti- tling, graphics and animation system

*,

GX -NBPCU single tube

RGB camera',

BR -9000 time lapse VCR

*,

Procan, digital audio mastering system, CR -850U

3

inch editing VCR. Staff:

Daniel Roberts,

Juan Martinez, Dave Walton, Mike Mes

- serla, Gary Horstkorta, John Brown, Don

Thorkelson,

Tom McCarthy, Charles

Rob- erts, Douglas DiGiacomo,

Bob

McManus, Bob

Kelshaw,

Larry Boden,

Thimas Itoh, Mark Falzarano.

K &H Products

Porta -Brace

Box 246, N. Bennington,

Vt.

05257

2532

Nylon ment.

Barry, cases for video and film equip-

Staff:

Marjorie Robertson, Ken

Bob Howe.

Kahn Communications 2454

425 Merrick

Ave.. Westbury, N.Y. 11590

AM stereo signal generator,

AM stereo exciter and monitor, Lines -Plus high fre- quency and low frequency telephone ex- tender.

Staff: Leonard

Kahn.

Kalamusic

169

4200 W Main

St.,

Kalamazoo, Mich. 49007

Kaman

Broadcasting System

3078

1500 Garden of the Gods Rd.. Colorado

Springs 80933

Demographic research and proposal system', programing inventory system

NBC

SPORTS

I I s

ELFVISION

REMOTE

TRUCK

DESIGN

AND CONSTRUCTION

Innovative concepts, attention

to

detail and competitive pricing has identified

Centro as an attractive alternative for mobile facilities planning, chassis and floor plan delineation, systems integration and project implementation.

With

a

decade of nationwide service and dedication to quality, Centro

is a

design and engineering firm employing the disciplines necessary to implement successful television mobile systems and facilities.

Call us today and compare our services and prices.

CENTRO CORPORATION

9516

CHESAPEAKE

DRIVE

SAN DIEGO,

CALIFORNIA

92123

Centro

(619)

560.1578

SEE US AT

NAB, BOOTH

3181

for scheduling, amortization and paya- bles. Staff: Richard

Smith, George Beat- tie, Bill Phillips, Richard Harper, Bob

Hoeglund, Beverly

Trentz,

Dave Ander- son. Vicki Clinebell.

Kangaroo Video Productions

2676

10845 Wheatlands Ave., Suite C, Santee, Ca- lif.

92071

Staff:

Steve Sickman,

Steve Leiserson,

Lynne Domash, Julia

Elkins,

Mac Heald,

Laurence Percz,

Pam Satterfield, Gary

Webb.

Kavouras

6301

2657

34th Ave.,

South, Minneapolis 55450

Weatherlink Vista and Weatherlink Met

- pac satellite communications systems

*,

Radac 2020 color weather radar receiver,

Triton graphics and animation software advancements, data base products',

Mcldas forecasting graphics and maps.

Staff:

Bill Schlueter, John

Traynor, Lynn

Anderson,

Ralph Manuel, Pete

Sap

- panos, Dave Schlueter, Greg

Slater,

Jim

Thole.

Kay

Industries

604

N.

2511

Hill

St., South Bend, Ind. 46617

Rotary phase converters.

Keltec Florida

2435

Bo.v

29/7,

Fort Walton Beach, Fla. 32549

Kern

Elektronik

30 Berry St., San Francisco

94107

2467

Keylite Productions

333

S.

2432

Front

St..

Burbank, Calif.

91502

QuartzColor incandescent

HMI spot- lights', Supercrank heavy light stand

*,

12000x QuartzColor HMI "Sirio" system,

Bambino incandescent lights, location and stage, lighting and grip packages production vans and generators. Staff:

Edward Carlin,

Ron Dahlquist, Carole

Carlin, Michael Carlin.

Kinemetrics/irue

Time

3243 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa,

95407

2513

Calif.

GPS* and Omega* synchronized clocks, other clocks, universal tion. clock driver op-

Staff:

Rick Dielman, Jeff McDonald,

John

Van

Groos. Chet

Prater, Ed Petroka.

Kings Electronics

3464

40

Marbledale

Rd., Titckahoe, N.Y. 10707

RF coaxial, twinax and triaxial connec- tors, video patch panels and patch cords. Staff:

Fred Pack, Fred Iacono,

Bob Braden.

Kintek

224

2455

Calvary St., Waltham, Mass. 02154

Stereophonic converter, monogard, ster- eogard*. Staff: Zaki Abdun -Nabi, John

Bubbers,

Dan

Taylor,

James Townsend,

Roberta Allis.

Kintronic

801 English

St.,

Bristol,

Tenn.

37620

2780

AM directional antenna phasing, power dividing and matching equipment, iso- coupler or isolation transformer for

STL use.

Staff:

Tom King, Gwen King.

NAB 1986

Klieg) Bros.

3581

32 -32 48th Ave., Long Island

City, N.Y. 11101

Performer IV computerized lighting con- trol console* ellipsoidal and fresnel light- ing fixtures,

K

-100

Kori Hansen, dimmer rack.

Staff:

Lawrence Kellerman,

John

H.

Klieg!

II, John H. Kliegs

Ill, Jose chez, Horst Emmert, Mike Cowger.

San-

Knox Video

Products

2611

8547 Grovemont Cr., Gaithersburg, Md.

20877

Video correctors, character generators.

Kobold of America

1905

Amerstone

2834

Ct., Silver Spring, Md.

29094

Kulka Smith

2691

1913

Atlantic

Ave., Manaquan, N.J.

08736

L

-W International

3427

50

W.

Easy St., Simi

Valley,

Calif.

93065

Laird Telemedia

2424

S.

2570

West,

3474

Salt Lake City 84119

Character generators.

Lake Systems

55 Chapel St., Newton, Mass. 02160

112

Landy Associates

1890 E.

08003

Marlton Pk., Cherry

2429

Hill,

N.J.

Interphase

M -40" and

M

-41" machine control system, Ikegami HL -79 ENG cam- era, countdown /safe area generator, character generator, tape editing equip- ment, Ikegami monitors.

Landy,

Staff:

Jim

Dave Newborg, Brad

Reed, Mike

Landy, Dave Raynes, Mike

Keller, Fred

Majewski, Dick

Wills.

Lang Video Systems

2533

547 NE 26 Ct.,

Pompano Beach,

Fla.

33064

Digital video test generators and source identifiers.

Larcan Communications

3314

380 Oser Ave., Hauppauge,

N.Y. 11788

Transmitters.

Laux Communications

244

4460

S.

Lake Forest Dr., Cincinnati

45242

C and Ku -band

TYRO systems.

Staff:

Pat

Laux.

LEA Dynatech

3332

12516 Lakeland

Rd., Santa Fe Springs. Ca- lif.

90670

Surge eliminators, electronic filtering sys- tems, transient eliminators for studio and transmitter applications. Staff: Edward

Bellamy, William Paulin, Robert Rozanski,

Peter Carpenter.

Leader Instruments

2763

380 Oser Ave., Hauppauge,

N.Y. 11788

Staff:

S.

Hirota,

B.

Storch,

R.

Sparks,

R.

Sileo, G. McGinty,

J. Fisher, C.

Asfour,

M.

Reiner,

R.

Storm,

S.

Nihei,

S.

Ohmatsu,

S.

Tanoue.

Learning

180

Industries

136

McCormick

Ave., Costa Mesa, Calif.

92626

Audio subcarrier equipment for broad- cast, microwave and satellite, wide dy-

Broadcas:u-g Apr ra

986

112 namic range

SCPC modulators and de- modulators. Staff:

Stan Serafin, John

Hoge, Jim Learning, Rob Learning.

LeBlanc

&

Dick

Communications

2903

14440

Cherry Lane Ct.. Suite 201, Laurel,

Md. 20707

Broadcast towers and antenna systems, combiners.

Staff:

Jim Wilson,

Ray

Tatter

- shall, Paul Dickie, George Patton, Keith

DeBelser, Larry

Penner, Don Cuthbert- son, Rufus Baldwin,

Roy Jeffrey, Alan

Dick, Mike Anders, David Brawn, John

Tranter.

Leasing Concepts

3

Radnor

19087

168

Corporate

Center, Radnor, Pa.

Leitch Video of America

3559

835K Greenbrier

Cr., Chesapeake, Va.

23320

SCH -7000 subcarrier to horizontal phase monitor,

TTG -2500N transmission test

*,

STG

-2500N studio test set',

XTG

-2500N transmitter test set*, CTG -2600N compo- nent test set*, frame synchronizer, video processing, audio and video distribution, sync pulse generators, master clock sys- tems. Staff: Bob Lehtonen, John

Walter,

Bob Henson, Stan Moote, Don Jackson,

Gary Newhook,

Dave Strachen, George

Adolph,

Fay Turner, Gary Stephens, Paul

Jenkins.

Lemo U.S.A.

2805

335 Tesconi Cr., Santa Rosa. Calif.

95401

Connectors.

Lenco

3056

300 N. Maryland

St., Jackson,

Mo.

63755

TBC -450 time base corrector -digital',

PVS -435 NTSC

PAL videoscope*,

PVS

-435P videoscope. Staff: Jerry

Ford, Don

Ford, Max

Prill, Bob Bergfeld, Bruce Blair,

Mark Hill, Jim Rhodes, Herb

Van

Driel,

Ron Wells, Roberto Orfila, Verna Stovall.

Lexicon

60 Turner Sr., Waltham, Mass. 02154

2909

Stereo digital audio time compressor

/ex- pander systems, digital audio delay syn- chronizers

*.

Lighting

Methods

1099

Jay St., Rochester, N.Y. 14611

2673

Lighting control equipment, Concept,

Idea, Designer and CH200 control con- soles, RD digital dimmer system.

Staff:

J.

Nettleton,

Tom Maloney, Bill

Florac.

Lightning Eliminators

&

Consultants

164

13007 Lakeland Rd.,

Santa Fe

Springs, Ca-

lif

90670

Vertical or horizontal Chem -Rod rechar- gable grounding electrode

*, dissipation array system, consulting services

*, light- ning warning system. Staff:

Roy

Carpen- ter

Jr.,

E.

Alvin Rich.

Lightning Sciences

138

4695 Ulmerton

Rd., Suite 200, Clearwater,

Fla. 33520

Lightning prevention devices. Staff:

Bruce

Kaiser,

Bruce Micek, Charlton

Sadler, William

Frey, Terri

McDonald.

-_14144444,Millli

T

TVGUIDE

LHVSO\

GUDH

CABL

TVGUID

Tvvov

GUDH

PAYIVGU

1_,

FV

Our trademarks are as important to

us

as

Guide

is to

over 39 million discriminating readers

'very week. So remember:

TV Guide,

Television

áuide,

Cable

TV Guide,

TV

Movie Guide,

Pay

V

Guide and the TV

Guide logo are

all

registered rademarks

of

Triangle Publications,

Inc., end

can't be used by anyone

else.

TV

GUIDE

TRIANGLE PUBLICATIONS.

INC

C

SEE

US AT

NAB

-

BOOTH 3587

DALLAS

Cetec Antennas

WHY

BUY

JUST

AN ANTENNA?

'

-

WITH

A CETEC

ANTENNA

YOU

GET:

-

f

r

r

REPU TATION

*

HIGH

QUALITY

*

TWO

YEAR

WARRANTY

PERFORMANCE

THAT'S

UNEQUALLED

RECOGNIZED SUPERIORITY

FM

In

today's competitive

market, you have no reason to

consider

an an-

tenna that's

not the very best. That means a tried and proven Cetec antenna.

Over one

thousand

JSCP

Penetrators have

built

this

reputation, and other

Cetec

models support higher

or lower

power requirements.

NOW, DON'T

YOU

WISH

YOU HAD A

CETEC?

THE

EDGE IN

PERFORMANCE

!

CALL THE FACTORY

OR

YOUR

CETEC

DEALER

Cetec

Antennas

6939

Power Inn

Rd.

Sacramento,

CA

95828

Tel: (916) 383

-1177

Telex:

377

321

Listec Video

3468, 3575

39 Cain Dr., Plainview, N.Y. 11803

Polar video production switcher, picture mover* and safe area generator

*,

Acron

NTSC encoder

*, pulse generator.

19- inch

CRT on- camera prompter, nine

- inch portable on- camera prompter

*,

15- inch

CRT on- camera, portable studio/ field prompters, scriptwriter electronic prompting system, simplicity

II ad- vanced digital prompter, short script ta- ble.

Staff: Jack

Littler, Raymond Blu- menthal, Paulette DiBona, Than Lien,

Peter Rowsell, Chris

Perry,

Fred Smith,

David Goillen,

Tom Keys, Phil Rutter, Jim

Lucas.

Logitek

3320 Bering Dr., Houston

77057

2807

Crossfire automated audio crossfade mixer', stereorack, audiorack and cus- tom audio series consoles, audio

DAs, audio power amps, audio preselectors, speakers, timers, LED audio level indica- tors.

Staff:

Scott

Hochberg,

Tag Borland,

Patti Bellis.

Lowel -Light Manufacturing

475 10th Ave., New York 10018

2610

Location and studio lighting equipment,

CM -90 surmountable kit',

CM -10 maxa- mount'. Staff:

Marvin Seligman, Amy

Carter, Roy

Low,

Dave Tearle.

LPB

28

Bacton

3338

Hill

Rd., Frazer,

Pa.

19355

Signature, Citation and Alpha series audio consoles,

DAs, presunrise trans- mitters, furniture, tonearms, high power

AM transmitters. Staff: Charles Sheri- dan, Richard Crompton, Mary Kiger,

Charles Bramhall, Richard Burden. Wil- liam Jackson.

LTM 2537

1160

N. Las Palmas Ave., Hollywood, Calif.

90038

Luxor Corp.

2245

Delany

Rd., Waukegan,

Ill.

60085

237

Lyon Lamb Video Animation

2932

4531 Empire

Ave.,

Burbank. Calif. 91505

Animation system, videodisk mastering, computer graphics.

3M

3120

Magnetic Audio Video products

Broadcasting

&

Related Products

Optical Recording Project

3M

Center

Bldg.,

225- 3s-05, St Paul 55144

Magnetic div.: Recording tapes, 480 one -inch helical, MBRR

3Y.

-inch videocas- settes,

PB

PVand

BC

/broadcast half -inch videocassettes, digital audio U- Matic, mastering tapes, audio/video accesso- ries.

Broadcasting div.: Routing switch

- ers, master control systems, machine control systems, component switchers, character generators, paint system. Op- tical div:

Custom mastering and replica- tion for laser videodisks and compact disks.

Staff:

Roger Hilde, Frank Price,

Jim Mazzoni,

Al

Smith, Jerry Tapley,

Bob

Landingham,

Bill

Westin, Joe Leon, Don

Rushin, Frank Russomanno, Wally

Freir.

NAB 1986

M

/A

63

-Com MAC

3284

Third

Ave., Burlington.

Mass. 01803

Transmit parabolic antenna', Skypoi with Nav- Tack', transmitters and receiv ers, 13CP and

13FA systems,

G

-line fixer microwave equipment, mini -scan anten na, super scan antenna.

Staff:

Yong Lee

Bob Morrill, Fred Collins, David Eriksor

Dan McCarthy, Carl Guastaferro, Bill Cul bertson, George Hardy, Gary Schmidt

Jack

Koo, Norman

Cheng,

Luis Barzana

John Van, Maureen Martin, Bob Morris sette.

Magni Systems

121

9500

SW

Gemini Dr., Beaverton,

Ore.

9700'

Integrated measurement package', op tions for

PC

-based test signal generator

Staff: Chuck

Barrows, Victor Kong, Devi

Jurgensen,

Ed

Kiyoi, John Judge,

Gres

Sorenson,

Phil Fernandez, Mark Wendt

Carl Alelyunas.

Magnum Towers

290-

9370

Elder

Creek, Sacramento, Calif.

95824

AM,

FM,

VHF and UHF towers.

The Management

Bor i.

Aledo,

Tex. 76008

2511

Super Log

I, II and Ill traffic, billing an accounting systems.

Staff:

Pete Charl ton, Debra Patrick, Don Stafford, Jear

Pitts. Betty Strickland.

Manhattan Production Music

255(

300

W.

53d St.,

Suite 2A, New

York

10019

Marcom

Box 6650Z Scotts Valley, Calif.

95066

243:

Model

701 -00M modification kit', 71( television stereo generator',

730

N

ste reo metered receiver monitor',

C.N

Rood BAX and

SC

-200 series, 516k audio monitor /switches Staff: Marty

Jackson, Ted Tripp, Doug Howland,

Greç

Morton

Marconi Instruments

3

Pearl Ct., Allendale, N.J.

07401

340E

Compact portable products for the mi crowave field service engineer, radic communications test set, microwave fre quency counter, digital power meter, ana log power meter, insertion signal analyz er,

TV interval timer.

John Garthwaite.

Staff:

Ray

Munde

Mark Antenna Products

244

2180

S.

Wold

Rd.,

Des

Plaines.

111.

60018

Antennas for terrestrial microwave sys tems, earth station antennas, two -foo dual polarized

18 ghz antenna'.

Staff

Ed Lamarre, Carlyn Buchanan.

Mark Electronics

4324 SW 35th

Terrace,

Gainesville.

241

i

Fla

32608

Vertical racks, audio monitoring systems character generator, automation sys tems, matrix wipe generator', audio jack fields. Staff: Homer Masingil, Lloyd

Wal ton, Rod

Morrill, Zeke Zetien,

Dave

Strickland, Bob Bachus, Carmelo Cata leno, John Williams, Paolo Ginobbi, Rog er Curwin, Robert Hansen, Joel Gibson

Wendy Johnson, Brenda Diaz, John WI liams.

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

114

This announcement

is

neither an offer

to

sell nor

a

solicitation of an offer

to

buy these securities.

The

offer is

made only

by

the Prospectus.

Shares

2,990,000

Jacor

JACOR COMMUNICATIONS,

INC.

Common

Stock

Price

$6.25 per Share

Copies of the Prospectus may be obtained in any State only from such of the several

Underwriters, including the undersigned. as may lawfully

offer

the securities

in

such

State.

Shearson

Lehman Brothers

Inc.

Stephens Inc.

Bear,

Stearns

&

Co.

Inc. Dillon,

Read

&

Co.

Inc.

Donaldson, Lufkin

&

Jenrette

Securities Corporation

Hambrecht

&

Incorporated

Quist

E.

F.

Hutton

&

Company Inc.

Kidder,

I

Peabody

&

Co.

ncorporatcrl

Lazard Frères

&

Co.

Montgomery Securities

PaineWebber

Incurporated

Prudential -Bache

Securides

Robertson, Colman

&

Stephens

L. F.

Rothschild, Unterberg, Towbin, Inc.

Salomon

Brothers

Inc

Smith Barney, Harris Upham

&

Co.

Wertheim

&

Co.,

Inc.

ncurpurated

I

Allen

&

I n c

Company

orpori ted

Rothschild Inc.

A.

G.

Edwards

&

Sons, Inc.

Dean Witter Reynolds

Oppenheimer

&

Co.,

Thomson McKinnon Securities

Inc.

Inc.

Inc.

April

9.

1986

Marketdyne International

10 S.

Riverside

2591

Pl.,

Suite 900,

Chicago

60606

Marti Electronics

Box 661, Cleburne,

Tex.

76031

3496

MW

-500 microwave booster /amplifier for

STL use, UPS -12 uninterruptible power system.

Staff:

George

Marti, M.E.

McClanahan, Rick Neace.

Matco

Control Products

2687

427Temmount

Ave.,

San

Jose,

Calif

95/25

Matthews Studio Equipment

2405 Empire Ave.,

3220

Burbank, Calif.

91504

Dollies, dolly track, mounting and grip equipment, reflectors, tulip crane, light- ing control scrims and diffusers, stands, griffolyn, car mounts, cam -remote, unit

85 dolly

*,

Litt briefcase dolly', super crank', new boom arms*, auto mount ac- cessories', gift line.

Staff: Edward

Phil- lips, Carlos DeMattos, Loet Farkas, Bob

Nettmann, Rick Hansen, Fred Farish,

Mark Streapy.

Maxell Corp.

3551

60 Oxford Dr.. Moonachie. N.J.

07074

Blank audio and video recording tape.

Staff:

Jim Ringwood, Joe Birskovich,

John Selvaggio,

Dan

Maida, Joe Santan- gelo, Phil Konecki, Mark Stenehjem,

Herb Matsumoto, Linda

Healy, Pat

Byrne,

Maureen

Ebers.

Maze Broadcast

Box 6968. Birmingham, Ala. 35210

213

McCurdy Radio

108

Carnforth Rd.,

Toronto

M4A 2L4

3028

Audio consoles, switchers,

DAs. inter- coms.

Media

California

2688

Suite 1064. 220 Montgomery St.,

San Fran- cisco 94104

Media Computing

4401

E.

Kings Ave.. Phoenix 85032

2545

Automated news graphics interface sys- tem

*, wire editor, PC prompter, produc- ers rundown, assignment/archives, script writer.

Staff:

Mike Rich, Kathy

Hulka, Larry Baum, Jim O'Brien, Ruth

Harris, Janet Goodman.

Media General

Broadcast Services

3335

2714 Union Extd., Memphis,

Tenn.

381/2

Production libraries, production and sales libraries, contest/promotion pack- ages, advertiser jingles, customized con- tests and promotions, incentive mer- chandise, travel packages, syndicated music formats, station

ID's, musical com- mercials, program syndication cam- paigns, media placement services.

Staff:

Don Robinson,

Ed

Hartnett,

Zack

Hernandez,

Bob

Blow,

Dick Denham,

Carl Reynolds, John Vaught, Ed Caplan,

Ken Theiss, Jack Inman, Chase Hooks,

Jim Mays. Suzanne Cheshire.

MEI

910

Electronics

2620

Sherwood Dr., Unit

19, Lake Bluff,

Ill.

60044

NAB 1986

Digital audio storage unit*, satmaster sat- ellite programer, reel -to-reel programer.

Staff: Dave Collins.

Medstar Communications

2798

1305

S.

12th St., Allentown,

Pa. 18103

Merlin Engineering

3408

2440 Embarcadero Rd., Palo

94303

Alto, Calif.

VTR's and accessories, engineering ser- vices for

VTR's.

Micro Communications

Box 4365, Manchester, N.H.

03108

3438

Waveguide transmission line, antennas and RF systems, technical services.

Staff:

Tom Vaughan,

Howard

Bouldry,

Dennis Heymans,

Cin. i

Daniel, Jim

Banker, Dave Marshall.

Micro

Controls

Box 728, Burleson,

Tex.

76028

2623

Microwave, remote control and subcar- rier paging equipment.

Microdyne

Box 7213. Ocala,

Fla. 32672

3520

Automated terminal programable hybrid

C

/Ku band earth station

*, communica- tion information manager data distribu- tion equipment, transportable

Ku

-band uplink,

Ku and C band satellite equip- ment and antennas.

Statt:

Steve Benoit,

Earl Currier, David Alvarez, Louis

Vblcott,

Torn

MacAllister, Dianne Giansante, Bar- bara

Karlosky, Jim Grabenstein, Steve

Lovely,

Mark

Chew,

Doug McKay.

Micron Audio Products

2685

210

West lake Dr., Valhalla,

N.Y. 10595

Wireless microphone systems

*,

CTR -501 mobile system with complementary noise suppression.

John Wykes.

Staff:

Paul Tepper,

Microprobe

(see MEI) 2620

Microsonics

2543

60 Winter St.. Weymouth, Mass. 02188

Video delay lines, ultrasonic glass delay lines, oscillators, crystal filters, video fil- ters for stereo TV', 20 mhz equalized de- lay lines for HDTV', micro filter miniature

DIL video filter

*.

Staff:

Frank Manning,.

Joseph

Killough, Joseph Pavao.

Microtime

1280 Blue

3086

Hills

Ave., Bloomfield, Conn.

06002

Low cost time base correctors* for NTSC and either

PAL

B or

PAL M applications,

T-

220 component time base corrector,

S-

230 TBC /frame synchronizer,

TSE120

N

B roll effects system,

T

-200 time base cor- rector.

Ray

Staff:

Dan Sofie,

Chuck

Bocan,

Bouchard, David

Everett, Steve

Krant, Jerry

Rankin,

Langdon

Cook, John

Kissel, Chris

Smith,

David Brown, Gene

Sarra,

Chris Hadjimichael, Michael

Mon- tag, Robert Wickland, Julie Adams.

Microwave Networks

166

6515 Corporate Dr., Houston,

Tex.

77036

MicroNet

23 communication system.

Staff: Arthur

Epley,

David Bolan,

W.F.

Montgomery.

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

116

Midwest

Orte

Sperti Dr., Edgewood,

Ky

41017

3210

Satellite news gathering vehicles. Staff:

David Barnes, Jay Adrick, Skip McWil- liams, John Loughmiller, Chris Summey,

Lloyd Hicks,

Fred Wood, Brad

Nogar, Roy

Williams, Pete Rightmire, Chris Siddell,

Jerry Willingham, Larry Mason,

Ron Brad- ley,

Fred Higbie.

Miller

Kaplan Arase

10911

Riverside Dr., N.

91602

2507

Hollywood, Calif.

Broadcast accounting services, national composite radio revenue report, 24- month market revenue trend graphs'

Staff: George Nadel,

Jeff Slomiak.

Minolta

101

Williams Dr.,

Ramsey,

N.J.

07446

2810

Audio distribution and switching equip- ment, amplifiers, switcher crosspoint cards, VCA modules, oscillators, equaliz- ers, compressor /limiters, pre -wired jack

- fields and patch cords, newsroom dub- bing and switching units.

Mitsubishi

Pro

225 Parkside

Audio Group

3530

Dr.,

San Fernando, Calif.

91340

X-850 32

-track digital audio tape record- er*,

SuperStar production and postpro- duction audio mixing console*

X

-86 two

- track digital audio mastering tape recorder

*,

Westar production and post

- production audio mixing console,

Wes

- trex digital master motion control sys- tem

*, magentic film recorder /reproducer and dual magnetic film reproducer.

Staff:

Tore

Nordahl, Cary

Fischer,

Bill

Windsor, Frank Pontius, Bud Bennett,

Sonny Kawakami, Bruce Bearman, Adri- an Bailey, Gerry Eschweiler, Joe Urbano- vitch, Kiyoshi Kondo.

Mobile

-Cam

Products

2594

Box A 82108.

San

Diego, Calif.

92138

Modulation Associates

2692

897 Independence Ave., Mountain

View;

Ca- lif.

94043

Ku

02 suitcase portable uplink', single channel per carrier and subcarrier satel- lite equipment for audio and data net- works.

Staff:

J.

Walter Johnson, Tim

Scholz, Craig

Pak,

Don Haight.

Modulation Sciences

2811

115

Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn,

N.Y. 11201

-784 TV

SAP stereo generator, TV sidekick generators,

SRD

-1

TV stereo refer- ence decoder

*,

FM sidekick

SCA gener- ator, data sidekick for FM and TV *, com- posite baseband processor, wired

STL sÿstem for FM and

TV aural baseband transmission. Staff: Richard Schumeyer,

Eric Small, Alan Perkins, Sonny Funke,

Will Dresser, Joseph Shapiro.

Modulight

(see Bardwell

&

McAlister)

2746

Mole-

Richardson

937 N. Sycamore Ave.,

90038

3368

Hollywood, Calif.

Lighting equipment including Solar

- spots, risers, fixtures, kits, grip equip-

The

news behind

the

news... i

&

WORLD

REPORT

U.S.News

i

RADIO

NETWORK

7.r

Now there's a new dimension to the news that goes that extra meaningful step beyond rou- tine

hourly

newscasts: the U.S. News Radio

Network.

You can put one of the country's most distin- guished and experienced staffs of correspondents to work for

your

station. daily. with four of the most

popular

short -form editorial features avail- able to radio stations. For the first time, familiar titles like

"Washington

Whispers'

"News

You

Can Use;'

"Tomorrow"

and

"Worldgram"

are aired by a broadcast journalism team of well

- recognized newsmen headed by Executive Pro- ducer Palmer Payne.

In its first six months on the air, here

's what Network affiliates are saying:

"... a timely and authoritative supplement to our morning news block. Based on the resources of U.S.

News

&

World Report. the

Network has the audience credibility that makes it a strong asset:

-Lee

Fowler,

Operations

Manager,

WNWS -AM

/Miami

"... fits in quite well with our jazz format. and provides a valuable service for our highly upscale audience:'

-Bob

Bordonaro, General Sales Manager,

KKGO

-FM

/Los Angeles

...provides our listeners with valuable features that don't intrude on our programming.

The program con- tent and high production standards are also instru- mental in helping generate additional revenues for the stations:'

-Ken

Lamb, Operations Manager,

WPAT-AM

-FM/New York

"...consistently strong program content with a line -up of professional and authoritative announcers that adds another fine dimension to our talk format:'

-Scott

Cassidy, Program

Administrator,

WTKN

-AM

/Pittsburgh

For a demo tape and

information

on exclusive rights to the U.S. News

Radio Network for

your

market. call

1-

(toll -free. outside

New York State) or

212 and ask for

Charles

Brandt, Vice President- Station

Relations.

U.S. News

Radio Network

Produced and distributed by

R &R

Syndications, Inc.

460

Park

Avenue South, New York, New York 10016

A Subsidiary of

Robbins

&

Ries. Inc.

01986.

R&R. Inr

ment. hangers and adapters.

Montage Computer Corp.

3260

52 Domino

Dr.

West Concord, Mass. 01742

Series 700, 1200 and 4000 disk system picture processors. Staff: Dominic

Sac

- cacio,

Bob Slutske, Deborah Harter, Mar- tin Soloway, Rick Weislak, Roger Kuhn,

Chet Shuler, Ken Kiesel, Paula Sanburn,

Ellen Weser,

Bob Dorsett.

Chuck

Wright, Harvey

Ray,

Morton

Hi -Tek

Furnishings

204

23461 Ridge Route Dr., Laguna Hills, Calif.

92653

Moseley Associates

3202

Ill

Castilian Dr.. Golem,

Calif.

93117

Enhancements to MRC -1600 remote control system', secure dial -up for re- mote control

*, spectrum- efficient

STLs', transmitter remote control systems, aural studio -transmitter links, telemetry return links, remote pickup links, stereo and subcarrier generators and demodula- tors, remote control and

STL accessories and interface kits. Staff:

Fred Zimmer- mann,

Paul McGoldrick, David

Chancey,

Liz Atesman, Daniel Barnett, Glenn

San- derson,

Paul Taylor, Jeff Kelm, Jamal

Hamdani, Vince Mercadente,

Fred Bar

- baria.

W.D.

Brewer. Eileen

Tuuri.

Motorola AM Stereo

1216 Remington Rd., Schaumburg,

60195

3539

III.

C

-Quam AM stereo exciters and modula- tion monitors,

C

-Quam

AM stereo receiv- ers

*.

Staff:

Steve Kravitz, Jennifer

De-

Palma, Ray

Schulenburg, Greg

Buchwald,

Frank Hilbert, Oscar Kusisto,

Norm Parker.

Motorola Communications

1301 E.

3442

Algonquin Rd., Schaumburg,

60196

Two

-way radio communications equip- ment, and paging equipment, cellular units communications test equipment, display pager printer /charger, portable cellular telephone.

MPO Videotronics

2549

2580 Turquoise Cr.. Newbury

Park, Calif.

91320

Multi -Track Magnetics

3

2515

Industrial

Ave., Upper Saddle River, N.J.

07458

Ultra high speed recorders and repro- ducers.

Musco

Lighting

2448

100

First

Ave.

West,

Box 258, Oskaloosa,

Iowa 52577

Music Director

Programing Service

2414

Box 103, Indian Orchard,

Mass. 01151

Music research library*, Basic Gold

Pop

Oldies library, Record Research publica- tion, country gold oldies library, key pro- motion.

Staff:

Budd

Clain, Carl Drake,

Noreen Bennett,

Bill Schoenborn, Bren- da

Clain.

Musicworks

Box

111390,

Nashville

37211

2734

NAB 1986

Three country music formats, adult con- temporary service, Jim Reeves Radio

Special, radio special programing. Staff:

Bill

Robinson, Skeeter Dodd, Jeff

Miller.

Mycro-Tek

2490

9229 E. 37th St., Wichita, Kan. 67226

Communications package

*, production font* and on -line tape storage devices for character generators, Dissolve. Staff:

Tim Hurley, Mike Burton, Don Paustian,

Paula Rothschild, Doug Barton,

Fred

Godwin.

Nady

Systems

1145

65th St., Oakland, Calif.

94608

2902

501 and 601 /701 VHF and UHF wireless microphone system, IRT-200/IRM-21 cordless studio monitor system. Staff:

Peter

Kalman, Jim Maloney, Rick Gentry,

Eric Schultheis.

Nagra Magnetic Recorders

19 W

44th St., New

York

11036

3453

Portable and miniature recorders,

T- audio recorder, synchronizers.

Nakamichi USA Corp.

1970!

S.

Vermont Ave., Torrance,

90502

2456

Calif

MR -2 professional cassette deck',

DMP-

100 digital mastering processor,

SP

-7 stereo headphones.

Staff:

Jett Logan,

Stephen Mascenik, Robert Shoji.

Nalpak Video Sales

1937 -C Friendship Dr.,

2800

El

Cajon, Calif.

92020

Mini

-test charts', tubular carrying cases, heavy duty soft case*.

Staff:

Bob Kaplan,

Stanley Singer, Jack

Eddy,

Les Wein- stock, Debbie Kaplan, Tracy

Eddy.

Narda Microwave

2551

435 Moreland

Rd.. Hauppauge,

N.Y

11788

National

TV

Systems

2419 Rutland

Dr,

Austin,

Tex.

78758

2472

Nautel

2658

201 Target

Industrial

Cr., Bangor, Me. 04401

Solid state modular ampfet series of AM transmitters.

Staff: Dave Grace,

Kevin

Rodgers, Jorgen

Jensen.

NEC

America

3161

130 Martin Ln., Elk

Grove Village,

Ill.

60007

Digital video effects, CCD cameras, tele- vision transmitters. Staff:

H. Ono, M. Shi- mizu,

R.

Curwin,

R.

Dienhart,

J. Engle,

L.

Litchfield,

G.

Schulte,

F.

Stolten, M. Burle- son,

J.

White.

L.E.

Nelson Sales Corp.

5451 Ukiah

Cr., Las

Vegas

89118

2437

1000 w 120 v par 64 lamps, 1200 w par

64 CID daylight source and 575 w par 46

CID daylight source.

Staff:

L.

Nelson,

B.

Nelson, Dan Imfeld,

H. Tilley

Netcom International

1702

Union St.,

San

Francisco

94123

2439

Satellite transmission services.

Network Production Music

11021

Via Frontera,

San

Diego

92127

2627

Music production and sound effects li- brary.

Staff:

Michael Anderson, Larry

Kessler, Ken Berkowitz.

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

118

New

England Digital Corp.

Box 546, White

134

River Junction,

Vt.

0500!

Synclavier digital audio system.

Staff:

David Nichtern, Mark

Terry,

Kevin Ma- loney, John

Mahoney, Steve Zaretsky, Ray

Niznik, Vaughn Halyard.

A.C. Nielsen

Co.

Nielsen Pl., Northbrook,

Ill.

60062

2787

Monitor plus commercial monitoring sys- tem. Staff:

Roy

Anderson, Dave

Traylor,

Bob Paine,

Tom Hargreaves, Dave

McCubbin, Larry Frerk, Hal Fleig, Leigh

Wilson, Carla Thompson.

Normex

2453

55 Montpellier,

St.

Laurent, Quebec H4N

2G3

Telnox on -air computerized telephone for broadcasters. Staff: Jacques

Coutellier,

Manon Coutellier,

Agnes

Eder,

Michel

Ponton,

Normand Girard, Alain Clement.

Norpak Corp.

2574

10 Hearst

Way,

Kanata, Ont. K2L

2P4

Teletext data delivery systems.

Staff:

James Carruthers, Randy

Carter, Mal- com Cocks, Louise McLaren, Robert Fitz- gerald,

Tim

Warren, Alfred

Lee, Brent Bar- nett.

Nortronics

8/01

10th Ave.. Minneapolis

55427

3384

Magnetic tape heads for replacement on broadcast and reel

-to-reel drives and

OEM product manufacture. Staff:

Karen

Nickolauson, Carole Carlson, James

Campeau, Anthony Price.

Nova Systems

20 Tower Ln.. Avon, Conn. 06001

Time base correctors.

2778

Fred Nudd Corp.

1743 Route 104, Ontario,

N.Y. 14519

2672

Radio,

Wand microwave towers, manu- facturing and service.

Staff:

Rick

Nudd,

Galer Wright.

Nurad

2165

Druid

Park Dr., Baltimore

21211

3573

SNG antenna for Ku band

*,

ENG /EJ mi- crowave systems including control re- ceive systems, remote transmit systems, automatic tracking systems. Staff:

Gor- don Neuberth, Vincent Rocco, David

Fair

- ley, Stephen Neuberth, Fred Hock, Eric

McCulley,

R.

Merritt,

G.

Becknell, Lisa

Czirjak.

Nytone

Electronics

123

2424 South 900

West,

Salt Lake City 84119

O'Connor Engineering Labs

3364

100 Kalmus Dr.,

Costa Mesa.

Calif.

92626

Camera support systems including the

155M -A metal tripod'. Staff:

Chadwell

O'Connor, Bruce Frenzinger, Kelly Nel- son, Mike Thompson, Chuck Caputo,

John

Healy.

Odetics

1515

S.

3586

Manchester Ave., Anaheim, Calif.

92802

TCS

-2000 television cart system.

Staff:

Dave Lewis, Dick

Petit, Bill

Keegan,

Tim

Crabtree,

Phil

McFadin, Robert Fairchild,

of now

The voice

the

can industry

be

heard...

Billboard

ENTERTAINMENT

NEWS NETWORK

111111111.1111

For the first time, radio listeners can ben- efit from the wealth of knowledge that station and entertainment industry executives have depended on for more than 50 years.

The new Billboard Entertainment

News

Network provides PD's with up to 30 60- second music and video features each week, based on the authoritative editorial resources of

Billboard magazine.

Anchored by three leading broadcast personalities

-Jim

Kerr of

WPLJ

-FM,

New

York;

Dennis

Elsas of

WNEW

-FM,

New

York; and

Brian McFadden, Executive

Producer of the Network

-six different programs are available.

Fed via Satcom

1R, and available ex- clusively through

R &R

Syndications, the

Network reaches the heart of the

18

-34 demo.

For a demo tape and information on market availability, call

Charles Brandt,

Vice

President- Station Relations at

1-

800

-225 -0358

(toll

-free outside New

York

State) or 212 -532 -7346. Limited to one station per

ADI.

019813.

R

&R. Inc

Billboard

Entertainment

News

Network

Produced and distributed by

R

&R

Syndications,

Inc.

460

Park Avenue South, New York, New York 10016

A Subsidiary of Robbins

&

Ries. Inc.

Dwight

Kelley, Neil Heller.

H.

Ogino

&

Co.

Box

170. Yokolmm 231

-9/

Japan

2792

Olesen

1535

3550

¡var

Ave., Hollywood, Calif.

90028

Omicron Video

2661

9700 Owensmooth Ave.,

Unit

F Chatsworth,

Calif. 913/1

Model

501 10/1 PT video switcher, model

507 master control switches Staff:

K.

Akiyama,

M.

Akiyama.

Omnimount Systems

2415

10850

Van Owen St., N. Hollywood, Calif.

9/605

Omnimusic

2775

52 Main St., Pon Washington, N.Y. 11050

Production music library with pop, elec- tronic, specialty industrial, classical, comedy and sports, atmosphere music library.

Staff: Douglas

Wood, Chip Jen- kins.

Omnisoft Systems

2965 Piekle Rd.. Toledo,

Ohio 43616

172

Traffic and billing software

*, sic research*, music call -out scheduling

*. mu-

Staff:

Lew Dickey

Jr., L.

Dickey, David Dickey,

Alfred Lutter

Ill.

Optical Disc Corp.

162

17517 H Fabrica

Way,

Cerritos,

Calif.

90701

ODC 610A LaserVision videodisk record- ing system, encoder

/generator, recorda-

World

Tower

Company

Offering the industry communications

Total Tower

Systems and Services.

Fabrication, installation and niaintenance of AM-

FM

-TV-

CATV &

Microwave towers.

Call or write:

Mr.

Nate Sholar, Pres.

World

Tower Co.

PO

Box 405

Mayfield,

Ky.

42066

Phone:

502/247

SEE

US AT

NAB BOOTH 2814

NAB 1986 ble laser videodisk. Staff:

Donald Hayes,

John Browne, Richard Wilkinson.

Orban Associates

645

Bryant

St.,

San

Francisco

94107

3444

Model 275A automatic stereo synthesiz-

8150A Optimod

-FMX stereo gener- ator,

ACC -22 filter card for Optimod-

FM

*, stereo television system,

AM and

FM audio processing systems, audio pro- cessing equipment, compressor /limiter/ de- essers, parametric equalizers, stereo synthesizer, reverb. Staff: Howard Mul- linack, Sid Goldstein, Robert Orban,

John Delantoni, Dave Shantz, Robert

Burkhardt, David Dunetz.

Orlon Research

Box 444, Richfield, Ohio 44286

2499

Otani

2

Corp.

David Dr., Belmont, Calif.

94002

3246

DTR- 900 -32 one -inch 32- channel digital audio digital recorder with remote and autolocator,

CTM

-10 NAB cartridge re- corder /reproducer`,

MX -80 -24 24

-chan- nel multitrack recorder*.

Staff:

John

Carey, Jeff Phillips, Wende

West, Steve

Hill, David Roudebush, Jack

Soma, Bill

Ford, Jim

Goodman, Emil Handke, Barry

Ross, Chris

Pukay,

Charlie

Webster, Mike

Babbitt, Mark

Yamashita,

Tom

Defiglio.

Oxberry

/80

Broad

St., Carlstadt, N.J. 07072

2441

Pacific Recorders

&

Engineering3151

2070 Las Palmas

Dr,

Carlsbad, Calif. 92008

BMX consoles,

AMX operations console,

ABX production console, cartridge ma- chines, phono preamp

TX990

*.

Staff:

Jack Williams, Sandy Berenics,

Rob Lin- gle, Robin

Starkey,

Mike Uhl, Dave

Pol- lard, Bonnie Smith, Don Coulter, Rich Ka- pushinski, Bob Moore.

Paco Electronics

2447

714 W

Olympic Blvd.,

Suite 706, Los Ange- les

900/5

DP

-11 * and

DP

-1240 battery pack, bat- tery chargers, dememorizers and mobile charger.

Staff:

Tetsushi VVakabayashi,

Kuniyasu Kaikiuchi,

K.

Kasuga.

Pag America

Box 15194, Asheville, N.C. 28813

2459

PAG

-lok battery to camera mounting sys- tem

*, PAG

-lok charger,

Master 90 bat- tery', Nitecam

ENG camera`, Master

- charger, speedcharge

6000, sequencer

6000, multicharger, ENG batteries, belts, lights, lighting kits.

Staff: Bebe McClain,

Robin Greeley, Nigel Gardiner, Barry

Parker.

Paltex

2752 Walnut Ave., Tustin,

3592

Calif.

92680

Videotape editing systems.

Panasonic

1

3116

Panasonic

Way, Secaucus,

N.J, 07094

M -II half -inch videotape format product family', professional -industrial products including in- camera recorders, camera kits, low capacitance diode gun plumbi- con tubes, saticon tubes, editing sys- tems, editing controllers, high resolution

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

120 monitors, RAMSA professional audio equipment.

Staff:

Steve Thhas,

Tom

Na- gai, Herman

Schkolnick, John McDon- nell, Steve

VVooley,

Morris Washington,

Ted Conboy

Patch Bay

4742 San

Designation

2409

Fernando Rd., Glendale, Calif.

91204

Custom labeling for audio and video patch bays, control panels, racks, mixing boards. Staff:

Scott Lookholder, Charles

Schufen, David Schermer.

Peerless Sales

1950

2412

Hawthorne

Ave., Melrose Park,

111.

60160

TV

/A/NCR/cable accessory products in- cluding security hardware, stands, mounts, carts and brackets for desk, wall and ceiling.

Pegasus Systems

(see

A.F.

Associates)

3141

Pelmark

240

250/

S.

Raritan

St., Englewood, Colo.

80110

Staff:

Peter Bauer, Walt Aikman, Kurt Os- wald, Dennis London.

Penn

Fabrication

2593

Unit

26

St.

Johns Estate,

St.

Johns Rd.,

Penn Buckinghamshire,

Eng.

HP10 8HR

Penny

&

Giles

2774

2716 Ocean Park

Blvd.,

Suite 1005, Santa

Monica, Calif.

90405

Conductive plastics studio faders.

T bar controller

*, motorized fader*. Staff:

Da- vid McLain, Gaynor Moses,

C.J. Mele- chin.

Penteco Optics

2469

7838 N.

San

Fernando Rd., Sun Valley.

Calif.

91352

PEP

25

W.

54th St., New York 10019

3387

ENG power and battery equipment.

Performance Group 2584

2741 Noblestown Rd.. Pittsburgh 15205

Perrott Engineering Labs

2733

7201 Lee

Hwy., Falls Church,

Va.

22046

Nickel cadmium, silver zinc and lead acid battery systems* for ENG /EFP in clip

-on or belt styles, single or multiple fast medium fast or overnight mini

- charger for ni

-cads and silver zinc packs

*, silver zinc and ni

-cad battery and charger combo clip -on packs', silver zinc

BP

-90 pack for

VTR camera

*, light- ing systems

*, accessories. Staff:

V.

Tyge- sen, W Mallon,

R.

Clutter, W

Aylor,

John

Stead, Harry Glass, Frank Fitzhenry.

Pesa

Electronics

6073 NW 167 St., Suite C4,

3417

Miami

33015

Digital sync analyzer, satellite receivers

*, color monitors',

TV modulator, VHF

5 kw transmitter

*,

Intercom, character gener- ators,

TV translators /transmitters.

Staff:

Antonio

Borja,

Jose

Elman,

Fernando

Guillot, Antonio Duarte, Fernando Gar- cia, Carlos Xifra, Alfonso Saiz,

Gaspar

Sastre, Jesus Reganon,

Dalmacio

Tola,

M.

Cazorla,

C.

A. Solana,

Laccourreye,

A.

Delgado,

Alicia

Cook.

The play

-by

-play of

Wall

Street...

BusinessWeek

INVESTOR

NEWS

NETWORK

Your listeners of time spend a substantial amount concerned about their money

-the way it's invested, and the impact of eco- nomic and corporate developments.

That's why

R

&R

Syndications has in- troduced the first pure editorial service to stations and listeners that offers the great- est on

-air flexibility

-the

Business Week

Investor News

Network. Live from the edi- torial offices of the world's largest and most prestigious business magazine, you can re- ceive up to six daily

60- second free- stand- ing reports that give your listeners an up

-to- the- minute play -by -play of the trends and events that affect their financial well- being.

From stocks and bonds to gasoline prices, the effects of inflation on paychecks to the impact of corporate mergers and takeovers on supermarket prices,

Business

Week Broadcast Editor

Rudy

Ruderman and Correspondent Ray

Hoffman offer in- sightful reporting that

is

most pertinent to your audience.

The Business Week Investor News

Net- work, now available via

Satcom

1R, has years of proven service to

Group W's AM stations in

New

York,

Boston, Philadel- phia, Pittsburgh and Los

Angeles.

For a demo tape and complete infor- mation on market availability and terms, contact Charles Brandt, Vice

President

-

Station Relations,

R

&R Syndications, at

1-

800 -225 -0358

(toll

-free outside New

York State) or

212

-532 -7346.

Business

Week

Investor

News

Network

Produced and distributed by

R &R

Syndications,

Inc.

460

Park Avenue South, New York, New York 10016

A Subsidiary of Robbins &

Ries. Inc.

01986..<re

I.

Peters

Productions

124

9590 Chesapeake Dr..

San Diego

92123

The Ultimate Programing System for

A/C, country, MOR, easy listening and

CHR, custom marketing campaigns, jingles, graphics, animation and creative consul- tation. Statt:

Ed Peters,

David Moore,

Steve

Cotov, Jerry Lee, Joel Thrope.

Philips

900

Television Systems

3128

Corporate Dr.. Mahwah. N.J.

07430

LDK 6A, LDK -26A family microprocessor cameras

*,

LDK -54A portable camera

*,

LDK -54A universal camera recorder

*,

Coach system computer maintenance and diagnostic aid', high resolution color monitors,

10 to 240 kw UHF television transmitters,

FM transmitters, profession- al compact disk player system, sync pulse generator, studio lighting. Staff:

Jim Wilson, Warren

Anderson, Bob

Blair,

Alan

Keil,

Nick Labate, John

Giove, WI- liam Sturcke, Colin Parkhill, Mike Mackin,

Mike Hartt, Jeffrey Clarine, Perry Priest- ley,

Frank Coleman.

Phoenix Financial Group

630

Third

Ave., New

York 10017

160,161

Diversified financial services. Staff:

James Youngling, Thomas Williams, Rich- ard

De Sina,

Jackie

Folts.

Pinzone Communications

Products

14850 Cross Creek

2411

Rd.. Newbury, Ohio

44065

Stereo

/multichannel vertical interval audio encoding system, refurbishment services, computer diagnostics, satellite uplinks/downlinks, all- format receiver w/ binaural stereo audio.

Staff:

Basil

Pin

- zone

Jr.,

Robert Broad, James Toohig,

Mark Leslie, Bob Sourek, Herb Schoen

- bohm, Ray Walsh, Phil Parker, Dave Stoll,

Dale Olgilvie, Frank Murzynski.

Pioneer Video 3546

5150 E.

Pacific Coast Hwy., Suite 300, Long

Beach. Calif.

90804

Laser optical videodisk players, video- disk replication, digital programing pro- ducts, video display and monitor sys- tems.

Polaroid

575 Technology,

252

Cambridge.

Mass. 02139

NAB

1986

Instant video film recorder*.

Porta -Pattern

3538

Box 38945, 750 N.

Highland

Ave., Los Ange- les

90038

Test charts and systems, telecine slides and films, spherical transparency illumin- ator and test transparencies, optical test media,

RCA

P

-200 and

P

-300 test pat- terns

*, filn video interface test media', medical television and imaging equip- ment.

Staff: Ed Ries,

E.

Taylor

Jr.,

Anne

Summers,

A.

Malang, Sid

Tuff,

Henry

Cheong,

Tom

Pressley, Debbie

Carter.

Potomac Instruments

3329

932

Philadelphia

Ave.,

Silver Spring, Md.

20910

QA -100 audio program analyzer

*, sub

- carrier modems modulator /demodulator modules

*, directional array antenna mon- itors, audio test system, automatic re- mote control system, frequency synthe- sizer and coherent detector, medium wave field strength meters,

VHF and UHF field strength meters, modulation and power controller, synthesized AM moni- tor receiver.

Staff:

Guy

Berry,

Bob Ellen- berger, Cliff Hall, Dave

Harry, Don Nash.

PPS

Electronics

2465

101

-10 Foster Ave., Brooklyn,

N.Y. 11236

Sonosax SX -S compact portable profes- sional mixing console,

SX -T mono- stereo mixing console for studio and mobile ap- plications. Staff:

Jean

-Jacques

Broc

- card, Jacques

Sax, Betty Sax.

Prismagraphics

2422

W.

2791

Clybourn

St.,

Box 703, Milwaukee

53233

Presentation folders/media kits.

Staff:

Richard Schmaelzle, Marsha

Harvey,

Jody

Dries.

Provisional Battery

3941

214

Oakcliff industrial Ct.,

Atlanta

30343

0E1

Corp.

Box D. Williamstown, N.J. 08094

3336

Model 695

FM exciter, low

-power

FM emergency transmitters, high power

FM transmitters,

691 FM modulation montcr automatic remote control system

*.

Staff:

Charles Haubrich, William Hoelzel,

John

Pilman, John Tiedeck,

Ed

Etschman. mplete "Ready to

Air"

Package

BINfiO

OLDEST PROMOTION

IN

THE

INDUSTRY

Over 26 years

...

1,000 plus stations.

GETS DOUBLE RATE CARD RATE

...

A complete promotional package providing sponsors the "extras" that command extra dollars.

WORLD

WIDE

BINGO, INC.

TREMENDOUS SPONSOR FOOT

TRAFFIC

...

Proves the effectiveness your station with tangible results. of

CONTINUOUS RENEWALS

...

Sponsors and listeners demand it.

INCREASE RATINGS

A proven leader in all

...

markets. r

CopY,,ght 1962.

J

.

Hampton

P.O.

BOX 2311

Littleton,

CO 80161

Telephone

(303) 795 -3288

Our

Business

Is

Improving Yours"

Broadcasting Apr

14 198E

122

QSI

Systems

2722

12

Linscott Rd.. Box 2176.

Woburn, Mass.

01801

AF -1000B three channel autophasing blackburst generator*,

BG- 308/BG -316 colorbar generator with video source identifier,

CB -1601 SMPTE colorbar generator with

16 character identifier,

CHID -10 cable channel identifier',

STAR -

16 series transportable satellite video uplink indentifiers

*,

VT-7A countdown generator, other color bar generators, battery/portable colorbar generator, bat- tery/portable eight character camera identifier, mini -production switches Staff:

Alfred Smilgis, Richard Sanford, Dick

Smilgis,

Bill Hickey, Peter Smilgis.

Q-TV

104 E. 25th St.. New

York 10010

3469

VPS -500' computerprompter system

(IBM compatible), console and conveyor transport videoprompter system.

Staff:

George Andros, John

Maffe, Jerry Berg,

Hy Sheft, Al Eisenberg, Jim Greenfield.

Quality

76

Video Supply

2461

Frederick St., Hackensack, N.J.

07602

Quanta Corp.

3145

2440

S.

Progress Dr., Salt Lake City

84119

Character generators.

Quantel

3290

W.

Baushore Rd., Palo Alto,

94303

3171

Calif

Paint box, animation editing system, im- age manipulators, still stores, standard converter.

Staff:

Richard

Taylor,

Howard

Shephard, Hugh Boyd, David Deven,

Douglas Schwartz, George Grasso,

Paul

Fletcher, Bob Knowles, Larry Biehl, Ja- nice Haigney,

Tom Carrigan, Ron Yokes,

Roy Varda.

Quantum Audio Labs

3446

1909 Riverside Dr., Glendale, Calif.

91201

On -air production consoles.

Quickset

;r,50

It?,ndhead Dr., Northbrook,

3380

Ill.

60062

Support equipment including tripods, pedestals, friction heads, cam and fluid heads, dollies, cable equipment.

Radiation Systems

1501

Moran Rd., Sterling,

Va.

22170

244

Tactical and fixed location antennas, f ive- meter

Ku band earth station antenna

*, eight -foot fold -down reflector for

SNG ve- hicles*. Staff:

Robert Denton

Jr.,

Law- rence Thomas, William Thomas.

Radio Resources

Box 8782, BWI Airport, Md.

21240

2833

Studios, transmitters, buying and selling of equipment, rentals of test and other equipment, turnkey installations. Staff:

Ashley Scarborough,

Ellen Scarborough,

Bernie O'Brien, Suzanne Roantree, Dale

Tucker, Peter Kovaleski, Kin Jones.

Radio Systems

Box 356, Edgemont,

Pa. 19028

2680

Staff:

Daniel Braverman,

Andy

Lovell,

Gerrett

Conover, Bill

Abhl.

RADIO SANTA BARBARA,

(Santa Barbara,

CA)

INC.

Alex

Patt

Wardlaw,

Sheftell,

President

Chairman

&

General Manager

Burke Kaplan, Chief

Financial

Officer

James

Olerich, Executive

Vice

President has acquired

K

AND

Financing for this transaction was provided by

BarclaysAmerican /Business Credit

Assisting in the acquisition was

Chapman Associates

CHAPMAN

ASSOCIATES"

nationwide media brokers

Elliot

B.

Evers

P.O. Box 881323

568 Howard Street,

4th

Floor

San Francisco,

CA

94188

(415) 495 -3516

A subsidiary of

F.

Barclays Bank re-

BARCLAYS

BarclaysAmerican/Business

Credit, Inc.

Special

111

Industries

Office

Founders Plaza

East

Hartford,

CT

06108

1-

800

-243

-LOAN

See BarclaysAmerican/Business

Credit at the

NAB

Convention in Dallas.

Contact

David

Cherhoniak or Chris Webster at the

Registry Hotel,

(214) 386 -6000

Ram Broadcast Systems

346

W.

Colfax

St., Palatine,

3028

Ill.

60067

Phasescope, routing switchers, inter- corns, input switchers. Staff:

Ron Mitch- ell,

Steve Gordoni,

Tim

Anderson, Doc

Masoomian.

Ramsa /Panasonic

3216

One Panasonic

Way, Secaucus,

N.J.

07094

Rank Cintel

3066

13340 Saticoy St., Unit

F,

North Hollywood,

Calif. 91605

Flying spot telecine plus high resolution version, telecine, preprograming control computer, still store, art file.

Staff:

J.

Campbell,

C.

Waldron,

D.

Fenton,

F.

Bundesmann,

D.

Corbitt,

N.

Kempt,

G.

Collett,

W.

Capon,

R.

Mathys,

G.

Orme,

J.

Brittain,

P.

Swinson,

D. Saville,

C.

Ritchie,

E.

Walden.

RCA

American Communications

3298

Four

Research Way. Princeton. N.J. 08540

Radio services, international /occasional

TV services,

RCA syndication system.

Staff:

Kurt Thoss, Guy

Lewis, Elizabeth

Rawson, Des McBride, Dave Cornell, An- dreas

Georghiou, Lou Donato, Gerry

Kaplan, John Williamson, Harold Rice,

Andrew

Hospodor, Eugene Murphy, John

Christopher, Al Weinrich.

RCA New

Products Division

3292

New

Holland

Ave., Lancaster,

Pa.

17604

TV camera tubes, power tubes and cav- ities for

TV and

FM services. Staff:

D.

Carter,

R.

Neuhauser,

G.

Grill, G. Brody,

E.

Dymacek,

R.

Nelson, G.

Kochnovicz,

O.

Goedecke,

L.

Vera, D.

Weinstein,

H.

Cramer, F

Ingle,

T.

Monroe,

H.

Strass

- man,

J.

Murphy

R- Columbia Products

2008

St.

Johns Ave.,

2671

Highland

Park,

Ill.

60035

Headphones/microphones.

RE

Instruments

31029 Center Ridge Rd., Westlake,

44145

108

Ohio

Dual channel audio analyzer'.

Staff:

George Mayhew, Steve

Watts, Don

Nat

- terer, Tom Zavesky.

Reach Electronics

1600

W.

13th Sr.,

2438

Lexington, Neb. 68850

SCA pocket paging receiver model

2VR82 tone and voice, dial access pag- ing terminal, dial access paging terminal.

Staff: Mike Sutton, Jim Griffith, Gary Gif- ford, Jim DeCastro.

Recortec

3327

275 Santa Ana Ct.,

Sunnyvale,

Calif.

94086

One -inch magnetic tape cleaners and evaluators, VCE -750

*.

Staff:

Lester Lee,

Eldon Corl, Ronald Troxell.

Rees Associates

4200

Perimeter,

Oklahoma City 7311'

2500

Register

Data

Systems

Box 1246, Perry, Ga. 31069

2505

Traffic system', multi user IBM

PCXT-

PCAT,

LF technologies multi user micro main frame, hard disk storage. Staff:

Richard Spruill,

Lowell Register, Janice

NAB 1986

Register, Len Register.

Research Technology

4700

Chase Ave., Lincolnwood,

3386

Ill.

60646

Videotape evaluator /cleaner for one

- inch, Y. and

1/2 inch, DV -5 dropout analyz- er, film editing, previewing and cleaning machines. Staff:

Tom

Tisch, Charlie Mor- ganti,

Gary Ingram, Larry Beilin,

Ray

Short, Steve Little,

Boyle.

Howard

Bowen, Tom

RF

Scientific

2701

181

Atlantic Dr., Maitland, Fla.

32751

R.F.

Specialty Products

4212

San

Pedro Ave.,

San

78212

165

Antonio,

Tex.

Design, manufacture and installation of

AM,

FM and

TV systems, AM phasors.

ATUS coils, lighting chokes, static drains, contactors and accessories.

Staff:

Jose

Rubio,

Kenneth Hyman, Francisco

Ibarra, Cesar Hernandez, Gustavo

Paez.

Luis Cavero, Guido Ortiz, Rocio Lopez.

RF

Technology

145

Woodward Ave.,

S.

06854

2809

Norwalk,

Cotin.

Flash

-Back

ENG transmit systems', 950 mhz wireless microphone for field use',

FRL

7 and

13 fixed link systems, other

ENG transmitters, power amplifiers.

Staff: Patrick Bradbury, Christopher

Lay.

Grady Jackson, Drew Lance, Peter Bur

- nage.

Richardson Electronics

2503

3030 N. River Rd., Box 424, Franklin Park,

Ill.

60131

Doomsday portable power amplifiers', replacement tubes and RF transistors, sockets and accessories.

Staff:

Larry

Broome, Carlos Aillon, John Hess,

Ian

Stewart.

Riviera Broadcast Leasing

2793

7400 Center Ave.,

Suite 102,

Hollywood lif.

90028

RJW Software

251

243

Rolling Meadow Dr., Billings,

Meru

59101

Computerized music scheduling and li- brary system. Staff: Richard Jones, John

Webber.

Rockwell Int.

Box

10462,

Dallas,

Tex.

75207

Staff:

Tom Noble, Bill Shurtleff.

3484

Roh Corp. 2647

3603 Clearview Pl., NE, Atlanta 30340

Rosco Laboratories

3443

36 Rush

Ave., Pon

Chester, N.Y. 10573

Roscor Corp.

1061

Feehanville

3404

Dr., Mt. Prospect,

Ill.

60056

Ross Video

Box 220, 500 John St., Iroquois,

KOE

1KO

2616

Ontario

FUS

508 production switcher with multi- level effects systems and 210

10

-input production switcher with the multi -level effects switcher.

Millard,

Staff: John

Ross, Jim

Jack Mcouigge,

Eric Good-

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

124 murphy, Donald McElheran, Brian Lus

- combe.

RPG

Diffuser Systems

2463

12003 Wimbleton St., Largo, Md.

20772

Reflection phase grating acoustical diffu- sors*, Tele -Image audio -for -video.

David Sless, Peter D'Antonio.

Staff:

R

/Scan Corp.

511 11th Ave. South,

2794

Minneapolis 55415

Lightning data and information systems.

Staff:

Dr.

Walter Lyons, Thomas Nelson,

Dr.

Ken Bauer.

RTNDA

1717

2622

K

St., Suite 615,

NW,

Washington

20006

RTS

Systems

3566

/100

W.

Chestnut St., Burbank, Calif. 91506

Model 848 intercom station* for the ma- trix intercommunication system

HST17 low cost headset*, software updates for model

802 master station',

TW, series 17 and series 800 intercom systems,

IFB systems, pro audio, amplifier systems.

Staff: Douglas Leighton, Shelley Harri- son, Dave

Richardson, Cliff Michael,

Su- san Seidenglanz, Bob

Ringer, Stan

Hubler,

Ed Fritz.

Rupert Neve

Berkshire Industrial

3318

Park, Bethel, Conn.

06801

8232 audio console for

TV production, postproduction and multitrack telepro- duction recording

*, V- series production consoles'

16 to 60 input 51- series of ste- reo broadcast, video post production and film consoles automated mixing sys- tems, other mixing consoles, mobile con- soles, limiter /compressors, digital signal processing consoles. Staff: Barry

Roche, Anthony

Langley, Geoffrey Lang

- don, Rhonda

Kohler,

Michael George,

Tom Semmes, Thomas Schlum.

Sachtler Corp.

3419

400 Oser Ave., Hauppauge,

N.Y. 11788

Hot Pod tripod', video

20 studio and O.B. pedestal', video

14 fluid head,

7

+7 fluid head,

Video 20, 25 and 30 fluid heads.

Staff: Eric Falkenberg,

John Gehrt, Alex

Froemel, Juergen Nussbaum, Hardy Jau- mann, Kurt Gunkel, Alice

Davis.

Samson

Music Products

124

2797

Fulton

Ave., Hempstead, N.Y. 11550

TH

-1 body pack transmitter for instru- ments/lavaliers,

VHF digitally synthe- sized receiving systems, receiver sys- tems, microphone stands. Staff: Doug

Bryant, Scott Goodman, Bob Rufkahr,

Amy Rufkahr, John Amstadter, Bob Ne- whuis, Joe Martin, Alan Hyatt,

Mark Tarshis, Randy Fuchs.

Bill

Ray,

Sansui Electronic

2598

108 Westlake

Dr., Valhalla,

N.Y. 10595

SatCom Technologies

2912

Pacific Dr.,

Norcross, Ga. 30071

244

Satellite earth station antennas, feed sys- tems and antenna control systems,

5.5 meter feed. antenna' with hybrid

C

/Ku band

Staff:

Dave Speed, John Bulman,

ATKAMAN

1

APURPOSEFUL

RRLÚTG

In

1981,

Kaman Broadcasting made a

a

system that

would

give broadcasters

in-

house computer control without dependence monumental decision. They resolved that

Kaman

would develop a

software system

for

broadcasters that

would

not only meet station needs more

ef-

ficiently

now,

but meet them

for

years

r

to

come.

It wasn't

idle

talk. Kaman put their dream

work

and their company name

on

the

line. i

an unprecedented

move,

Kaman Broad

-

rsting withdrew from the marketplace.

For two

intensive years, they labored

over on

long distance

phone lines. They

purposed to design

a

totally interactive system. That meant avails

were always

actual reflections

of

the logs and salespeople could

sell,

book, and rotate schedules with confidence. And they hammered out

a

hard working family

of

support programs to extend the system's

power

beyond

The just sales and traffic. system Kaman envisioned

is

the system you can actually buy

today.

This

is

TOÉVVI0dRBIRTH

AN

CE the era of

the Kaman Broadcasting System:

Kaman Broadcast Management

Kaman Accounting

Kaman Films

Kaman Demographics

Kaman Autoswitching Interface

IBM System /38 hardware

All

interactive.

All in-

house.

All you could

ever need.

Call a

Kaman

today.

Then you

will

representative understand

how a pur- poseful

retreat at Kaman

produced advances

that

are revolutionary.

Revolutionary indeed.

KAMAN

BROADCASTING

PO.

Box 7463

Colorado Springs, CO 80933

303/599

-1470

See us at the NAB Convention, April

13 -16,

Booth 3078.

KAMAN

'

1986,

Kaman

Broadcasting

G.

Douglas Henderson, John Scrib- beras.

Scandia Telecon

1

Park

235

Pl..

Suite 310, 621 N.W. 53d, Boca

Raton, Fla. 33431

Schafer World Comm.

Hwy. 16 South,

3353

Box 31,

Marion,

Va. 24354

Schmid Telecommunication

Rieterstrasse 6.

2462

CH -8002, Zurich,

Switzer- land

Schneider

Corp. of America

3343

400 Crossways Park Dr.,

Woodbury, N.Y.

11797

TV zoom lenses for

2/3,

1,

11/4-inch tube cameras,

TV-80 series zoom lenses',

TV

64,65,66 series zoom lenses

*,

TV-44 se- ries wide angle

ENG /EFP zoom lenses.

Staff: Bob Jones, Craig Marcin,

Erwin

Gerteis, Horst Stahl,

Dr.

Joachim Herzke,

Peter Mieke, Dwight

Lindsay,

Jay Citrin.

Schwem Technology

3305 Vincent

Rd., Pleasant

2553

Hill,

Calif.

94523

Gyrozoom 60/300 image stabilizing zoom lens for ENG /EFP cameras, wide angle attachment*, remote control sys- tem

*.

Staff:

Katherine Metrulas, Michael

Salit, Holt Johnson, Clayton

Sylvester, Ja- net Alvarez.

Scientific -Atlanta

3845 Pleasantdale Rd., Atlanta

30340

3272

7555 Ku band video exciter, 7500 09 vid- eo receiver

C band input displays

Ku

BATTERY, INC.

MAKES NEWS EVERYDAY!

CNN

KTVY

WPLG

WTBS KCNC

WXFL KING

KSL

WGBH KCRA KOMO

KSLA

WAGA

KRON KABC

WDSU

KDFW KGO WTAE

WPIX

WBBH WCBS

KJRH

WBAL

Just a few of the

650 news operations that choose

PRO as their ENG power source.

WHY?

Because

PRO

Batteries last longer!

PRO

Batteries have matched cells for quality, color- coding for crew iden- tification and are personalized with station call letters.

Go with the PRO! formerly

Provisional Battery

Co., Inc.

3941

Oakcliff Industrial

Court

Atlanta,

Georgia

30340

(800)

451.7171

(404)

449 -5900

NAB

1988 band, 9630 video receiver with low noise block converter for SNG trunks, Ku band

LNAs

302A and

304, digital audio termi- nal, models of

11, 10, 7,

4.5, 2.8,

1.8 and

1.2 meter antennas,

B

-MAC equipment, video /studio equipment, enclosure cabi- nets. Staff:

Sid Topol, Jay Levergood,

John Lappington,

Duke Brown, Alan

Freece, Alex Best, Dan Ozley, Jim

Cofer.

Sea -Tex div. /Si

-Tex

14000 Roosevelt

Marine

2683

Blvd.,

Clearwater, Fla.

33520

Color weather radar system. Staff:

Ted

Bodtmann,

Dave Church.

Selco/Sifam

2450

7580 Stage Rd.,

Buena Park,

Calif.

90621

Knobs, audio level indicator, meters.

Staff:

Bill Wilkinson, John Tamsitt, Ce- leste Martinez,

Tom

Swearingen.

Sennheiser

48

W.

38th St., New

York 10018

2914

UHF and VHF wireless microphones, headphones and microphones.

Sescom

1111

3445

Las

Vegas

Blvd.,

Las

Vegas

89101

Staff:

Franklin

Miller.

SG

Communications

2556

3444 N.

Dodge, Suite A,

Tucson, Ariz. 85716

Staff: James Meehan, Thomas Leschak,

Douglas

Gratzer, Jean Gratzer, Wallace

Steiger.

Sharp

Electronics

Sharp

Pl.,

Paramus,

N.J.

07430

3305

Color camera systems and high resolu- tion rackmount color monitors, triax con- trol systems, component

VTR adaptors for Sharp cameras, four head industrial

VCR's* with VHS-HQ ment. picture enhance-

Staff:

Ron Colgan, Bob Garbutt,

Bob McNeill,

Paul

Insco, Gary Bridges,

Ron Parker, Neil Kobu, Peter Gloeggler,

Bruce Pollack, Hank Miura, Mike

Yama- guchi, Jim Hulfish.

Douglas Sheer

&

Assoc.

2561

274 Madison Ave., Suite 1406, New

York

10016

Broadcast equipment marketplace sur- vey and census of

TV stations, profes- sional video marketplace survey Statt:

Douglas Sheer, Des Chaskelson, April

Palmer, Karen Kent.

Shintron

Co.

3036

144 Rogers St., Cambridge, Mass. 02142

Empress

C

-2000 component production switcher with downstream keyer*, DK3/

CK3 composite downstream keyer /chro- makeyer

*,

12X -C4 12- input/four- output component routing switcher,

Androme- da 3000 component framestore/DVE unit with control panel

*, component switch

- ers, time code generator

/reader,

VDAS and ADAs.

Swift,

Staff: Shintaro Asano, Jeff

Jacques

Kuchler, George Laugh

- ead, Kathleen O'Keefe, Jose Rosado,

Morris Sazar.

Shively Labs

2709

86 Harrison Rd., Bridgeton,

Me. 04009

Spaced broadcast antennas`, vertically

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

126 polarized

FM broadcast antennas

*, cir- cularly polarized

FM broadcast anten- nas, panel antennas, horizontal -only an- tennas, rigid coaxial transmission line and coax components, branched and balanced

FM combiners,

RF patch pan- els, AM /FM isocouplers, hybrid power combiners, harmonic filters, directional couplers, pressurization equipment,

FCC directional pattern and omnidirec- tional pattern studies, VSWR monitoring, display and protection systems, TV an- tennas.

Staff:

Paul Wescott,

D.

Steve Col- lins, Charles Peabody, Robert Surette,

Jonathan Clark, Peter Hayes, George

Harris.

Shook Electronic Enterprises

3222

6630 Topper Pwy., San

Antonio,

Tex.

78233

Model

14

-22/D 22 -foot mobile produc- tion system with dual generators, nine equipment racks, terminal package. two cameras and two

VTRts

*,

ENG /EFP con- struction manual, network production trailer.

Statt:

Edwin Shook, Julia

Hollen- beck

Shook,

Stuart Shook,

Patrick

McCafferty.

Shure Brothers

222 Hanrey

Ave., Evanston,

3320

Ill.

60202

FP32 stereo

ENG mixer

*, FP42 stereo production mixer*, microphones, circuit- ry, phono cartridges. Staff: Dick

Murphy,

John Phelan, Dan

Marchetto, Chris

Ly- ons, Michael Pettersen,

Al Hershner, Lot

- tie Morgan, Joanne Wilkinson.

Sigma Electronics

2905

1184

Enterprise Rd.,

East Petersburg,

Pa.

17520

Generators, video processing amplifiers, distribution amplifiers. Staff:

Sue Huber,

Joe Donches, Bob

Hivner, Kent

Porter,

Jeff Spittle, Jerry

Wangle,

Cheryl

Stauffer.

Singer Broadcast Productions

3344

875

Merrick

Ave., Westbury, N.Y. 11590

CCA electronics FM -20G FM exciter and

20 kw FM transmitter.

Staff:

John Hill- man, Timothy Hillman, Alan Singer,

Ron

Baker.

Skotel Corp.

2738

1445

Provencher, Brossard, Quebec

.14W

173

Staff: Stephen Scott, Gaston Auclair,

Mark Danowski.

Leonard Sloan

&

Assoc.

2542 Elm St., Dallas,

Tex.

75226

234

Staff: John Davis, Russell Anokey, David

Downs, Kathryn Saxton, Larry Tompkins.

SMPTE 2501M

862 Scarsdale Ave., Scarsdale,

N.Y. 10583

"Digital Television Tape Recording and

Other New Developments" book. Staff:

Alex Alden, Janice

Baio, Peg Caggiano,

Barry Detwiler, Harold

Eady, Jeff Fried- man, Lynne Robinson.

Solid State

228 E. Main

St.,

Milan, Mich. 48160

3560

Audio mixing systems and studio com- puters.

THE

FEDERATED PRESS

s/

1/10( dc(

we

(ock

v140

S

The

Federated Press is

a

member sponsored

-

disseminate profit sharing consortium wire service organized global and local news among its newspaper and broadcast members. to

Finances

The Members arc responsible for the

FP's

Editorial Operating Budget through an

Annual Apportionment: which is offset by the

Member's earned income from the FP's

Production Services and

/or the

Profit Sharing Allocation. Consequently. each FP

Member eventually receives the Wire

At

No Cost

T

",

Communications

The FP employs ultra high -speed communications technology that delivers news up to 46 times faster than all other wires.

The wire is delivered through

HAQTM enabling editors to read breaking stories or select pre- determined news subjects.

Editorial

With over

717 bureaus and more than 2000 correspondents. the Federated Press organization. Over

30 will be the world's million original words. I2(X) photographs and

7(X) broadcast reports to be carried daily. largest news

News

Gathering Standards

The

FP guarantees contacting over

27.00

news subjects daily and over

584,0(10

ADTFlashT'c, news editors are instantly alerted when police or

Lire departments are dispatched. news subjects weekly. With

Membership Rights and

Privileges

The voting rights of the Federated Press is extended to all

Member newspapers and broadcasters.

Members are entitled to all

Standard

Membership

Benefits. a

Governing

Although The

Authority

Poor Richard Corp. is responsible for the management of the FP, final governing authority is vested in member elected Board of

Trustees. The thirty one seats are distributed among daily newspapers by circulation, weekly newspapers, the networks, and broadcasters by market sire.

Editorial Oversight

The Federated

Press

Editorial Association is responsible for editorial standards and wire -editor relations. The FPEA

Convention represents the working staff, while editors have their own

Conference.

Inaugural Membership

Only Inaugural Members who in the $542 join the Federated Press prior to Commencement of

Operations are million plus annual

Profit Sharing Allocation. Distribution is based on the

Member's seniority. entitled to participate

Group Ownership Membership

Inaugural Members under

Group Ownership may join under a

Flat

Rate versus their actual circulation

(audience) rate.

The Launch of the Federated Press

Backed by S50 million investment and 55

General Contractors, the FP obtained the required number of

Inaugural Members. will commence operations 123 days after it has

American Ownership

The FP joins the

AP as the only American

-owned wire services, flying under the color the FP and the

AP are directly controlled by and report to the

Members they serve. of the

First Amendment. Only

One of Two Wires

The

FP is not intended to replace the AP as the only wire: instead the FP is to be one of the two wires editors need today.

Because the FP pays for itself. every newspaper and broadcaster can have two wires for the cost of one. Those who couldn't afford a wire, now can have the largest.

Poor

Richard

INDEPENDENCE SQUARE, PHILADELPHIA,

PA

19105 -1776

215 WA2 -1776

H.A. Solutec

2530

4360 Iberville

St., Montreal,

Que.

H2H

21.8

SOL -6800 automated broadcasting sys- tem for recording and playback,

SOL

-

6800/UIS for eight

VTR's with 12 inputs

A/ switcher,

SOL

-6800 /MICRO for one VTR with four inputs

PV switches,

SOL

AD.IDI

Q generator,

SOL -8200 adaptive co- channel filter'.

Statt:

E.

Grondin,

G. For- tin, G. Caron, M.

Beland.

Solway

2745

50/0

Johnson St.,

Hollywood, Fla.

33021

Sono -Mag

1833 W Hovey Ave.. Normal,

3480

Ill.

61761

Broadcast automation programers and systems for' radio, compact disk -based automation program for live assist and random access of CD disks.

Staff:

Ste- phen Sampson, William Moulic

Jr., Bill

Hosington, Jerry Bassett,

Pete Charlton.

Sony Broadcast Products

Co. 3100

1600 Queen Anne Rd.,

Teaneck,

N.J. 07666

DVR

-1000 component digital videotape recorder,

BVW -105 CCD Betacam cam- era*, BVH -2800

VTR with digital audio re- cording',

SP

-mode

U

-matic recorders',

MXP

-2000 stereo audio mixing console,

BVE -900 editing system

*,

CDK -006 auto- matic compact audio disk loader,

Beta

- cam camera -recorders, Betacart auto- mated playback system, stereo audio production /post -production equipment,

Type

C one -inch videotape recorders and accessories, high -definition

TV sys- tems, color monitors, three -quarter -inch

U -matic recorders and professional cam- eras. Staff: William Connolly.

Soper Sound Music Library

Box 498, Palo

Alto, Calif.

94302

2443

Production music library.

Sound Ideas

86

McGill

St., Toronto

M5B

1H2

2444

Staff:

Brian Nimens, Michael Bell, Garry

Trafford, Bruce Hayne.

Sound Technology

1400 Dell

Ave..

Campbell, Calif.

3328

95008

Soundcraft USA

2770

1517 20th St., Santa Monica, Calif.

90404

Staff:

Wayne Freeman, Erika Lopez,

Greg McVeigh, Alan Archer, Gary Lynn,

Shane Morris,

Charlie

Day.

Soundtrack/Aircraft Music

25 E. 21st, New

York

10010

2554

Custom, syndication and production mu- sic service. Staff: Mark, Crit, Rob, John,

David,

Vi,

Jeannie, Mary

Ellen, Lisa, Bon

- zie.

Soundtracs /USA Office

MCI

Intertek

745 109th St.,

144.145

Arlington,

Tex. 76011

Audio mixing consoles

M series monitor desk',

CM -4400 studio console linked with 24 -track tape machine,

M and MR ranges for sound reinforcement and stu- dio engineers, eight and

16

-track record- ing.

T series consoles.

Staff:

Todd Wells,

John Carroll, Peter Jostins, John Stadius,

Tom

Burrows, Jerry Spohn, John Birk-

NAB 1988 head, Travis Ludwig,

Bill Mullin, John Ca- porale, Rick Brown, Stan

Sliz, Wane Fu- day,

Barry Evans,

Paul Cullity, Randy

Fuchs, Jim Starkin, Bob Rufkahr,

Pete

Wood

Mark Tarshis.

Spantel

968 NBC Center, Lincoln,

Neb. 68508

3382

FM subcarrier paging, tone and voice pagers. Staff:

Richard Thompson, Donn

Davis,

Andy Andros,

Tom Barker, Ken

Gray,

Robert

Roe, Kay Davis, Mary Enda- cott, Ann

Murray,

Deb Sandstedt, Chuck

Piper.

Spectrum Planning

Box 831360, Richardson,

Tex.

75083

2634

Communications systems engineering services, marketing research, site loca- tion, feasibility studies, channel and fre- quency searches, coordination and pro- tection, TV

Beam* combining ineering, marketing and eng- cable analysis into one tool, 80/90 application package for spectrum planning. Staff:

Scott Gold- man, Nick

Stanley,

Jerry

Mull, Jerry

Armes, Duncan McIntosh,

Randy Oster,

Dale Rylander, Fred Johnston,

Lyman

Bishop.

Sperry Corp.

2633

49 Music

Square

West,

Nashville,

Tenn.

37211

Radio traffic and accounting software for

IBM PC's.

Staff:

Ray Hines, Sharon

Moyers, Mark Spruill.

Sprague Magnetics

2540

15720 Stagg St.,

Van Nuys, Calif. 91406

Replacement

Sony BVH audio heads, re- placement parts and tape heads, refur- bishment services. Staff: Darrell Spra- gue, John Austin, Bob

Reiss.

Stage

Lighting Distributors

346 44th St., New

York 10036

2446

Lighting dimmers and control, studio lighting, fog and smoke machines.

Stainless

2735

Third & Montgomery

Ave., North Wales, Pa.

19454

Guyed and self- supporting towers, de- sign, fabrication and installation ser- vices.

Statt:

R.A.

Farrington, J.C. Rodri- guez, Howard Balshukat, Owen

Ulmer,

Peter Starke, Kenneth Wetzel, Ronald

Pagnotto, John Windle,

H.

William

Guzewicz.

Standard

Communications

Box 92/51, Los Angeles 90009

2489

Stanton Magnetics

3331

200 Terminal Dr., Plainview,

N.Y. 11803

Cartridges, styli, preamplifiers, head- phones and record care products. Staff:

Pete Bidwell, Jack O'Donnell.

Stantron

2911

6900 Beck

Ave.,

N. Hollywood, Calif.

91605

Desk consoles, VTRNCR racks, duplica- tion racks and cabinet consoles. Staff:

Guy

Tessier, Tom Grant

Jr., Tom

Hanson

Scott Harries,

Tom

Judkins, John Crock- ett.

Jeff Couch.

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

128

Star Case Manufacturing

648 Superiro, Munster, Ind. 46321

2555

Staff:

Dennis

Toma, Bernard Fryman, Al

Novak,

Bill

Coffel, David Athans.

Steads

-Film

248

70718th Ave., South, Nashville,

Tenn.

37203

Steadi -Film system retrofitted to Rank

Cintel Mark

111G with microprocessor con- troller which interfaces with Sony

BVH

-

2500 or Abekas and color grading sys- tem for film -to-tape transfer.

Staff:

Wayne

Smith, Sara Brinker,

Phil Kroll, Chris

Gyoury, Sarah Burmeister.

Steenbeck

2749

9554 Vassar Ave.,

Chatsworth, Calif. 91311

Storeel

3322

2050 -C Chamblee

-

Tucker Rd., Box 80523,

Atlanta

30341

Instant access and modular rapid transit storage systems for videotape, cassettes and film, room stretcher high -density storage for

RCA,

Ampex and Beta carts, set -up trucks', high -density audio cart for

FM and AM storage. Staff: Carolyn

Galvin, Michael

Plaut, Robert Kearns,

Paul

Galvin, Maureen Kearns.

Straight

Wire

Audio

2518

2611

Wilson Blvd., Arlington,

Va.

22201

Strand Century

3024

18111 S. Santa Fe

Ave., Rancho Dominguez,

Calif.

90221

Showchangers motorized fixtures', Light

- board

XP,

Lightboard

M, control con- soles',

DC -90 dimming, memory control console, laniro fixtures,

12 kw HMI, HMI par units. Staff: John Pavacik, Jeff

Sessler, Marion Rimmer, William Groener,

Jim Crooks, Len Bedard, Leonard

Witt- man, Lee Magadini, Robert

Schiller,

Franc Dutton, Susan Dandridge, Debra

Garcia, Tom Folsom, Robin Crews, No- land Murdock.

Strata

Marketing

403

W.

North

Ave., Chicago,

2689

Ill.

606/0

Staff: Bruce Johnson,

Roger Skolnik,

Chuck

Cady, John Thompson, Deborah

Novess.

2769

5520 Touhv Ave., Skokie,

Ill.

60077

AEA active MS matrix,

MS 380 battery powered ENG version with microphone inputs, AN2 stereo simulator. Staff: Gor- don Kapes. Carolyn Cashel.

Studor Revox America

1425

Elm

Hill

Pk., Nashville 37210

3048

A812

ATR,

A807

ATR, B203 automation controller,

SC

4016 and

SC

4008 system controllers for video post', 961/962 com- pact mixing consoles

*,

A820

-TC

ATR with center track time code', multitrack

ATR's, mixing consoles, compact disk players, compact

ATR's, telephone hybrid sys- tems, cassette decks, synchronizing sys- tems, studio monitor loudspeakers.

Staff:

Thomas Mintner, Doug Beard, Da- v,d Bowman, Larry Jaffe, Thomas Jenny,

Chris

Ware,

Nick Balsamo,

Fred Layn, Bri- an Tucker, Joe Bean, Vencil Wells, Nancy

iatellite

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Nelson and Connie

Francis and the

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Loving Spoonful, and the Association... Simon

&

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DALIAS NEW YORK CHICAGO LOS ANGELES

Byers, Bruce Borgerson,

Tom Knox.

Sunspot

2440 San

47110

Mateo

2679

Pl..

Albuquerque,

N.M.

Broadcast billing, trafficking and data system for Apple

III and IBM compatible computers'. Staff:

Don Rice, Dave

Spring, Dawn Bodener, John

Flint,

Mag- gie

Wesley, Joshua Wesley,

Don

Manual,

Jerry Littenberg.

Swintek Enterprises

587 Division

St., Campbell, Calif.

2918

Staff:

William Swintek, Les Underwood,

Davisa

Hill,

John Ferguson, Dan Deegal,

Wayne Wyche, Richard

Pass, Frank Fitz

- henry, Tovge Montero.

Switchcraft Inc.

5555 N. Elston Ave., Chicago 60630

2684

Phone jacks and plugs, phono jacks and plugs, audio and general purpose con- nectors, jack panels and connectorized jackfields, molded and nonmolded cable assemblies,

E series audio receptacles with removable inserts

*, straight and right -angle

BNC receptacles', high -pow- er plugs and jacks

*, two -wire printed cir- cuit board jackfields. Staff:

Bruce Heeb,

Terry Leen, Bill Kysiak, Keith Rosbor- ough.

SWR Inc.

Box 215, Goffstown,

N.H.

03045

3350

Sylvania

US

Lighting

3393

Sylvania Lighting

Center, Danvers,

Mass.

01923

Lighting equipment.

Symetrix

4211 24th Ave.,

West, Seattle 98199

2519

Teleconferencing interface, broadcast telephone interface, telephone interface, noise reduction system, fast RMS corn- pressor/limiter, peak

-RMS compressor/ limiter, stereo amplifier, parametric equal- izer, quad expander /gate, voice track processor. Staff:

Dane Butcher,

Roy

Blankenship, Mike Burnes.

Symtec /One Pass Video

14902 Winning Creek

228

Rd.,

Tampa, Fla.

33612

Graphics and text generator.

Staff:

Rob- ert Cook, Heather

Weiner, Rob Duncan,

Steve Strong, Peter Mandel, Jim Davies.

System Associates

3392

5801

90230

Uplander

Way,

Culver

City,

Calif.

Brokers of used

TV equipment.

Walter Shubin, Billy Seidel.

Staff:

Systemation

337 N.

Water,

Decatur,

Ill.

62523

2567

Taber Manufacturing

3491

1880 Embarcadero Rd., Palo

Alto, Calif.

94303

Bulk degaussers, audio replacement heads, refurbishing services computer software, computer graphics software.

Staff:

Veldon

Leverich, Diane Leverich,

Chuck Towns, Neil Martinez, Bob Souza.

NAB 1986

Take a

Trip America

3608 N.W. 58th St., Oklahoma

2590

City

73112

Tamron Industries

120

24 Valley

Rd., Port Washington,

N.Y. 11080

Film video professor.

Staff:

Hank Naga- shima, Tony Garaguso, Hideaki

Shimizu,

Takamune Hirano, Harumasa Ikumo,

Ya- sumasa Mizushima.

Tandberg of America

Box 58, Armonk. N.Y

10504

2748

Tannoy North America

215

97 Victoria St., North. Kitchener, Om. N2H

SC1

NFM -8, SRM -10B and

SRM -12B near- field broadcast monitors,

SR

-840 power amplifier. kamp.

Staff:

Bill

Calma, Rob Hof

-

Tápecaster

3798 Watman Ave., Memphis 38118

3310

Series 1000 chine. console cartridge ma-

Staff:

Welton Jetton, Steve Sage,

Stovall Kendrick, Bob Jones.

Tapscan

2664

2100

Data

Park, Suite 202, Riverchase, Ala.

35244

Tascam

7733 Telegraph

90640

3416

Rd.,

Montebello, Calif.

Recorder reproducers

*, studio

8 console multitrack,

16- channel multitrack, other mixing consoles. Staff: Anders Madsen,

Bill Mohrhoff, Gregg Hildebrandt, Barry

Goldman, David

Oren, Norio Tamura,

Jimmy

Yamaguchi, Hal Onda, Vince

Basse, Kiy Watanabe, Gary Beckerman,

Fred Johnson, Jon Bliese.

Teatronics

2756

3100

McMillan

Rd.,

San

Luis

Obispo,

Calif.

93401

Lighting control equipment,

Vision com- puter lighting console,

Tech Director manual two -scene console. Staff:

Roger

N,blk,

Paul Rabinovitz, Mike Griffith, Randy

Pybas.

Technov Industries

148

3974 Amboy

Rd.,

Staten

Island,

N.Y. 10308

Sync generators,

DAs, switchers.

Tekno

100

W.

Erie

St., Chicago 60610

2486

Tekskil Industries

2570

Suite 310, 218 Blue

Mountain

St., Coquit- lam,

B.C. V3K 4H2

Tektronix

Box 500, Beaverton, Ore. 97077

3214

1730 waveform monitor,

1720 vectors

- cope, sync, pulse and test signal gener- ators, picture monitors, precision demo- dulators, frame synchronizers and automated measurement devices. Staff:

Larry Kaplan,

Steve Kerman,

Jim Zook,

Dan

Castles, Larry Harrington, Dave

Friedley, Wayne Olmstead,

Rex Stevens,

Jeanine Navarra,

Ron

Marquez.

Telcom

Research

2588

1163

King Rd., Burlington,

Ont. L7R 3X5

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

130

Telemet

185

3396

Dixon Ave.,

Amityville.

N.Y. 11701

TV broadcast demodulator

*, controller for routing switcher, fiber optics sys- tems, isolation izers, amplifiers, thermal equal- sideband analyzers, spectrum/ sideband analyzers, clamping amplifi- ers, repeaters, video cable terminals, test signal generators, modulators, chroma keyers and decoders, group de- lay ers. measuring systems, routing switch

-

Staff:

Robert Griffiths, Seymour

Hamer,

Eugene

Murphy, Alex Kwartiroff,

Leo Lazarus, Vincent Delmato, Ivan Slo- vak, Antonio

Silva.

Telemetrics

7

Valley St.,

Hawthorne, N.J.

07506

2569

Camera remote -control system', pan/tilt tri

-ax cable connected table for remote control of portable video color cameras, other tables controlled via microwave transmitters/receivers, standard multi

- conductor cable controlled systems.

Staff: Anthony Cuomo,

Allen Phelps, Al- bert Chan, Haig Soojian.

Telepak San Diego

2566

8340 Clairemont Mesa

Blvd.,

Suite 201, San

Diego

92111

Carrying cases.

Telescript

445

3351

Livingston St., Norwood, N.J. 07748

1000 line resolution monitor /prompters, telecue and telescriptor transports, hi -ef- ficiency beamsplitters, telepod free standing transport,

C -64 networking prompting program

*, 8088 -8086 PC prompting program*,

1150 line resolution monitor /prompter`. Staff:

Bob Swanson,

Jim Stringer, Rich Mergner, Susan Moran,

Kay Hyde, John Lennan.

Television Engineering

3400

580 Goddard

Ave.

,

Chesterfield, Mo. 63017

14

-inch four camera production unit.

Staff:

Jack Vines, Linda

Vines, Gary

VVar- necke,

Ray Vines.

Television Equipment Associates

3342

Box 393,

S.

Salem,

N.Y. 10590

Matthey low loss video delays', micro video filters', wideband products for

HDTV

*, rack mounted and video and pulse delays, little gray boxes transpar- ent low pass video filters, Elcon one -inch tape cleaner /profiler',

3/4 inch cassette cleaner

/profiler,

Racal ounce intercom headset*. Staff:

Bill Pegler, Steve Tocid- lowski, Vince Emmerson, Bill Walters,

Marilyn Walters.

Television

745

Information Office

Fifth

Ave., New York 10151

3105

Television Technology Corp.

2360

3492

Industrial Ln.. Broomfield, Colo.

80020

Staff:

Carol Anderson, Jim Billig, John

Binsfeld, Dave Haupt, Mark Hutchins,

Nick Panos, Bo Pearce, Byron

St.

Clair.

Telex

9600

55420

Communications

3370

Aldrich

Ave., South, Minneapolis

y

NEWS ON

COMPUTERS:

For every

10 newsrooms have computerized,

7 that chose Basys

A

few of our customers include:

ABC Radio

ABC

Television Anglia Television

American

Forces Network

BBC BCNZ

Channel Television

Channel Four Network News

CNN

CNN Headline News

Figaro ITN NBC Radio

MacNeil

/Lehrer Newshour

NBC

Television RAI

WOR

WINS WMAQ

KRON

KYUU

KSAN

WFAA

KDAF KIKK

WKYC

WJZ

WTHI

KTVY WTAR/WLTY

BTQ7 RVN2

AMV4 2GB

3AW

4BH

5DN

4AY

2WL 2CA

Find out why.

One of many reasons is that

Basys' is so easy to use.

Our customers have found the Basys newsroom computer system to be surprisingly easy to use, because it does exactly what they already do

-only

faster.

Basys was designed by newsroom professionals to operate with simple commands in plain English. No one on the newsroom team has to learn complex code commands.

Perhaps that's why broadcasters find the average time to train on a

Basys system to be so short.

"Based

OH till' hest available public information as of February I.

19 86.

Trademark: ltasys Basys, Inc.

For all of the reasons, call to qualify for our free

(In

CA: 1- demonstration video.

1-

800 -847 -0633

800

-332 -2245)

Dept. B7

BASYS, INC.

900

Stierlin

Road

Mountain View

CA 94043

51\5E\y

Single antenna and dual diversity wire- less mic systems, headsets, head- phones, intercom systems, wired mics, audio tape duplicators,

ENG-4 wireless microphone receiver*.

Staff:

Jim

Arring- ton,

Pat Gillette, Don Mereen, Michael

Olinger, Dan Paulnock,

Claude

Kleiman,

Gary Fisher, Rick Peterson, Joel Johnson,

Dan Dantzler.

Tennaplex Systems

2812

452 Five Farms Ln.,

Timonium, Md. 21093

Wand

FM broadband panel with circular polarization, multistation combiner

*, broadcast antennas with vertical pat- terns

*.

Staff:

Marvin Crouch, Les

Lear,

Manfred Muenzel,

Ed

Ritz, Bob Paradise.

Tentel

1506

Dell

Ave.,

3326

Campbell, Calif. 95008

Staff:

Wayne Graham, John Bonn, John

Chavers, Burke Stafford, Bev Zern, Chris

Lui,

Lorrie David.

Texar

7175

Saltsburg Rd., Pittsburgh

15235

2571

Texscan MSI/Compuvid

2473

3855

S.

500

W. Suite S, Salt Lake City 84115

TFT

3420

3090 Oakmead

Village Dr.

,

Santa Clara,

Ca- lif. 95051

Multi- channel remote control', baseband input

BTSC aural modulation monitor, distortion analyzer

*, narrowband

STL re- ceiver*, composite subcarrier generator, series STL with

IF repeater,

FM /stereo monitor, AM stereo exciter,

EBS systems,

AM monitor, BTSC aural modulation mon- itor.

Staff:

Joe

Wu,

Henry

Wu,

Jesse Max

- enchs,

Lois Kiriu, Kevinn

Tam, Joe Bor

- gonia,

Terry Peterson, Gerald Wakayama,

Charlie

Hu,

Charles Lee,

Y.S. Law,

Rich- ard Chien. Malcolm

Furfly.

Theater Service

&

Supply

1792 Union Ave., Baltimore

21211

2917

Staff: Richard Antisdel, Jacauelin

Kele- man.

Thermodyne

2824

20850

S.

Alameda St., Long Beach, Calif.

90810

Shipping cases, rack -mounted instru- ment cases.

Thomson -CSF

Broadcast

3190

37 Brownhouse Rd., Stamford, Conn. 06902

Vidifont graphic product line, Betacam and studio cameras,

FM and TV transmit- ters and video and audio processing equipment.

Staff:

Stanley

Basara,

Charles Gaydos, Thomas Hindle, Johan

Safar.

Thomson Electron

Tubes 3422

550 Mount

Pleasant

Ave., Dover N.J. 0780/

Staff:

Robert Kolts, S.N. Barthelmes,

Daniel Kleim, Anthony Laconti, Charles

Kalfon, James Auxier,

C.

Marliac,

C.

Bon- net.

P.

Gerlach.

C.

Grolleau,

G.

Cleri. liiffen Manufacturing

90

Oser

Ave.,

Hauppauge,

N.Y. 11788

2736

Special effect filters, lenses, special ef- fect viewing kit.

Staff:

Nat Tiffen, Ira Tif

- fen, Steve Tiffen,

Tom

Grosso Jack Bon-

NAB 1986

Timeline

2686

270 Lafayette St.,

Room 1300, New

York

10012

Time code and synchronization pro- ducts, Lynx time code module, SAL time code module,

Lynx model video systems interface

*, system controller, software package'. Staff:

Gerry Block, Julie

Goldscheid, Glenn Lystad

Jr.,

James

Monroe.

TOA

Electronics

2498

480 Carlton Ct.,

S.

San Francisco 94080

Audio equipment manufacturer, studio reference monitors, sound reinforce- ment, loudspeakers systems and com- ponents, mixing consoles, signal pro- cessing equipment, digital delay, microphones. Staff:

Terry Taylor, Bill Es- kew,

Kae Cochran.

Torpey Controls

2906

98 -2220 Midland

Ave., Scarborough, Ont.

MIP

3E6

Hi- styled, low profile illuminated analog clocks to operate from impulse drive*, master clock systems, digital and analog slave clocks, central temperature display systems, timers, central timing systems with remote readouts, video time display, video temperature display, video stop- watch, video/audio routing switchers.

Staff:

R.J. Torpey, A.

Critchley.

Toshiba America

3302

2441 Michelle Dr., Tustin, Calif. 92680

Total Spectrum Manufacturing

3534

20 Virginia Ave.,

West Nyack,

N.Y.

10994

Townsend Associates

3418

79 Mainline Dr., Westfield, Mass, 01085

UHF VHF transmitters,

15kw VHF

*, high efficiency pulse for klystron transmitters', update

TV exciter,

VHF and UHF solid state amplifiers for replacement in older transmitters. Staff: George

Townsend,

Tom

McDonald, Howard McClure,

Ray

Yrga, Bob Anderman, Gary Cooper, Jim

Rogers, Harry Craig, Ken Barker, Bob

Klein.

Ttacoustics

Box 3610, Austin,

Tex.

78764

151

Ttansimage International

245

130

Hanworth Rd., Hounslow,

Middlesex.

England

TW3

3UA

Transmission Structures

Box 907.

Vinita,

Okla., 74301

2621

Staff: Richard

Bell, Shari Bell, Tom Snow.

THmm

Inc.

223

400

W.

Lake

St., Libertyville, Ill.

60048

Audio jacks, plugs and patch cords, co- axial jacks, plugs and patch cords, termi- nal block and connectorized terminal block, front facing terminal blocks, fuse panels, audio and video jack panels and connectorized panels. sen,

Staff:

Ron Lar-

Harry

Lewis, George Newton, Rich- ard Sinclair.

Trinity Corp.

143

481 8th Ave., Suite

647, New

York

10001

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

132

Trivial Development

2514

4 N 240 Calvary

Dr,

Unit D, Bloomingdale,

Ill. 60108

Trompeter Electronics

3348

31186 La Baya

Dr., Westlake Village,

Calif.

91362

Coax connectors, cable assemblies, patch panels, patch cords and accesso- ries, RGB cable plug

*.

Staff:

Ed Trom- peter, Hap Gladish,

Bill Byers, Dick Cole- man, Frank Miles,

Jones, Arnie Stryk.

Jeannette

Miles, Sam

WI

2752

5426 Fair

Ave., N. Hollywood, Calif.

91601

TWR

Lighting

1630 Elmview, Houston 77080

246

Obstructional lighting including bea- cons, sidelights and controls, strobe lighting

*.

Staff:

George Jackson, Mike

El- ledge, Jack

Byers, Bill

Fabry, Tom Brame.

Ultimate Support Systems

Box

470, Fon

Collins, Colo. 80522

2783

Rackmount tems

*, stands

*, modular parts sys- lightweight aluminum and porta- ble support stands, tripods, ulility stands, versa tables and mic boom stands. Staff:

Glen Snider.

Ultimatte Corp.

3552

18607 Topham

St., Reseda, Calif. 91335

Ultimatte

-5 production and post produc- tion and Newsmatte -2 weather and news. Staff:

Paul Vlahos,

Pat Smith, Da- vid

Fellinger,

Arpag Dadourian,

Ron Un- german,

Petro

Vlahos, Maury

Schallock,

Roger Factora.

Uni -Set Corp.

449

Avenue

A, Rochester,

N.Y.

14621

2808

Modular studio staging system, graphic design cart, riser blocks, tops, ramps, news set and table system.

Unicol Products

2475

74 Fourth St., New Rochelle,

N.Y.

10801

Union

Connector

2923

/49

Babylon Tpke., Box H, Roosevelt,

N.Y.

11575

United Media

3526

4075 Leaverton Ct., Anaheim, Calif. 92807

Comm -ette videotape editor, mini comm A/B /C roll editor, Commander

II

- eight machine edit controller, time code generators, readers and character gen- erators, audio router /dissolver. Staff:

Robert Ricci.

United Ropeworks

Box

2420

306, 20 Commerce Dr., Montgomery- ville,

Pa.

18936

Phillystran HPTG, ent, electrically transpar- maintenance -free tower guys and specially designed systems for high pow- er applications. Staff:

Vincent Pappas,

Kenneth Knight.

Universal Elecon

152

903

S.

9/502

Lake St., Suite 102, Burbank, Calif.

Universal Antennas

244

909 E. Collins

Blvd.

,

Richardson,

Tex.

75081

LEMFG

TEMPO Enterprises

is

the new name for

SSS,

but by no means

is

TEMPO new to the cable industry.

We've provided many great services through the years and will continue to do

so.

The

only difference

is

now one, easy

-to- remember rame will accompany and identify all we do.

That name

is

TEMPO

-

TEMPO

Television,

TEMPO Sound, TEMPO Cable, TEMPO

Data.*

Distinctive

TEMPO

-

Memorable

-

Competitive

Experience the future of communications with

us!

TEMPO

ENTERPRISES P.O.

BOX 702T60 TULSA,

OK

74170.918/496 -3200

TELEX

796322

'TEMPO

Television, formerly

SPN

(Satellite Program

Netwod.)

TEMPO

Sound, formerly

Star Ship Stereo TEMPO Cable, formerly Cable Southwest TEMPO Dato, formerly CableText

Earth stations, radio telescopes and atennas for offshore drilling. Staff:

John

Wallace.

UPI

1400 Eye St.. NW

Washington 20005

3378

UPI

TeleCasi

",

The Assignment

Desk

*,

CustomNews,

Custom

-Weather,

Uni

- slides, Nuestras Noticias, CustomNet*,

Live',

NewsFeed

*,

TeleSports 100

",

For- mat Wires`.

Staff: Bruce

Kanner, Gordon

Rice, Bill Ferguson, Bud Hutchinson, Jim

O'Keefe,

Bill Fuller, Jim

Palmer, Lou Wes

- tendorf, Courtenay Carson, Mary

Meter,

Lauren Savadel, Pinky Vidacovich.

U.S. lape and Label

1561

Fairview

Ave.,

St.

Louis

63132

2723

Bumper strips, window labels and con- cert patches. Staff:

Byron Crecelius, Au- drey Moore, Jim Eiseman.

Utah

Scientific

3144

1685

W.

2200 South, Salt Lake City

84119

Routing switchers, station automation hardware, video and audio distribution amplifiers.

Utility

Tower

3485

3200 NW 38th. Box 12369. Oklahoma City

73157

Tower sections for AM,

FM,

TV,

CATV and

MW communications.

Staff:

R.

Nelson,

C.

Nelson, Joe James, Chris Payne, Rick

Bales.

Valentino Music

Library

151

W.

46th Sr., New

York 10036

3465

Production music and sound effects li- braries, direct licensing of performance rights. Staff:

Thomas Valentino, Chris

Carrino, John Battaglia.

Valley People

2817 Erica Pl., Nashville

37204

2747

Model 400 microphone processor

",

415 dynamic sibilance processor,

PR

-2 powered rack for 800A series limiters', expanders*, multifunction signal proces- sor, limiter /compressor /expanders.

Staff: Norman

Baker,

Michael Morgan,

Tom Irby, Shawna Crymes.

Varian

611

Associates

Hansen

Way.

Palo

3206

Alto,

Calif

94304

Broadcast tubes and amplifiers, klys- trode, klystrons, sockets and cavities for radio and

TV, linear triodes and tetrodes, switch tubes, industrial heating applica- tions, special ham cavity, test set,

TWT power supply, UHF -TV klystrons, variable visual couplers. Staff:

G.

Badger,

H. Fos- ter, D.

Crumm,

S.

Paul, K. Peterson,

M.

Wytyshyn,

S.

Adamo,

R.

Stones,

W.

Brun

- hart,

J.

Aurand,

E.

McCune,

J.

Button,

M.

Schrader,

N.

Pond,

J.

Driscoll,

C. Wirth,

B.

Miklos,

C. Erridge,

T.

Dolan,

J.

Ahern,

J.

Bradley,

R.

Brandon.

Veam

/Litton

Systems

100 New Wood Rd.

.

2559

Watertown, Calif. 06795

Active interconnect.

Staff:

Hubert

Du- mas,

Al nis

Bernardini, William Stopper, Den-

Kohanek.

Vertex Communications

208, 209

2600 Longview

St.. Kilgore,

Tex. 75662

NAB 1986

Vidcom International

3 West

225

End Ave., Old Greenwich,

Conn.

06830

BAT 1700 billing, accounting traffic sys- tem. ter,

Staff: Anthony Toogood, Mark Cus-

Warren Middleton, Charles

Cox.

Video Aids of Colorado

175

Suite H, 2450 Central

Ave., Boulder,

Colo.

80301

Pattern generator, burst phasemeter, se- quential switcher,

D.

Staff:

Pat

Adam- son, Don Rogers, Kirk

Fowler.

Video Associates Labs

3933 Steck Ave.. Austin.

Tex.

78756

3330

Video International

2754

1280 Sunrise Hwy:, Copiague, N.Y. 11726

DTC 3500 standard converters,

DTC2500 standards converter, TBC

3000 time base corrector.

Staff: Gerhard

Freitag, Stefanie Freitag, Peter Kaminsky.

Video Telecom

1041

N.

2592

Highland

Ave.,

Hollywood, Calif.

90038

VideoLab

1978 B

210

Del

Amo Blvd.,

Torrance, Calif.

90501

Time code retrofit, zero offset time code retrofit*, fast shuttle retrofit

,

6800 time code retrofit*, balanced audio module for type

V VTR's. Staff:

Tom Anderson, Kevin

Irlean, Ramsey Dawson.

Videomagnetics

3515 Edison

Way,

Menlo Park, 94025

2725

Quad video heads.

Staff:

Tony Korte,

Ted

Barger, Ed Chapman, Carme- Blanchard.

Videomedia

211 Weddell

Dr.,

Sunnyvale,

3558

Calif

94089

Eagle editing systems

XR low cost

AB roll', magnum editing system,

VS10 frame accurate videotape animation sys- tem*,

Q

-Star IIA commercial insertion se- quencer, VMC -202A multichannel traffic control system with log generator, avail

- abilities, billing, sales tracking, edit list generator, graphics. Staff:

Jim Thibe- deaux, Hank

Wilks, Ken Royer, Bill Stick

- ney, Stu Earnest,

Dorsa.

Herb Kneiss, Dick

Videotek

3316

243 Shoemaker

Rd., Pottstown,

Pa. 19464

VSM -60 broadcast vectorscope*,

HR-

190 19 -inch high resolution master color monitor*,

AVM

-13s

13

-inch color monitor with audio*,

APM -8RS eight input audio program monitor with four stereo inputs*, rack mount color monitors, color receiv- er /monitors, waveform monitor, sync gen- erator, routing switchers, audio program monitors, ulators. distribution amplifiers, demod-

Staff:

Phil Steyaert, Peter Choi,

Rick

Hollowbush,

Don Taylor, Eric

Wahl

- berg, Emery Grady, Barry Gardner,

Bill

Boxill,

Jay Trunzo, Jim Mauger.

Viking Cases

/0480

Oak St.. NE,

33702

St.

Petersburg,

2757

Fla.

Heavy duty shipping cases and

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

134 lightweight carrying cases,

EIA rack cases and shock mounted rack cases.

Staff: Arthur

Stemler, William

Strickland,

Robert Stemler, Bruce

Stemler.

Vital Industries

3191

3700 NE 53d Ave., Gainesville, Fla.

32601

3000 video production switcher", digital video manipulator.

Staff: Christopher

Donoyan, Linda Buickel, Norman White,

Paul Dragon, Gordon Peters, Jon Martin,

Richard Hardage.

VTS

Music

Box

1168, Arden,

N.C.

28704

206

Ward -Beck Systems

841 Progress Ave., Scarborough Ont.

3060

M1H

2X4

R1400 and R2200 radio audio consoles`, transportable production console, stereo

TVaudio consoles, stereo routing switch

-

er,

distribution amplifier assembly, distri- bution amplifier, extended range meters, intercom systems. Staff:

Ronald Ward,

Rodger Beck, Arthur Schubert

Jr.,

Eu- gene Johnson,

Sylvia Fantin, William

McFadden, Duke McLane.

Wavefront Technologies

247

1421 State St.,

Santa

Barbara, Calif.

93101

Software modules, Model, PreView and

Image, for 3D animation/simulation.

Staff:

Lauri

Kelty,

Ken Duckworth, John

Grower, Larry Barels, Bill Kovacs, Mark

Sylvester, Dave Elrod,

Wood.

Richard

Taylor.

Scott Stein, Jeff

Weatherbank

2185

S.

2930

3600

West,

Salt Lake

City, Utah

84119

WeatherCheck weather information ser- vices Staff:

Steven

Root,

Richard

Eu- bank.

Wegener Communications

2760

150

Technology Park, Norcross, Ga. 30092

Staff: Bob Placek, Peggy Placek, Ned

Mountain, Jon Thrasher, Roger Doering,

Harry Matthews, Steve

Fox, Neil Kohrn,

Louis Livaditis, Heinz Wegener.

West End Film

2121

Newport Pl.,

Washington

20037

2474

Wheatstone Broadcast Group

2400

5 Collins Rd.,

Bethany, Conn. 06525

Stereo television consoles.

Wheelit

440 Arco Dr..

Toledo, Ohio 43607

2478

Whirlwind

Box 1075, Rochester, N.Y. 14603

2463

Audio and video cabling for interface, audio accessories, custom cabling and rack panels, cable reels and transform- ers.

Will -Burt Co.

169

S.

Main

St.,

Orville,

Ohio 44667

2587

Telescoping masts for radio mobile units*, masts for

ENG and SNG mobile units.

Staff:

David Davis, Jeffrey Milligan,

W.M.

Patterson, Don Barlow.

Winsted

980/

James

Cr,

Minneapolis

55431

3424

INTEREP

BROADCAST

FINANCIAL

SERVICES

INTEREP

A Division of

National Radio Sales. Inc.

INTEREP

Broadcast professional to sellers, qualified buyers

of

Financial

Services specializes in providing financial assistance current owners and broadcast properties (including

first

-time buyers with good track records).

Services include among others:

New equity and debt financing.

Debt restructuring;

Professional, customized presentations for each market and station.

Vince Bellino will be at the

NAB

Convention and can be reached the hospitality suites

of

any

of

the

INTEREP

Companies. at

For more information

Vince Bellino call at

(212) 916

-0541

INTEREP

Broadcast Financial Services

100

Park Avenue

New

York,

N.Y.

10017

INTEREP

BROADCAST

FINANCIAL

SERVICES

INTEREP

A Division of

National Radio

Sales. Inc.

THE FIRST

EIGHT

MONTHS' ACHIEVEMENTS

Purchase

of KGOL

-FM

(Lake Jackson) /Houston, Texas

Assisted in

- securing

$12,500,000

of

debt financing.

Purchase

of KFRE

AM

&

FM

Fresno California

-

Assisted securing

$3,000,000

of

debt in and equity financing.

Editing consoles tape storage systems, vertical equipment racks, dubbing racks, mini editing console

*, modular dubbing rack

*.

Staff:

C.E. Johnson,

G.R. Hoska,

Brenda Sabin, Judy

Ruzek, Kent Lilja,

Greg Hedlund.

Wireworks

2401

380 Hillside

Ave., Hillside, N.J.

07205

Multiboxes/racks, multitrunks, multitails, transformer isolated mic splitters, chas- sis mount multipin connectors, mini mi- crophone multiboxes, prism compo- nents, assemblies, cables, cable tester, reelers, consulting and design services.

Staff:

Larry Williams, Jerry Krulewicz, An- gela DiCicco.

Wold Communications

2606

10880

Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles

90024

Satellite sion delivery of programing, televi- operations centers, earth station complexes, mobile satellite uplink and microwave units, weather data and infor- mation service, Ku- and

C

-band trans- mission services. Staff:

Maxine Jordan,

Robert

E.

Wold, Robert

N.

Wold, Bill

Hynes,

Tom Bartunek, Dorothy Marsh,

Jim Burke, Mike LoCollo, Bob Abrahams,

Gary Lister, Bob Wean,

Craig Robin,

Pau- la

Aldridge,

John Chin, Gary Luhrman.

Wolf Coach

3541

7 B St., Industrial Park, Auburn, Mass.

01501

Satellite newsgathering mobile design.

World Tower

Box 405, Mayfield,

Ky.

42066

2814

AM,

FM,

TV, towers. cable and microwave

Staff:

M. Sholar, Jeff Sholar, Jim

Wilson,

Ron

Williams.

WS!

41 N.

2642

Road, Box

B,

Bedford, Mass. 01730

Astro

-WX complete weather service

*,

As- trofax, Astrographics and Astrodata, high resolution satellite images, weather graphics and database. Staff:

Alan

Riley,

Ray Costello, Don Freeland, Debbie

Turn- er,

Dave Miller, Maureen Condon, Dave

Devlin, Grady

Young, Roy Reiss, Todd

Glickman. Mike Daunais, Rich Schanck,

Arlo Gambell, Bob

Brammer.

NAB 1986

Zellan

Optics

15 E. 26th St., New

York

10010

2477

Zenith

Electronics

167

1000

N. Milwaukee, Glenview,

IB.

60025

Zonal Limited

2586

Holmethrope Ave., Redhill, Surrey,

England

Acetate and polyester -based magnetic sound recording film, audio tape and cassette products, multitrack audio tapes*. Staff:

A. Heise,

S.

Malek- Jahan- ian, V

Gaboudian,

M.

Gaboudian.

Outdoor exhibitors

Aerospatiale Helicopter

2701 Forum

Corp.

29

Dr,

Grand Prairie,

Tex.

75053

Aries Industries

6

W229 N2494AA,

Hwy.

164, Waukesha,

Wis.

53186

AT &T

Communications

Rtes. 202 /206, Bedminster,

N.J. 07921

BAF Communications

228 Essex St., Salem, Mass. 01970

9

4,6

Broadcast Microwave Service

17

7322 Conroy Ct..

Box 84630, San Diego.

Calif

92138

Centro Corp.

9516 Chesapeake

Dr.,

San Diego 92123

52

Comsat

26,27

950 L'Enfant Pl.,

SW,

Washington 20024

Comtech Antenna

15

3100 Communications Rd.,

St. Cloud. Fla.

32769

Conus Communications

3415

University, Minneapolis 55414

Dalsat

1205 Summit, Plano.

Tex.

75074

24

3

Ethereum

7641

Scientific Corp.

19

Clarewood.

Suite 336. Houston.

Tex.

77036

Hubbard Communications

23

12495 34th

St.

N.,

Sr.

Petersburg, Fla. 33702

IDB Communication

Group

5

10509

W.

Washington Blvd.. Culver

City, Ca- lif.

90232

"TWENTY

YEARS EXPERIENCE GOES INTO

EVERY

SALE"

H.B.

La

Rue, Media Broker

Radio TV CATV

Appraisals

At the

NAB,

Loews Anatole, Tower Suite

1489

West Coast

44 Montgomery

St.

#500

San

Francisco, CA 94104

415 434 -1750

East

Coast

500

East

77th

St.

#1909

New York, N.Y. 10021

212 288 -0737

Atlanta

6201 Powers Ferry Rd.,

Atlanta,

GA 30339

#455

404 956 -0673 Hal Gore,

V.P.

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

136

Kavouras Inc.

6301 34th Ave., South,

14

Minneapolis 55450

Microdyne

Corp.

491 Oak Rd..

Ocala, Fla. 32672

16

Midwest Corp.

One Spetti

10,11,12,13

Dr

:.

Edgewood,

Ku 41007

Musco Mobile

100

Lighting

1,2

First

Ave.,

West,

Oskaloosa, Iowa 52577

MZB

& Associates

22

4203 Beltway Dr.,

Dallas,

Tex.

75244

ENG /EFP

/production mobile video vehi- cles. Staff:

John Zienkosky,

Dick Bock,

Tom

Hosper, Herb

Huff, Bruce Laughlin,

Mike

Woody. Karen Westbrook, Mike

Rucker.

Pesa America

18

6073

N.W. 167th St., Suite

C4,

Miami, Fla.

330/5

Radiation Systems

1501

Moran Rd., Sterling,

Va.

22170

28

RCA American

Communications

7

Four Research

Way,

Princeton. N.J. 08540

Shook Electronic Enterprises

6630

Topper Pkwy

.

30

San Antonio,

Tex.

78233

Spectra

Communications

Rte.

1,

Box 1168, Aldie,

Va.

22001

Networks

Capital Cities /ABC

Plaza of the Americas

Loews Anatole, Honeysuckle room

Staff:

George Newi, Bryce Rathbone,

Buzz Mathesius, Arnold Marfoglia, Les- ley Allegro, Howard Burkat, Warren

Denker, Bob Hingel, Tim Kearney, Nancy

Smith, Peter Zobel.

Capcities /ABC Radio

1330 Avenue

Loews Honeysuckle room of the Americas, New

York

10019

Staff:

Jim Arcara, Stuart Krane, Charles

King, Daniel Forth, Susan Moran, Darryl

Brown, zik, Ed

Debbie Golden, Beverly Padrat-

McLaughlin, Bob Benson, Peter

Flannery, Kathy Lavinder, Joe Keating,

Kent Coughlin, Richard Martinez, John

Axten, Bob Kingsley, Gloria Briggs,

Rob- ert Donnelly, Maria LaPorta, Doug Land,

Lettice

Tanchum, Diane Jennings, Linda

Stern, Maurice

Tunick,

David

Rimmer, Al

Resnick, Harry Priester, Lou Raymo, Ed

Glab, Don Bouloukus,

Tom

Rounds,

Ralph Smith, Mark Kalman, Lorraine

McConnell, Howard Cosell.

CBS Inc.

51

W.

Fairmont

52d St.,

New

York

10019

1901

CBS

/Broadcast Group

Staff:

Thomas

Leahy,

George Schweit- zer, Tony

Malara.

Affiliate

Relations

Staff:

Scott Michels, Don Clancy, Fran

Ei- gendorff, Joe Eustace, Preston

Farr, Eu- nice Broome, Dave Olmsted, Heather

Re-

Coming

Soon:

ME

'

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Numbers

.

(00)

8AM 9AM

10AM 11AM

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I

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IDDD

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VEEE

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VFFF

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TEENS

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18-34

W

18-34

M 25-54 w 25-54

M 35-6h

W 35-64

4MAA

P12+ SHR 1.3

P12+

21

TEENS

M

18.34

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7

6

6 M 25.54

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8

6

2

(BBB

P12+ SHR

3.7

P12+

58

TEENS

M 18-34

W 18-34

14

10

M

25.54

26

W

25-54

11

M

W

35-64

18

35-64

6

ICCC

P12+ SHR

P12+

TEENS

M 18-34

W 18.34

M 25-54

W 25-54

M 35-64

W 35-64

2.1

102

6

22

31

33

34

21

21

2.2

166

9

31

55

50

5

32

38

2.2

193

1

61

44

81

73

40

35

4.7

348

2

138

100

143

122

42

53

`\

DEMOS

ESTIIv1,

2.2

168

2

31

58

57

72

36

41

2.5

185

3

30

61

51

80

38

51

2

6

.186

1

22

63

44

78

32

50

4.9

368

120

132

106

161

36

67

GEOGRAPI

DAYPART

!

5.3

390

2

110

142

114

150

43

79

5.2

372

93

123

128

123

6

2.9

200

2

24

75

48

88

35

59

5.

3

3.1

201

5

24

7

+

,

-,,

o5-64

1

!TS

5-6AM

TO MID

-1

AM

IIPM

MID

MID

1AM

2.2

53

14

3

1.8

28

8

7

12

2

7

2

4

13

6 rock on the

cutting

edge. Scorpions, Judas

Priest, Led Zeppelin,

Van

Halen,

ZZ

Top,

Hellion, Deep Purple, Pink

Z -ROCK is live

Floyd, Jimi Hendrix, Iron Maiden, Ozzy Osbourne, AC

/DC,

Motley

Crue, Ted

Nugent, Santana,

Anthrax, Dio,

Black 'u' Blue,

Whiplash,

Leatherwolf, Outlaws, Doors, Grim Reaper, Motorhead,

Metal

Massacre, Twisted Sister, Blind in Texas,

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Leppard, Stones,

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Power Squadron, Alice Cooper, Cream,

Breakthrough numbers 12-34, breakthrough numbers for your bottom line

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s

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at

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In Texas call

1-

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991

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Z

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from Satellite Music

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11111111111=111111M1

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NIIMIMPRONE

Network

DALLAS NEW YORK CHICAGO

LOS ANGELES

gan, Jeff McIntyre, Bob Shetland, Ged

Young, George Zurich,

Diane Quinzi.

CBS/TV Stations

Fairmont

1901

Staff: Neil

Derrough, Mark

Pearlman, Al- len Shaklan, Ronald Tindiglia, Carl

Wen

- hold, Ray Solley,

Douglas Clemenson. wCBS

-TV

Roger Colloff,

Tom

Baldwin,

Ron

Tarasoff.

WBBM -TV

Chicago: Jonathan

Rodgers, Howard Matthews,

E.

Charles

Upton.

KCBS

-Tv

Los Angeles:

Frank Gard- ner,

David

Percelay,

Bob

Davis, Bob

Lacy. wcAu

-Tv

Philadelphia: Steven Cohen,

Gordon Hughes, John

Byrne, Hank

Schorle.

CBS Radio Loews Anatole

1134

Staff: CBS Radio

Division:

Van Gordon

Sauter,

Robert Hosking, Elizabeth Hayter,

Sylvia Hughes, Helene Blieberg, Larry

Conti.

CBS Owned AM

Stations:

Eu- gene

Lothery, Anna Mae Sokusky,

Jerone

Navies, Allen Balch. CBS Owned

FM

Stations:

Robert Hyland, Robert VanDer- heyden. CBS Radio Network: Richard

Brescia, Joseph Dembo,

Tom McGinn,

Michael Ewing, David Kurman, Suzanne

Sack, Deborah Reno,

Cornelius

Knox,

John Burrows, Peter

Acquaviva,

William

McGee, Anne

Murray, David Kleinbart,

Michael

Connolly,

Charles Osgood, Judy

Muller,

Dr.

Peter Salgo, Marshall Loeb,

Doug Poling, John

Rooney.

CBS Radio-

Radio:

Robert

Kipperman, Frank

D.

Mur- phy,

Norm Ginsburg,

Rob Carpenter,

"We

Set The

Frazier, Gross

&

Kadlec communications the past forty knowledge years,

NAB 1968

Larry Cooper, David

A st,

Nick

Kiernan,

Robert Leeder, Steven Epstein, Mike Har- rison. CBS Radio Representatives:

Ed- ward

Kiernan, Anthony Miraglia.

Operations

&

Engineering

Staff: George

Shannon,

Gerald Plotnick,

Jim

McKenna, Herman

Badler, Jerry

Stahler, Robert Norvet, man, David

White,

Charles Capple-

Joseph

Flaherty,

Ralph Green, Robert

Zagoma, Charles

Dages, Robert

O'Connor, Palma Ricken,

Howell Matte.

CNN

Radio

Loews Anatole

523

1050 Techwood Dr., Atlanta 30318

Staff:

Paul Amos, Clifford

Matis, Lisa

McMahon, Chuck

Carr.

CNN Television Loews Anatole

523

1050 Techwood Dr.,

Atlanta 30318

Staff:

Paul

Amos, Earl Casey, Gene

Wright, Henry Gillespie, Bob Rierson,

Bob

Schuessler, Arthur O'Connor,

Paul

Wischmeyer, Colin Chisholm, Carol Born- berger,

Judy

Borza.

Mutual Broadcasting

Loews Anatole

1034

1755

S.

Jefferson Davis

Hwy.,

Arlington,

Va.

22202

Staff:

Jack Clements, Ben

Avery, Esther

Bernard,

Lynn McIntosh, George Barber,

Grace

Gearino, Craig Whetstine, Gordon

Peil,

Peggy

Solomon, Ron Nessen, Marc

Standards:'

we've developed a and experience base second to none. offer

Because of our clients industries creative and innovative approaches to this in the

Broadcast and

Cable tax our clients money.

Charles

H. Kadlec,

President

Frazier,

Gross

&

Kadlec, Inc. has industry unique grown since perspective, appraisals and with the

1946. fair

Over market valuations. The result:

We save we

FRAZIER

co

GROSS

&

KADLEC INC

financial and Marketing Services to the

Communications Industry since

1946.

Asset Appraisals Fair Market Valuations Market Research

4801 Massachusetts Avenue,

IYN,

Washington. DC. 20016, (202)

966 -2280

Feldman, Mac Allen, Larry King,

Pat

Pip- er,

George Thomas, Rick Bockes, Art

Kriemelman.

NBC Inc.

30 Rockefeller Pl.,

New

York

10020

Staff:

Grant Tinker, Irwin

Segelstein,

M.S.

Rukeyser.

NBC

-N

Network

Fairmont 2500

Staff:

Ray Timothy, Pierson Mapes,

George Hiltzik.

NBC -TV Affiliate

Relations

Staff:

Tony Cervini, John Damiano, Bill

Fouch, Jim

Ritter, Bill Kelley, Eric Ben

- north, Barry

Hillebrandt, Peter Flynn, Ar- lene Engleman, Jim

Barry,

Mort Dillon.

NBC -TV Sales Services:

Rick Quacken- boss, Joe Fedrich, Frank Neumeister,

Don Hector. Operations

&

Technical

Services: Michael Sherlock, Jack

Weir,

Steve Bonica, David Baylor,

Maurice

Greenfield, Arthur Digman, Joseph

Ulascewicz, Crawford

McGill, Anthony

Pedalino. TV Stations Division:

Al Jer- ome, Bob Finnerty, Mark Monsky, Duffy

Sasser, Paul Beavers;

WNBC -TV

Carl

Carey, Jerry Nachman, Edward Knapp; wac

-TV

Fred

DeMarco,

Jim

Van

Messel,

Bill

Ron

Johnston;

WKYC

-TV.

John Llewellyn,

Bilek, Dave Boylan,

Torn Powers;

Richard Lobo, Allan Horlick,

Richard Reingold,

James

Powell;

KNec(Tvl. John Rohrbeck,

Tom Capra, Bill

Landers,

Pat Wallace.

News:

Larry

Grossman, Tom Wblzien, Tim Russert,

Jo

Moring. Sports:

Ken Shanzer, Ken Ha- gard,

Phil Parlante, Bill Tobey, Terry Ewert,

John Gonzalez. Press:

Dom Giofre,

Cathy Lehrfeld. Corporate:

Rick

Kelly.

NBC Radio

Anatole

1234

Staff:

Randall Bongarten, Robert Mounty,

Barbara Landes, Stephen

Soule, Larry

Miller, Craig Simon, Deborah

McLaugh- lin, Steve White,

Gerry Green, Richard

Greenhut, Robert Wogan, Dave Bartlett,

Willard Lochridge, Nancy

Cook, Gig Bar- ton,

Patti Le Mon, Frank Cody,

Shirley Mal- donado, James

Farley,

Sidney Friedman,

Frank Raphael, Joan Vbukides, Nicholas

Schiavone, Warren Vandeveer, Raphael

Weiss,

John Bailie,

Dr.

Ruth Wlestheimer,

Bruce

Williams, Sally Jessy

Raphael, Mi- chael Donovan, Charles Pickering, John

Irwin,

Terry

DeWto, Mark Olkowski, Scott

Standiford, William Newbrough,

Bill

Kraus, Michael Bock,

Joel Hodroff, Bart- ley Wash.

Satellite Music Network Anatole

2072

40655

N.

Central Expwy,

Suite 600, Dallas

75243

Staff:

John

Tyler,

David Hubschman,

Bob Bruton, Kristine

Sites, Greg Daugh- erty, Mel Diamond, Sheila Quisenberry,

Michael

Penzell, Robert Hall, Carlos

Hurd, Ralph Sherman,

Tim Spencer, Roni

Bava,

Pat Clarke, Jim White, Marianne

Bellinger,

Charlie Strickland, Jackie

But- ler.

Sheridan Broadcasting

Loews Anatole

1500 Chamber of

Commerce Bldg., Pitts- burgh 15219

Staff:

Ronald Davenport.

Broadcasting Apr 14 1986

138

SIN

Television Network

460

W.

42d St., New

York

10036

Staff:

Rene

Anselmo,

William Stiles.

Wanstar Radio Networks Loews

2172

620

S.

Pointe Ct.,

Suite 185,

Colorado

Springs

80906

Statt:

Terry Robinson,

Ron Ruth, Gary

Fries, Bill

Moyes, Mike Harvey,

Tom Page,

Carl Goldman, Rob Bein, Ken Harris,

Clark Jones, John Lodge, Larry

Wilson,

Craig Hines, Bud

Weisner.

The United

Stations

Loews 2372

1440 Broadway, New

York,

10018

Staff: Nick

Verbitsky, Bill

Hogan, Barbara

McMahon,

Ruth Presslaff,

Ed Salamon.

Unity Broadcasting Loews Anatole

934

Io

Columbus Cr., New

York

/0019

Staff:

Eugene Jackson, Sydney

Small,

Del

Raycee, Joan Logue, George Ed- wards (National Black

Network), and

Jack Bryant (National Black Network).

Wall

22

Street Journal Report

Loews Anatole

2189

Corrlandt St., New

York

10007

Staff:

Bob Rush, Tony Garcia.

Westwood One Loews Anatole

1034

9540 Washington Blvd., Culver

City,

Calif.

90230

Staff:

Gary Landis,

Tom Ferro, Richard

Kimble,

Bill Battison, Barry

Freeman,

Doug Field, Biff Davis, Mike Carne, Glen

Sigmon,

Steve Jenkins.

Al

N7

NAB 1986

Brokers

American Radio Brokers

SFO

Anatole

5182

1255

94109

Port

St., Suite 625, San Francisco

Staff: Chester Coleman,

Warren

Earl.

Americom

Loews Anatole

610

900 17th St., Suite 1050, Washington 20006

Staff: Thomas Gammon, Daniel Gam- mon, Craig Culp, Mark Cunningham.

Bill

-David

Associates

Loews Anatole

2508

80909

Fair

Mount

St., Colorado

Springs

Staff:

Bill Martin.

Blackburn

& Co.

Loews Anatole

810

1/11

19th St.,

NW

Washington 20036

Staff:

Jim Blackburn, Richard Black- burn,

Tony Rizzo, Joe Sitrick, Alan

Tindal,

Roy Rowan,

Jay Bowles, Howard

Stas- sen, Bud Doss, Charles Kurtz, George

Otwell, Greg Johnson, Jack

Harvey,

Neil

Rockhoff, Steve Puett, Susan Byers.

Frank Boyle

& Co.

Marriott Market Center

55 Old Field Point

Road, Greenwich, Cont.

06830

Staff:

Frank Boyle, Bob Pates, Jim Boyle.

Business Broker Associates

Loews Anatole

399 Somerville

Ave.,

Chattanooga 37405

Executive Offices:

8425 Dunwoody

Place, Atlanta, GA

30338

(404) 998

-1100

The and

See

CHAPMAN

ASSOCIATES® nationwide media brokers

Nation's

Most Professional

Knowledgeable Broadcast

Brokerage

Firm. us at the

NAB in Loews

Suite

923

Atrium

-Anatole

Staff: Alfred

Dick.

Robert

A. Chaisson Inc. Loews Anatole

50 Locust Ave., New Canaan, Conn. 06840

Staff:

Robert

A.

Chaisson.

Chapman Associates

Loews Anatole

923 Atrium

1835 Savoy Dr., Suite 206, Atlanta

30341

Staff:

Bill Cate, Ray Stanfield, Corky

Cartwright, Charles Giddens,

William

Ly- tel,

Brian Cobb,

Elliot Evers, Warren

Gregory, Bill Lochman, Greg

Merrill,

Er- nie Pearce, Peter Stromquist, Bill Whitley,

Mitt Younts, man,

David LaFrance,

Ron

Hick-

James Mergen, Randy

Jeffrey.

Donald

K. Clark Loews Anatole

1788

Box 1065,

Merritt

Island, Fla.

32952 -1065

Staff: Donald

Clark,

Anne

Clark.

Communications

Equity Associates

851

Loews Anatole

753

Fairmont

1101

Lincoln

Center, 5401

W.

Kennedy,

Tampa,

Fla.

33609

Staff:

Kent Phillips, Diane Healy- Linen,

Glen Serafin,

J.

Patrick Michaels.

R.C.

Crisler

& Co.

Suite 801, 580 Walnut St.,

Hyatt

Cincinnati

45202

Staff:

R.C. Crisler, Clyde Haehnle, Larry

Wood, John

Babcock, Graham

Quaal,

Carl Ward. e14

Daniels

&

2930

E.

Associates

Sheraton

Third Ave., Denver 80206

Staff:

Phil Hogue, Bruce Cranston.

William A. Exline

Loews Anatole 710 Atrium

4340 Redwood Hwy., San Rafael,

Calif.

94903

ell

Staff:

Bill Exline, Andrew McClure.

Norman Fischer

&

Associates

Loews Anatole

1010

Box 5308, Austin,

Tex.

78763

Staff:

Norman Fischer, Bill Prikryl.

Richard

A. Foreman Assoc.

Marriott

Market Center

330 Emery

Dr

East, Stamford, Conn. 06902

Staff: Dick

Foreman.

Milton

O.

Ford & Associates

Loews Anatole

1765 Tower

5050

Poplar

Ave., Suite

1135, Memphis

38157

Staff: Milton Q. Ford,

Jo Ann

F.

Kail.

Gammon

&

Ninowskl

Media Investments Hyatt Regency

Suite 306, 1925

K

St., Washington 20006

Staff:

Jim Gammon, Ron Ninowski, Don

Bussell, Jack Satterfield, Marc Hand,

Richard

Wartell, Carl Fielstra.

wlt

Gunzendorfer

&

Assoc. Hyatt

2210 Hastings Dr., Belmont, Calif.

94002

Staff: Wit Gunzendorfer.

Hogan -Feldmann Loews Anatole

16255 Ventura

Blvd.

,

Suite 219, Encino,

Ca- lif.

91436

Staff: Arthur Hogan, Jack

Feldmann.

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

140

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"Fly

By

Light"

by

demo:

Name

light

Title

Station

Address

City

Fly by

Light,

P.O.

Box

11059,

Memphis,Tennessee

38111

Phone_

L

State

Zip

J

The Holt Corp.

Loews Anatole

653

Suite 205, Westgate

Mall,

Atrium

Bethlehem, Pa.

18017

Staff:

G.

Arthur

Holt, Bernhard

Fuhr- mann, Gary

Kirtley,

Mark O'Brien.

Jamar -Rice

Co. Loews Anatole

1165

110

Wild

Basin Rd., Suite 245,

Austin,

Tex.

78746

Staff: Wiliam

Rice.

Kalil

& Co. Loews Anatole

3438 N.

Country Club,

Tucson,

Ariz.

85716

Staff:

Frank

Kahl,

Howard Duncan, Kelly

Callan.

Kepper, Tupper

&

Co. Summit

300 Knightsbridge

Parkway, Suite 360, Lin- colnshire,

111.

60069.

Staff:

William Kepper, John Tupper, Pam

Mysker, Mike Fugatt.

H.B. LaRue

Loews Anatole

1489

44

Montgomery

St., San Francisco 94104

Staff:

Hugh Ben

LaRue, Harold Gore,

Joy Thomas.

The Mahlman

Co.

Loews Anatole

723

I

Stone

Pl.. Brortxville,

N.Y.

10708

Staff:

Bob Mahlman, Nancy Mahlman,

Josh Mayberry, Bob Biernacki, Lou Faust.

R.A.

508A

Marshall

Pineland

&

Co.

Wyndham

Mall

Office Center,

Hilton

Head Island,

S.C. 29928

Statt:

Bob Marshall, Marti Marshall.

NAB 1986

Reggie Martin

&

Associates

Loews Anatole

710

Atrium

731 S. Mashta Dr.,

Key Biscayne, Fla.

33149

Staff: Reggie

Martin,

Ron Jones.

Ralph Meador

Loews Anatole

Box 36,

Lexington, Mo. 64067

8189

Staff: Ralph Meador, Randy Meador.

George Moore

&

Associates

Suite 712, 6116 N.

Loews

Anatole

Central Expwy., Dallas

75206

Staff: George

Moore,

Jim Moore,

Charles

Earls.

The Montcalm Corp.

Duncan

Pan

Pacific Vancouver

Building.

315 2nd

Ave.. Seattle

98104

Staff: Jerry

Dennon,

Wiliam

Baldwin.

O'Grady

&

Associates

Wyndham

Drawer D,

Goshen, N.Y. 10924

Staff:

Jim O'Grady, Richard

Lyttle, Tom

Shovan.

Stan Raymond

&

Assoc. Loews

1889

1795 Peachtree Rd., NE, Suite 220,

30309

Atlanta

Staff:

Stan Raymond, Nancy Raymond,

Nick Ibornone.

Cecil

L.

Richards Inc.

Hyatt

1018

7700 Leesburg Pike, Suite 408,

Falls

Church,

Va.

22043

Staff: Cecil Richards, Loyola Richards,

SUDBRINK BROADCASTING has acquired

WTLL

(TV)

Richmond,

Virginia for

$3,000,000 from

National Capital Christian Broadcasting,

Inc.

The

undersigned initiated this transaction

and

assisted the parties

in

negotiations.

TREIRL

RICHAR

1

S

INC.

A Confidential Seance to Owners

8

Quaid led Buyers

NEGOTIATIONS

FINANCING APPRAISALS

TV CATV RADIO NEWSPAPERS

7700 LEESBURG PIKE

FALLS CHURCH, VA

22043

(703) 821

-2552

4320 DUNDEE ROAD

NORTHBROOK. IL

60062

(312) 291.0188

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

142

Bruce Houston, Lee Hague.

Robert Rounsaville

&

Associates

Plaza of the Americas

P.O. Box 11898,

Atlanta

30355

Staff:

Robert Rounsaville,

Arnold man, Mary Bush.

Kauf-

Barry

Sherman

&

Associates

Loews Anatole

1665 Tower

1828 L St., N.W.,

#300,

Washington 20036

Staff: Barry Sherman, Walter Wbstman,

Muriel Levin.

Howard

E.

Stark

By appt.

575 Madison Ave.,

10th Floor, New only

York

10022

Staff: Howard

Stark.

Edwin Tornberg

&

Co.

Box 8698, Washington 20011

Staff: Edwin Tornberg.

Mansion

Reps

John Blair

1290 Avenue

& Co.

Anatole

823 of the Americas, New

York

10104

Staff: Corporate: Jack

Fritz. TV: Harry

Smart, Wally Schwartz,

Pat

Devlin, Jim

Kelly,

Floyd Gelini,

Bill Breda. Jack

Poor,

Kenn Donnellon. Radio Representation

Division:

Jim Hilliard, John Boden, Bar- bara Crooks, Bob

Smith.

Blair

Radio:

Charlie Colombo, Bob

Ferraro, Bill Coury,

Ken Miller, Bob Lion, Scott Lazare, Karen

Wald. Selcom /RAR:

Frank Oxarart,

Bill

McHale,

Tom Turner, Andy

Rainey, Jim

Ferrer,

Brian Robinson.

Torbet:

Tony Fa- solino, Mike Bellantoni, John Graziano,

Robert Lurito, Mariann DeLuca, Bill Kehl

- beck, Alan Harrison, Loyd Senn.

Durpetti

&

111

E.

Associates

Wacker Dr., Chicago 60601

Anatole

Staff:

Michael Blackman,

Pat

Byrne,

Tony

Durpetti, John Fabian, Cheryle Han

- gartner, Peggy Kafka, Jay Kirchmaier,

Stacy Mack, Bruce

Pollock, Patty Riegor.

Eastman Radio

/

Rockefeller Pl.,

New

York

10020

Anatole

Staff:

Bill Burton, Dave Rocher,

Jerry

Schubert, Carl Butrum,

Lee Lahey. Dan

Prodanovich,

Dave MacAlister, Mayo

Smith.

Hillier, Newmark,

Wechsler & Howard

100

Park Ave.. New

York

10017

Anatole

Staff:

Frank Carter, Joi

Christo-Schlapp,

Kirk Combs, Rocky Crawford, Jane

En- gel,

Marc

Gross,

Marcia Herman,

Chuck

Hillier, Bernard Howard, Nick Imbornone,

Clarence Johnson, Georgann

Lavelle,

Ashley Manning, Phil Newmark, Paddy

O'Brien, Tom O'Brien, Elaine Pappas,

Jacqui

Rossinsky, Ira Wechsler, Sharon

Wienzveg.

Independent TV Sales

437 Madison Ave..

New

York 10022

Staff:

Bill Bee.

Interep

100 Park Avenue, New

York 10017

See

Durpetti

&

Associates;

Hillier, New-

Program

Profit

Introducing International

Broadcast Systems, Ltd.

A

New

Force In

Worldwide Television.

International

Broadcast Systems is accepting television clients for world- wide advertising

Sales

Representation.

Your station or station group may qualify for vastly increased sales revenue. Station

Group Heads or

General Managers may arrange a confidential appointment at

NAB by contacting:

Earl Jones

Chairman, Chief Executive

Officer

Hotel Crescent Court

400 Crescent Court

Dallas,

Texas,

USA

75201

Telephone:

214 -871

-3200

Telex:

275555

International

Broadcast

Systems, Ltd.

O

WE

mark, Wechsler

&

Howard; Major Market

Radio; McGavren Guild

Radio, and Weiss

& Powell.

Katz

One

Communications Anatole

1472

Dag Hammarskjold Pl.,

New

York

10017

Staff: Corporate: James Greenwald.

Dick Mendelson, Barry

Lewis, Lucille

Luongo, Debra

Kontir.

Katz Television Group

Staff: Corporate:

Peter Goulazian,

Rich- ard

Goldstein,

Paul Arnzen.

American

Television:

James Beloyianis, Michael

Hugger. Continental

Television:

Tom Ol- son,

Jack Higgins. Independent Televi- sion:

Marty

Ozer.

Katz Radio Group:

Ken Swetz, Stu

Olds, Glenn

Kummerow.

David Halberstam, Bruce Hoban.

Chris- t&

Radio:

Bill

Fortenbaugh, Paddy

Ram- say,

Mark Braunstein, John

Fouts, Dave

Winston,

John Comenos, Bob Gad,

Su- san Specht,

Ken Roberts. Katz Radio:

Dick

Romanick, Bob McCurdy, Jerry

Stehney, Greg Noack, Mike Marshall,

Tim

Robisch, Mitch Kline. Republic Radio:

Jerry Cregan, Dick

McCauley,

Ed

Mar

- shak, Jeff Hodge, Linda

Packer- Spitz,

John

Poche, John Lynch.

Major Market Radio

Anatole

553

100 Park Avenue, New

York 10017

Staff:

Karin Dutcher, Jim Hagar, Elaine

Jenkins, Dave Kaufman,

Tom McKinley,

Warner Rush, Austin

Walsh.

Masla Radio

41 E. 42d

St., New

York

10017

Anatole

Staff: Jack

Masla,

Stan Feinblatt,

Charles McCreary, Mel Trauner, Doug

Masla, Johnnie Pegues, Arnold

Taylor, Ju- lie Judge, Kathy

Murphy, Cathy Moran,

Phil Roberts, Peter Moore, Sue Barnes,

Bruce

Schneider.

McGavren Guild Radio

Anatole

100 Park Avenue, New

York 10017

734

Staff:

Gary Ahrens, Gina Ansaldi, John

Bitting, Robert Bordelon,

Adrian

Chu, Jeff

Dashev, Lynn

DeCaterina, Tom

Dolliff, Pe- ter Doyle, Erica

Farber,

Andie

Fatool,

Shane

Fox, Les Goldberg, Marc Guild,

Ralph Guild, Don Hall, Martha Harring- ton, Denton Holmes, Ellen

Hulleberg,

Donna

La Vitola, Pam

Little,

Debbie

Pas- cale, Jim Peacock, Vince

Perez, George

Pine, Tom Poulos, Kathy Score, Dick

Sharpe, Andrea

Simon,

Jane Sperrazza,

David Wisentaner.

Seltel

750

Third Ave., New

York

10017

Staff:

Ray Johns, Jack Mulderrig, Joe

Cosenza.

TeleRep

875 Third Ave., New

York 10022

Fairmont

Staff: Sandra McCourt, Dick

Singer, Al

Masini, Dave Plager,

011ie

Treyz, Jim Jor- dan.

Weiss & Powell Anatole

100 Park Avenue, New

York

100/7

984

Staff: Judith Brandt, Jay Berman,

Ralph

Connor, Glen

Corneliess, Carol

Salter,

Christi Taylor.

NAB 1986

Adam Young

3 E. 54th

St.

New York 10022

Fairmont

Statt: Vincent

Young, Keith Thompson

Joan Barron, Susan Clair Wagner.

Other

Toby Arnold

&

Assoc. Loews

622 -23

3234 Commander

Dr., Carmiion,

Tex.

75006

Contemporary country

ID package*, adult contemporary*, urban contempo- rary* jingle packages,

Silk & Satin adult contemporary format*, computer gener- ated music system', Unforgettable,

Un- forgettable

II, Country Magic, production bank and master library.

Staff:

Toby Ar- nold, Dolly Arnold,

Bill Pasha, Jim

Kerr,

Norma

Kerr, Walter Wienecke, Danny

Owen, Ed Johnson, Jeanne Bozetti, Irene

Bonales, Dottie Wbodell,

Tom

Wedge,

Debbie

Pasha, Greg Ricks.

Birch

Radio

Loews Anatole

2082

120

Van

Nostrand Ave., Englewood Cliffs.

N.J.

07632

Radio audience measurement for all 212 markets, micro ing computer generated rat- analysis system. Staff:

Alan Trug- man, David Kabakoff, John Dobel,

Bill Li- vek, Craig

Harper,

Larry Gorick.

Broadcast Investment Analysts

Fairmont

2100

Box 17307, Washington 20041

Staff:

Tom Buono,

Jonathan Intrater, Da- vid

Cole.

Firstmark

Financial Loews Anatole

110

Washington St.,

Indianapolis 46204

Staff:

Mike Lewis,

Ed

Brubeck,

Don God- frey.

Frazier, Gross

&

Kadlec

Loews Anatole

953

4801 Massachusetts

Ave., Suite 390.

Wash- ington 20016

Staff: Charles

H.

Kadlec, Sandra

Fres- chi, Timothy Pecaro,

Linda Shapiro,

Elisa- beth

Swanson, Arthur Dietz.

Jhan Hiber

&

Associates

Loews Anatole

6189

26384

Carmel

Rancho

Ln.,

Suite 202. Car- mel, Calif.

93923

The Predictor. Staff:

Jhan Hiber, Larry

Johnson, Wendy Minafo.

International Broadcast Systems

Hotel Crescent Court

2807

Briar Knoll

Dr., Arlington,

Tex. 76006

Consulting services for

TV stations.

Staff:

Earl Jones

Jr.

The Ward

L.

Quaal Co.

40/

N. Michigan

Ave., Suite 3140,

Hyatt

Chicago

60611

Staff:

Ward

L. Quaal, Graham

W.

Quaal,

Donald Raydon.

SESAC

/0

Columbus

Central

Expressway

Inn

Cr,

New

York

10019

Staff:

Willis

(Jim) Myers, Deborah

Houghton, Alan Altman,

Evie

Altman.

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

144

T.A.

45

Associates

Milk

St., Boston 02190

Loewe

Anatole

Staff:

David Croll, Richard Churchill,

Wil- liam Collatos, James Wade,

Stephen

Gormley.

TelCom

Associates

Loews Anatole

8033 Sunset

Blvd..

Suite 559, Los Angeles

90046

TV station and program consulting firm.

Staff:

Ronald Krueger,

Grace Jacobs.

Turner Program Services

2424, 3210

100 International Blvd., Box /05366, Atlan- ta 30348

The

Goodwill Games, World of Audubon,

World of Cousteau, Cousteau's Redisco- very of the World, End of Eden,

Super

Football Saturday

Night.

Staff: Henry Gil- lespie, Bob Schuessler, Bob Rierson,

Paul

Amos, Carol Bomberger, Colin Chis- holm, Art O'Connor,

Paul

Wischmeyer,

Lisa McMahon, Cliff Matis.

FCC

All of the FCC commissioners are ex- pected to be in attendance at NAB. Ex- pected to be accompanying them will be: Daniel Brenner, senior adviser to

Chairman Mark

Fowler;

John Kamp, special assistant for congressional af- fairs; Kenneth Howard

Jr., legal assis- tant to Commissioner James Quello:

Robert

Pettit, senior adviser to Commis- sioner

Mimi Dawson, and Diane

Killory, senior adviser to Commissioner Dennis

Patrick.

If

President

Reagan signs the

Budget Reconciliation Act, which would permit the industry to reimburse

FCC officials for travel expenses, the Mass

Media Bureau is expected to be repre- sented by

William Hassinger, engineer- ing assistant to the Mass Media Bureau chief; Larry

Eads, chief, audio services division;

Roy Stewart, chief, video ser- vices division;

Ralph Haller, deputy chief, policy and rules division; Jim

Shook, attorney, EEO branch, and John

Reiser, assistant chief, engineering poli- cy branch. Also expected to attend are

Thomas Stanley, chief engineer;

Robert

Cleveland, physical scientist, spectrum engineering division, and

Kent Craw- ford, director,

FCC Field

Operations

Bu- reau Chicago office.

Public service

All-

Industry

Radio Music License Com- mittee

-2301;

Conservative Media

Net- work

-2311;

Commerce Department Mi- nority Services

-2302;

Department of the Army and Air Force

-2307;

Museum of Broadcasting

-3104;

National Air/

Space Museum

-2308;

National Safety

Council

-2310;

Society of Broadcast

En- gineers-

2305;

Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers

-2501;

Televi- sion ish

Information

Museum

Office-3105;

The

Jew-

-2301;

U.S.

Armed

Forces

Radio Service

-2309;

Voice of Amer- ica

-2312.

Bùsinósst

Pulitzer waters grow muddier

cabman increases offer to buy out

)mpany; majority shareholders and anagement file countersuit to

ie filed

by

minority group

ie stakes, both legal and to financial, contin- build in the fight for Pulitzer

Publish

- g

Co. Last Monday,

Alfred Taubman, the loomfield Hills, Mich.

-based investor who ready has an option on 20% of the com- my's shares, increased his offer to buy the hole company from

$500 million to $625 illion.

The previous Friday,

April

4, the

)mpany's

Zement majority shareholders and man - filed a countersuit to the suit filed to weeks ago by certain minority share

-

)Iders.

Taubman's offer, comprising $450 million rsh and

$175 million in preferred stock, ills at the bottom end

of

a

"range of fair

- sss" for the value of the St. Louis -based iedia company, estimated by

Morgan

Stan

- y

&

Co., one of the company's investment ankers.

Peter W. Quesada, a any and one director

of

the com- of the minority shareholders

I ho to optioned their shares to Taubman, said new kely

...

because the aubman's

:ceive

if

offer's success was ' disparity

...

more

(between offer and the money they might they sold their shares as part of the

3mpany's planned initial public stock offer

- ig) is so great that trustees

(of the

80% oting trust) can no longer argue that it is not the best interests of shareholders to take

!vantage of this offer."

But that logic did not persuade three lareholders, Joseph

Pulitzer Jr., the corn- any's chairman; Michael

Pulitzer, vice hairman, and

David Moore, who among iem own 54%

of

the outstanding stock.

The ext day, Tuesday, the three said they had no

)tention ient

of

changing their

Feb.

24 agree

- which forbids any of them to sell his tock to an outsider until March 31, 1987, at

)e earliest. Meanwhile, all indications were tat the company would proceed with its lanned initial public offering

[IPO]

BROADCASTING,

March 24). t

By now most major shareholders have let be known whether they favor the sale

of

'ulitzer to an outsider (roughly

43 %) or fa- or the

IPO (the remainder). Most of those in either side have also squared off in litiga- ion which is scheduled for trial May

12 in

Jnited

States

District Court for the Eastern

)istrict of

Missouri.

In a filing April

4, the majority sharehold-

:rs and certain officers and directors denied ill allegations of mismanagement and cor-

)(irate entrenchment made by some of the ninority shareholders (BROADCASTING.

4pril 7). The countercomplaint stated that he

Pulitzer voting trust, which controls

80%

)f the stock and does not expire until

1994, was established to preserve company within either the family and/or cer- tain management control

of

the closely associated with the family.

The countercomplaint also makes some allegations of its own, including that Peter

Quesada had used his position as director to

Company

CBS

Gannett

Fifth

Quarter

First

Fourth

Year

Satellite Music Net.

Year

SFN

Companies

Three

Sony

Telepictures

***

First

Fourth

Year

TM Communications

Year

Turner

Broadcasting

Fourth

United

Cable

TV

Westwood One

Year

Third

First

Estate

Revenue

(000)

$2,209,421

$13,589

$113,399

$499,511

$1,906,682

$59,210

$155,453

$8,031

$92,451 obtain information which he then disclosed to outsiders (such as

Taubman) in

"violation of his fiduciary duties as a director of

Pulit- zer

Publishing." The countercomplaint also accused Quesada of "greenmail," saying that he had offered

"to cease his conduct in exchange for the receipt tortious

of

a sub

Quarterly

$1,198,900

$619,520

$351,891

$50,645

$11,229

% change'

9

9

13

119

16

25

8

33

46

28

30

25

19

229

Earnings

Earnings

(000)

$16,300

$79,444

$253,277

$376

($25,271)

$29,094

$97,579

$7,070

$14,829

$35

$6,158

$1,157

$2,078

$830

% change'

-3

7

13

NM

NM

75

-6

83

59

NM

212

-89

-39

132

EPS'*

$0.56

$0.99

$3.16

$0.05

""

'

***

$0.42

$0.48

$1.10

$0.01

$0.28

$0.05

$0.07

$0.12

*Percentage change from same period year before.

** Earnings per share. Parentheses indicate loss. means not change in meaningful.

**

*Figures are for

11 months ending

Dec. 31.

Lack fiscal period from year ending

April

30 to calendar year. Figures full year's figures

NM is due to for

11 months ending

1984 were unaudited. * *

**

SFN has no publicly traded common stock.

See story on of

CBS, page 150.

Gannett Co. reported operating income for fourth quarter

$155.7 million, up

7

%, and $504,520 for full year, up 13 %.

Broadcasting division reported fourth -quarter revenue of $77.3 million, up

7 %, while full

-year revenue was up

14% to $265,480.

Satellite Music Network (NASDAQ: SMNI) had net loss of $2.3 million in

1984.

Net income reported last year included operating loss carryforward

(tax benefit) of $152,717. Company said that "initial crossover to profitability had been achieved in the first quarter of of the

1985... and that profitability had been maintained for each four quarters of the year."

Company also said that revenue from sale of network time to advertisers increased

236% to

$8.6 million.

SFN

Companies had net loss of $9 million in

1984 fourth quarter. Company had quarter, operating loss of $14.9 million in fourth compared to operating loss of

$6.1 million in

1984 fourth quarter. For

11 months ending Dec. 31, 1985, company had operating income of $57.4 million, up 4 %.

Company said improvement in net earnings for

11 months was "due primarily to the sale of wFTv(Tv)

Orlando,

Fla., for $180 million."

First

-quarter operating profit for

Sony dropped

22 %, which company attributed largely to strengthening of Japanese yen compared to

U.S. dollar.

Telepictures merged with

Lorimar on Feb. 18.

TM

Communications

1984 net loss of $306,165. Pre

-tax income in

1985 was $477,914.

Turner reported

Broadcasting

System had fourth

-quarter operating income of

$7.2 million, up 203 %, and full -year operating income of

$22.9 million, up 82

%.

Depressing net income for both periods was extraordinary expenses associated with

TBS's unsuccessful takeover attempt of CBS, and absense of significant operating loss carryforwards (tax benefits) realized in

1984.

Fiscal results for

TBS's

75% interest in

Omni Ventures real estate complex ended Oct.

31.

Company said that if results for last two months of 1985 were included,

TBS annual net income would have been $764,000 lower.

United's cash flow

('net income plus depreci- ation and other noncash items ") was $36,276.000, up 10 %.

Norman

J.

Pattiz, chairman and chief executive officer of

Westwood

One, attributed company's improved results to.

"the company's acquisition of the Mutual

Broadcasting System along with higher average advertising rates and substantial increases in up -front commitments from national adver- tisers....

These advertising revenues combined with our ability to maintain a stable cost base continued to provide substantial operating leverage."

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

145

stantial portion

of

Pulitzer Publishing's as- sets."

Quesada denied the and greenmail allegation told

BROADCASTING there is in fact a

"long record" indicating he is interested only in a solution which benefits all shareholders.

There are now fewer signs reaching such a solution.

of

amicably

There have been no out

-of

-court negotiations,

Quesada sail because there is nobody who is "above tt fray" and who could bring the two sides tr gether.

The uneasy life of bedfellows

Warner and Chris -Craft

Industry observers think tense alliance between two companies will last as long as their values continue to run roughly parallel values, the terms for Chris -Craft were appar- ently not satisfactory. Siegel filed with the

Securities and Exchange

Commission, say- ing Chris -Craft would take what steps it deemed necessary to

"protect or enhance the value

of

its holdings."

Since then the comparative value

of

those holdings has increased, said Chris -Craft's executive vice president, Lawrence Barne

"I

think our investment looks much better

Warner's films have been doing well at d box office; its records division has been ai ed by the boom in compact disk sales, al

Warner Brothers Television continues to su ply a handful of series to the three network

Corporate, general and administrative e

Warner had a

Chairman

Steven

J.

Ross recently

minor operation, causing

the third postponement of the company's shareholder meeting in the last

12 months. Lawyer Ar-

thurLiman,

widely seen

as an intermediary

between

Ross

and

Herbert

Siegel, chairman of Chris -Craft he

Industries,

recently dropped his membership on the Chris -Craft board

remains

counsel

for

Warner. Last year's

-

open disputes between the two companies contributed to the decision.

NOiA[1,ri ne

Pooling talents. Hollywood executives

Norman Horowitz and Russell

Goldsmith announced they have "entered into an agreement" to work together to analyze opportunities and pursue investments in entertainment and communications businesses.

Horowitz will work with

Goldsmiths The Paragon Group in search of media properties ranging from magazines to broadcast stations and program copyrights. Goldsmith, former chief operating officer of Lorimar, formed The Paragon

Group as limited partnership in late 1985. Goldsmith is general partner. Horowitz, former president of

PolyGram Television to and, before that, Columbia Pictures

Television, formed The Norman

Horowitz Co. in

1984 specializing in acquisition of rights to program and theatrical titles for television distribution.

Both said they have "significant" capital available-or available to borrow make acquisitions in hardware and software ends of business (Limited partnership

-

investments in The Paragon Group started at minimum of

$1 million,

Goldsmith said.)

It has not been a tranquil year for those in- volved in the continuing chess match be- tween Warner

Craft, least

Communications and Chris

-

of

all for those outsiders who have been trying to predict the outcome.

All

that is seen by observers now is that there has been enough

of

a lull in the recent tension to allow

Warner to schedule its first share- holder meeting in two years

-to

be held in

New York on April

17.

Warner's stock is currently at

$42, up 50% from where it was a year ago, giving

Siegel less reason to regret having given up a piece

of

his company for a piece

of

Warner. The two companies first became intertwined in late 1983 to thwart a possible takeover by

Rupert Murdoch. In the stock swap that took place early the next year, Chris -Craft re- ceived a

20% interest in

Warner, which in turn received 42.5% in Chris -Craft's televi- sion subsidiary, and even more

BHC Inc. (BHC accounts for roughly

90%

of

Chris -Craft's revenue

of

its operating income.)

Since then, Chris -Craft and its affiliated companies have added, through purchases. another 50% to its Warner holdings.

Aside from occasional battles

of

personal- ity, it is the changing values

of

each corn

- pany that outside observers focus on to ex- plain the dissension. They do so on the theory that the Wamer/Chris -Craft marriage

will

work as long as the values proceed roughly in tandem, but that any divergence will cause dissatisfaction.

That theory appears to help explain last year's dissension. In early

1985 Warner stock was changed trading at $28 per share, un- from when the stock swap took place the year before.

Meanwhile, the value of television stations-Chris

-Craft owns two and a majority

of

five- station group owner,

United Television

-was

soaring as evidenced by the May

1985 sale

of

KTLA(TV)

Los Angeles for

$510 million, a doubling of the station's value in just two years. One

of

the two Chris -Craft stations is co- located

KCOP(TV), also a

VHF independent.

Ross, having sold

off

much

of

Warner's poorly performing operations and reduced its debt, was contemplating a leveraged buyout. But because

of

the divergence in

Less outstanding.

Board of

Cetec Corp. authorized future repurchase of 100,000 shares of common stock

(ASE: CEC) for retirement. Beginning in 1985,

El

Monte, Calif.

- based electronics manufacturer has purchased and retired approximately 218,000 shares, it said.

O

Reductionist thinking.

Shamrock Holdings said it lowered ownership in

Walt Disney

Co. from 3.97 %

-as

of

Disney's Jan. 6 proxy statement

-to

about

3 %, or four million shares

(Disney recently had four -for -one split). Shamrock, station group owner, is owned by family of

Roy

E.

Disney, who is vice chairman of Disney board and head of Disney's animation department.

O

Less leverage.

SFN Companies has called for $205 million redemption of all of outstanding

14'/e% senior subordinated notes due February

1994. Notes were issued in connection with leveraged buyout of

Feb. 1,

1985. SFN still has

161/4% preferred stock and 16% subordinated notes, both of which are listed on American Stock Exchange.

O

Video value.

Two

New

York -based investors have accumulated 6.4% of outstanding stock of Unitel Video within past two months, according to March

31 filing with Securities and

Exchange Commission. Michael Landes and Albert Schwartz, co- chairman of RKO

Century Warner Theaters, said they had acquired

138,425 shares of Unitel (ASE: UNV) at mean average purchase price of $8.04 (for total of

$1.1 million). Purchase of shares, through margin account, began

SEC on Feb. 5, when stock was trading below

$7. By time of filing, stock was trading at roughly

81/2 per share and by last Tuesday stock closed at

9%. Landes and Schwartz said they "...anticipate that they might under certain circumstances consider seeking control of the company...and...also may attempt to dispose of shares of common stock held by them in the open market."

Two co-chairmen, both lawyers, own

131 exhibition theaters in greater

New

York city area, as well as film distribution company and videocassette stores. They additionally have real estate and oil exploration investments. Unite) is

New

York

-based videotape services company.

Company provides mobile production services as well as studio production, editing and duplication facilities.

Unitel is

26% owned by Herbert Bass, president, and Alex

Geisler, executive vice president. Company has staggered board of directors and approved

"super majority"

(80 %) approval provision for mergers, as well as other antitakeover defenses. Unitel had revenue for year ending Aug.

31, 1985, of $13.2 million; cash flow from operations of

$2.6 million, and net loss of

$655,000.

Cheap money.

Knight -Ridder offered $100 million in

Hawkins, notes vice president, said purpose of offering was simply to due

1993. Frank switch out of short-term debt and "lock in low rates for the long- term."

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

146

:apital Cities'ABC

:BS

:fear Channel lull

Broadcasting acor Commun

IN talrite talrite

'A' rice

Commun. lcripps Howard lunGroup Inc

'aft

'VX

Broadcast Group lnited

Television

Closing Closing

Wed

Wed

Apr

9

Apr

2

BROADCASTING

Net

Change

233 232

3/4

138 3/8 142

19

19

1/4

3/16

6 1/2

7

1/8

1/2

44 3/8 44 7/8

15 3/8 15

1/4

15

14 3/4

10 7/8 10

7/8

53 3/4 52

1/4

4 1/4

4 3/8

95 1/2

96 3/4

10 3/8 10

7/8

28 3/8

28

1/4

-

3

5/8

-

1/4

1/16

-

1

-

1/2

1/8

1/4

Marker

Percent

PIE

Capitali-

:arion

Change Ratio

(000.000)

.10 21

3.027

-

2.55 31

3,243

-

1.29 28

55

-

50.00

13.33

8

36

-

1.11

30 1,171

128

.81

18

1.69

18 63

1

1/2

-

1/8

-

1

1/4

-

1/2

3/8

-

2.87

2.85

17 555

7

-

1.29

21

863

-

4.59 43 60

1.33 85

310

BROADCASTING WITH OTHER MAJOR INTERESTS

LH.

Belo

Idams Russell titillated

Pabs tmerican Family tssoc. Commun.

3hris -Craft

3annett Co.

3enCorp

3ray

Commun. letterson -Pilot lohn Blair

Josephson Intl.

(night

-Ridder

_ee

Enterprises

_iberty

McGraw -Hill

Media

General

Meredith Corp.

Multimedia

New York

Times

Park

Commun.

Rollins Commun.

Selkirk

Stauffer Commun

Tech.Ops Inc.

Times Mirror

Tribune

Turner Bcstg.

Washington Post

50 3/4

50 3/4

34 1/2 33

3/4

47 1/2

45

3/4

28 1/2

28 5/8

42 1/4

42 1/4

60 1/8 62

3/8

73 5/8 72

1/4

74 75

1/4

138 138

51

21

1/2 52

7/8

21

1/2

7 3/4

8

47 5/8

47 5/8

26

26

34

41 7/8

42

55 1/2

57

7/8

91

91

3/4

76 3/8 77

1/4

31

60

1/2 35

3/8

62 5/8

28 1/4 27

1/2

29 3/4 30

12

25 3/8 25

1/4

122

29

117

30 1/4

60 3/4 62

1/8

65 1/8 67

7/8

19

17

3/8

152 3/4 153 1/2

-

2.22

1

3/4 3.82

-

1/8

-

0.43

-

-

-

2 1/4

1

1

3/4

3/8

1/4

1/2

3/8

-

3.60

190

-

1.66

0.96

1.74

-

1/4

-

3.12

-

3/4

-

2.80

-

1/8

-

0.29

-

2

3/8

-

4.10

-

3/4

-

0.81

-

7/8

-

1.13

-

3

7/8

-10.95

-

2 5/8

-

4.19

3/4

2.72

-

3/4

-

245

1/8 .49

-

5

1

1/4

427

-

4.13

-

1

3/8

-

2.21

-

2 3/4

-

4.05

1

5/8

-

3/4

9.35

-

0.48

43

23

21

23

7

24

22

29

13

21

25

34

55

20

5

15

22

44

17

21

22

18

19

19

14

587

213

873

1,139

201

384

5,908

1.619

68

1,470

176

36

2,667

658

422

2,797

640

723

346

2,397

389

434

205

122

63

3.921

2.641

414

1,958

0

Ally & Gargano

0

BBDO Inc.

0

Compact Video

N

Comsat

0

Doyle Dane B

N

Foote Cone & B.

0

Grey

Advertising

N

Interpublic Group

N

A

JWT Group

Movielab

0

Ogilvy Group

0

Saatchi

&

Saatchi

0 Telemation

0 Tempo

Enterprises

A

Unite! Video

N

Western Union

Closing Closing

Wed

Apr

9

Wed

Apr

2

SERVICE

Net

Change

Percent

PIE

Market

Capitali

-

zation change Ratio (000,0001

12

31

6

35

1/4

9

3/4 62 1/4

5/8 6

7/8

34

1/4

22 3/8 23 1/2

64

227

64 5/8

230 1/4

54 1/2 55 1/8

39 3/4

39 5/8

7

39

41

1/8 7 1/8

39 1/2

5/8

43

6

8

1/2

1/2

9 1/2

7 1/8

6

10

9

7

1/4

3/8

11 3 1/4 36.11

-30

1/2

-48.99

11

-

1/4

-

3.63

27

409

28

3/4

2.18 10

633

-

1

1/8

-

4.78

15

118

-

5/8

-

0.96 16

243

-

3 1/4

-

1.41 14

136

-

5/8

-

1.13 18

593

1/8

22 360

.31

11

-

1/2

-

1.26

12

535

-

1

3/8

-

3.19 24

523

1/2 8.33 6 7

-

1

3/4

-17.07

32

48

1/2

5.55

-

1/4

-

3.38

20

173

CABLE

A

Acton Corp.

0

AM

Cable

TV

N

American Express

N

Anixter Brothers

0 Burnup

&

Sims

0

Cardiff Commun.

N

Centel Corp

0 Comcast

N

Gen.

Instrument

N

Heritage Commun.

0

Jones Intercable

T

Maclean Hunter 'X'

2 3/8

1

1/2

1

1

7/8

1/2

66 67 3/4

24 1/2 25 1/8

6

1

1/2

6

7/8

316

1

3/8

50 1/4 52 1/2

26

25 5/8

19 3/4 18 3/4

25 7/8 26

3/4

12 3/8

11

1/8

18 7/8

18

7/8

A

0 Rogers Cable

0

TCA Cable TV

0

Tele-

Commun

15

26

5/8 2 1/4

15

26 1/2

48 1/4 48 3/4

N

Time Inc 73 1/2 74 3/4

0

United

Artists Commun..

.

28

N

United Cable

TV

28 1/2

27 1/8

28

N

Viacom

81

1/8 57

1/2 26.66

13

5

-

1

3/4

-

2.58 18

14,675

-

5/8

-

3/8

-

2.48

23 445

-

5.45 12 58

-

3/16

-

13.63

3 2

-

2 1/4

-

4.28

10

1,390

3/8

1.46 44 553

1

5.33 637

-

7/8

-

3.27 50

408

1/4 11.23 53 128

1

3/8

26 695

9

351

-

1/2

-

1.88 35

173

-

1/2

-

1.02

2.268

-

1

1/4

-

1.67 23 4,610

-

1/2

-

1.75 41

574

-

7/8

-

3.12 41

410

4

1/8 7.23

23

1,237

411

American

TV

American Nat. Em

Barris Indus

Century Commun.

Coca -Cola

Disney

Dow

Jones

&

Co.

Financial News

Four Star

Fries

Entertain.

Gulf + Western

Hal

Roach

King World

Lorimar- Telepictures

MCA

MGM /UA

New

World Pictures

Orion Pictures

Playboy Ent

Reeves

Commun.

Republic Pictures 'N

Republic Pictures

'B'

Robert Halmi

Sat. Music

Net.

Warner

Communications

.

Westwood One

PROGRAMING

6 1/2

2 5/16

8

3

3/4

21 21

1/4

12

7/8

13

1/2

100 5/8 103

7/8

39 3/4 36

1/2

51

8

7/8 53 3/4

8

1/4

5 7/8

9 1/2

5

3/4

9 1/4

59 1/2 57

5/8

13 1/4 13 5/8

37 1/2

26

38

1B 26

52 3/4 51 518

26 5/8 26

5/8

15 3/4 17 1/2

11

7

3/4

11

3/4

1/4

8

1/8

14

7/8 14 5/8

11

11

1/8

10 10

4 1/8 4

3/8

12

7 3/4 7

42 1/4 42

24 1/4

26

12

-

2 1/4

-

25.71

-

11/16

-

2291

-

1/4

-

1.17

-

5/8

-

4.62

-

3 1/4

-

3.12

3 1/4

8.90

-

1

7/8

-

3.48

-

1/4

-

3.03

1/8 2.17

1/4 2.70

1

7/8

3.25

-

3/8

-

2.75

-

1/2

-

1.31

1/8 .48

2.17

1

1/8

11

25

257

19

28

24

200

6

12

16

24

10

33

-

1

3/4

-

10.00

1/2

4.44

-

3/8

-

4.61

1/4

-

118

1.70

-

1.12

-

1/4

-

5.71

1/4 3.33

1/4

-

2

114

.59

-

8.49

63

78

71

58

20

7

5

186

249

13.162

5.142

3,344

86

4

32

3,666

73

382

203

3.953

1.322

134

112

72

185

31

7

71

52

2.596

82

N

3M

N

N

Allied -Signal

Arvin Industries

0

C

-Cor Electronics

0 Cable

TV

Indus

A

Cetec

0 Chyron

A CMX

Corp

A

Cohu

N

Conrac

N

Eastman Kodak

0 Elec Mis

&

Comm.

N

General Electric

0

Geotel Inc

N

N

Harris Corp.

MIA Corn.

Inc.

0 Microdyne

N

Motorola

N

N

N.A.

Philips

Oak

Industries

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

RCA

Rockwell Intl.

Sci- Atlanta

Sony Corp

Tektronix

Varian

Assoc.

Westinghouse

Zenith

Standard &

Poor's

400

.

ELECTRONICSIMANUFACTURING

98 1/8 102 114

51

3/4 50 7/8

27 1/4 27 1/4

5

1/2

5 1/2

3

8

6

1/2

1/4

3 1/2

8 1/8

6

1

6

42

41

5/8

1

5/8

9

16

1/8

38

8 3/8

16

5/8

59

3

76

1

1!4

61

5/8

5/8 3 5/8

1,8

77

1/4

3/8

1

1/2

27 3/4 27 3/8

17 16

7/8

3/8

6 3/8

14

43 1/4

78

45 7/8

1

64

7,8

2

63 1/2

46 5/8 47 7/8

10 1/2 10 7/8

..

22

21

7/8

55

718 55 5/8

25 1/8 26 5/8

55 7/8

54

3/8

22

5B 24 1/4

258.44 260.22

-

4 1/8

7/8

1/8

-

4.03

17

11224

1.71

10

9,009

12

424

16

10

1.53

175

20

19

17

60

6

3/4

-

1/4

-

2

3/8

8.95

9

16

-

1.50 19

98

-

3.85 18 13,371

-

1

118

-

1.45 14

-

1B

-

8.33 22

14

34,683

4

3/8 1.36 18

1,116

1/8 .74 22

740

-

28 28

-

2.31

69 5,034

1

-

4

-

8.71 14

1,209

-

1/8

-

6.25 57

1/2 .78 15

5,745

-

1

1/4

-

2.61

11

6,961

-

3/8

-

3.44

14

245

1/8 .57 14

5,080

1/4 .44 16

1,105

-

1

1/2

-

5.63 35 535

-

1

1

1/2

5/8

2.75

15

-

6.70

9.759

523

-

1.78

-

0.68 pronto. A-

American.

N

-N.Y,

0

-OTC. Bid prices and common A stock used unless for the previous

12 months as c,.olished by Standard

& Poor's or as obtained by

Ierwise noted. "O" in P/E ratio is deficit.

P/E ratios are based on earnings per share

BROAOCASTINGs own research.

Notes: '

2 for

1 split, April

7.

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

147

pense were cut by

40% in 1985 and long- term debt was lower. In addition, improved cable industry prospects reflect well on

Warner's cable operations which were serv- ing end about

1.2 million basic subscribers at the

of

1985.

The latter. operation is one area where, according to several informed sources,

Ross and Siegel initially disagreed. The Chris

-

Craft chairman, it is said, wanted

Warner to sell what was then half ownership of

Warner

Amex for

$375 million and the assumption

of

debt.

Ross declined simultaneously with

Chris- Craft's SEC fil- ing

-and

partner,

-this

was occurring instead bought out Warner Amex's

American Express, for $450 million in a deal that just closed last month. Ross then continued to sell off Warner Amex's interest in Showtime/The Movie Channel and MTV to Viacom. The wheeling and dealing apparently paid off.

Warner's improved results helped reduce conflict between the two chairmen, allowing a revision of their original

1984 agreement.

The new amendments, dated

Feb. 7, dou- bled Chris- Craft's representation on the board, which now stands at six

of

16 seats.

In addition, other amendments gave Chris

-

Craft more flexibility to dispose

of

its shares.

Although Warner's businesses are doing well, Liman said Chris -Craft wanted strong representation because

of

the size

of

its in- vestment: "For Chris -Craft, the investment is a very significant part of its assets and it wanted representation that would more near- ly approximate its voting interest."

Liman, a partner in the law firm

Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton

& Garrison, said too much was being made

of of

Paul, disagreements between the two chairmen: "Whenever you have discussion you can have disagreements and when you have two companies, each with a different constituency, then no matter how much good will you have between the people

...

after all

Herb and Steve are friends

...

you are going to have points of difference. In this kind

of

industry it is very hard because everyone is putting a magnify- ing glass to the companies and every time they sit at different tables in the same restau- rant people will notice. Hopefully the kind

of

relationship that existed in the beginning will continue."

One securities analyst who requested anonymity agreed: "All the rows you hear about are exaggerated."

Beyond the current truce, most observers are reluctant to hazard a prediction on the future courses

of

the two companies. The securities analyst suggested that Siegel may now regard the Warner investment as a good balance to the uncertainties

of

independent television

-five

of Chris -Craft's and Unit

- ed's seven stations are independents.

But, he noted, it was also reasonable to speculate that

Siegel might still wish to dis- engage the two companies' interlocking ownership, or at least liquidate a large por- tion

of

his holdings, and for that reason had sought increased board membership. "At some time he will have to make a move and he wants to be in the best position possible to make lion in it." Chris -Craft gets less than $15 r dividends

-most

of which is not

I able

-on

stock with a market value

of

in than $750 million. Warner gets no cash tribution from its BHC holdings.

Liman did not explicitly deny that Sie had already tried to disengage the two cc panies, but said that the assertion was

"overstatement."

Chris -Craft might be able to reduce

Warner investment by having the latter dertake a large share repurchase, especit now that Warner's debt has been lower

The analyst noted that Warner is delay approving a replacement for former

WA ble chairman, Drew Lewis.

"If

you wan keep restructuring

Warner, the easiest wa' do it is by selling cable. And not havin head

of

that division makes it easier to sel

With lower debt and a declining inter rate it is also possible that Ross may of again consider a leveraged buyout. But price would also be higher.

Harold Voge securities analyst for Merrill Lynch, asses

Warner's current break

-up value at

betw

$45 and

$55, at least $10 more than w was being talked about only nine mon ago.

Virtually every observer discounted possibility

of

Siegel taking over Warner forcing out Ross. Siegel is more

of

an inv tor than an operator, it was said, and nizes that it would be a mistake reo to rem(

Ross, who with the reportedly has good creative people who make War profitable.

"If

you ask:

relati

'Five years from n

Sa

1tal]

[1

HoNFooltpenao

Who's buying a

Ford. Because of the many technical and econom- ic uncertainties affecting the communications satellite marketplace, said Alan

L.

Parker, chairman of Ford Aerospace

Satellite Services

Corp., at a tors can no satellite seminar in

Washington last week, satellite opera- longer afford to build and launch satellites on specula- tion. Market uncertainties mandate that a satellite provider have firm customer commitments for a significant part of system capacity at the time he begins construction of the program," he said. "More- over, these commitments must be from substantial companies."

When

Parker added that Ford was beginning construction of three high

-capacity hybrid satellites later this month, reporters wanted to know what commitments for capacity

Ford had. Parker wouldn't say.

Talks with various entities willing and able to make such commit- ments are at a delicate stage, he said. However, he added, pros- pects that Ford will secure the necessary commitments are "very favorable

"

-so

favorable, in fact, that Ford is confident enough to start building the birds.

Assuming they are built, each of the Ford satellites will have more capacity than any communications satellite built to date.

According to Parker, each will have

24 C

-band and 24

Ku

-band cross -strapped

36 mhz transponders.

The C -band transponders will have

10 watts of power; the

Ku

-band,

45 watts.

According to Parker, that today's marketplace is making life diffi- cult for satellite operators and would -be operators will have serious implications:

1) There will be only four "significant" satellite opera- tors in the future, which

Parker declined to identify; 2) the prices of transponders will increase as the prices of satellites increase, and

3) there will be a shortfall in transponder supply beginning in

1989 and continuing through

1995.

Smooth sailing.

"Everything is going just as it should be," said a

GTE Spacenet spokeswoman after being asked for a status report on

GSTAR II. GSTAR

II was launched March

28 by Arianespace aboard the Ariane

3 rocket and was boosted into geostationary orbit on March

31 by an on

-board rocket.

A week and a half after the launch, it was drifting toward a permanent orbital slot at 105 de- grees west longitude.

The spokeswoman said

GTE would use the satellite's

16 Ku

-band transponders for expansion of existing

SNG and data transmission services.

News agreement.

South Star

Communications Inc., operator of a teleport near

Fort

Lauderdale,

Fla., and BAF Communications

Corp., a have supplier of satellite news gathering vehicles and services, concluded a cooperative agreement that should strengthen the position of both companies in the competitive satellite communi- cations marketplace. Under the agreement, according to South Star

President Barry Pasternak, South Star's teleport will become the

"hub" for BAF's SNG services, including two -way voice and

IFB communications for SNG vehicles and

C- band -to-Ku -band turnar- ound.

BAF, which has capacity on

GTE

Spacenet's

GSTAR

I, has built at the teleport a

7.2 -meter earth station aimed at the Ku

-band bird. The teleport's other dishes will be available on an as- needed basis for BAF and its customers. Pasternak did not want to discuss the financial arrangement, but said it involved some "sharing of profits."

Covering it all.

The FCC Common Carrier Bureau has agreed to start issuing blanket authorizations for large networks of technically identical earth stations of less than five meters in diameter operating in the Ku

-band.

The authorizations will be good for 10 years.

Applicants for such authority are supposed to describe them- selves and their overall systems, fill out one form for each "hub" station of five meters in diameter or more in the network, and another for each representative type of dish with a diameter of less than five meters that will be used

In works its order, the bureau also said pending applications for net- would be granted by separate orders under the new scheme.

Ready for grant, according to the bureau, are the pending applica- tions of Wal

-Mart Stores

Inc.; Telcom General Corp.; Federal Ex- press Corp.; Southland Corp.; Satellite Techology Management

Inc., and American Satellite Co.

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

148

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Since 1983, BrightStar has linked Europe with locations throughout

North America. Many of the world's leading broadcasters trust their news, sports and entertainment programming to BrightStar.

In the

U.S.,

BrightStar has introduced

SyndiStar, a complete television distribution system designed specifi- cally for the needs of producers, syndicators, distributors and advertisers. SyndiStar reaches more than

900

commercial

TV stations nationwide

-simultaneously

-at

less than the cost of bicycling tapes. And SyndiStar features satellite delivery on

RCAs

Satcom

K -2 satellite,

TV's newest, most powerful and predominant bird in the sky.

Later this year SyndiStar will add

Ku

-band delivery capability for broadcasters throughout

Europe as

BrightStar expands its international transmission routes.

SyndiStar will provide satellite program and commercial delivery in both directions across the Atlantic at prices less than the combined costs of tape duplication, standards conversion, shipping, duty and delivery charges.

Best of all, you'll know it got there

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will Ross still be running Warner ?'

" said

Liman. "I would say

yes."

Another informed observer who asked not to be named said,

"I suspect that five years from now they won't be

together...

but it is generally agreed that making predictions about those two is a bad business."

Weak scatter market hurts

CBS's earnings

Company reports

3% and

TV

drop stations divisions

in

profits; bright

spots are radio

CBS's first -quarter net income was down

3% from the comparable period last year. Drop- ping significantly was the CBS

/Broadcast

Group's operating profit, largely attributable to a weak first -quarter scatter market.

The broadcast group's operating profits fell to an estimated $19.4 million, from

$57.4 million in the first quarter

of

1985.

The company said the reduced profits, which were also below those of

1984,

..

reflected sharply lower profits for the

CBS television network partly offset by sol- idly improved results for the CBS television stations division and higher profits for the

CBS radio division which includes the five stations purchased from

Taft Broadcasting in

July 1985."

Overall company revenue was up

9

%, to

$1.2 billion, while operating profit, held down by the poorer performance

of

the broadcast group, was down 4 %, to

$61.2 million. The

CBS

/Records Group turned in the best results, showing estimated revenue

of $353.9'

million, up 21%, and estimated operating profit of $52.2 million, double that of last year

(but still below that of

1984).

The CBS/Publishing Group reported esti- mated revenue

of

$131.5 million, down

5

%, and an operating loss

of

$12.3 million, slightly less than that reported in the

IS first quarter.

General corporate expenses for

CBS w down

13% but net corporate interest expel

(interest expense minus interest incor quadrupled to $28.2 million. The jump interest expense resulted from debt sery

of

money CBS borrowed to repurch; shares last fall and was largely responsi for halving income from continuing op ations to $22.7 million.

Still, estimated net income was close that reported last year, largely drop in the provision for income taxes because

of

the absence

of

because o losses from a d continued operations which were report last year.

At a meeting with securities analysts month

(BROADCASTING,

Chairman Thomas

"one- time

H. Wyman said

-only" financing transactions

1;

March

17), Cl

tl

the past pany to few months also allowed the coi report net income.

Press at the bench

C

-SPAN raises

consciousness with night

-long coverage of

D.C.'s Court of Appeals

Last the

Monday (April

7), for the first time in history of the federal judiciary, television cameras were allowed inside the U.S. Court of Appeals for the

District of Columbia

Cir- cuit. Although it was was not in session, nighttime, and court

judges,

lawyers and jour- nalists were present. The occasion was a six

- and-a- half -hour examination of the courts, conducted by

C

-SPAN, the 24 -hour, public

- affairs, basic cable service that serves ap- proximately 24.5 million households.

The program was part

of

C- SPAN's Amer- ica and the Courts series, which began last

November. Last week's installment,

A Fo- cus on the mixture

Federal Judiciary,

featured a

of

live and recorded interviews and roundtable discussions.

At

6

-6:30 p.m.

NYT, Tony Fisher, clerk

Appeals, spoke

of of

the

U.S. Court

of

the structure and history of the court, live from the courtroom.

At

6:30 -7,

C -SPAN ran a recorded interview with Judge Patricia

Wald. At

7

-7:30, in the

Judges Mikva and

Starr. with courtroom, lawyers Alan Morrison and Dan-

id

Gribbon talked about what it's like to argue cases in the Court of Appeals.

At 7:30-

8:30, viewers saw a live roundtable with re- presentatives from four federal the FCC,

Federal the Federal Trade

agencies-

Commission, the

Election Commission and the Envi-

TV talk.

The Society tions for the third of Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi, is annual

BROAOcAsTING-

Taishoff Seminar, to be held June

13 -14 at the ABC

News bureau in Washington. Fifty TV news two -day seminar, which is devoted to producers, assignment editors lence in or journalists camera operators, the field. Among the veteran will be accepting applica- chosen to participate in the

"developing future leaders in television news."

Applicants must have at least five years' experience as TV anchors, reporters, writers, and must have journalists who will discuss television news issues at the conference are ABC News commentator David Brinkley

President Joel Chaseman. demonstrated excel- and

Post- Newsweek Stations

The seminar, and publisher which honors

Sol Taishoff, the memory of a former

SPJ -SDX

BROADCASTING magazine co- founder, editor national president, is endowment from the

BRoAocAsTING- Taishoff Foundation.

9. For further information, contact Sigma

Delta Chi: (312) 922 -7424. made possible by an

Deadline for applications is

May

C -SPAN moderator Connie Doebele ronmental Protection Agency

-that

are r fected by the rulings of the court. At 8:3

9:30, reporters from Time magazine, tl

Washington Post, the

Baltimore

Sun

and tl

National

Law

Journal

discussed coven the court. At 9:30 -10:30

p.m.,

Judge Abn

Mikva and Judge Kenneth Starr fields phone calls from viewers.

And from

10:: p.m. to 12:30 en

Connie Doebele, the producer

of

the gram, said: "We were very pleased that

pr se of

the

11 judges had accepted our invit tion. Many

of

the judges had said that tht show.

a.m.,

the program feature recorded interviews with D.t

Circuit Judges Antonin Scalia, Harry E wards,

Robert Bork and Ruth Ginsburg. very rarely do this kind said he

of thing."

Milo

hadn't

done a call -in show since

lea

ing Congress, and Starr said he had nev. been on a call -in program before last week

The Washington Post's Al Kamen said:

Broadcasting

Apr

14 1986

150

Saluting

the

two groups we helped create in 1985

LEGACY

BROADCASTING and

BROKERS

These major broadcast groups were assisted in their acquisitions by

James

F.

O'Grady Associates and Media Marketing

Associates, which have now merged to form

O'Grady and Associates.

As

Media

Brokers and Financial

Consultants,

O'Grady and

Associates assisted

Legacy Broadcasting and

Resort

Broadcasters in over

35 transactions in 1985 alone!

&

A

S S

O

C

I

A T

S

James

F.

O'Grady

150

E.

58th Street

New

York, NY 10022

212

-980 -4455

Richard

D.

Lyttle

P.O.

Box

35224

Richmond,

VA 23235

804 -745 -1004

N

\

v--

\ t

tlllt.,.r'

FEC's Charles Steele and Georgetown's Robert Pitofsky think

if

the public could see the arguments

of

the court, it would be the greatest intellectu- al show in town. They really are quite im- pressive."

There were mixed feelings among the pro- gram's participants as to whether television cameras should be courts in session. allowed to cover the

Clerk

of

the Court

Tony

Fisher said he believed "people tend to think too much about being on television" when there are cameras in the courts. Judge Ed- wards presented both sides of the argument:

"I

hink there would surely be some benefit because people would have a much better idea as to what the process really is about and would understand the limitations on the process," he said, but

"I

frankly think that once some exposure was given, the public would get terribly bored, over the long haul, with watching judicial proceedings."

Asked whether he thought cameras would eventually be allowed in the federal courts,

Judge Starr said:

"I

don't know.

I wouldn't opine on that. I ture." But

Judge think it's an uncertain fu-

Mikva said:

"Whatever the future is of active coverage

of

the drama

( trial or an appeal,

I do hope that this kinc coverage goes on.

I and good think that while it's y for the judges to be invisible, very bad for any public institution to be visible, and it is important that people kn what goes on by saying: in their courts."

He conclut

"I

would hope that whatever e happens with public television, with tele sion, that at least this part age continues." of the court cov

Distinguished journalists.

Among those receiving 1985

Sigma Delta Chi Distinguished

Service Awards were seven radio and television stations. The Society of Professional

Journalists has presented the awards annually since

1932, this year choosing

19 winners from more than 1,250 entries. Those in broadcast categories are: radio reporting:

Tony

Hanson, Richard Maloney and Larry Litwin, general assignment reporters for

KYW(AM)

Philadelphia, for spot news reports about the police siege and bombing of

MOVE head- quarters in

Philadelphia last spring;

Francisco for public service in radio journalism:

KGO(AM)

San

Tarnished Silver: Life in a Nursing Home, a

10

-part series about sexual abuse, unsanitary conditions and other problems in nursing homes; editorializing on radio:

Nicholas DeLuca and Joan Margalith of

KCBS(AM)

San Francisco for The Case of

Eugene Barnes, a two-part editorial criticizing area hospitals for refusing to accept as a patient a stabbing victim who was unemployed and uninsured; television reporting:

WFAA

-TV

Dallas for its spot -news coverage of the crash of Delta flight

191 at the

Dallas -Fort

Worth International airport last

August; public service in television journalism (stations in the top

50 markets):

KPRC

-TV

Houston for

Death Without Dignity, a four -part series report- ing on a

Houston nursing home, where neglect contributed to the deaths of several people; public service in television

Tulsa, Okla., for journalism (stations in all other markets):

KTUL -TV

Tulsa's

Golden

Missionaries, a series reporting that a

Tulsa -based foundation raises millions of dollars a year, supposedly for aid to needy people in the Third

World, but spends most of it on "overhead costs"; editorializing on television:

Phil

John- son of wwL -ry New Orleans for a five -part series commenting on the point- shaving scandal involving

Tulane University's 1984 -85 basketball team. This year's winners will receive their awards at a banquet April 26 in

Columbus, Ohio.

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BLACK JOURNALISTS

ethics and the future of minorities in America's newsrooms at the annual convention of the

National Association of nalism

51

as

Last August 1,200 journalists met in Baltimore to examine news coverage, journalism

50%

Of organization.

If you are those

Capital Cities Communications and Gannett Broadcasting.

Can you

Come join trying

51

us

Dallas,

Texas. to made job offers. at the

B1ackJournalists recruit the nation's media companies took

1986 advantage media companies, only

NABJ five

-the top of our

Newsmaker black jobs were nation's largest minority professional journalists, there fair last year. broadcast:

Convention

73% excellent or above average.

65% assessed the applicants as impressive or above average.

ABC News, andJobs is

CBS afford not to attend?

Fair, no better rated the

NABJ

News,

August

NBC

13

gathering.

Jobs

- jour-

News,

17,

Fair in

Thanks to the following companies for sponsoring part of our

1985

convention:

American Broadcasting Company

CBS

Owned

&

Operated

TV Stations

National Broadcasting Company

A.H. Belo Corporation

Capital Cities Communications,

Inc.

Gannett Company,

Inc.

Baltimore

TV Stations:

WBAL,

WJZ, WMAR

VANITA

Productions

We

look forward to your continued support in Dallas.

For more information on the

NABJ

Convention and Jobs

Fair,

please call or write:

Alexis Yancey

/NABJ

Convention Chair

WFAA TV or

Paula Walke:

/Co -Chair

/Communications

Center /Dallas,

TX 75202 (214)

748 -9631

The National Association of

Black

Journalists-

1,200 strong and growing!

Broadcasting Apr

14

152

1986

1986

is NBC's

60th anniversary year.

BROADCASTING issue, will celebrate on the eve of the that occasion in its annual affiliates meeting.

June

9

With a special report incorporating:

Six decades worth of

NBC history, from Sarnoff to

GE.

An oral history featuring one of the company's most senior and respected executives.

Profiles of the top executive leadership.

And the complete story of how the

Cinderella network made it out of the ashes.

In words, pictures and perspective.

in

BROADCASTING

June

9

Buyout wave hits syndication business

List of smaller

firms

being swallowed by larger companies leads some to say that only the large will survive

The sales

of

four smaller television syndica- tors in the past eight weeks are leading some observers to speculate that the days

of

the smaller syndicator are numbered. No longer, observers say,

will

syndication boutiques be able to survive in the hopes of some day scoring success with the next

Wheel of For- tune. "You can always catch lightning in a bottle," said Marvin M. Grieve, president of

MG /Perin. "The odds are just getting tough- er."

But there are those who work at the small- er end

of

that business who contend not all that much has changed. programing niches

They point out that

-such

as

MG /Penn's sports vignettes series,

The Winning

Mo- ment, and specials for weekends and holi- days

-not

covered by the the major syndica- tors

will

continue to allow smaller companies to exist.

The television programing business, in- cluding syndication, is in a state

After last year's merger

of

flux.

of

Lorimar and Tele- pictures came the acquisitions

of

Syndicast,

Koch

Fox/Lorber, Primetime Entertainment and

Lionheart Television.

As the list

of

smaller firms dwindles, the focus shifts to larger prey. Several midsize syndicators, for exam- ple, said that they still are receiving unsoli- cited offers.

The four buyouts were the Australia based animation house

Network Film

Co.

Ltd.'s (NFC) purchase

of

Syndicast

(BRO/

CASTING, Feb. purchase

24); Prism Entertainmer

of

Fox/Lorber

Associates (BRO/

CASTING, ment

March

24); Southbrook Enterta

Corp.'s purchase

of

the assets and p sonnel

of

the U.S. syndication

of

Primetii

Entertainment

(BROADCASTING, and an agreement in principle

April

' for BBC

I terprises to purchase 98%

of

Lionheart

Te vision International

(BROADCASTING,

AI

7).

(It already owns the other 2%.)

In each case, the purchase was made w stock in the some buying company (or rights of the purchaser's assets) in combir tion with cash, or simply stock. The prit paid for the companies varied from betwe

$2.5 million and $2.6 million in

Prism sto and warrens for Fox/Lorber, to $10.3 m lion ($7.5 million in cash) for the

Pnmetii

Entertainment assets.

The lot

of

the smaller syndicator has t come search tougher in the past few years. In for money, a larger syndicator c leverage a programing acquisition agains current success. But with the cost

of

sync

NBC wins week, ties

CBS in evening news race

NBC edged

CBS for its

21st win of the season during the week of

March

31

-April

6 and, perhaps more important, tied CBS in the even- ing news ratings. Both newscasts ended the week with an 11.8/23, while ABC had a

10.9/21. The two newscasts have tied twice before this season in share, when CBS beat NBC by

0.1 rating point. The week of

March

17

-23 CBS had a

12.3/22 and NBC a 12.2/22, and during the week of

Feb. 17 -23 CBS had a

13.3/23 and NBC a 13.2/23.

Last week was the first time the two tied in rating and share.

In the prime time ratings, NBC ended the week with a

16.7 rating and a

27 share. CBS followed with a 16.5/27 and ABC with a 14.3/23.

CBS was paced by a strong showing on Sunday, including its movie,

"Nobody's Child," which scored a

25.7/39; its regular schedule on

Friday and, in part, on Monday with the CBS NCAA Basketball

Cham- pionship

(20.7/31).

ABC stayed in the game early in the week with wins on Tuesday and

Wednesday. ABC now dominates Tuesday, winning all time periods, thanks not only to good numbers from

8 to

10 but also a surge in the performance of

Spenser:

for

Hire, at 10.11.

In rating statistics,

HUT levels were up

1

%, from a

61.5 during the same week a year ago, to

62.

Combined network ratings were up 2 %, from last year's 46.5 to 47.5. And combined network shares were up from last year's 76 to 77. Of the week's 67 programs,

12 were repeats.

Rank

Show Network Rating/Share

I.

NBC 34.3/52

:3.

.3.

The

Cosby

Show

Family Ties

Murder, She Wrote

NBC 31.8/48

CBS

25.7/39

1.

5.

Nobody's Child

Cheers

6.

7.

3.

60

Minutes

Who's the

Boss?

Night Court

J. Perfect Strangers

1.

2.

3.

4.

Golden

Girls

Dynasty

Moonlighting

Miami

Vice

NCAA Basketball Final

5.

6.

7.

3.

J.

?.

Killer in the

Dallas

Mirror

Simon

&

Simon

Knots Landing

Highway to Heaven

Hotel

CBS

NBC

CBS

26.7/39

25.2/38

22.9/40

ABC

NBC

22.4/35

22.0/34

ABC 21.3/32

NBC 21.2/36

ABC

21.1/33

ABC 21.1/32

NBC

CBS

CBS

21.0/36

CBS 20.7/31

NBC 20.4/31

19.8/32

19.429

CBS

18.8/31

NBC 18.3/29

ABC 18.2/32

Valerie

NBC 17.8/2,8

.

Beverly

Hills Madam

NBC 17.5/27 i.

Macoyver

ABC 17.4/27

Rank Show Network

Falcon Crest

Hill

Street Blues

You

Again

Facts of

:Ife

Mr. Belvedere

Scarecrow

&

Mrs.

King

Hunter

Webster

Blacke's Magic

Spenser. Fcr Hire

Gimme a Break

All is

Forgiven

Magnum,

P.1.

A Team

I

Man

Mr. Sunshine

Love Boot

Hardcasle

2020

&

McCormick

Knight

Rider

Remington

Steele

Blue Thunder

Charley Hannah

Rating/Share

CBS 17.2/30

NBC 17.2/28

NBC 17.2/26

NBC 16.8/29

ABC 16.5/28

CBS

16.2/24

NBC 18.0/25

ABC 15.7/28

NBC 15.7/24

ABC

15.6/29

NBC 15.3/28

NBC

16.227

CBS 14.5/22

NBC

14.6/7

ABC 14.4/23

ABC 14.3/23

ABC 14.2/26

ABC

13.9/21

ABC 13.8/23

NBC 13.7/22

NBC 13.5/25

ABC 13.5/21

ABC 13.4/23

Rank

Show

Network

News at Eleven

Pleasures

Twilight

Zone

Riptide

Stinky

Caddyshack

Crazy Like a Fox

St.

Elsewhere

Equalizer

Fist Times

Mary

Joe

Bash

Amazing

Stories

Morningstar/Eveningstar

Foley Square

Alfred Hitchcock

Presents

Tough Cookies

Funky

Brewster

Fathers and

Sons

Diner

Bill

Guy

'indicates premiere episode

Rating/Share

CBS 13.3/22

ABC 12.9/20

CBS

12.6/21

NBC 12.1/21

NBC 11.9/22

CBS

CBS

NBC

CBS

11.4/20

11.2/20

11.2/20

11.1/20

CBS

10.9/17

CBS

10.8/18

ABC

10.7/17

NBC 10.5/16

CBS

10216

CBS

10.0/16

NBC 10.0/15

CBS

NBC

NBC

9.9/15

8.8/15

7.1/13

ABC 6.4/10

ABC

62/11

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

154

syndicated

Fox and Lorber product increasing steadily, much programing is out of of the reach mailer shops. When smaller shops seek a

1, they will typically use the quality of r sales talent as collatoral because they e he no existing program leverage.

To stay syndication business these days,

LBS nmunications chairman and president try

Siegel says,

"I'd

like to be a big guy." xonard Koch, president

of

Syndicast,

Kes the same point. "There's just no way nake it alone any more" without being a company, or having a large company as ker, he said. kel and

"You have to sell a lot dime programing" in lieu

of

of that, said.

Syndicast, formerly owned by Ad- rex nber

International, was approached by a

of

companies before its deal. with

C.

\mong the other problems the small syn- ator faces these days is the weak indepen- tt stations, to whom credit must some

- ies be extended out

of

necessity. When a ubled station is struggling, payments to idicators and rep firms have assumed a priority. Syndicators are also faced with need to supply stations with cash com- isation in barter sales, a phenomenon that

;rowing according to one smaller syndica- who said that such a practice makes prof

- obsolete in some sales

(

"Closed irch 31).

Circuit,"

And, according to one syndica- n veteran, the $125,000 price tag to keep alesman on a staff ($75,000 in salary, and

3,000 in travel costs) does not make the ing any easier.

In

_t addition, the smaller syndicator can ex- to see the competition intensify, as evi- nced by the expected attempt by Rupert irdoch's 20th Century Fox to program one tire night

of

prime time on a weekend, as

:ll as attempts by other major groups to

)gram themselves through their in -house ndication divisions.

Bleak forecasts aside, smaller syndicators t t be an attractive' opportunity for a buyer only for their existing program library also for their sales talent. In none of the

it

purchases is the buyer is changing mar

- ting personnel.

Tom

McDermott, presi- nt and chief executive officer

of

South

-

)ok Entertainment Corp., said the rchase of

Primetime's syndication divi- m was made not only for the 53 movies to

lid'

it holds rights but also for its sales ent, principally Harvey Reinstein, execu- e vice president in charge

of

sales. cDermott and Reinstein both worked at e time at

Four Star

International.

McDermott's Southbrook began oper- ons last summer with the goal of becom- g a broadly based entertainment company, is essential for survival these days, he id. The company went public in the over

- e- counter market last December.

McDer- ott said his company

will

function as both a producer for the networks and as a syndica- tor: "The wonderful days of making money on the first run

of

a program are gone."

Primetime Entertainment, a division of

Primetime Holdings, based in

London and owned by Richard Price, function under the aegis

will

continue to of president Robert

E. Shay. was

Primetime's syndication division formed in 1983 with the purchase of

Trident Television.

Shay said that the South

- brook offer was too good to turn down, espe- cially given the need for cash in the enter- tainment business.

That the syndication business can be prof- itable is no secret. Based in

Los Angeles,

Lionheart posted 1985 sales

$100 of better than million, up 45% from its

1984 total, as

Public dispute. A controversial public television program,

Palestif,ia,rs, evoked heated discussion even before it aired

Flashpoint-

last week as

Israel and

18 PBS the stations decided against broadcasting the show because of its form and content. Eleven others skipped the program because others in their markets showed it.

Produced by noncommercial

KOED(TV)

San Francisco, hour

Flashpoint was a two- and -a -half- special including three films made "by partisans of each side," a

KOED spokeswoman said, which the discussed the disputes over Israeli

-claimed territory in the

Middle

East.

It is second part of a three

-part experimental series informally called

Theme

Nights, whose "central purpose," according to PBS,

Is

to identify and present the uncensored views of advocates on both sides of highly emotional and controversial issues." Among those criticizing Flashpoint was the

American Jewish Committee, which, according to

David Gordis, its executive vice president, urged its chapters to contact local PBS sta- tions to express their displeasure with the program.

Of the 29 PBS stations not airing Flashpoint, several were in large markets, including

WNET(TV)

New York and wETA -TV

Washington, two of the PBS system's largest stations. Stella

Giammasi, director of public information at

WNET, said that

Flashpoint was not aired, in part, because the station's program directors and senior managers felt that the two Israeli

- perspective films were "dated" and the Palestinian ganda piece based on the piece was

"a highly emotional propa- distorted premise that Israel's intention is to expel and annihi- late the Palestinians."

SOUTH

SOUTH STAR.

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NOVA UNIVERSITY it upped its sales to commercial stations also supplies

(it programing to public stations) from

10% to

45%, an improvement that prompted the

BBC Enterprises offer.

Public

Media Inc. and Western

World Television, which each owned a

49% share in the dis- tributor, sold out to

BBC Enterprises combination for a of cash and certain distribution rights to

BBC programs.

"We see this as a sensible move to make at this moment," said Ian

Duncan, a spokes- man for BBC

Enterprises, a

BBC for -profit subsidiary that sells

BBC programing and a variety

of

other BBC material (home video, records, tapes) internationally.

The BBC di- vision made a profit

of

$10 million on $150 million in revenue in 1985. The

BBC has in

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Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

i

55

the past a maintained an active involvement as partner in Lionheart. Lionheart President

Frank R. Miller will continue to run the corn- pany.

Fox/Lorber overcame its need for cash last year by successfully securing a private placement that gave the company $600,000 in capital with which it doubled its revenues from $1.5 million to $3 million. The com- pany used the money to double its staff and to restore a number

of

vintage John

Wayne movies.

Fox/Lorber was approached by six com- panies and received three offers before de- ciding on Prism. The Prism deal not only gives the company 137,609 shares

of

Prism common stock but also

110,000 warrants ex- ercisable at only dream

$15.50 each (and valued at $2 each).

"We have facilitated what we could

of'

before, said David

M. Fox, executive vice president.

With

Prism essen- tially acting as its in -house banker behind it, the company will have access to product ac- quisition critical to increasing its presence in the market.

Fox/Lorber currently licenses movie rights to home video distributors, but will not necessarily give all

of

its product to

Prism which also distributes videocassettes.

Richard Lorber, Fox/Lorber president, said that currently 40%

of

the company's rev- enues are derived from licening films to vid- eo distributors, an activity he expects to in- crease in the future. Another 40%

-50%

of

revenue comes from syndication, and the rest from sales to cable.

MPAA objects to

Canadian

TV, film

`barriers'

Association tells

House subcommittee

that country's

limits on

U.S.

programing cause economic harm

The Motion Picture Association of America has told Congress that

Canada has erected substantial barriers against U.S. motion pic- tures, television programs and home video material.

And it is clear, MPAA added, that the purpose protection is

of

primarily economic, not the

"cultural sovereignty," as claimed.

MPAA made the charge in comments it filed with the House

Ways and Means Com- mittee on the proposed U.S. -Canada

Free

Trade Agreement.

MPAA said that free trade in motion picture and television material cannot exist between the U.S. and Canada until Canada removes its "unreasonable bar- riers" to trade in those products and im- proves its level of intellectual property pro- tection.

MPAA said that in the guise

of

seeking seeking to interfere with the operation to protect 'cultural sovereignty'

" Canada is

of

motion picture companies in

Canada. At the federal level,

MPAA said, Canada is at- tempting to use its

"Investment Canada" leg- islation to restrict the ability

of

those com- panies to operate through wholly owned subsidiaries or branches "and/or to impose conditions to require the companies to invest part of their revenue in Canadian production or the distribution

of

Canadian

pictures."

As for television programing,

MPAA said the Canadian Radio -Television and Telecom- munications Commission, as part of a policy to develop has a

Canadian broadcasting system, adopted content restrictions. They re- quire Canadian television networks and sta- tions to tence devote

60%

of

their broadcast time to Canadian- content programs. The exis-

of

that restriction,

MPAA said,

"should be borne in mind by the

U.S. negoti- ators in the overall conduct" negotiations.

of

the free trade

And MPAA said that the failure

of

Can-

ada-

"one

of

the most heavily cabled coun- tries in the world "

-to

assure copyright owners from cable retransmissions "is completely out

of of

the right to derive compensation step with generally accepted interna- tional standards."

MPAA noted that

Canadi- an Prime

Minister

Brian Mulroney assured

President Reagan during their meeting in

March that efforts to deal with American concerns in that matter would be made.

"These assurances are not being implement-

ed,"

MPAA said.

MPAA noted that work licensed signals

of

Cancom, a satellite net- by CRTC in 1981 to deliver

American programs to Canadian cable systems in remote areas, is increasing- ly ulated than those it was originally intended to serving areas larger and more heavily pop- serve. Neither the systems nor Cancom pays American copyright owners

CRTC

of

the pro- grams. And

MPAA said its request that can ed. an require Cancom to pay for the Ameri- programs it transmits has gone unheed-

What's more,

MPAA said, some Canadi- cable systems have received authority from the CRTC to carry the signals of

American superstations, and other applica- tions are pending.

"Such Canadian cable systems are obtaining a free ride, as they are not liable to make any payments to the copy- right owner or to the

U.S. resale carrier."

MPAA urged the committee to direct U.S. negotiators "at an early stage

of

the negotia-

tions,"

that the concerns it expressed regard- ing what it considers market barriers and inadequate copyright protection must be dealt with.

Lotto big in game scores

California

Among the ranks of syndicated successes in

Nielsen's

February

Cassandra report was

The Big

Spin,

produced tributor, or even a small not by a major dis- sortium one, but by a con-

of

11

California stations on which it airs exclusively. (The show is produced by

Alexander Media Services, based in Sacra- mento.)

The Big Spin, which landed be- tween

Entertainment

Tonight and P.M.

Magazine with a 9.1 rating in the report, is a weekly California state lottery contest.

The Big Spin features winners

Spin, of

the state's instant game as contestants.

In the bonus round on The Big tant spins a wheel

(a la Wheel each contes-

of Fortune)

for a guaranteed minimum cash prize and a shot at a jackpot that builds until someone hits it big. There are

100 spots on the wheel prizes beginning at into the millions.

$10,000 and going

Originally, stations used the show lead -out for

Monday Night Football.

(W the show began last

September, all

11 e sortium members were ABC affiliates.) the West

Coast,

MNF

begins at

6,

mal the show's typical broadcast time

9 -( p.m. After the end home at

7 the and San

of

the season, the

stat

shifted the show in favor regular schedules.

It eventually foun or 7:30 p.m. two ABC -owned stations in Los Ang

Francisco,

KABC and the state gets three on

of

-TV the netwo

Saturdays. and minutes.

KGO dropped the show after the football seas

They were replaced by independi

KTTV(TV) and

KTVU(TV), respectively.

The show is distributed tions sell four minutes

of

via satellite. advertising t

On

KTTV(TV), the show has produce high demand both local and national ad' tising, according to Martin Bergman, president and general sales manager.

Thi second spots sell for between $3,000

$3,500. Advertisers include Pepsi,

Playt

Mitsubishi and Southern California

Vol wagon dealers.

CBS to produce series for

APR

Joint partnership has

CBS

producing financial program.

CBS News is embarking on two distinc different radio programing projects, the p duction

of

a financial series for public ra stations and the distribution radio adaptation

of of

a 30 -min

CBS Television's

14,

57th Street program to affiliates produce a new, 30- minute, afternc drive time financial shorter, I0- minute broadcast

of

as

CBS dio's young adult network, RadioRadio.

CBS

Radio has signed a "joint partn ship" agreement with American Public dio,

St. Paul, Minn., calling for

CBS Ne to well morning version

a

I previous day's financial activity for

AP affiliated stations. The programs, which y be anchored

Frank date. They are slated to begin in late

Septe ber. by

Settipani, will be called Business

According to

CBS News corresponds

CBS, the 30-

L minute Bu ness Update broadcast will be a mix

of of

i

"ha news, features and investment informatior

The public radio business programi venture was initiated late last year by Di

Brescia, senior vice president

Radio

ING

Networks. Brescia told

BROADCM that, in the process

of of

the Cl looking at

"ne ways" to approach the radio business, decided to discuss ideas with American

Pu lic Radio

APR's

A

President

Bill Kling because had been impressed with the quality

Prairie

Home

Companion seri with Garrison Keillor. "I did some brai storming with

Kling and the issue

of

a ha hour business show came up because t

[American Public

Radio] network had r cently lost its business program." (APR h. carried a

30- minute, specially produced ve

lion of

the ESPN financial program,

Bu:

Broadcasting Apr 14

1986

156

s

Times, but the show folded last sum - r.)

Brescia continued,

"I

didn't see a lflict with commercial radio because most nmercial stations won't give up 30 rain- s

of

time Ito such programing] nightly."

3rescia said

American Public

Radio

will

"putting up most rws

of

the money" for the with

CBS absorbing the rest of the

.t.

"Once the cost level is covered," said

:scia,

"then the revenues

will

be shared

50."

Brescia noted that the revenue po- tial for the

Business Update programs

I be derived from both underwriting and

'hate or user fees.

The deal makes

-'good business sense," said Brescia. CBS

"publics" will be able to serve two

-the

public radio stations and their listeners

-with

a product in which it has

"considerable expertise," he said.

The

APR /CBS uled to be programing venture was sched- unveiled last Saturday

(April

12) morning at

APR's conference in

San

Diego.

On another offering front, CBS News

will

begin

In

Touch: West 57th

Street to

Ra- dioRadio affiliates. Each program, accord- ing to

Larry

Copper, news director for the youth -oriented network, will include "three stories adapted from that week's CBS

Televi- sion

Bob

Network broadcast."

The news maga- zine's principal correspondents

Wallace, John Ferrugia, are Jane

Meredith Vieira and

Sirott.

"Our affiliates told us they were interested in a regularly scheduled, long

-form public affairs broadcast," said Bob

Kipperman, vice president and general manager for

Ra- dioRadio. "West

57th's fast pace and use

of

ambient sound are very well suited to the style and casts format on the

of

the hourly news broad- network," he said.

In

Touch:

West 57th

Street

will

be ready for distribu- tion the weekend of May

2.

SyndlcelonKEr-AsO

.-sco

A pilot for The Best of

You, distributed by Fox/Lorber in associ- ation with

All American Television, has been completed and is ready for sales presentations to stations. The show's focus has been switched from a beauty show which integrates talk segments, to a talk show which integrates beauty segments. Linda Dano, star of

Another R'orld, will continue to host. The show will incorporate segments on makeovers (featuring

Lynn

Redgrave in the pilot), fit- ness and fashion. The Best of

You is now in its third year in

Canada

(where it reaches 95% of television homes, and has enjoyed a

100% renewal rate for the past two years), and is produced by R.E.O.

Dano

International, headed by Robert Essery. Essery will produce both the

Canadian and American versions of the show

Sales of the

American version will be on a barter basis with four minutes for stations and two minutes for the distributors. All American will sell the two nation- al minutes. All American Television has also announced a partner- ship with George Carlin and Carlin Productions, and Scott Sternberg

Productions, for the production of a half -hour strip tentatively titled

Here's the Good News. Carlin will take stories off the newswires and elaborate on them in his own style. The series is slated for early fringe or access. Carlin and Sternberg have been developing the project for two years.

Casablanca Productions is packaging it.

All

American and Sternberg have produced

The Second

Annual

Stunt- man Awards, which airs this month. Sternberg also produced the first season of Lorimar- Telepictures's Perfect Match.

MCA -TV has signed up all five Gaylord stations for its series with Tribune Entertainment, Charles in Cha ge. The Tribune stations were the first to take the series

(BROADCASTING,

March 31). The Gay- lord stations are wuAB(TV)

Cleveland,

KTVr(TV)

Dallas,

KHTV(rv)

Houston,

KSTw(TV)

Tacoma, Wash., and wvrv(rv) Milwaukee.

DCA

Teleproductions says that it cleared

Everything

You

Wanted to Know About Taxes

But

Were

Afraid to

Ask in 58 markets covering more than 50% of the country. Stations used the program during weekend access, among other time periods, throughout its

March

1

-April

15 window. The half -hour guide was produced by the

Internal Revenue Service and DCA, and distributed with four minutes of ad time for stations. DCA retained no time in the program. Along with host

Tony

Randall, the program featured an IRS spokesperson, and a variety of vintage film clips to lighten the discussion on taxes.

Among the clearances were the ABC owned stations in

New York, Los

Angeles and Chicago, as well as

WBZ -TV

Boston,

WJLA -TV

Washington,

KTRK -TV

Houston,

WTAE -TV

Pittsburgh and

KIRO

-TV

Seattle. DCA Teleproductions is a Taft

Broadcasting subsidiary.

Paramount says that it has cleared

Solid Gold in

145 markets for the coming 1986 -87 season, its seventh year on the air.

Formerly sold by TPE, the show is now cleared in

45 of the top 50 markets, including wTAF -Tv

Philadelphia,

KTVU(TV)

San Francisco, wez -ry Boston, wcco

-ry

Minneapolis,

KPLR -TV

St.

Louis,

KMGH -TV

Denver,

KTSP -TV

Phoenix, wrociTV)

Tampa, Fla., and wFSe(rv)

Hartford, Conn. The one -hour show, hosted by Dionne Warwick, is sold on a barter basis with six minutes for stations and six minutes for Paramount.

Consolidated Productions has acquired all foreign rights to

A

Case of

Deadly Force, starring Richard Crenna and John Shea. The made -for -television production was seen on CBS on

April

9.

Consoli- dated will be offering the film at MIR.

In expanding international sales.

Blairspan, the distribution arm of John Blair &

Co.'s Spanish

-language subsidiary, has appointed

San- ta Clara

S.A.

/Argentina as its representative for sales of its programing library in

Argentina,

Chile, Peru and

Uruguay

Pedro

Simoncini is presi- dent of the South American distributorship. Blairspan has 2,000 hours of

Spanish

-language programing, including

17

Telemundo novelas.

Blair Entertainment says that it has cleared its 12

-title package,

"Revenge," on 16 more stations, now total bringing its total to 26.

Gross sales over $2 million in cash. The suspense

/mystery films in the package include "Whispering Death," starring Christopher

Lee and

Trevor Howard:

"Mean Frank and Crazy Tony" starring Lee Van

Cleef and Tony Lo Bianco, and

"Order to Kill," starring Jose Ferrer.

Among the latest sales are wPwR -Tv

Chicago;

KTZZ(TV)

Seattle; wax -ry Miami; wrvT(rv) Tampa, Fla.;

KPHO

-TV

Phoenix;

WTNH -1V

Hartford, Conn.; wPRi -Tv

Providence, R.I., and

WBNS -TV

Columbus, Ohio.

In NTI ratings through March 23, three animated series produced by

Sunbow

Productions in association with Marvel

Productions

Ltd. and distributed by

Claster top the animation charts. G.I. Joe, with a 4 rating, and The

Transformers, with a 3.8, have been vying for number one since their September debut. Claster's Super Sunday is third in ratings through March

23.

Telerep's division for the sales of specials has now cleared The

Coca

-Cola

100th

Anniversary Parade in 57 markets for its May 10 window. Stations will p.m. for receive a live feed on that day between

11 a.m.

-1 broadcast. They may also show the parade on a delayed basis. Sales of the two

-hour event are on a barter basis with eight minutes for stations and eight minutes for Telerep. Kenneth D.

Kolb,

Telerep director of special sales

/sports marketing, said that all of the

Cox

Broadcasting -owned stations are expected to clear the parade

(Cox owns Telerep).

Among recent clearances are Cox's wPxi(rv)

Pitts- burgh and wse

-Tv

Atlanta, as well as

WNEV

-TV

Boston,

KOIN -TV

Portland,

Ore., and wFrv(Tv) Tampa, Fla.

Access Syndication opens a

Chicago office today (April 14). Joe

Hillenbrand, director of

Midwest sales, will head the office. Last month

Access opened an East Coast office, headed by Rick Pack, vice presi- dent, eastern advertising sales.

Eagle Media has sold Pet

Action Line, a series of 98 half -hours on animal care topics, on 17 broadcast stations and four cable sys- tems. Pet

Action Line, with topics ranging from animal welfare to animal care, aired on

PBS systems are for cash. during the 1984 -85 season. Sales to cable

Broadcast sales are on a barter basis with three

- and -a -half

Station minutes for stations and two -and -a -half minutes for Eagle. sales include

KXMI(TV)

Grand Rapids, Mich.;

WEJC(TV)

Greens- boro, N.C.;

KIHS

-TV

Ontario, Calif. (Los Angeles); wIYE(TV)

Orlando, Fla., and

WNEG -TV

Toccoa, Ga.

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

157

Fifth

Estate

PACmen and women

More than

S1.6

million

in

political contributions

was donated in 1985 by broadcasting, cable. motion picture and

American Family was biggest giver,

Pete other communications interests;

Wilson was favorite recipient

Political campaign contributions from the

Fifth Estate in 1985 were well over

$1.6 million. According to filings at the Federal

Election Commission,

35 cal action the

The the

American

Family

of

the major politi- committees

(PAC's), sponsored by broadcasting, cable and motion picture industries as well as law firms and public relations companies, showed that even in a nonelection year, Congress was not ignored. leading

PAC contributor for

1985 was

Corp.'s

AF

-PAC, which raised $180,125 and distributed

$202,395

(the difference came from funds left over from

1984).

American

Family is a

Columbus, Ga. -based firm with major insur- ance interests that also owns six television stations.

Many

of

the 1985 contributions came from the Hollywood

Many production community.

of

the studios and production compan- ies have contributions to the

Motion Picture Associ- ation

of

America's

PAC.

MPAA itself was near the bottom of the fund -raising list in 1985 with $27,000 in re- ceipts and $15,472 in disbursements, while

Paramount parent. Gulf +

Western Indus- tries, was at the top with

$77,216 in receipts and $73,226 in disbursements. Among some

of

the other Hollywood

PAC's are MCA, which raised $88,053 and spent $71,364, and Warner in

Communications, with

$54,600 receipts and $53,350 in disbursements.

Others in the creative community operating

PAC's: Columbia Pictures Industries; 20th

Century Fox Film Corp.; MGM /UA Enter- tainment Co.;

Walt Disney

Productions, and

Lorimar

(see list below).

Broadcasters look to the

National Associ- ation

of

Broadcasters'

TARPAC (Television and Radio PAC) as its leading political fund raiser. Last year

TARPAC raised $82,004 and distributed $120,393

(the difference came from left over

1984 funds). The Asso- ciation

of

Independent

Television Stations also has a PAC.

It raised $11,500 and spent

$9,158. And a number

of

broadcast oper- ations, such as

American

Family, have their own committees.

Turner Broadcasting System's

PAC listed

$16,854 in receipts and $16,309 in disburse- ments. Some

of

the other prominent broad- casting

PAC's are Nationwide Political

Par- ticipation Committee (Nationwide is a

Columbus, Ohio -based group operator with cable and insurance interests) and Jefferson

-

Pilot

Communications Good Government

Committee.

Cable also is a major

PAC player. Last year the National Cable Television Associ- ation's

CablePAC raised $79,927 and spent

$43,443. Warner Amex Cable

Communica- tions reported raising $17,825 and distribut- ing $20,600 (using leftover money). Among other cable

PAC's listed below: Heritage

Communications;

Viacom International;

United Cable Television

Corp.,

and Daniels

&

Associates. Cablevision Systems

Corp. also operates a PAC bursements in 1985. but reported no dis-

Other factions in communications have committees, including the American Adver- tising Federation, Comsat and the Satellite

Television Industry Association, the last re- presenting dealers, manufacturers and dis- tributors

of

backyard satellite dishes. The

Low Power

Television Association of Amer- ica reported no activity for its PAC last year.

Law firms often have

PAC's. Washington

- based

Dow, Lohnes & Albertson, for exam- ple, raised $24,196 and spent $21,165.

Crowell

&

Moring, another law firm, has its own committee, although it did not make any contributions last year. Verner,

Liipfert,

Bernhard

& McPherson raised $74,095 and spent $68,097. Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer

&

Feld, which represents Hollywood in most

of

its legislative battles, reported $62,300 in receipts and $62,086 in disbursements.

The public relations and lobbying firm

of

Gray

&

Co., which represents NBC, raised $28,778 and distributed $30,182 (using left -over funds).

Members of the House and Senate

Corn

- merce Committees, which have jurisdiction over telecommunications matters, and the

House and Senate which oversee copyright matters, received the majority

of

the

Judiciary Committees, contributions. Budget and

PAC

Appropriations Committee members and members dollars. All of Wilson's $55,500 in do- nations of the House Ways and Means

Committee also figured on the PAC lists.

Senator

Pete Wilson (R- Calif.) was the leading recipient last year came from the of

Fifth Estate

Hollywood produc- tion community. Wilson was followed by

House Telecommunications

Subcommittee

Chairman Tim

Wirth (D- Colo.), who re- ceived $33,300, much

of

it from cable

PAC's and the motion picture industry.

Wirth, who is running for the Senate also received

$12,800 from the Satellite Television

Indus- try Association. Representative Ken Kramer

(R- Colo.), who appears to be the most likely

Republican candidate to oppose Wirth, re- ceived $500 from

NCTA and $1,250 from

United Cable's

PAC. ate

The other top Senate recipients were: Sen-

Finance Committee Chairman Bob

Pack- wood (R-

Ore.), also a Communications

Subcommittee member,

$25,000; Senator

Patrick Leahy (D

-Vt.),

ranking minority member

(D-

of

the

Copyright Subcommitt

$24,019; Senator

Daniel Inouye (D

-I waii),

Communications

Subcommit member, $23,846; Senator Alan Crans

Calif.), $23,500;

Senator Alfonse D' mato

(R-

N.Y.), Appropriations Commit member, $22,500, and Senator Ernest

He ings (D-

S.C.),

ranking minority member the Commerce Committee, $18,250.

Other key congressmen receiving cons erable contributions from the Fifth

Est were: House Energy and

Commerce

Co mittee Chairman John Dingell

(D -Mict

$8,050; House Commerce Committee

Rai ing Minority member James

T.

Broyhill

N.C.),

who is running for the Sena

$6,500; Representative Matthew

Rinal

(R-

N.J.),

ranking minority member on

1

House Telecommunications Subcommitti

$4,500; Senator

Wendell Ford (D -Ky.).

Communications Subcommittee memb

$16,076; Senator

Slade Gorton (R- Wash.)

Communications Subcommittee memb

$7,500; Senator Charles Grassley

(R

-Iow a Judiciary Committee member, $13,1( and Senator Arlen

Specter

(R -Pa.), a

Jut ciary list

Committee member, $6,873.

Below,

BROADCASTING of some Fifth Estate

PAC's with totals: each has compiled candidate for

1985. (The disbursemr figure represents contributions to candidat and PAC's and does not include other e penses.) Incumbent Senate members up re- election this year are in bold. Membe major committee assignments are identifi by: CC

-House

mittees;

TS

Subcommittee; or

Senate

-House

CmS-

Commerce

1

Col

Telecommunicatio

Senate Communi( tions Subcommittee;

JC

-House

or

Sent

Judiciary Committees;

CS

-House

or

Se ate or Senate Appropriations Committer

BC

Copyright Subcommittees;

AC

-House

and WMC mittee. or

-Hou

Senate Budget Committee

-House

Ways and Means Col

Akin,

Gump,

Strauss

Hauer &

Feld Civic

Action Committee

Disbursement: $62,086

House

Jim Bates (D- Calif.)

TS

Frederick Boucher

(D -Va.) CS

Barbara Boxer

(D- Calif.)

BC

Jack Brooks

(D -Tex.) CS

John Bryant

(D -Tex.) TS

Howard Coble

(R

-N.C.)

CC, CS

John Conyers (D- Mich.) JC

Wayne Dowdy

(D- Miss.)

TS

Dennis Eckart (D -Ohio) CC

Edward Feighan

(D

-Ohio)

JC

Dan Glickman

(D -Kan.)

JC

Ralph Hall (DTex.) CC

$5

$5

$2

$5

$1,0

$5

$2

$5

$7

$2

$1.075.

$5

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

158

cey

Leland (D -Tex.) TS nan

Lent (R -N.Y.)

CC

Richardson (D -N.M.)

CC

:

Rinaldo

(R

-N.J.)

TS

Sharp (D -Ind.) CC

..

It

Sikorski

(D- Minn.) CC

...

..

...

..

.

$250

William Thomas (R-

Calif.) WMC

$250 Guy Vander Jagt

(R-

Mich.) WMC, chairman of

$1,000

National

$250

Republican Congressional Committee)

..

$150

$500

Doug Walgren (D -Pa.) CC

$300

$250 Henry Waxman (D- Calif

$250 Tim Wirth

(D-Colo.) TS

.)

TS

$10.000

$200 y

Smith (D -Fla.) JC

$300

Tauzin (D -La.) TS

Wirth (D-

Colo.)

TS

$500

$1.000

Senate

Wyden (D -Ore.) CC

House

Fazio (D-

Calif.) AC

. ms

J.

Florio

(D

-N.J.)

CC

Wirth (D- Colo.) TS

..

Senate

'tdell Ford (D

-Ky) CmS

)art Kasten (R-Ore.) AC, BC, CC

Packwood 't-Ore.) Cms

...

American

Disbursement:

$202,395

House

Family

y1 e

Aninony

(U -Ark.)

WMC

Bilirakis

(R

-Fla.) CC iy

Boggs (D -La.) AC

....

roll Campbell

Jr.

(R-S C

)

WMC orge

Darden

(D

-Ga.)

Mm Dickinson (R

-Ala.)

01

Dorgan (D -N.D.) WMC

.. me Dowdy

(D-

Miss.) TS trims

Downey

(D

-N.Y) BC. WMC

. . to

Duncan (R- Tenn.)

WMC

1

:k

Erdreich (D -Ala.)

Fields

(R -Tex.) TS an n

Gallo (R

-N.J.)

Gibbons

(D

-Fla.) WMC

WI

Gingrich

(R

-Ga.) nk Guarini (D -N.J.) WMC arles

Hatcher (D

-Ga.)

Jenkins (D -Ga.) BC. WMC nes

R.

Jones (R- Okla.) WMC

:k

Kemp (R -N.Y) AC

-bara Kennelly (D- Conn.) WMC er Kostmayer (D -Pa.) nt Lott (R-

Miss.) mas Luken

(D

-Ohio)

TS o

Michel (R -III., minority leader) yid

Monson

(R

-Utah) nson

Moore

(D -La.) BC. WMC n

Pease (D -Ohio) WMC nes Quillen (R- Tenn.)

Richardson (D -N.M.) CC

Roy

Rowland (D -Ga.)

.fly

Russo (D -Ill.) BC, WMC

:hard Schulze

(R -Pa.)

WMC

:hard Shelby

(D -Ala.) CC rry Sikorski (D- Minn.) CC nny Smith (R

-Ore.) BC

Yney H.

Stark (D- Calif.) WMC

:rick Swindall (R -Ga.) CS dsay Thomas (D -Ga.)

$500

Jim Abdnor

(R

-5.0.)

AC

Alfonse D'Amato

(R

-N.Y.) AC

Nell

Ford

(D

-Ky) CmS art

Gore (D- Tenn.)

CmS ie

Gorton

(R- Wash.) BC. CmS est del

Hollings

(D

-S.C.) AC, CmS

Inouye

(D-

Hawaii) AC, CmS

Riegle (D-

Mich.)

BC.

CC an

Senate

Specter

(R -Pa.) AC.

JC

American

Federation

Disbursement:

$2,500

$695

Dale

Bumpers

(D

-Ark.) AC

Quentin Burdick (D

-N.D.) AC

Alan

Cranston

(D- Calif.)

$500

$500

Wendell Ford (D- Ky)CmS

Jake Gam (R

-Utah) AC

$1.000

Slade

Gorton

(R-

Wash.) BC, CmS

....

$1,164.90

Charles Grassley (R-lowa) BC,JC

$7,000

$5,000

... ...

$500

$5.000

$1.000 Tom

Harkin

Paula

(0

-Iowa)

AC

$500 Orrin Hatch

(R -Utah) BC. CS

$1.000

$5.000

Hawkins

(R

-Fla., chairman of

Children, Family,

Advertising

Ad

PAC

Drugs 8 Alcoholism Subcommittee)

Ernest Hollings (D

-S.C.) AC. CmS

Daniel Inouye

(D-

Hawaii)

AC, CmS

Mack

Mattingly

(R

-Ga.) AC

Don

Nickles

(R- Okla.)

Robert

Packwood

(R

-Ore.)

CmS

Dan Quayle (R

-Ind.) BC

$2,000

$1.000

$2.000

$5.000

$5,000

$9.000

$6.000

$2,000

$1.000

$2.000

$300

$500

S200

$500

$500

$500

.

$250

$500

$500

$500

$250

$250

$500

$250

$500

$500

$250

$500

$250

$3.000

$5.000

$1.000

$250

$5.000

$1.000

$2.000

$500

$5.000

$500

$250

$1..000

$5.000

$5.000

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500

$1.000

$1,000

$250

$250

$1.000

$2,500

$500

William Roth

Jr.

(R

-Del.)

Arlen Specter

(R -Pa.) AC, JC

Steven Symms (R-

Idaho)

BC

Paul Trible (R -Va.)

CC

Other

Americans for Constitution Action PAC

(supports con- servative candidates for House and Senate seats)

$5,000

Business -Industry PAC (supports pro- business and in- dustry candidates)

$1,000

Campaign America (supports Republican candidates at federal, state and local levels)

$1.000

Coalition for a

Democratic Majority

$500

Democratic Congressional

Campaign

Commit- tee

$1,000

Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee $5,000

Effective Government Committee

(Rep.

Richard

Ge- phardt

(D -Mo.] PAC)

$500

Independent Action

PAC

(supports Democratic candi- dates running for House or Senate seats)

$500

National Bipartisan PAC

(supports pro -Israel and civil rights -oriented candidates)

$2,500

National

8,

Economic PAC

(pro-business, especially mi- nority business)

$1,000

Republican Senatorial Trust

$20,000

Columbia

Senate

Jeff Bingaman (D

-N.M

)

Christopher Dodd

(D-

Conn.)

Pete

Domenici

(R

-N.M.) AC. BC

Wendell Ford (D

-Ky) CmS

.

$3.000

$15.000

$5,000

$2,000

$2.000

Pictures

Disbursement:

$40,250

$300

House

Joseph

P

Addabbo(O- N.Y)PC

$500

Howard Berman (D-

Calif.)

CS

Jim Oberstar (D- Minn.)

$250

Frederick Boucher (DAM.) CS

Mc Fazio (D-

Calif.) AC

$500

John Bryant (D -Tex.) TS

Howard Coble

(R

-N.C.)

CC. CS

Tony

Coelho (D- Calif., chairman. Democratic Congres- sional Campaign Committee)

$500

John Dingell (D- Mich.) CC

John Duncan (R- Tenn.)

WMC

$1.000

$500

$1.000

$500

$500

Barney

Sam

Frank (D- Mass.) CS

Gibbons

(D -Fla.) WMC

James R.

Jones

(D-

Okla.) WMC

Mickey Leland (D

-Tex.) TS

$500

$500

.......

$1.000

$250

$250

James Quillen

(R- Tenn.)

$500

Larry Smith (D -Fla.) JC

Tm

Wirth (D- Colo.) TS

$750

$1.000

$500

Ron

Wyden (D -Ore.) CC

$500

$1,000

$500

(AC, BC)

$1.000

Slade Gorton (R-

Wash.) BC, CmS

Ernest Hollings (D -S.C.) AC. CmS

Patrick Leahy

(D

-Vt.) AC, CS

Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D -N.Y.) BC

Bob Packwood

(R

-Ore.) CmS

Pete Wilson (R-

Calif.)

Other

Democratic

Congressional

Campaign Commit- tee

$5.000

Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee $4,250

MPAA PAC

$5,000

COMSATPAC (Comsat)

Disbursement:

$22,585

House

Michael Barnes

(0

-Md.) BC

Howard Berman (D -Md.) CS

Mike Bilirakis

(R

-Fla.) CC

Thomas Bliley (R -Va.) TS

Don

Bonker(D- Wash.)

James Broyhill

(R -N.C.)

TS

John Bryant

(D -Tex.) TS

Beverly Byron

(D -Md.)

Bob Carr (D- Mich.)

AC

Dan

Coats

(R

-Ind.)

TS

Bill

Cobey

(R

-N.C.)

Cardiss Collins (D -III.) TS

Wayne Dowdy (D- Miss.) TS

Mervyn Dymally

(D-

Calif.)

Dante

Fascell (D -Fla.)

Bobbi Fiedler

(R- Calif.) BC

Sam

Gejdenson (D- Conn.)

Bill

Green (R-N.Y.) AC

Judd Gregg

(R

-N.H.) WMC

Peter Kostmayer

(D -Pa.)

Mickey Leland (D -Tex.) TS

Mel

Levine (D- Calif.)

Manual Lujan (R

-N.M.)

Connie Mack

(R

-Fla.)

BC

Buddy MacKay (D -Fla.)

BC

Ed

Madigan

(R

-III.) CC

Dan Mica (D -Fla.)

Henson Moore (D -La.) BC, WMC

Carlos Moorhead

(R-

Calif.)

TS,

CS

Bill

Nelson (D -Fla.)

Howard Nielson (R

-Utah)

TS

Matthew Rinaldo (R

-N.J.)

TS

Don Ritter (R -Pa.) TS

Gerry Sikorski

(D- Minn.) CC

Larry Smith (D -Fla.) JC

Neal Smith

(0

-Iowa) AC

Olympia Snowe (R

-Me.)

Harley

O.

Staggers

Jr.

(D -WVa.) JC

Al Swift (D- Wash.) TS

Billy

Tauzin (D -La.) TS

Bob Torricelli (D

-N.J.)

Henry Waxman (D- Calif.)TS

Tim Wirth (D-

Colo.) TS

Frank Wolf

(R

-Va.) AC

Howard Wblpe (D- Mich.) BC

Senate

Mark

Andrews

(R

-N.D.)

AC, BC

Christopher Dodd (D- Conn.)

Wendell Ford

(D

-Ky) CmS

Albert Gore

(D- Tenn.) CmS

Slade Gorton (R- Wash.)

BC,

Daniel

CmS

Inouye

(D-

Hawaii)

AC.

CmS

Frank

Murkowski

(R-

Alaska)

Bob Packwood

(R

-Ore.) CmS

Paul Trible (R -Va.) CC

Danielspac

(Daniels

Disbursement: $6,754

House

Henson Moore

(R

-La.

)

BC, WMC

$1,000

$1.000

$2,500

$1,000

$1,000

$5,000

$200

$250

$250

$250

$500

$500

$250

$300

$250

$2$0

$250

$250

$750

$250

$500

$500

$250

$300

$250

$750

$2$0

$250

$250

$250

$250

$500

$750

$$00

$250

$250

$250

$250

$250

$250

$300

$250

$250

$250

$250

$500

$250

$500

$500

$500

$250

$1.000

$1,000

$1.000

$500

$500

$500

$1.000

$1.000

$300

& Associates)

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

159

Patricia Schroeder

(D-

Colo.)

CS

Tim Wirth (D- Colo.) TS

NCTA-CablePAC

.

Other

$100

$1.100

$5,000

Ernest Hollings

(D -S.C.) AC,

CmS

Robert Kasten

(R

-Ws.)

AC, BC, CC

Paul

Simon (D -III.) JC

Other

$1,000

$1,000

$500

MPAA

PAC

Ohio Democratic tee

Party

$'

Ohio Republican Federal Candidates Finance

Cor s,

Republican Leaders

Fund (Rep. Bob Michel

[

PAC) s'

The House Leadership

Fund $500

Walt Disney

Heritage Employe Pi

Disbursement: $4,250

Gulf

+

Western

Disbursement: $6,581

House

Disbursement: $73,226

House

Joseph

Addabbo

(D -N.Y.) AC

Frederick Boucher

(D -Va.) CS

$500 (AC)

$500

House

John Bryant (D -Tex.) TS

Howard Coble

(R

-N.C.)

CC. CS

Barney Frank (D- Mass.) CS

Romano Mazzoli

(D-Ky.) CS

Jeff

Bingaman

(D -N.M

)

Alan Cranston

Don

Ed

Mel

ID -Calif

Dow, Lohnes

& Albertson

Levine (D- Calif.)

Jerry Lewis (R- Calif.) AC

Bill

Lowery

(R- Calif.) AC

Leon Panetta (D- Calif.)

1

Senate

Disbursement:

House

Howard Berman

(D -Calif

)

CS

Bonker(D-

Wash.)

Tom Daschle

(D -S.D

)

Julian Dixon (D- Calif.) AC

Don Edwards

(D- Calif.) JC

Mc Fazio (D-

Calif.) AC

Ronnie Flippo

(D -Ala.) WMC

James

J.

Florio

(D

-N.J.) CC

Robert Lagomarsino

(R-

Catit.)

$21,165

..

$500 Joe

Addabbo

(0-N.Y.) AC

Frank Annunzio

(D -III.)

$500

$500

Doug Barnard

(D -Ga.)

$1,000

$500

Steve

Bartlett

(R -Tex.)

$500

$250

$1,050

Frederick Boucher

(D -Va.) CS

$500

John Bryant (D

-Tex.) TS

$500

Thomas Carper

(D

-Del.)

Dick Cheney

(R

-Wyo.)

$500

$500

$500

$1.000 Howard Coble

(R

-N.C.)

CC. CS

$626.48

Tony Coehlo

(D- Calif., chairman, Democratic Congres- sional Campaign Committee)

$500

Butler Derrick (D -S.C.) BC

$500

John Dingell (D- Mich.)

CC

$500

Glenn English (D- Okla.)

$250

Ben Erdreich (D

-Ala.)

$500

Harold

Ford (D- Tenn.) WMC

$500

Barney Frank (D- Mass.)

CS

$500

Martin Frost (D

-Tex.) BC

$1,000

Sam Gibbons

(D -Fla.)

WMC

Bart Gordon (D-

Tenn.)

$500

$500

$500

$1,000

James Broyhill

Tony

(R

-N.C.) CC

$500

Coehlo

(D- Calif., chairman, Democratic Congres- sional Campaign Committee)

Jenkins

(D

-Ga.)

BC, WMC

Robert Matsui (D- Calif.) WMC

Edward Roybal

(D- Calif.) AC

Gerry Sikorski (D- Minn.)

CC

Jim Slattery (D

-Kan.) BC. TS

Fortney

H. Stark (D- Calif.) WMC

$1.000

$1,000

$500

$500

$1.000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

$1.000

$1.000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

$500

$500

$1,000

$500

$1.000

William Gray

(D -Pa.) AC, BC

Frank Guarini

(D -N.J.) WMC

Thomas Hartnett

(R -S.C.)

James

R.

Jones (D- Okla.) WMC

Mel Levine (D- Calif.)

Tom Manton (D -N.Y.)

Raymond McGrath

(R

-N.Y..)

Stewart McKinney

(R- Conn.)

George Miller (D-

Calif.) BC

Steve Neal (D-N.0

)

Claude Pepper (D -Fla.)

James Quillen

(R- Tenn.)

Matthew Rinaldo

(R

-N.J.)

TS

Romano Mazzoli (D-Ky)

CS

Fernand

St.

Germain

(D -R.I.)

Gerry Sikorsi (D- Minn.)

Larry Smith

(D -Fla.) JC

Bob Torricelli

(D -N.J.)

WMC

Henry Waxman (D- Calif.)

TS

11m

Wrth

(D- Colo.)

TS

Jim

Wright (D -Tex.. majority leader)

BC

..

$500

$500

$500

$1,000

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500

$1,000

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500

$300

$500

$1,000

$2,000

Bob Torricelli (D -N.J.)

11m

Wrth (D- Colo.)

TS

$500

$1.000

Senate

Senate

Charles Grassley

(R-lowa)

BC. JC

Dan

Quayle

(R

-Ind.)

BC

Gray

Doug Walgren (D -Pa.) CC

&

Disbursement: $30,182

House

Barney Frank (D- Mass.) CS

William Gray (D

-Pa.) AC, BC

Henry Hyde

(R-N.Y.)CS

Robert Kastenmeier

(D

-Ws.)

CS

Barbara Mikulski

(D -Md.) CC

Michael Oxley

(R

-Ohio)

TS

Patricia Schroeder

(D-

Colo.)

CS

Gerry Sikorski (D- Minn.) CC

Co.

$1,000

$1.000

$250

$500

$250

$200

$250

$250

$250

$250

$250

Jeff

Bingaman

(D -N.M

)

Alan

Cranston (D- Calif.)

Alfonse D'Amato

(R -N.Y..) AC

Christopher Dodd

(D- Conn.)

Albert Gore (D-

Tenn.) CmS

$500

$4,500

$5,000

$1.000

$1,000

Chic Hecht

(R

-Utah)

Ernest Hollings

(D -S.C.) AC.

CmS

Daniel Inouye

(D-

Hawaii) AC, CmS

$500

$1.000

$2.500

Slade

Gorton

(R- Wash.) BC,

CmS $1.000

Charles Grassley

(A -Iowa)

BC, JC

Orrin

Paula

Drugs

& Alcoholism Subcommittee)

Patrick Leahy

(D -Vt.) AC, CS

Mack

Hatch (R -Utah)

BC. CS

Mattingly

(R -Ga.)

AC

Patrick Moynihan

(D -N.Y.) BC

$1,000

$2,000

Hawkins

(R -Fla., chairman, Children,

Family,

$1.500

$1.500

$1.000

$2.000

Dan Quayle

(R

-Ind.)

BC

$500

Paul Simon (D -III.) JC

$1,000

Arlen Specter

(R -Pa.) AC, JC

$500

Pete Wilson (R-

Calif.)

$10,000

Other

Tim Wirth (D- Colo.) TS

$200

Senate

Robert Dole

(R -Kan., majority leader)

Charles Grassley

(A

-Iowa)

BC. JC

....

$1,000

$100

AFSA

PAC (American Financial

Services As- soc.)

$1.000

Chicago Campaign Committee

(Rep. Dan Rosten- kowski (D -III.]

PAC) $500

Effective Government Committee phardt [D-Mo.)

PAC)

(Rep.

Richard Ge-

$1,000

Steve Bartlett

(R -Tex

Jim

Ross Lightfoot

(R -Iowa)

Pat Schroeder (D- Colo.)

CS

Charles Grassley

(R -Iowa) BC, JC

NCTA-

CablePAC

Texas Cable Television Association

PAC

Truman Fund

(Democratic Party of Iowa)

INTV

Disbursement: $9,158

Thomas Bliley

(R -Va.) TS

Frederick Boucher

(D -Va.) CS

Jack Brooks

(D -Tex.) CS

James Broyhill

(R

-N.C.) CC

John Bryant

(D -Tex.) TS

William

E.

Dannemeyer

(R- Calif.) CC, JC

John Dingell (D-

Mich.) CC

Jack Fields

(R -Tex.) TS

Hamilton

Fish (R

-N.Y..)

JC

Barney Frank (D- Mass.) CS

Dan Glickman

(D -Kan.) JC

Mickey Leland

(D -Tex.) TS

...

Tom Luken

(D

-Ohio)

TS

Dan Lungren

(R-

Calif.)

JC

Romano

Mazzoli (D -Ky.) CS

Michael Oxley

(R

-Ohio)

TS

Matthew Rinaldo

(R

-N.J.)

TS

Don

Ritter

(R -Pa.) TS

Patricia Schroeder (D-Colo.)

CS

Gerry Sikorski

(D-

Minn.)

CC

Al Swift (D- Wash.) TS

Billy Tauzin (D -La.)

TS

Doug Walgren

(D -Pa.) CC

Henry Waxman (D- Calif.)

TS

Bob Whittaker

(R

-Kan.) CC

Tim Wirth (D-

Colo.) TS

Senate

Slade Gorton

(R- Wash .) BC, CmS

Other

Wbmen's Congressional Council

Jefferson

Senate

Other

House

-Pilot

Corp,

Disbursement: $12,954

House

Other

$1

$1

$1

Robin Britt (Dem candidate opposing

Rep. How

Coble

(A- N.C.)) eC$

Bill

Cobey

(R

-N.C.)

Richard Gephardt

(D

-Mo.) WMC

$5.1

S

Alex McMillan

(R -N.C.)

W.

Henson Moore

(R

-La.)

BC, WMC

$1,:

$1

i

Steve Neal

(D

-N.0

)

S

HI PAC (Health Insurance Association of

Art

Broadcasting Apr 14

1986

160

ica)

$1,000

Insurance PAC (American Council of Life Insur- ance)

$2,000

Industry

PAC

(American Land Title

Associ- ation)

$200 n

Liberty

Disbursement:

Spratt (D-S.C.) ney

H.

Stark

(D-Calil

)

WMC

Senate est Hollings

(D -S C

I

AC. CmS

Other

Insurance

PAC

(American Council of Life Insur- ance)

$1.500

Lorimar PAC

Disbursement: $21,050

Carr (D- Mich.) AC

Levine (D- Calif.)

Wirth (D- Colo.) TS

Corp.

House

House

$6,000

$1.000

$1.000

$500

$250

$2.500

$1.000

Senate n

Cranston (D- Calif.) de

Gorton

(R-

Wash.) BC.

CmS

$4,500

$1.500 lie! Inouye

ID-

Hawaii) AC, CmS

.

_ rick Leahy

(D -VI.) AC. CS

...

_

.

_

Bert ven

Packwood

(R

-Ore.) CmS

Symms

(R-

Idaho)

BC

......

$1.000

$2.000

.....

$2.000

$1.000

Henry Hyde

(R

-III.) CS

Tom

Kindness

(R

-Ohio) CS

William

Mel

Lehman

(D -Fla.) AC

Levine (D- Calif.)

Cathy Long (D

-La.)

Dan Lungren (R-

Calif.) JC

Robert Matsui (D- Calif.) WMC

Romano Mazzoli (D-Ky)

CS

Norman Mineta (D- Calif.)

Henson Moore

(D -La.) BC. WMC

Bruce Morrison

(D- Conn.)

CS

Claude Pepper

(D -Fla.)

Peter Rodino (D

-N.J.) JC

Gerry Sikorski (D-

Minn.) CC

Larry Smith (D -Fla.) JC

Tim

Wirth (D- Colo.)

TS

...

$250

$500

$200

51.750

$500

$200

$300

$500

$250

$1,000

$250

$500

$1.500

$250

$300

$1,500

Ernest

Hollings

(D -S.C.) AC.CmS

Patrick Leahy (D -VI.) AC, CS

Robert Packwood

(R -Ore.) CmS

Pete Wilson (R-

Calif.)

MPAA PAC

Other

$1.000

$2.000

$1.000

$10,000.

$5.000

Motion Picture

Association of

America

Disbursement: $15,472

Senate

Jeff

Bill

Bingaman

(D -N.M

)

Bradley

(D

-N.J.)

Alan Cranston (D- Calif.)

Alan

Dixon

(D -III.)

Christopher Dodd

(D-

Conn.)

A:)e"

Gore (D- Tenn.)

CmS

Slade

Gorton

R- Wash.) BC. CmS

Charles Grassley (A

-Iowa)

BC. JC

..

Tom

Hark

.

7 owa) AC

Orrin Hatch

-

Utah) BC. CS

.

Ernest

Hollings

(D -S.C.) AC. CmS

Daniel

Inouye (D- Hawaii) AC. CmS

Patrick Leahy (D -VI.) AC. CS

Bob Packwood

(R

-Ore.) CmS

Paul Simon (D -III.) JC

Steven Symms (R-

Idaho)

BC

Pete Wilson (D-

Calif.)

House

$500

$1.000

$5$1,00,000

0

$1,000

$240

$1.000

$500

$500

52.500

$2.000

$3.500

$3.500

$2.000

$1.000

$1.000

$10.000

Joe

Addabbo

(D

-N.Y) AC

Joseph DioGuardi (A-N.Y.)

Barney Frank (D- Mass.) CS

Sam Gibbons (D- Fla.)WMC

William Gray (D -Pa.) AC. BC

Joe Moakley (D- Mass.)

Henry Waxman (D- Calif.) TS

Senate

$500

$250

$649.05

$500

$500

$100

$500

Jeff

Bob

Bingaman (D -N.M

)

Packwood

(R

-Ore.)

CmS

$500

Robert Dole (R -Kan., majority leader)

Orrin

G.

Hatch (R -Utah) BC. CS

Daniel Inouye (D- Hawaii)

$1.000

$1.000

....

AC, CmS $1.181.83

Patrick Leahy

(D -VI.) AC. CS

$769.60

$1.000

Arlen Specter

(R -Pa.) AC, JC

$623

Other

Howard Baker for President

Democratic

Conc'ess o

^a'

Campaign tee

$5.000

Commit-

$5.000

Other

Chairman's Council (Democratic Congressional Cam- paign Committee)

$2,500

Meredith

Corp.

Disbursement:

$9,709

NAB

(TARPAC)

Disbursement: $120,393

Other

Serrate

Democratic Business Roundtable (Demo- cratic Senatorial Campaign Committee) $5,000

MCA PAC

Disbursement: $71,364

House mph

Addabbo

(D

-N ti)

AC ward Berman (D- Calif.)

CS

5500

$500 derick Boucher

(D -Va.) CS $500 rbara Boxer

(D- Catit.) BC nes Broyhill

(R

-N.C.)

CC

$250

............

$500

$500 b

Carr (D- Mich

.)

AC ward Coble

(R -N C.) CC. CS

1y

Coehlo (D

-Calif

. chairman. Democratic Congres- sional Campaign Committee)

$250

In Conyers (D- Mich.) JC rold Daub

(R

-Neb.) WMC

$500

$1.000

$250

$250 laid

Dellums (D- Calif.)

$250 an

Donnelly (D- Mass.) WMC

-on

Dorgan

(D -N.D.) WMC yne Dowdy (D- Miss.)

TS

$500

$500

-

$500

$500

)mas Downey (D-N.Y.) BC, WMC

In Duncan (R- Tenn.) WMC

Fazio (D-

Calif.)

AC bbi Fiedler (R-

Calif.) BC milton

Fish (R -N.Y.) JC nnie Flippo (D -Ala.) WMC rold Ford (D- Tenn.) WMC

....

rney Frank

(D-

Mass.)

CS

$500

$600

$500

$300

$1.000

$500

$1,000

T1

Frenzel (R- Minn.) WMC

Gibbons (D -Fla.) WMC n

Glickman (D -Kan.) JC liam Gray

(D -Pa.) AC, BC

.....

..

$500

$1.500

$1.000

$500

House

House

James Broyhill (R

-N.C.) CC

Howard Coble

(R

-N.C.) CC.

CS

Ron

Flippo

(D

-Ala.) WMC

Dale Kildee (D-

Mich.)

Buddy MacKay

(D -Fla.) BC

Bill

Nelson (D -Fla.)

Doug Walgren

(D -Pa

.)

CC

Tony

Senate

Charles Grassley

(R

-Iowa)

BC.

JC

Other

Fund for America's Future (George Bush Pac)

$1.000

MGM /UA

Disbursement:

House

$30,328

Coelho

(D- Calif., chairman Democratic

Congres- sional Campaign Committee)

Julian Dixon

(D-

Calif.)AC

Don

Sam

Edwards (D- Calif.)JC

Gibbons

(D

-Fla.) WMC

Tom

Kindness

(R

-Ohio)

CS

Mel Levine (D- Calif.)

Romano Mazzoli

(D

-Ky)

CS

Carlos Moorhead

(R-

Calif.)

TS,

CS

Peter

Rodino

(D

-N.J.)

JC

Senate

Orrin Hatch (R

-Utah)

BC. CS

.. $2,500

Herb Bateman

(R -Va.)

$250

Jim Bates (D- Calif.) TS

$300

Berkley Bedell (D -Iowa)

$100

Doug Bereuter (R-Neb.)

$500

$250

Mike Bilirakis

(R

-Fla.) CC

Tom

Bliley

(R

-a.)

TS

$100

Fredrick Boucher, (D -Va.) CS

Jack Brooks (D -Tex.) CS

James Broyhill (R

-N.C.)

CC

$300

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500

$1,000

$500

$500

$500

$2,000

John Bryant

(D -Tex.) TS

Dan Burton (R

-Ind.)

Bob Carr (D-

Mich.)

AC

Dick Cheney

(R -Wyo.)

Dan Coats

(R

-Intl.)

TS

Bill

Cobey

(R

-N.C.)

Howard Coble

(R

-N.C.)

CC, CS

Tony Coehlo

(0-

Calif.), chairman, Democratic Con- gressional Campaign Committee $1.000

Cardiss Collins (D -III.) TS

Tom Daschle (D

-5.0.)

John Dingell

(0-

Mich.) CC

Joseph DioGuardi

(P -N.Y.)

$1,500

$200

$2,000

$500

Wayne Dowdy (D -Miss) TS

Joseph Early (D- Mass.) AC

Dennis

E.

Eckart (D

-Ohio)

CC

Bill Emerson (R -Mo.)

$1.000

$250

$250

$500

$1,000

$500

$250

$750

$1,250

$500

$250

$250

Vic Fazio (D- Calif.) AC

James

J.

Florio (D -N.J.) CC

Barney Frank (D- Mass.) CS

Steve Gunderson (R

-Ws.)

Henry Hyde

(R -III.)

CS

Andy Ireland

(R -Fla.)

Jack Kemp (R -N.Y.) AC

Peter Kostmayer (D -Pa.)

Robert Lagomarsino

(R-

Calif.)

Richard Lehman (D- Calif.)

Norman

Lent (R -N.Y.) CC

Jim Lightfoot

(R

-Iowa)

Tom Luken (D -Ohio) TS

$500

$1,250

$2.500

$275

$500

$1,000

$250

$400

$1,000

$2.250

$1,000

$250

$1,000

$350

$500

$500

$300

$250

$500

$250

$1,750

Broadcasting Apr 14 1986

161

Dan Lungren (R- Calif.)

JC

Buddy MacKay (D -Fla.) BC

Ed Madigan

(R -III.) CC

Robert Matsui (D-

Calif.) WMC

Robert Michel

(R- minority leader

Allan Mollohan

(D -WVa.)

Carlos Moorhead

(R- Calif.) TS, CS

Michael Oxley

(R

-Ohio)

TS

Claude Pepper (D -Fla.)

RC

James Quillen

(R- Tenn.) RC

Charles

Rangel (D -N.Y.)

WMC

Bill Richardson

(D -N.M.) CC

Matthew Rinaldo

(R

-N.J.)

TS

Tommy Robinson (D

-Ark.)

Peter

Rodino

(D -N.J.)

JC

John Rowland

(R- Conn.)

Claudine Schneider

(R-R

I

)

Richard Shelby

(D -Ala.) CC

Gerry Sikorski (D- Minn.) CC

Jim Slattery

(D

-Kan.)

BC. TS

D.

French Slaughter (A

-Va.)

Larry Smith (D. -Fla.) JC

Al Swift (D- Wash.) TS

Pat

Swindall (R

-Ga.) CS

Tom Tauke (A -Iowa)

TS

Billy

Tauzin (D -La.) TS

Harold Wlkmer

(D -Mo.)

Doug Walgren (D -Pa.)

CC

Henry Waxman (D- Calif.)

TS

Jamie Whitten (D- Miss.)

AC

Tim Wirth (D- Colo.)

TS

Ron

Wyden

(D

-Ore.)

CC

Senate

Jim

Mark

Dale

Abdnor iR -S.D.) AC

Andrews

(R -N.D.) AC, BC

Bumpers

(D -Ark.) AC

Alfonse D'Amato

Jeremiah Denton

Alan Dixon

(D -III.)

Christopher

(R -N.Y.)

(R

-Ala.)

AC

JC

Dodd (D- Conn.)

$1.500

$500

$2.000

$1,000

$1.000

$1,000

$500

Robert Dole

(R

-Kan., majority leader)

Wendell Ford

(D

-Ky) CmS

Slade

Gorton,

(R- Wash.) BC,

CmS

Charles Grassley

(R

-Iowa)

BC. JC

Paula Hawkins

(R chairman, Children,

$1.000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,200

Family,

Drugs

&

Alcoholism Subcommittee

Ernest Hollings

(D -S.C.) AC. CmS

Daniel louyne

(D- Hawaii) AC. CmS

Robert Kasten

(R -Wits.) AC. BC. CC

Patrick Leahy

(D -Vt.) AC, CS

Mitc'- McConnell

(R

-Ky)

JC

Frank Murkowskf

(A-Ark.)

Don

Nickles

(R- Okla.)

Bob Packwood

(R -Ore.) CmS

Dan Quayle

(R

-Ind.)

BC

Donald Riegle

(0-

Mich.)

BC, CC

Paul Simon

(D -III.) JC

Arlen Specter

(R

-Pa.) AC, JC

Paul Trible

(R -Va.) CC

John Warner (A -Va.)

Ed

Zorinsky

(D -Neb.)

$1,000

$1.000

$2,000

$1.000

$1.000

$500

$1.000

$1.000

$5.000

$500

$1,000

$500

$1,000

$300

$4,000

$250

$300

$250

$1,000

$1,250

$500

$500

$300

$250

$250

$750

$500

$250

$300

$700

$500

$600

$1.250

$500

$1.000

$1.000

$500

$1,000

$500

$1.000

$500

$500

$500

$1.250

$500

$500

$125

$500

Carroll

John

NAMIC

Campbell

PAC

Cos)

Jr.

Tony Hall (D

-Ohio)

Charles Grassley

(R

-S.C.) WMC

George Gekas

(R -Pa.) JC

Barbara Kennelly

(D-

Conn.) WMC

Henson Moore

(R -La.) BC, WMC

Don Pease (D -Ohio) WMC $500

Senate

BC. JC

John Heinz

(R

-Pa

.)

Bob Packwood

(R

-Ore.) CmS

Arlen Specter

(R -Pa.) AC. JC

Other

(National Association

NCTA

Disbursement:

John Danforth

(R -Mo.)

$43,443

Jim Bates (D- Catit.)

TS

Douglas Bosco (D- Calif.)

.

Barbara Boxer

(D- Calif.) BC

John Dingell (D- Mich.) CC

$500

$250

$100

$2,000

Dennis Eckart (D

-Ohio) CC

Don Edwards

(D-

Calif.) JC

Dante Fascell

(D -Fla.)

$1,000

$500

Duncan Hunter (R-

Calif.)

Ed Jones

(D- Tenn.)

$500

5155

Ken

Kramer

(R-

George Miller

Colo.)

(D-

Calif.) BC

Patricia Schroeder

(D- Colo.)

CS

Richard Shelby

(D -Ala.) CC

Esteban

Torres (D-

Calif.)

Doug Walgren (D -Pa.) CC

$500

$250

$3.400

$1.000

$150

$500

Tim

Wirth (D-

Colo.)

TS $3.000

Jim Wright

(D -Tex., House majority leader) BC

$5,000

Alan Cranston

-Ohio)

(D- Calif.)

Alfonse D'Amato

Paul

Glenn (D

(R-lowa)

House

Senate

(R -N.Y.)

AC

Other of Mutual

Charles Grassley

(A -Iowa) BC, JC

Wendell Ford

(D-Ky.) CmS

Ernest Hollings

(D -S.C.) AC, CmS

Patrick Leahy

(D -Vt.) AC, CS

Bob Packwood

(R -Ore.) CmS

Simon (D -III.) JC

$500

$55

$1,500

$1,000

$2,500

$550

$1,000

$1,000

$2.000

$1,500

Insurance

$500

$1,000

$1,000

BC, CC $1,000

$2.000

$1.000

$1.000

CS

$1.000

$5.000

$1,000

Other

Campaign Fund for

Rep.

Wbmen

8

Friends

...

$80

Constitution Federal Committee (Lowell Weiker

PAC)

AC

$500

Effective Government Committee (Richard Gephardt

PAC)

The Fund for

$500

America's

Future (George Bush

PAC)

Fund for a

Republican Majority (House)

$500

$500

National Republican

Congressional Committee

(House)

$1.000

The Speaker's Club (House)

$10.000

Wte '86 (House)

Democrat

$500

,t

-.gal Campaign Committee $15.000

Nationwide

Corp.

Disbursement: $19,566

California Republican Congressional

PAC

$250

Californian for America (Senator

Pete

Wilson ER-Ca- lif.])

Valley

$500

Presidents Dinner Committee

$1.500

Education

Fund (Rep Tony Coelho [D -Ca- lif.])

...

$250

RKO General Inc.

Disbursement:

$4,110

House

Matthew Rinaldo

(A -N.J.) s

Other

$250

Satellite

Television

Industry

Larry Smith (D -Fla

.)

JC

Associatio

Disbursement: $41,677

House

Charles Rose (D -N.0

)

$1

Tim Wirth (D- Colo.)

TS

$12

Jim Wright (D

-Tex House majority leader)

BC $26

Storer

Disbursement:

$8,050

House

Jim Bates

(0- Calif.)

TS

Cardiss Collins

(D -III.)

TS

John Conyers

(D.

-Mich) JC

John Dingell (D-

Mich.) CC

Mickey Leland

(D -Tex.)

TS

Michael Oxley

(R

-Ohio)

TS

Claude Pepper (D -Fla.)

Matthew Rinaldo

(R -N.J.) TS

Billy Tauzin (D -La.)

TS

Tim Wirth (D- Colo.)

TS

Senate

Wendell Ford

(D

-Ky) CmS

Ernest

Hollings

(D -S.C.) AC.

CmS

Robert Kasten

(R

-WS.) AC. BC. CC

Mack

Mattingly

(R -Ga.) AC

Susquehanna

Disbursement: $650

House

Senate

Arlen Specter

(R

-Pa.) AC. JC

S

S

9

9

S

9

S

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

Turner Broadcasting

Disbursement: $16,309

House

Jim Bates (D- Calif.)

TS

St

Thomas Bliley

(R -Va.) TS

$:

Frederick Boucher

(D -Va.) CS

James Broyhill

(R -N.C.)

CC

.

Si

.......

$t

Bob Carr (D- Mich.)

AC

$:

Cardiss Collins

(D -III.) TS s:

Mike DeWine

(R

-Ohio)

CS s:

Vic Fazio (D- Calif.)AC

$:

Newt Gingrich (R

-Ga.)

Charles Hatcher

(D -Ga.)

Henry Hyde

(A-N.Y.)

CS

Thomas Kindness

(R

-Ohio) CS

Mickey Leland

(D -Tex.) TS

Norman Lent

(R -N.Y.) CC

Bill

Tom

McCollum

(R -Fla.) JC

McMillen (Md.

Dem. candidate)

Carlos Moorhead

(R-

Calif.)

TS. CS

Matthew Rinaldo

(R

-N.J.)

TS

.

$:

$:

Si

V.

$;

$;

5:

$:

$:

J. Roy Rowland (D

-Ga.)

Patricia Schroeder

(D- Colo.) CS

Al Swift (D- Wash.) TS

$:

$:

$:

Pat Swindall (R -Ga.) CS

Wes

Watkins (D- Okla.)

AC

Tim

Wirth (D- Colo.)

TS

$:

&

$f

$1.1

House

Helen Benrey

1R

-MO

James Broyhill

(R

-N.C.)

CC

$500

$500

Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee $1.000

GenCorp

PAC

(GenCorp is

RKOS parent com- pany) $1.460

24th

Congressional District of California PAC

(Rep.

Henry Waxman [D- Calif.]

PAC) $600

Senate

Christopher

Dodd

(D- Conn.)

Robert Dole

(R- Kan.,.majority leader)

..

$1.0

$1.0

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

162

:dell urt

Gore (D- Tenn.) CmS ick

Leahy

(D -Vt.) AC, CS

:k

Ford (D-Ky.) CmS

Mattingly

(R

-Ga.)

AC tard Zorinsky (D -Neb.)

Other

$1,000

$500

$1,000

$1.000

$250. nocratic Senatorial Campaign Committee $1,000

Clive Government Committee (Rep.

Richard Ge- phardt [D-Mo.)

PAC)

$500

Barbara Kennelly (D- Conn.)

WMC

Mickey Leland (D -Tex.) TS

Norman Lent

(R -N.Y.)

CC

Barbara Mikulski (D

-Ma.)

CC

Mike Oxley

(R

-Ohio)

TS

Bill

Richardson

(D

-N.M.)

CC

James Scheuer (D -N.Y.) TS

Patricia Schroeder (D- Colo.)

CS

Richard Shelby (D -Ala.) CC

Al Swift (D- Wash.) TS

Tim Wirth (D- Colo.) TS

Ron Wyden (D -Ore.) CC

$813.75

$500

$250

$250

$250

$500

$250

$250

$250

$250

$800

$500

20th

Century

Fox

Film Corp.

Disbursement: $31,936

House ph

Addabbo (D-N.Y.) AC

.. erick Boucher (D -Va.) CS

.. i

Bryant (D -Tex.) TS and

Bey

Coble

(R

-N.C.)

CC. CS

Frank (D-

Mass.)

CS y

Hyde (R

-N.Y..)

CS

Levine (D- Calif.)

:e

Morrison (D- Conn.) CS r de Pepper

(D -Fla.)

Rodino (D -N.J.) JC

Wirth (D-

Colo.)

TS

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500

$500

$2.000

$500

$500

$500

$600

Senate

Wendell Ford

(D

-Ky) CmS

Ernest Hollings

(D

-S.C.)

AC, CmS

Daniel

Inouye

(D- Hawaii)

AC.

CmS

Patrick Leahy

(D -Vt.) AC, CS

Donald Riegle (D- Mich.) BC. CC

Paul

Simon (D -III.) JC

$2,631.46

$1.000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

Other

Chairman's Council (Democratic Congressional Cam- paign Committee) $1,000

Viacom

International

Disbursement:

$8,350

Senate t

Bingaman (D

-N.M)

Cranston (D- Calif.) i

Hatch (R -Utah) BC. CS rat

Hollings

(D -S.C.) AC,

CmS iel Inouye

(D-

Hawaii) AC, CmS ick Leahy (D -Vt.) AC. CS n

Packwood

(R

-Ore.) CmS

Spector

(R -Pa.)

..

Wilson

(R-

Calif.)

$500

$2,500

$1,000

$2,000

$1,000

$5.250

$1.000

$500

$10.000

House

Vic Fazio (D- Calif.) AC

...

Mickey Leland

(D -Tex.) TS

Matthew Rinaldo

(R

-N.J.)

TS

..

Al Swift (D- Wash.) TS

11m

Wirth (D-

Colo.)

TS

United

Cable

Television

Disbursement: $7,166

Senate

Alfonse D'Amato

(R -N.Y.) AC

Bob Packwood

(R

-Ore.)

CmS

Pete

Wilson (R- Calif.)

Other

NCTA-Cab18PAC

House i n

Dingell (D- Mich.)

Kramer

(R-

Colo.)

CC

$300

$1.250

Krause

(Rep. candidate for

Colorado House seat) icia

Schroeder (O- Colo.) CS

$2.000

$100

Warner Amex

Disbursement:

$20,600

$300

$500

$250

$500

$2.000

$500

$500

$500.

$3.300

Senate

:k Mattingly

(R

-Ga.) AC $500

Other nocratic Congressional Campaign tee

TA-

CablePAC

.

Commit-

$1,000

$2.000

Verner,

Liipfert,

Bernhard &

McPherson

Disbursement:

$68,097

House

Jack Brooks

(D -Tex.) CS

William Clinger (R -Pa.)

Dan Coats

(R

-Ind.)

TS

$200

$500

$250

Joseph Gaydos (D -Pa.) $200

Marc Holtzman (Rep. candidate for Pa.

House seat)

James

R.

Jones (D- Okla.) WMC

Robert

Kasteneier

(D -Ws.)

CS

Jack Kemp

(R -N.Y.) AC

Mickey Leland

(D -Tex.) TS

$200

$250

$250

$300

$250

Norman Lent (R -N.Y.) CC

James Quillen

(R- Tenn.)

Richard Schulze

(R -Pa.)

WMC

Bud Shuster (R -Pa.)

Tim Wirth (D-

Colo.) TS

....

_

...

$250

$300

$150

$250

$700

House ierick

Boucher (D -Va.) CS diss

Collins (D

-Ill.)

TS me Dowdy (D-

Miss.)

TS mis Eckart

(D

-Ohio) CC ies

J.

Florio

(D

-N.J.) CC

$250

$500

$500

$250

$500

Senate

Jeremiah Denton

(R

-Ala.) JC

Robert Dole

(R

-Kan., majority leader)

Barry Goldwater (R- Ariz.)

CmS

J.

Bennett Johnson (D -La.) AC. BC

Robert Packwood

(R

-Ore.) CmS

Dan Quayle

(R

-Ind.)

BC

Arlen Specter

(R

-Pa.) AC, JC

$1,000

$1.000

$1,000

$1.000

$1.000

$1.000

$500

Paul Trible (R -Va.) CC

Other

Black Entrepreneurs Salute (National Black Republi- can Council) $1,000

Connecticut Republican Party

Massachusetts Democratic State Committee

NCTA -CablePAC

.

$1,000

$500

$2,500

National Republican Congressional Committee $100

New Leadership

PAC

(supports new Republican candi- dates at all levels) $2,000

Republican Leaders Fund (House Minority Leader

Rob- ert Michel [R -III.] PAC) $1,000

Salute America (supports freshmen Republican mem- bers of

Congress) $1.500

Women in Politics

PAC

(supports Republican women running for congress in

Pennsylvania)

...

$600

Warner PAC

Disbursement:

$53,350

$150

House

Joseph

P.

Mike

Addabbo

Barnes

(D

-Md.)

(D -N.Y.) AC

BC

Jim Bates

(D-

Calif.)

TS

Howard Berman (D- Calif.) CS

Frederick Boucher (D -Va.) CS

John Bryant (D -Tex.) TS

Bob Carr (D-

Mich.)

AC

Howard Coble

(R

-N.C.)

CC, CS

$500

$900

$250

$500

$1.000

$1.000

$250

$500

Tony Coehlo (D- Calif., chairman, Democratic Congres-

Tom sional Campaign Committee)

Daschle

(D

-S.D.)

$250

$300

$1,000

John Dingell (D- Mich.) CC

Julian Dixon (D- Calif.) AC

Thomas Downey

(O-N.Y.) BC, WMC

Dennis Eckart

(D -Ohio) CC

$500

$1,750

$250

$250

Don Edwards (D- Calif.) JC

Vic Fazio (D- Calif.) AC

Hamilton Fish (R -N.Y.) JC

James Florio (D -N.J.) CC

$300

$600

$500

Barney Frank (D- Mass.)

CS

Sam Gejdensen (D- Conn.)

Sam

Gibbons

(D -Fla.) WMC

Dan Glickman (D -Kan.) JC, CC

Lee Hamilton

(D

-Ind.)

William Hughes

(D -N.J.) JC

Henry Hyde

(R

-N.Y) CS

James

R.

Jones

(D-

Okla.) WMC

Mickey Leland

(D -Tex.) TS

$500

$250

$500

$500

$250

$250

$250

$500

Mel Levine (D- Calif.)

$250

$250

Romano Mazzoli (D -Ky) CS

Tom

$250

McMillen (Dem. candidate for Maryland House seat)

Jim Moody

(D -Wis.)

Carlos Moorhead

(R-

Calif.)

Alan Wheat (D -Mo.)

Tim

Wirth (D- Colo.)

TS

Ron

Wyden (D -Ore.) CC

TS, CS

Bruce Morrison (D- Conn.) CS

Charles Range: (D -N.Y.)

WMC

Matthew Rinaldo

(R

-N.J.) TS

Peter

Rodino

(D

-N.J.) JC

Patricia Schroeder

(D- Colo.) CS

Gerry Sikorski (D- Minn.) CC

Larry

Smith (D -Fla.)

JC

Henry Waxman (D- Calif.)

TS

$500

$500

$500

$250

$1,000

$500

$1.000

$500

$500

$500

$500

$250

$1,500

$250

Senate

Jefl Bingaman (D -N.M

)

Alan

Cranston

(D-

Calif.)

Christopher Dodd

(D-

Conn.)

Tom Harkin (D -Iowa) AC

Orrin Hatch

(R

-Utah)

BC. CS

Daniel Inouye

(D-

Hawaii)

AC. CmS

Pat Leahy

(D

-Vt.) AC. CS

Bob Packwood

(R

-Ore.) CmS

Donald Riegle (D- Mich.) BC, CC

Paul Simon (D

-III.)

JC

Arlen Specter

(R -Pa.) AC, JC

Pete

Wilson (R-

Calif.)

....

$500

$3.000

$500

$500

$2,000

$3,000

$2.500

$1,000

.....

$500

$2,000

$500

$10.000

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

1R3

Two sides in music licensing dispute square off again on

H

Broadcasters and composers battle over blanket license before

Senate

Copyright

Committee

Four weeks ago, before the House Copyright

Subcommittee, broadcasters argued strongly for legislation that would, in essence, elimi- nate the blanket copyright licensing system for music in syndicated television program- ing, while songwriters and representatives

of

the music licensing societies argued equally strongly against it

(BROADCASTING,

March 24). Last week before the Senate

Copyright Subcommittee, they repeated their performances.

Opponents of the legislation got a slight head start in last week's congressional de- bate, calling ence to sound their theme for the day

-

"Don't

stop the music." Senator Albert

Gore

(D- Tenn.); representatives

of

the American

Society of Composers, Authors and Publish- ers (ASCAP), Broadcast

Music Inc.

(BMI) and and

SESAC, and a long line of songwriters singers who appeared in person or on videotape, told reporters that passage

1980 and

of

S.

H.R.

3521, its companion bill in the try,

House, would devastate the music indus removing much of the songwriters' com- pensation and incentive to write new music.

Gore and Boucher

"If

the composers are not compensate said Gore, "the music will

stop.'

"

Commercial Banking

Division

This announcement appears as a mauer of record

Sterling

nnl,

Communications Corp.

has acquired

WKJN

-FM

Hammond, Louisiana

WMSI

-FM

Jackson, Mississippi

WJDX-

AM

Jackson,

Mississippi

WSSL

-FM

Gray Court, South Carolina

WGSL

-AM

Greenville, South Carolina

Senior Debt Financing Provided by

Irving Trust

Irving Trust Company

One Wall Street

New York, NY

10015

Standing on a chair so he could see the array

of

microphones on the lectern, diminutive songwriter

Paul Williams there is no cause for

Congress to step in protect broadcasters from him and o songwriters. he said.

"If

it ain't broke, don't fix

Citing the participation

of

m country music stars in Farm

Aid, a conce: raise money for American farmers, cow singer

/songwriter

T.G.

Sheppard called legislation

"a slap in the face

[of those w are trying so hard to better our country local communities." Without compensai from the blanket license, said singer Do

Osmond, little new music will be wri and produced.

Television viewers will up with nothing but "talking heads and runs," he said. Mike Post, a composer music for such prime time network serie

Hill Street Blues, said the blanket lice has allowed him to

"flourish" as a comp( and should be retained so that others follow in his footsteps. Without the blar license, he said, "guys like me

...

would d

According to testimony at the heari broadcasters paid about

2% of their reven or around $85 million for the blanket lice last year. The legislation would not elimir the blanket license per se. It would reel' program syndicators to acquire the mt rights for each program they distribute sell those rights along with the rest

of

program to television stations. The legi: tion, said Senate Copyright Subcommii

Chairman Charles McC.

(Mac) Mathias

Md.) in his opening comments at the h( ing,

"would mandate this so- called 'sour licensing as the only way for television tions to acquire performance rights in music in syndicated programs."

Prospects for passage

of

the legislat during the current session of Congress dim.

In the Senate, Judiciary

Commit

Chairman Strom Thurmond is the authot

S. 1980.

The measure will be discharl from the subcommittee to the parent Judi( ry Committee on May

I .

Despite that act there doesn't appear move the bill out to be enough suppor

of

the full committee.

'I bill was introduced in the House by Freder

Boucher (D -Va.), the most junior

Demo( on the Copyright Subcommittee. Although and the bill's lobbyists have been able to m ter more

130 co- sponsors in the

House, o three of them are on the subcommittee.

The broadcasters got the first at

Broadcasting Apr 14 1986

1

Rd

Iring the hearing. Although Mathias said e e burden

of

proof was on the proponents of legislation, they tried to shift it to the usic

:n, industry and its allies. Preston Pad

- president

of

the

Association of Inde-

:ndent Television

Association, said even ough stations are paying small fortunes for ndicated programing

-up

to $15 million for a single off -network series

-the

pro- graming is

"worthless" until the stations pay

"tribute to

ASCAP and BMI" for the blanket licenses. "The sad truth is that both buyers and ers seller of television programs are prison-

of

this outmoded, antiquated anachro- nism," he said.

The broadcasters said they want the same deal as theater owners, who are able to source -license music for the films they show.

"Why shouldn't television be treated like the movies ?" asked Eddie Fritts, presi- dent

of

the

National Association of Broad- casters. "Why should the same movie be treated differently in a local theater than when it is broadcast by a local sta

The money in CPB's and FCC's

President

Reagan last week signed a budget reconciliation bill that included authorizing legislation for the FCC and Corporation for gram: 1986

-$24

million, 1987

-$28

million and

1988-$32 million.

Under the legislation, the FCC is reauthorized for fiscal

1986 and

1987 at funding levels of $99.7 million and $98.7 million, respective-

Public

Broadcasting.

CPB is reauthorized for fiscal

1987 through

1990 with funding levels set at:

1987

-$200

million, 1988

-$214

million, 1989

-$238

million and 1990

-$254

million. The bill would ly.

The FCC provisions also include cost -of- regulation fees for FCC applicants and licensees which appear in the following chart.

The also establish funds for the National

Telecommunications and Infor- only changes from an earlier version

(BROADCASTING,

April

22,

1985) mation Administration's

Private radio services- public telecommunications facilities pro

-

Rates were in

futures

cellular systems.

-ground individual license, renewals. and modifications

....

...........

20

Cellular systems:

Marine coast station

-new, modifications, renewals

Operational fixed microwave stations -new, modifications. renewals

Aviation

(ground stations)

-new, modifications, renewals

Land mobile radio license -new modifications, renewals

Equipment approval services:

Certifications:

.

$60

.......

...

135

60

30

Initial construction permits and major modification applications (per cellular system) .200

Assignments and transfers (per station)

200

Initial covering license:

1Mreline carrier

525

Nonwireline

Renewals carrier

Minor modifications and additional licenses

50

900

250

Receivers (except

TV and FM receivers)

All other devices

250

650

Rural radio service (central office, interoffice or relay facilities): type acceptance: Initial construction permits, assignments and transfers (per transmitter)

Renewals and modifications (per station)

90

20

Approval of subscription TV systems

All others

2.000

325

Offshore radio service: lype approval: Initial construction permits. assignments and transfers (per transmitter)

Renewals and modifications (per station)

90

20

Ship (radio telegraph) automatic alarm systems

Ship and lifeboat transmitters

All others (with testing)

All others (without testing)

6.500

3.250

1.300

150

Local television or point-to-point microwave radio service:

Notification

Mass media services:

Commercial

TV

Stations:

100

Construction permits. and modification of construction permits and renewals of licenses

Assignments and transfers of control (per station)

.......

Initial license for new frequency

.

International fixed public radio service -public and control stations:

Initial construction permits. assignments and transfers

..

Renewals and modifications

135

..

45

..

135

....

450

....

325

New and major change construction permit application fees

Minor change application

Hearing charge fee

License lee

2250

500

6,000

150

Satellite service:

Transmit earth stations:

Commercial radio stations:

New and major change construction permits:

Application fee

-AM stations

Application fee

-FM stations

Minor change applications

-AM's and FM§

Hearing charge

License fee:

AM

FM

Directional antenna license fee (AM only)

2.000

1,800

500

6,000

325

100

375

FM/TV translators and

LPN stations (new and major change construction permits):

Auxiliary services major actions application fee

Application fee

75

375

License fee 75

Station assignment and transfer fees:

Initial station authorization

Assignments and transfers of station authorization

All other applications

Small transmiL'receive earth stations (two meters or less)

Lead authorization

Routine authorization

All other applications

Receive -only earth stations:

Initial station authorization

All other applications

Application for authority to construct a space station.

Application for authority to launch and operate a space station

Satellite System

Application:

Initial station

Assignments and transfers

All other applications

Muldpoint distribution service:

1.350

450

.

90

.

3.000

....

30

.

90

200

90

1,800

...

18.000

.

5,000

1.333

..

90

Commercial AM, FM and

TV stations:

Application fee

Application fee (Form 316)

FM/TV translators and

LPN stations

500

70

75

Renewals -all

Cable services

N service:

30

Cable TV relay service construction permits. assignment and transfers, renewals and modifications

135

Cable special relief petitions -filing fee

..

700

Direct broadcast satellite -new and major changes, construction permits:

Application for authority to construct a direct broadcast satellite

Issuance of construction permit and launch authority

License to operate satellite

Hearing charge

1,800

17,500

500

6.000

Construction permits, renewals and modifications of construction permits

Assignments and transfers of control (per station)

Initial license (per channel)

Section 214 applications:

Applications for overseas cable construction

Application for domestic cable construction

All other 214 applications

Tariff filings:

Filing fee

Special permission filing

135

45

400

8 100

540

540

250

200

135

Common carrier service:

Domestic public land mobile stations (base, dispatch, control and repeater stations):

New or additional facility authorizations, assignments and transfers (per transmitteriper station)

Renewals and minor modifications (per station)

200

20

Telephone equipment registration

Digital electronic message service:

Construction permits, renewals and modifications of construction permits

Assignments and transfers of control

(per station)

.......

....

..

Initial license

(first license or license adding a new frequency)

135

45

..

135

Broadcasting Apr 14

1986

1AR

Pro.

L -r:

Preston Padden, president,

INTV; Eddie Fritts, president,

NAB and Leslie Arries, chairman, All- Industry

Television Station Music License

Committee. tion

?...

The answer is clearly that television music can and should be bargained for on a case

-by

-case basis, where the value of each and every show's music can be determined in the marketplace." are

Leslie Arries, chairman blanket licensing exists because syndicators financially attached to the blanket cense. want

of

the

All-Indus- try Television

Station Music

License Com- mittee, which represents more than 800 tele- vision stations, said source licensing is not a viable alternative for stations as long as

li-

They have the golden ring and they this merry-go -round to continue for- ever," he said.

"They belong to an exclusive and lucrative club, whose members com- prise a small clique

of

composers and pub- lishers who receive the benefits of the blan- ket license system.

Today, these program suppliers not only call the tune in the lucra-

Con.

L -r:

W.

Robert Thompson, president,

SESAC; Mike Post, compo

Edward

Cramer, president and chief executive officer, BMI, and

D<

Hall, president,

ASCAP. tive syndication marketplace, they also re- ceive a back -end kickback

of

50% royalties paid out by ASCAP and television performances

of of

BMI background the for and theme

music-

through wholly owned music publishing subsidiaries."

Because the blanket license fees are tied to station revenues, Arries said,

ASCAP.

BMI

have become the "revenue partners' stations. "We do not pay for the spec compositions we need and use," he st

"We pay for unneeded access to lions

of

compositions." literally r

In their testimony, Ames and Padden

o

dy

v

yloc0

Cy, if you want your

News/Talk AM to be taken seriously, then quit airing stories like "Imelda and her

24 Kt. Girdle."

See Barry Sherman in

Suite

1665 Tower.

Barry Sherman

&

Associates

full service media brokers and consultants

1828 L

St.,

N.W.

Suite

300

Washington,

D.C.

(202) 429 -0658

Midwestern contact:

Walter

H.

Westman

(313) 881 -5432

Dennis is almost there.

Patricia Diaz Dennis, President Reagan's nominee for the Demo- cratic

FCC seat vacated by

Henry Rivera, is almost in.

And, judging from her hearing before the Senate Commerce Committee last week, she will face no receiving confirmation. confirmation difficulties in

At the hearing, Dennis, now a asked to member of the National Labor Relations Board, was not answer any substantive questions.

"I have to report that background, and

I found nothing in the world to hold against you," said

I looked into your

Senate Communi- cations

Subcommittee Chairman Barry

Goldwater (R- Ariz.), who was presiding. "Any- body who would want to move out of the Southwest to come back to this godawful place might be loòked

at....

But you're in." Dennis is shown above with her son, Geoffrey,

Goldwater. Goldwater and Slade Gorton

(R- Wash.), who stood in for Goldwater for a minutes, were the only committee members to put in an appearance.

After the hearing, committee staffers said the committee would probably approve and few her confirmation this month, assuming that legislation cutting back the terms of the commis- sioners from seven years to five is approved. Committee Democrats had insisted upon that legislation, which the Senate has already approved.

The bill is pending in the House, where it is expected to receive routine approval.

At the hearing, Dennis, who was born in

New

13), was

Mexico

(BROADCASTING,

March

17,

Jan. introduced by Senator Jeff Bingaman (D- N.M.). Dennis said she would address issues at the

FCC in a

"fair, open -minded and impartial manner," just as she said she does at the NLRB. "My overall philosophy, which

I have to limit applied at the NLRB, will continue to be governmental regulation to that appropriate to achieve the statutory goals," she said. "My starting point, however, will be the

Communications Act itself, which mandates that the commission make available, so far as possible, to all the people of the United

States, a rapid, efficient, nationwide and worldwide wire and radio communications service with adequate facilities at reasonable charges.

I will further adhere to the acts requirement that the commission promote the public interest, convenience and necessity.

I intend to work with my colleagues at the commission and with the

Congress to achieve these ends."

Broadcasting

Apr

14

1986

1

A

:d the music lination industry's argument that of the blanket license would de- e composers and publishers

of

residual ilties. The composers can negotiate with program producers for residuals as part compensation package, they said. The

¡posers want to continue to saddle broad - ers with the blanket license, Arries said,

¡use they are

"scared" to negotiate with producers.

.rries and Padden also said that instead

of

ping young composers trying to break the business as the music industry med,

¡Id elimination of the blanket license actually benefit them. Television sta- s have no incentive to pay local compos- for original music, Arries said, when are already paying for millions

of

titles ugh the blanket license. move to source licensing, he said, ild "open the door to a lot of young com-

:rs who are not in Los Angeles, New k and

Nashville."

'he heads of the various licensing soci- s argued that what the broadcasters really

It is music without paying for it. ASCAP sident Hal

David testified broadcasters

. luld have Congress remove all alterna- forms

of

licensing except source licens-

They would give us one choice only in ing the performing rights to our music on yndicated

TV show and that is to sell se rights to the producer at a time when he

't possibly know whether the show teed, whether the music ether he

will will

succeed or

will

even recoup his production

More on

KHJTV agreement dispute. peting

In a applicant for RKO's

KHJ

RKO General Inc. and Fidelity Television, the com-

Los

Angeles, last week argued that the settlement agreement under which Group

W has proposed to buy the station is in the public interest. filing with an

FCC administrative law judge, RKO General and Fidelity said the agreement, under which

RKO would get $212 million and Fidelity would get

$95 million, was it consistent with FCC rules and policies. "When the settlement is viewed as an entirety, most certainly will serve the public interest,"

RKO and Fidelity said. "There is no other comparative proceeding that, commencing its third decade, still commission's halls for years to come. There is no taxed the resources of the threatens to haunt the other comparative proceeding that has courts and the commission as much without a definitive result.

Settlement of such a case

-particularly when it places the station in the hands of a distinguished broadcaster

-is

in the public interest." costs." Under such a system, experienced composers pensation, he said. there would receive

"very

And

"for the little" would simply be no future at com- newcomer,

all,"

he said.

At last week's hearing the representatives

of

the music industry were supported by re- presentatives

of

the programing industry.

Jack Valenti, president

Association

of

the

Motion Picture of

America, said the legislation, by mandating source licensing, composers

"would deny continuous payment for continu- ous use is

of

their that fewer and ludicrous music

...That

would mean fewer men and women could pursue professional careers as composers. It for broadcasters to suggest that all they want is to ers a

'give America's compos- break.' What they really want to do is break

America's composers," he said.

Elimination have a of the blanket license detrimental effect on would program pro- duction, Valenti said. The legislation would

"force program producers into a straitjack- et," he said.

"lit would gravely constrict their flexibility in choosing music for their shows.

It would force producers to swallow new costs for performance rights which they may never use.

Moreover, the bill would throw the

of

the industry into chaos. The terms contracts for thousands

of

programs that are currently under license to broadcasters thousands grams and

of

underlying agreements for pro-

'in

the can' would be cast into uncer- tainty."

Mel Blumenthal, executive vice presi- dent,

MTM

Enterprises

Inc., producer

of

five programs now on the network schedules and several more in elimination wide syndication, said

of

the blanket license would

"sti- fle the freedom

of

both producers and corn- posers to search

'match.' for the best possible creative

"

Today, he said, composers

of

pro- gram theme and background music receive only "modest" payments from producers.

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Blair's Select

John

Blair

&

Co. has

changed the name

of its

Selcom/RAR rep company to Select

Radio

Representatives to

better

reflect

the

firm's new "selective" positioning approach.

The

representative stations, according

to company positioned as "select" or important stations

"vital to

president

Frank Oxarart, will be any media buy."

To accomplish that, Select

Radio Representatives is reduc- ing its client list by some

50

%, concentrat- ing on outlets in where, sales activity takes place

(

"Closed Circuit,"

March

31).

"We are committed to entering into a station /rep partnership as if each sta- tion is

the

only one we represent," Oxarart said.

the

top

70 to 75 markets

said

Oxarart, over

80% of all national

Another from

WFMT

Fine

arts

WFMT(FM)

Chicago will unveil a new, 24 -hour, satellite- delivered music and news service for classical radio

stations this

week, to be programed separately from

the

Continental's top

RADI

Leading radio advertisers in 1985, according to the Radio Network

Association

(RNA), on data

Whinney. the way. collected

Sears Roebuck,

Warner

Lambert and

AT

&T were the top three netwo confidentially from network companies by the accounting which firm of relic

Ernst

12

"Sears is employing network radio in the promotion of products in virtually ment of the store," said the medium. different

As for

RNA

Warner-

President

Lambert,

Bob Lobdell,

Lobdell in every explaining the company's depai use said the company placed commercials products, ranging from chewing gum to cold remedies.

AT &T, fi said Lobde used network radio for 10 campaigns, including selling long- distance services and con puters.

Rounding out the top

10 network radio advertisers were: Anheuser- Busch, Cotter

(parent of True Value hardware stores),

Triangle

Motors, Nabisco Brands and

K

-Mart.

Total year came to

$328,708,708, an increase of

14% over

1984

(BROADCASTING,

Feb. 3.)

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Publications, Procter

&

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"The Beethoven Network," according to

Nordstrand,

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The wFMT programing package also

dudes

research and marketing materic help sell the format to local

underwriters. advertisers

WFMT

General

Marschner said field

Manager

Ricl

the station

is

entering

"because the time

is right" for a c efficient, classical music service.

"Pressi for profit have never

been greater

in c merciai radio and funding is enormo

tight

in

the

public sector," Marschner s

Nordstrand said a formal rate card yet been established,

has but subscriber

ri

"will be in line with other format servie

Nordstrand will to introduce the servic

National Public Radio's annual confere this week in San Diego while Marschner do

the same at the

National Associatio

Broadcasters convention in Dallas.

WI said Nordstand, is looking to launch service in September.

the

t

McBirch report

McDonald's,

the

fast

-food franchise c glomerate, said it will use Birch Radio as primary ratings service for planning buy: metro

areas where

Birch

measures

radio

teeing.

"We feel

the

strong points in

Birc favor not only include their telephone me odology,

but

their

better response rates

rc tive to a diary [the Arbitron methodoloc, especially in

the

younger demographic

said

Karen Dixon -Ware, media manager

McDonald's.

Birch presently

measures

ra listening in over 200 markets,

90 of them a year -round basis.

Legal injunction

Westwood One

Inc., Culver City, Calif.,

granted

a preliminary court injunction

April

8 enjoining Amway

Corp., Ada,

Mic

and

its satellite distribution unit, Mt

Comm Telecommunications

Corp.,

Arli ton, Va., from

transmitting

and advertising related to radio progre

such

progre eroadcas..

168

Christal

Radio

Katz

Radio Group.

The best.

that

are allegedly in violation of

agreements under which

Westwood One had

purchased the

principal

assets and name

of

the

Mutual

Broadcasting System.

The action

stems

from a $10- million law-

suit

filed in Los Angeles Superior Court on

March

4 by Westwood

One, which pur-

chased

Mutual from

Amway late last year,

against the

former Mutual owner and

Multi

-

Comm, alleging

that

they have broken

three

-year, noncompete agreements by op- erating "shadow"

and "independent"

net- works with radio programing in competition with Mutual. (MultiComm currently distrib-

utes

Mutual programing over Westar

IV.)

Judge

John

L.

Cole of

the

Los Angeles

Superior Court

entered the

order prohibiting

Amway and its MultiComm subsidiary from

the

following:

transmitting

any programs to radio

stations

other

than those transmitted pursuant

to contracts executed prior to

March

4;

entering

into or renewing any

agreements

to

transmit

radio progre

sending

any sales literature or other ad

tising related

to any radio programs to

mitted

by MultiComm prior to March

4,

ceasing use

of

the

word

"Mutual" in

M

Comm

business.

Mutual signing

Three

RKO -owned major market radio

Lions-

wRKO(AM)

Boston,

WOR(AM)

New' and

xrnc(Atut) San Francisco new one

-year affiliation

Mutual Broadcasting.

WRKO, a basic

Mu affiliate

-have

sig

agreements since

1982, renewed its agreen with Mutual while

WOR

and

KFRC signet as new commercial affiliates. (Won

been

carrying Mutual's Larry

King

Show

America in the

Morning broadcast).

Playback

King fete.

The Mutual

Broadcasting

System celebrated the new six -hour format and

11 p.m. (NYT) starting time of

The

Larry

King Show

(

"Riding Gain," Dec.

16, 1985) by throwing a party for nearly 200 advertising and agency executives at

New

York's

Marquee hotel. The overnight talk show was broadcast live from the hotel on

Marriott three nights.

Joining the guests at the event were

(I

-r): Bob

Lobdell, president of the Radio Network

Association,

Peter Bloom, Mutual's vice president- eastern sales manager, and

Bill

Stake

- lin, president and

CEO of the Radio

Advertising Bureau.

The United Stations

Radio Networks ha newed its production contract with pro( er Dick Bartley,

Chicago, for

the head

Solid of DB

Gold

Producti

Saturday

T and

Solid

Gold Scrapbook series.

Solid

Saturday

Night is a live, five -hour, of show currently in

its

fifth year distribution.

Solid Gold

Scrapbook of

nati starte

March

1984 as a two

-hour, weekly of feature

but has been expanded

to five,

( hour programs per week. The new fon according to United Stations, is designe be aired as an hourly program, Mor through

Friday. Both shows are hostec

Bartley.

People and money

Some

1

of the CBS Radio that mean

Stations

News Service Reports listeners and sponsors for you.

u

BUSINESS

William

S.

Rukeyser

7'.i i

THE LEARNING

Dr.

CENTER

Lonnie Carton s

(r

TRAVEL

Stew Birnbaum

III

ESS

Ur. Gabe Mirkin

For details on all the features including the all new

THIS

DAY

IN HISTORY with Stan Bunger call:

Allen

Balch

2020

M Street. N.W.

202 -457 -4366 (Collect)

Washington. D.C. 20036

vu

NE

,mfIGAzInE

ABC

Radio has launched a weekday, view actuality service focusing on film record celebrities

Called Today's People, it is able to affiliates of ABC's six netw, through twice daily feeds. The service, cording to an

ABC spokeswoman, offers type of programing "most filiates.

being made requested" it and sports personals a

by

Separately,

ABC Radio News will air e ries of follow

-up reports this week exar ing how money collected by

the

Live

and

Band Aid organizations last year famine victims in Africa is

being spent.

reports will be anchored by

Richard

Day special correspondent for

ABC's Direc network

'

Hams across the water

The British Isles of Scilly may seem an likely place for an amateur radio hamb

but the uninhabited

island of

Great Gar will be

just that

for four days in May whe group of

Lifeboat

Cornish hams conduct

Institution.

the

even help raise funds for

Britain's Royal Natic

Courtesy of

Prince Charles,

the

20 -a

isle's

principal owner,

15

Cornish radio

"

thusiasts,"

will

gather

May 23 -26

at the

s

30 miles off calls. Said

Mumford, is

water and

fc

the

British mainland by

Mee er." Call signs are

GB 4 IOS

and

GB

8 I(

and the

"special

event station square,"

cording to

participant

Clive

Tregarti

"Oscar November

69

Oscar ray."

southwestern England's

Lan

End peninsula, to take in an

estimated

5,1

Cornishman Tony Bevingtor

Carnkie, Wendron, "There's bound to pandemonium. We're bringing radios, e ials, generators, tents, across from

Broadcasting

Apr 14 1986

Syitc

Spectrum dispute

'dcasters

and land

- mobile radio indus

-

'epresentatives

have yet to agree on a

Cula

Ale ducted laboratory k for protecting

UHF TV

stations

from radio interference, of an FCC

despite tests

recently as part of the technical advisory commit- he FCC year after proposing to

arum

sharing to land mobile services in it major acted to

set

up

the

advisory committee markets, and

present extend

UHF

the committee

its final report to is the

'mission in early May.

3st of week, a committee subgroup

that

ducted two analyses of viewer percep- interference failed to find a consen-

between broadcast

and land -mobile

nbers

on

what interference protection is

UHF TV

stations

should be provided. rough

the

final subgroup report is not until this week, it is unlikely

agreement

be reached, explained co- chairman

's

Cohen, a

broadcast engineering

con- ant.

,ccording to Cohen, land -mobile partici- ts continue to support the commission's

posalto decrease

co- channel protection as

between the desired

TV signal level

undesired

land- mobile signal level from

50 db to 40 db

at the

TV

station's

predicted grade

B service contour. Extensive subjec- tive

tests

Technology Center in

Stamford, Conn., however, completed have led in March

broadcasters at the

to

CBS believe

that

greater protection is required

than that

afforded by ers not

the

commission. The broadcast-

base

their

suggested

protection ratio, yet specified, on findings of the

CBS

tests

showing

that

viewers' expectations of picture quality and sensitivity to interfer-

ence

are higher today they were it was sev- eral

decades

ago when the

FCC

conducted the interference tests

on which it is now basing its proposal.

Broadcasters in

the

group also have re- jected some of the findings of a second study, conducted for mobile radio members by consulting engineer Carl

T.

Jones, be- cause, Cohen explained, a portion of the

study's

subjective viewer

testing used

off

- air broadcasts, leaving its conclusions not scientifically replicable. The CBS

tests used repeatable

motion

segments

with

scenes

re- corded on videodisk.

The

separate

subgroup reports were sub-

mitted

last week to a second working group

set

up to review the FCC's sharing plan, but

Cohen said there was little

the parties

would agree on

the issues

in time for

expectation that that

group's report,

due

April 25.

The whole advisory committee meets next on April 28 and again on May

5

-6 in an effort to complete its final report to

the

FCC by

the

May

7 deadline.

Ampex clinches Cup

In

Ampex's largest international equipment order ever,

the

Redwood

City, Calif., manu- facturer will supply $11.9 million in one -inch

Type

C videotape recorders, digital effects systems and videotape to the

13th World

Cup soccer games in

Mexico May

31

-June

29.

The

52

-game World Cup is

Mexican television to become

expected

by

broadcasting executives the

world's most

watched

sport- ing event.

Ampex, working in part through the

cup's

prime systems contractor, Philips's

PYE-

TVT, will

137 video recorders, providing

94 studio

VTR's be

the

sole supplier of the

cup's

and

43 portable one -inch units, as well as

16 channels of ADO digital effects, an AVA -3 video art system,

22 time -base correctors ators.

and

10

Chyron

character

gener-

The company will also supply all video-

tape used

by

the host broadcaster,

Telemex- ico.

Telemexico was formed for

the event

as a joint venture of

Mexico's privately owned

Televisa and the government -owned Imevi-

bruaoen

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Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

sion.

According to Ampex,

the

43 portable one

- inch

VPR -5 units supplied to Telemexico during

the games

will be used afterward by

Televisa's news department, making it first network in

the

inch format

the

world to adopt a one-

standard

for electronic news- gathering. Televisa will also keep eight channels of ADO and the

AVA

-3 system.

Cetec divestiture

Cetec Antenna has returned to private own- ership after nearly two former

parent Cetec decades

Corp. as part

The of

antenna

company, formed in

the

early 1960's

and bought

by

Cetec in

1967, will

change

its name to its original,

Jampro

Jampro President

James

Antennas

Inc.

E.

Olver fi-

nanced the

buyback for an undisclosed sum, and he will be sole owner of the new firm,

FM which will continue making its line of and television ters will staff of 25.

antennas.

Its headquar-

stay

in Sacramento,

Calif., with a

Cetec

Corp., which still owns microphone manufacturer Cetec

Vega, in has sold other broadcast ests, including its

Elcom Bauer)

equipment

and its audio group.

7TC recent

years inter-

transmitter

group (now

capitalization

Television Technology

Corp., a Broomfield,

Colo., television transmission and radio

equipment

manufacturer, has acquired a

the purchase

of new infusion of capital with stock options in the company by Quality

Media Corp., a $20- million tion contractor and equipment broker in

Columbus,

Ga. turnkey

TV sta-

based

TTC

had been under

financial

strain

in

the past

two years, in large

part because the

market for its line of TV translator and low

- power

transmitters had been

greatly slowed by FCC

CASTING, delays in permit approvals

(BxoAD-

Jan.

6).

Quality Media President

William J. Kitch- en said last week he has purchased options for majority control of

the

company which he would exercise in the next six months to two years. and the agreement has already brought

TTC a half- million dollars in capital. Company founder

Byron St.

I has for

stepped

Kitchen, aside as president of

the

firm

but

will remain active in as chairman, and would still reta

10%

interest

in

the business

after all options are exercised.

Kitchen

said the

company, whic) scheduled to be at the National Associa of

Broadcasters' annual tion

this week equipment

in Dallas, is planning ex] to it duce a new line of high -power

UHF tr mitters in

the

near future.

Gearing up

A new

BTSC stereo generator is now a, able for cable operators from Leamiug

dustries

of

Costa Mesa,

Calif.

The Ml generator can be right

used

to

transmit

m channel sound through cable distribu systems

and

provides a band aural composite signal from left

baseband

composite

BTSC stereo audio inputs, as bt

baseband

signal from sum difference signals. well

E

French government throws wrench in HDTV works

aim to tems. developing "compatible"

HDTV sys-

Its on

request

to

postpone action

Japanese

TV system

draws cool reception

from

U.S.

A

French government appeal to postpone the standardization

of

high -definition television studio ing technology is being rejected in lead-

U.S. technical circles as a last- minute effort to block international approval

of

a

U.S.-

backed,

Japanese- designed HDTV system.

Spokesmen for the U.S. Advanced

Televi- sion Systems Committee

(ATSC) and

CBS/

Broadcast Group, speaking in a telephone conference with

BROADCASTING last

Wednesday, took issue with claims made by

France for its still -theoretical HDTV tech- nologies and characterized the late submis- sion as a

"red herring" designed solely to weaken chances

of

acceptance posed 1,125 -line, 60 hz system.

of

the pro-

HDTV studio standardization is sched- uled to be taken up at a plenary session

of

the

CCIR (International

Radio Consultative

Committee) in

Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, in

May. But documents submitted last month

The French have emerged in recent months as the most vocal opposition to the

1,125 -line sions proposed standard, believed, because

of

mainly,

French interest in it is ver- of

MAC (multiplexed analog compo- by France to the international standards body asked that studies

of

HDTV studio techno- logy be allowed to continue past current nent) transmission and component display technology developed by

Dutch manufactur- deadlines so that two French technical pro- er Philips. Whether recent changes in the duction proposals could be studied with an

SiIIQr

French government following the March án

rlagQQ

40

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06103

203 -249 -7228 general elections may affect the

nation's!

ture on HDTV is not yet clear, but at

1 one major figure leaning against the l posed standard, Francois Schoeller, pr dent

of

French television organization

T was reportedly forced from office.

In an effort to bridge the gap remair between proponents and opponents

of

1,125 -line, 60 hz system, several suppor met earlier this month in Paris with Eurt an organizations resisting the standard. though no resolution was announced a the meetings, observers viewed as a posi step the decision to continue the talks in kyo on May

6 -7

(

"Closed

Circuit,"

April

The discussions are apparently aimel considering

joint

exchanges

of

rights, ents and designs on

HDTV technologie equalize advantages held by

Japanese de opens

of

1,125 -line HDTV products.

E1 pean consumer -industrial conglomera such as Philips of the Netherlands

Thomson of France, two ropean opponents

of

the strongest

of

the standard, have d little HDTV research, with most

of

their forts in ed to the the improved -television field de' development

of

MAC transmis: and reception systems, primarily for with prospective direct broadcast sate systems.

Active in the Paris meeting, accordin.

U.S. representative ATSC, were both Th. son and

Philips, Japanese manufactu

Sony and Matsushita, the secretary

of

European Association of Consumer E tronics Manufacturers, the director

of

European office of the Electronic Indust

Association of Japan and the host Fre

Electronic Industries Association. TDF

Japan Broadcasting Corp., NHK, were

Broadcasnng Apr 14 1986

:

j

as observers. ance's television production sector first widespread notice of its position on

'V

with a brief, but aggressively worded

:k on the proposed

HDTV standard, dis- ded prior to a gathering

of

world broad - ng unions in Prague last February

)ADCASTING,

March 3). The French since produced a longer, more complex ysis opposing the g npatible"

U.S.- backed system, with their own technical proposals for

HDTV systems.

A condensed ion of the report was later submitted to

CIR.

multaneously, in es mid

-March, represen-

of

France, the

Netherlands, the

U.K.

West

Germany gathered informally un- the aegis

of

the

European

Economic

¡mission to discuss the possibilities of

:loping a

European consensus on the

CV question. Each

of

the four has at var- times expressed different degrees

of

dis- fort with the proposal. he

EEC reported only inconclusive re- from the meeting and many European idcasters, such as those active in the Eu-

:an

Broadcasting Union

(EBU), are be- d e to be reticent about attempts to re- technical debates in a highly ticized body such as the

EEC.

Che

EBU itself

will

attempt to take a final d on the issue at a meeting

of

its techni- bureau in

Montreux, Switzerland, later month. The bureau has been unable in rious meetings to develop a position on issue because its consensus

-only deci- i-making methods prevent it from stating clear support

of

the majority for the pro- d standard.) rance's fundamental argument, as stated he submission to

CCIR, is that the ap- ich to future

HDTV systems should be alutionary," and rather than considering

TV production standards separately from ismission and display, as the ved long

-ap-

CCIR procedure has specified, the ors should be considered simultaneously. n its own scenario of events leading to

TV,

France envisions

MAC transmission t

:ems for DBS as a stepping stone to

TV, along with the use of digital produc- technology and the introduction

of

digi-

'

Frame stores to increase television receiv- field frequency and aspect ratio for her quality pictures.

Although MAC is actually compatible with Europe's exist - television systems, it is convertible using

:latively simple set

-top unit.

1DTV production would not begin until mid-

1990's, the French argue, and during undefined period to follow it would be

Alerted before transmission to option on

MAC for digitally enhanced receivers. imately, new transmission techniques uld allow HDTV to be provided directly he home.

Co buttress its request for "further study"

HDTV during the next four -year study

:le, France has put

)n a pair forward for consider

-

of

what it calls

"compatible"

ITV production proposals, one believed be developed by Thomson, the other by lips.

Che first proposal uses progressive scan

- g, maintains the existing television ts' dual field frequencies

of

50 hz sys-

(for

PAL and

SECAM) and

59.94 hz

(for

NTSC), but achieves a single 60 hz horizon- tal line frequency tween the for easier conversion be- two by doubling the number

of

active lines in current 625

-line and

525

-line systems. Total lines version provided in the 50 hz would be

1,200, with

1,001 total lines in the

59.94 hz version. The proposed system would have 65 mhz luminance band- width, however, more than 10 times current systems' 6 mhz bandwidth and more than twice the 27 mhz bandwidth used for the proposed

HDTV production standard.

The second system, from Philips, uses in- terlaced scanning as does the proposed stan- dard but doubles

PAL -SECAM's

50 hz field frequency to 100 hz, and doubles

NTSC's

525 lines to

1.050 lines.

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Questioning the motivation for the French proposals is

ATSC

Chairman and former

FCC Commissioner E. tion has been taken

William

Henry. cording to Henry, the detailed French

Ac- posi- for one reason:

"The

French dard. want to prevent adoption

of

the stan-

They want delay; that's their objective.

Their suggestion cannot possibly be acted on, but they can point to it

[in their request] for further study."

Henry also disagreed that the proposed

I

,125 was, with the implication

-line,

60 hz standard contrary to the

"evolutionary" systems proposed by the French, a

"revolutionary"

if

a

60 hertz system is cho- approach. sen, its

"Even going to take a number least a decade of years, at or longer, before there is po- tential widespread displacement" of current

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Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

173

systems, he said.

Renville McMann

Jr., vice president advanced television

Center and chairman at

of

CBS Technology of

ATSC's technology group on HDTV, called the French position a

"red herring thrown in to put an obstacle in the way of the proposal."

He said that al- though the French -outlined systems could probably be built in a few years, they suf- fered "fundamental problems," and plans for reduction

of

their very large bandwidths were not "realistic."

Long -time proponent

of

the

HDTV pro- duction proposal, Joseph Flaherty, vice president and general manager ing and development

of

engineer- for

CBS Operations and Engineering, noted the "opposition now centers on the been asleep, industrial side. They have literally; then they suddenly be- came alarmed" when they realized the pro- posed standard was close to acceptance. hefty said that the French proposals hastily compiled and

"not terribly thought out."

He added: "To start over a would cost $50 million to $100 million three to five years to design products. that time those in place

will

present

; facto standard. The present system ha infrastructure

of

200 -plus components ai a complete design."

NAB sends draft of five

-year plan to board members

Plan, to be submitted for board approval in

June, outlines ways to strengthen trade association

A draft

of

a strategic plan for the

National

Association of

Broadcasters for the next five years proposes to produce a more trade association effective with stronger ties to Con- gress, improved member services and a bet- ter image overall for the broadcasting indus-

The draft, prepared by

NAB's committee under the guidance

of

executive

Joint

Board

Chairman

Ted

Snider, KARN(AM) -KKYK(FM)

Little

Rock,

Ark., has been sent to members

Put to

of NAB's TV and radio boards for reaction.

The document includes goals and strategies for the next five years.

A list

of

sample tac- tics that NAB might use in accomplishing its goals is also included. The committee has asked the boards to critique the plan, which

will

be submitted for approval at

NAB's

June board meeting.

The association's four major goals, ac- cording to the plan, are to "represent and advocate the interests

of

broadcasters; serve the membership; enhance the public image

of

broadcasting, and enhance the associ- ation's leadership and its role as spokesman for the broadcasting industry."

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As calls those: competitive wage and benefit prograi tige for NAB's role as a lobbyist, the for several strategies.

Chief an involving

Congressmen and their in broadcasting grassroots activities; maintainir lobbying organization that ca mobilized on short notice; maintainit professional lobbying staff by working with allied impacting organizations on is broadcasting; increasing the

of

NAB lobbyists; providing

"off( guid; and training to state associations and members; conducting NAB's activities

"integrity and honesty so that NAB is he the very highest esteem," and

1 issues

"independently dealing for radio and tel sion as the circumstances require."

In serving its membership, the plan gests that

NAB "staff and maintain" its r. and

TV departments with the needs

of

with personnel

"in

broadcasters." Other

: t ommendations include: conducting semi: and meetings to sues; inform members on ke3 maintaining communication

1 members; maximizing nondues income, being responsive to member requests.

Improving the public image

of

broad( ing might be accomplished by refining

NAB publications and its communica practices, the plan said. It also proposed

NAB

"research new and improved melt

of

communication and research the r( and effectiveness

of

NAB commun tions." Still other initiatives the associa should pursue:

"employ competent writ artists and others tive with required commun skills;" use industry leaders and N staff as spokesmen; involve past

NAB k ership as

"broadbased counsel and con with the industry," and implement pu service campaigns.

The plan also calls ties that for developing act

will

give high visibility to N leadership. Additionally, industry lea( would become involved with NAB thro participation on committees and through

: vice on the board.

It also recommends

NAB directors and staff be encourage( become involved in national activities broaden ship their scope, visibility with national leaders." and relati

One sample tactic in the plan would h

NAB rank issues in order of importance

; by category, such as radio, television

;

14

1986

1741

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I joint board issues. Other tactics:

"Develop and prudently manage an op- erating budget.

Develop a feedback system so as to be able to anticipate and stay alert to impending issues.

Plan events and special social and recreational invite congressmen and staff.

Involve congressmen in on- the -air ac- tivities such as PSA's, documentaries and

I

PROPOSED

1

KCBA(TV) Salinas, Calif. o

Sold by Sainte

Broadcasting Corp. to Cypress Broadcasting

Inc. for

$13.1 million cash.

Seller is princi- pally owned by Chester Smith and his wife,

Naomi.

It also owns

KCSO -TV

Modesto, Ca-

lif.,

and

KREN -TV

Reno. Buyer is subsidiary

of

Ackerly Communications,

Seattle -based group and of two

AM's. one

FM and four TV's outdoor advertising firm.

It is owned by

Barry Ackerly, owner

of

Seattle Supersonics professional basketball team. KCBA is

SIN affiliate on channel 35, with

2,328 kw visu- al. 238 kw aural and antenna

2.414 feet above average terrain.

KCBO -AM -FM San Diego, Calif. o

Sold by In- finity

Broadcasting to Eric /Chandler Com- munications for $12.2 million.

Seller is

New

York -based

FM's. group

of

four AM's and six principally owned by

Michael A.

Weiner and

Gerald Carrus. Buyer is subsid-

LOEWS

ANATOLE

Suite 810

745 -5535

I talk shows.

Develop special awards and recognition for congressmen and staff for laudable help or exemplary service.

Seek out special interests

of

congress- men and assist them through utilization of broadcasting techniques and resources.

On regular basis arrange for congress- men to attend lunch leadership." or dinner with NAB

ChnVEgetE6

iary of

Los Angeles -based entertainment in- vestment firm,

Eric /Chandler Ltd., princi- pally owned by

Robert

E. Geddes and

Terry

C. Bassett. Subsidiary president, Simon

T, also has interest in buyer. He was formerly general sales manager at WLS-AM-FM

Chica- go. KCBQ is on

1170 khz

5 with

50 kw day and kw night.

KCBQ

-FM is on 105.3 mhz with

29 kw and antenna

620 feet above average terrain. Broker:

The

Mahlnan

Co.

WKIX(AM)

-WYLT(FM)

Raleigh,

N.C. o

Sold by

Mann Media to

Metroplex Communications for

$10.5 million.

Seller is owned by Ber- nard Mann, president

of

National Radio

Broadcasters Association. It also owns

WRKB(AM)

-WOJY(FM) Greensboro-High Point,

N.C.

Buyer is Cleveland -based group

of

five

AM's, six FM's and one TV.

It is owned by

Norman

Wain and

Robert C. Weiss. WKIx is on 850 khz with

10 kw day and

5 kw night.

WYLT is on 96.

I mhz with

98 kw and anten-

Please visit us during the

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BLACKBURNOCOMPANY

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100 Connecticut

Ave.,

(202) 331.9270

NW

Media

Brokers er Appraisers

Since 1947

ATLANTA, GA 30361 CHICAGO, IL

60601

400 Colony

Square 333 N.

Michigan Ave.

(4041892.4655

(312) 346-6460

BEVERLY HILLS, CA

9465 Wilshire

Blvd.

90212

(213) 274

-8151 na

930 feet above average

Cecil L.

Richards

Inc. terrain. Br(

KEBC

-FM Oklahoma City, Okla. o Sol(

Electronic

Broadcasting Corp. to

Van ner Communications

Inc. for approximt

$5 million.

Seller is owned by Ralph Tvl, has no other broadcast interests. Buyl owned by

Jason

Perlin.

It also e

WXCM(AM)- WIBM

-FM

FM is on

Jackson, Mich.

K:

94.7 mhz with

100 kw and ant(

440 feet above average

Blackburn &

Co. terrain. Brc

KTCT(TV)

ThIsa, Okla. o

Sold by Coit

C ery and Cleaners Inc. to Le

$3.4

SEA

Inc. million.

Seller is owned by Lou

Kearn and family. It also has intere

Granby,

Colo.

Buyer is nons corporation headed by Lester Sumral also owns

WHME -FM -TV South Bend,

WHMBITV) Indianapolis, and

1 internati broadcast station,

WHRI

Noblesville,

KTCT is independent on channel 47 with kw visual, 62.75 kw aural and anti

1,425 feet above average terrain.

KSCO -AM -FM Santa Cruz, Calif. o

Sol(

Radio Santa

Inc. for

$3.

I

Cruz to

Fuller -Jeffrey

G: million cash. plus other cot erations. Seller is principally owned by non

Berlin. and brothers, Fred and Ma

McPherson. They have no other broac interests. Buyer is

Sacramento, group

Calif. -b

of

one

AM and five FM's, owne

Robert

F.

Bock.

(Doc) Fuller, J.J. Jeffrey an

Ksco is on 1080 khz with

10 kw and

5 kw night.

KSCO -FM is on 99.1 with

1.15 kw and antenna 2,618 feet al average terrain. Broker:

Brokers,SFO.

KIKO(AM) Miami and KIKO

-FM Globe,

Arizona tJ

Sold by Willard

Shoecraft to

I corn Corp. for $1,750,000.

Seller ha: other broadcast interests. Buyer is owne

Denny Durbin,

Phoenix -based contra and real estate broker with no other br cast interests. KIKO is on 1340 khz with day and 250 w night.

KIKO

-FM is on

It mhz with

15.3 kw and antenna

4,100 above average

Kalil

& for buyer terrain. Broker:

and

American Radio Brokersl:

for

seller.

KLSN(AM) -KISC(FM) Spokane, Wash. o by KHQ Inc. to Home News Co.

$1,547,700 cash. Seller also owns KH(

Spokane and is subsidiary

of

Cowles I lishing

of

Washington, principally owner

William

H. Cowles. It publishes

Spol

Chronicle and Spokesman- Review. Sub iary is headed by

J.

Buyer is

New

Bimey Blair,

Brunswick, N.J. presid

-based fisher, cable operator and station grout three

AM's, four FM's and two TV's.

It lishes and daily Brunswick,

N.J.,

Home

Is( five weekly papers and owns cable tems in

Collegeville and Trappe, both

Pt sylvania. Home News Co. is owned

by'

liam

M.

Boyd. KISN is on 590 khz full t with

5 kw.

Kisc is on 98.

I mhz with

94 and rain. antenna

2,030 feet above average

Broker: Richard A. Foreman As ates.

WKEU -AM -FM Griffin,

Ga. o

Sold by Wi

Inc. to Dominion Marketing Inc. for

$ million including $50,000 noncom) agreement. Seller is owned by

Allen

N

Broadcasting

Apr

14

1986

17R

III and

Bill

Westmoreland. They have ther broadcast interests. Buyer is princi- r owned by rdow.

A.C. Schmick and

Joseph

Schick was formerly owner of

NAM Staunton, Va.

They have interest

AL

-PACK, Richmond, Va. -based cou- company. Broker: The

Thorburn

Co.

)(AM) Franklin (Nashville),

Tenn.

Sold oobro

Inc. to Sam

Littleton for

$1 mil

-

Seller is owned by

James R. Romine, has no other broadcast interests. Buyer formerly general manager of

WSM(AM)

wille

and WLRQ(FM)

Franklin, Tenn. o is on 1380 khz with

5 kw day and

500 ght. Broker: Mack Sanders.

IP(AM) San

Sebastian,

P.R.

Sold by

-ia

E.

Mendez Cruz and

Glorimar

Perez idez and family to Las Raices Pepinianas for $450,000. Sellers have no other dcast interests. Buyer is owned

William

:ra

Acevedo and two others.

Acevedo is on's general manager. WLRP is on 1460 full time with 500 w.

45,000 subscribers and owned by Carolyn

S.

Chambers.

It also owns

KEZI -TV

Eugene,

Ore. System passes

4,500 homes with 3,500 subscribers and 88 miles of plant.

Broker:

Padden

Henry Ansbacher

Inc.

For

other proposed

"For the Record." pape

178.

defends must

Tells ABA meeting in Dallas on eve of NAB convention that compromise will help many independent television stations

Preston Padden, president of the

Association of

Independent Television Stations, de- fended the industry compromise on must

- carry last Saturday

(April

12), saying that

if

it is adopted, it would benefit many indepen- dent

UHF stations and

"curtail the undeni-

and

approved sales

-carry accord

see able anticompetitive behavior that we have observed in the field."

The

"policy rationale for our compromise," Padden said,

"is that modified must

-carry rules are required to in- sure the continued availability

of

some quan- tum of free

-over

-the

-air television service."

Padden was marks at a legal

Bar scheduled to make his re- forum held by the

American

Association forum committee on com- munications law at the

National Association

Knowing what it is doesrit tell you how to use it.

CABLE tems serving Anchorage and Kenai/Sol- la, both Alaska u

Sold by

Multi Visions to

SONIC Communications for

$78 mil-

.

Seller is

Anchorage -based cable opera - principally owned by Robert

J.

Gould

Robert N. Uchitel. Buyer is

Walnut z.tk,

Calif.

-based cable

MSO serving over

XX) subscribers. It is owned by Chris Co-

, president. Anchorage system has

)00 homes in franchise area scribers and 68 miles with

1

1,000 of proposed 600-

: plant. Kenai system has

3,000 homes in chise area with

112 miles of plant. ker: Henry Ansbacher

Inc. tems serving Carson, Inglewood and Po- ur, all California u Sold by Tele- Commu- utions p.

Inc. to for

$

I8 -$22

American Cablesystems million.

Seller is publicly red, Denver -based

MSO headed by Bob

;mess, chairman. It is country's largest le firm, with over

3.5 million subscrib-

Buyer is

,s. -based publicly owned, Beverly,

MSO headed by Stephen lge, president. It serves over 300,000 scribers in

¡es five states. Carson system

30,000 homes with 2,250 subscribers

125

;es miles

of

plant. Inglewood system

34,000 homes with approximately

30 subscribers and 135 miles

of

plant.

Iona system passes

15,000 homes

30 subscribers and 150 miles with of plant. tern serving Portsmouth, Ohio Sold by up

W Cable to

Century Communications approximately

$18 cing million.

Seller is di- all its cable interests. Buyer is

New man, Conn.

-based cable MSO with over

1,000 subscribers. It is principally owned

Leonard

Tow, president. System passes

000 homes with

18,000 subscribers and miles of plant. Broker: Daniels

&

Asso- es.

.tems serving Orofino -Grangeville,

Idaho old by umbers

Clearwater Communications to

Cable of

Idaho Inc. for approxi-

.ely $3 million.

Seller is

Coeur d'Alene. no -based as no firm headed by Ted W.

Hughett. other cable interests. Buyer is

Eu- e,

Ore. -based cable

MSO serving over

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Group Chicago, IL

Broadcasting Apr 14

1986

177

of

Broadcasting's annual convention in Dal- las on Saturday. He said it is not accurate to dub the compromise

-now

pending at the

FCC-"must-carry-for-the-rich.

On the con- trary," Padden said, the proposal

"would provide substantial relief for many new and struggling independent UHF stations."

He cited examples

of

stations benefitting from the agreement by being entitled to wide- spread carriage, or being restored to a basic tier. He said also that under the modified rules, "our stations would no longer be vic- timized by program blackouts designed to advance the competitive position

of

cable program channels."

Padden also talked about the recent growth

of

independent television

-from

27 stations in

1960, to

120 in

1980, to 283 in operation by 1985.

Audiences for those sta- tions are growing as well, Padden said, cit- ing a report from BBDO that Padden said

"sees the networks' current audience share

of

73% shrinking to 65% by 1990, with most of the loss attributed to the 'aggressive stance taken by independent TV stations, which have been upgrading their program- ing in recent years and running consistent

schedules.'

"

However, Padden said, the growth revenues have done a remarkable

of

in- dependent stations has "not been an unble- mished success.

A few new stations have failed. Others are hanging on by their finger- nails. However, the good news is that our

job of

keeping up with the explosive growth in our

ranks."

But the INTV president warned that

"the chronic understatement

of

independent

[television] viewing levels in diary-based audience measurements poses a serious threat to the continued growth of diverse new independent stations." in

Another area windfall profits in syndication have stimu- lated a rush

of

growth cited by Padden agency for network expenditures is barter program syndication, which he said has provided independent stations with "po- tential access" to money "planned by the

...The of

new entrants and new pro- gram product.

As these divergent lines cross, independents may enter the promised land

of

station compensation,"

Padden said, adding that "already there are signs that a strong station can, under certain circum- stances, command compensation for clear- ing a barter program.

It clearly is a phenom- enon to watch."

Padden said.

Israeli satellite executive discounts importance of

Intelsat letter

An der

Intelsat letter to Israel regarding the tech- nical satellite system may have seemed uncom- promising, not to mention defiant

of

coordination the board

of

its proposed domestic of governors

of

an or-

(BROADCAST-

ING,

April 7).

But while U.S. government officials last week were beginning to ponder the contents of the March

28 letter that they had

just

obtained from a member press of

-Intelsat

apparently served no or government with a copy unconcerned by the brewing controver

Hesi

Satellite

Corp.,

Tel

Aviv,

-Israelis

Carmel, president

of

which is appe the Gei repre: ing Israel in the coordination activities,

"The board

of

governors makes the n not the director general or the direct( external relations. If the board says:

`N.

scission,'

that's what's going to hap

There's nothing to discuss."

Carmel, who was in New

York on t ness for his company, had that Francis not seen the

1

Latapie, Intelsat's director of ternal affairs, had written to

Israel's min:

of

communications.

It warned that

Isr. coordination

of

its AMS system woulc longer be "in effect" unless the system formed to the information regarding it

Israel had

E submitted originally.

Israel, cording to

Intelsat, had twice made sigi cant changes in the proposal and had responded to requests for information

Intelsat said was needed to begin a new ordination process.

Intelsat's director general, Richard lino, last month had recommended to board that it rescind the original coord tion and begin the process anew. But board, led by the

U.S.,

rejected the prof al, fearing such action would establish tems, and directed Colino simply to tell

I: el to prise recoordinate as needed. Hence the caused by Latapie's letter, one t some at

Intelsat apparently expected to

"bombshell."

But not

Carmel.

To him, the followed."

al

cedent that could be used to stall progres the coordination

of

American satellite

t

i instruction of the board "that should

TIMING

iming can make or break a transaction.

And when you're inter- ested in broad- cast properties, timing is critical.

That's why there's no better time than the pres- ent to talk with Robert

Rounsaville, Mary

Bush and Arnold

Kaufman. See us in our

Hospitality

Suite

#833, in the

Plaza of the

Americas Hotel at the

NAB Con- vention.

We're the media brokers who get results.

Time and time again.

1RobertWRounsaville

AssoC

,.

MEDIA

í.

`

OIERS

ANCOlSLTLTAII'i

ATLANTA, GA

ORLANDO, FL

30355

P.O.

Box 11898 (404) 261-3000/

1-

800

-531 -1500

32802

P.O.

Box 2991 (305)

423-9426/1-800-328-3500

He also offered a reason for the delay providing Intelsat with the informatior said it needed, a reason he said had provided to the global organization. "Th letters were sent to

Intelsat."

In the b< fir

Carmel said, Israel explained it was coor nating the AMS with other countries throt: the

International Frequency

Registrati

Board. "There was no sense in coordinati with Intelsat until we completed w

IFRB," Carmel said. "Otherwise, to coordinate again."

we'd

ht

Then Carmel noted, "When we first c ordinated with Intelsat, it took sev months.

I

don't

see the urgency."

The developing U.S. view was that t

Intelsat executive organ has acted contrary the the by board's order.

"Our view has been tl existing consultation would remain effect and be updated at an appropriate tir

Israel,"

Office said Frank Urbany, who heads t

of

International

Affairs at the

Natic al Telecommunications and Information

A ministration. "And my understanding is tt there is a difference between updating a c ordination and starting from scratch."

Clearly, the Latapie usual in the history

of

letter was highly

Intelsat, for u officia. like Urbany, were it approaching the questio raises with caution. "Based on our view this time, it [the letter] seems an inappropi ate

action,"

now? "I

Urbany said. What happe: next

don't

know.

We haven't discuss[ steps. We'll look at it in a delibera fashion.

We won't rush to judgment on

it."

K.

G

CRISLER

& COMPANY

Some transactions we're proud to have arranged since last year s convention.

WKZO -TV

KMEGITV)

KOLN -TV

KG IN

-TV

WLNS-TV

WKBT(TV)

Harlem Globetrotters

Ice

Capades

Kalamazoo, MI

Sioux City, IA

Lincoln, NE

Grand Island, NE

Lansing, MI

La

Crosse, WI

WCTI(TV)

WPTY

-TV

WPWR

-TV

KLLS(AM)

KLLS

-FM

New Bern,

NC

Memphis,

TN

Aurora

/Chicago, IL

San

Antonio,

TX

WPBN -TV

WTOM -TV

KIEM -TV

Traverse City. MI

Cheboygan, MI

Eureka, CA

WAKY(AM)

WVEZ

-FM

WRKR(AM)

WRKR-FM

WHCU(AM)

WHCU-FM

WFWY(TV)(CP)

WMKT(TVXCP)

Louisville,

KY

Racine, WI

Ithaca,

NY

Syracuse, NY

Muskegon, MI

$80,000,000

$72,000,000'

$30,000,000

$22,500,000

$12,500,000*

$12,000,000

$

8,000,000

S

5,400,000

$

4,000,000

S

3,150,000

$

2,050,000

$

1,500,000

$

$

440,000

440,000

'Subject to

FCC approval

Full service financial counseling to the broadcast industry.

NAB

Convention

Residence

Suite

2117,

The Hyatt

R.C.

CRISLER & COMPANY

580 WALNUT STREET

CINCINNATI. OHIO 45202

15131381

-7775

Richard

C.

Crisler,

Clyde Haehnle, Alex Howard, Larry Wood.

John

Babcock

Carl

S.

Ward, Graham Quaal; Special

Consultant: Ward

L.

Quaal

C e

Recondc

As compiled by

BROADCASTING,

April

3 through

April 9, and based on filings, au- thorizations and other FCC actions.

Abbreviations: AFC -Antenna

For Communications.

AU-

Administrative announced.

Law Judge. alt. -alternate. antenna.

CH- critical hours.

CP- construction permit. D

-day.

DA

-directional antenna. radiated power. khz

-kilohertz. ann.- auxiliary.

-effective

HAAT

-height above average terrain.

MEOC- maximum expected operation value. mhz

-megahertz. mod.- modification. presunrise service authority.

RCL

-remote control location.

S-

Atlanta.

SH-

SL- studio location. transmitter location. trans.

-transmitter. power output. ant.- kw-

N-

night. specified hours.

U-

kilowatts. unlimited

*-noncommercial. aur.-aural.

Doc- hours.

PSA- aux.-

Docket. ERP

m-

meters.

A-

Scientific-

IL-

TPO- transmitter vis.- visual.

w-

watts.

Ownership Changes

Applications

KCBA -TV

Salinas.

Calif.

(ch. 35: SIN; ERP vis. 2.328 kw. aur. 238 kw:

HAAT: 2.414 ft.. ant. height above ground:

227 ft.) -Seeks assignment of license from Sainte Broad- casting Corp. to

Cypress Broadcasting Inc. for $13.1 million cash.

Seller is principally owned by Chester and Naomi

Smith.

It also owns KCSO -TV

Modesto.

Calif.. and

KREN-

TV

Reno. Buyer is subsidiary of Ackerly

Communications.

Seattle -based group of two AM's. one FM and four TV's and outdoor advenising firm.

It is owned by

Barn

Ackerly. owner of

Seattle Supersonics professional basketball team.

Filtd March 31.

WKMK(AM)-

WRTM(FM) Blountstown.

Fla.

(AM:

1000

Seeks khz;

1 kw -D; FM: 102.3 mhz;

3 kw; HAAT:

185 assignment

ft.)-

of license from Hentz McClellan, trustee to Blountstown Communications no for

5103,000. Seller has other broadcast interests. Farrell- O'Quinn Partnership.

Buyer is owned by Harry Hagan and his

Hagan also owns wife,

Cathryn.

WPRY(AM) -WPCI -FM

Perry, Fla.

Filed

March

31.

WPOK(AM)- WJEZ(FM)

Pontiac,

Ill. (AM:

1080 khz;

1 kw -D: FM:

103.1 mhz; fer

3 kw; HAAT:

185 ft.) -Seeks trans- of control of

Livingston County Broadcasters Inc. from

Lawrence Nelson and his wife,

Pamela (57.9% before; none after) and Dallas Ingemunson (2% before: none after).

J.

Collins

Miller and his wife for

S231.437.23. Seller Inge

- munson also has interest in buyer's

WBYG(AM)

Sandwich.

Ill. Buyer also owns WSPY(FM)

Plano and

WBYG(AM)

Sandwich. both Illinois. It owns remaining stock of station.

Filed March 27.

WKDZ -AM

-FM Cadiz. Ky. (AM:

1110 khz:

FM: 106.3 mhz;

3 kw; HAAT:

215

I kw -D: ft.)

-Seeks assignment of license from Berkley Lake Broadcasting Co. to

WKDZ

Inc. for 5225.000 cash. Seller is principally owned by John

Woodruff.

It has no other broadcast interests. Buyer is owned by Gary Kidd and his wife, Michele.

It also owns

WMOK(AM)

Metropolis.

Ill.

Filed Mar. 31.

KLPL -AM -FM

Lake Providence, La. (AM:

1050 khz;

250 w -D; FM: 97.2 mhz;

2 kw; HAAT:

145 ft.) -Seeks assignment of license from Dixie

Business Investment Co.

Inc. to New Directions Broadcasting Inc. for

$225.000.

Seller is headed by

L.W. Baker. It has no other broadcast interests. Buyer is owned by

Paul

L. Coates and his wife,

Elizabeth. His brother, Gary, owns

Fordyce,

Ark.

Filed March

31.

KBJT(AM)- KQEW(FM)

WLNS -TV

Lansing.

Mich.. and

WKBT -TV

La Crosse.

Wis.

(WLNS:

HAAT: 1.000 ch.

6:

CBS; ERP vis.

100 kw, aur.

20 kw;

0.; ant height above ground: 1.023 ft. WKBT:

Richard T. Wartell ch.

8;

CBS; ERP vis. 316 kw. aur. 57.5 kw; HAAT: 1.5 ant. height above ground: 1.625 ft.) -Seeks assignrr license from Backe Communications to Young Broadc for

$72 million. Seller is owned by John Backe. t president of

CBS Inc. Buyer is subsidiary of

Adam

Inc.,

New York

-based station representative. Subsid owned by Adam Young (66.6 %) and his son, V

(33.3 %). Filed April

2.

W TYJ(FM)

Fayette. Miss. (97.7 mhz;

3 kw; HAA ft.) -Seeks assignment of license from Double

G Broa ing Inc. to Natchez Communications Inc. for

$20

Seller is owned by Nick Gizzardo, his wife.

Paula. and

Gancy. They have no other broadcasting interests. Bt owned by

James B.

Nutter and his wife. Diane.

It also

WMIS(AM)

Natchez. Miss. Filed

April I.

KTCT(TV)

Tulsa. Okla. (ch. 47: independent;

ER

344 kw, aur.

62.75 kw; HAAT: 1,425 ft.: ant. height ground: 2.000 ft.) -Seeks transfer of control of

KBJ: from Coit Drapery and Cleaners Inc. to Le SEA Inc. fc million.

Seller is owned by

Louis

J.

Kean and family. has interest in

KRDZ(AM)

Granby. Colo. Buyer is not corporation headed by Lester Sumrall. It also owns W

FM

-TV

South Bend.

Ind.. WHMB(TV) Indianapol international broadcast station

WHRI Noblesville.

Ind

March 28.

WLRP(AM)

San Sebastian.

P.R.(1460khz: 500w

Seeks assignment of license from Gloria

E.

Mendez

C

Las Raices Pepinianas Inc. for

$450,000. Seller is owl

Cruz (50%) and

Glorimar

Perez Mendez and family. It other broadcast interests. Buyer is owned by

William

I

Acevedo, and two others. Acevedo is general mana station. Filed March

31.

KBRO(AM) Bremerton,

Wash.

(1490khz:

I kw

-1

W

-N) -Seeks assignment of license from Bingham

1 casting of

Washington Inc. to Everest Broadcasting for $1,330,000, comprising 5930,000 cash and rem note at 10% over six years. Seller is Seattle -based gn three

AM's and three

FM's principally owned b)

Bingham. Buyer is

Olympia.

Wash. -based group c

AM's and two FM's principally owned by Gerry

Dc

Filed March

27.

WKAU(AM)

Kaukauna, Wis. (1050 khz:

1 kw

Seeks assignment of license from WinCom Wisconsi

Partnership to

Martin Communications for $512,500. is principally owned by Donald Winther and G. Woo

Stover. It owns WHFB

-AM -FM

St. Joseph's,

Mo.

WNFL(AM)

Green Bay and

WKAU(FM) Kaukauna

Wisconsin. Buyer is

Milwaukee attorney with no broadcast interests.

Filed March 31.

WE

TAKE GREAT PLEASURE IN

ANNOUNCING THAT

RICHARD T. WARTELL HAS

JOINED GAMMON & NINOWSKI

MEDIA INVESTMENTS, INC.

AS

AN ASSOCIATE BROKER

OPERATING

OUT

OF KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI.

Mr. Wartell is a graduate of

Kansas

State University with a

Bachelor of

Science degree.

Mr. Wartell brings to Gammon which includes

AM

&

Ninowski sixteen years

/FM station ownership and positions as of broadcast experience

Western U.S. Regional

Manager of Mutual

Broadcasting System in

Los

Angeles and Director of

Broadcast

Liaison and Regional Manager for The National

Association of

Broadcasters.

Through his affiliations and broadcast experience,

Mr. Wartell is well acquainted with broadcasters throughout the industry. o

Gammon Ninowski

Mcdi,t

InvcnitncnLn,

Inc.

Washington, D.C.

Los Angeles,

CA.

Philadelphia, PA.

(202) 862.2020 (714)837.9800 (215)525.8767

Denver, CO.

(303)534.3513

Kansas

City, MO.

(316)442.9370

New Stations

AM's

Rosamond.

Calif.

-Desert

Broadcasters seeks 89(

500 w -D:

I kw -N. Address: Box 2233. Citrus Heighu lif.

95611. Principal is owned by Donald

P.

Hams. wl no other broadcast interests. Filed March

28.

Florida City.

Fla.-

Florida City

Radio seeks 880 kt kw -D:

1 kw -N. Address:

85 East

Harris St.. LaGrang.

60525. Principal is owned by Karen M. Cox. other broadcast interests. Filed March 31. who h

Longwood.

Fla.-

Family Stations Inc. seeks 880

50 kw -D.

I kw -N. 3108 Fulton Ave.. Sacramento.

95821. Principal is

Oakland. Calif.

-based nonprofit si

I group of one

AM.

17

FM's. one shoo wave and one

T\ headed by Harold Camping. Filed March

31.

Perrin.

Fla.

-Perrin

Communications seeks 102(

20 kw -D;

1 kw -N. Address: 2017

East

Cliff

Dr..

Calif. 95062. Principal is owned by Thomas

F.

Santa l

Mulle

Leo Kasselman.

It has no other broadcast interests.

March 31.

Port Orange. Fla.

-Pon

Orange Radio seeks 1020

10 kw -D. Address:

1662

Willowmont Ave..

San Jose.

95124. Principal is owned by Richard interest in new

A.

Bowers. wh

AM in Hialeah. Fla. Filed March 31.

Orono. Me. -James

E.

Richford seeks 1250 khz;

D. Address:

167 Center. Bangor. Mc. 04401. Principe

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

tan

er broadcast interests. Filed

April

2. ncord.

1140

N.H.

-Concord

Broadcasting Associates khz;

10 kw -D. Address: 401 W.

Kirkpatrick

St.. tse,

N.Y. 13204. Principal is owned by Craig L. Fox

:orge W.

Kimble. They have interest in

WWLF -TV on and

WOLF -TV

Scranton, both Pennsylvania; and c

-AM -FM Manlius, WYHV(AM) Canton,

WNOD- mestown and

WICK -TV Watertown, all New York.

;o has interest in

WTUV -TV Utica, N.Y.. and

Kimble crest in irview,

N.C.-

Fairview Broadcasting Co. seeks 880 kw -D. Address: 298

Town Mountain Rd., Asheville,

28804.

Principal is principally owned by Dorothea

Cr and two others.

Alderfer has interest in

-(AM) Columbia, S.C. Filed March 28. lem, N.C.

-Michael

B.

Glinter seeks

880 khz;

1 kw- dress: 1711

,al owns

Appletree Lane. Fort

Mill,

S.C. 29715.

WQCC(AM) Charlotte,

N.C., and

WID-

)

Elizabethtown, Tenn.

Filed March 31. aufont,

S.C.

-Wilbur

H. Goforth seeks

880 khz; 500 address: P.O.

Box 66345, Mobile, Ala. 36660.

Princi- s no other broadcast interests. Filed March 31. ythewood, S.C.

-Michael

B.

Glinter seeks

880 khz; v

-D. Address:

1711

Appletree Lane, Fort

Mill,

S.C.

.

Principal owns

WQCC(AM) Charlotte, N.C., and

)(AM) Elizabethtown,

Tenn.

Filed March 31.

,wis, S.C.

-Mark

H.

Gunn seeks 880 khz; 320 w -D. ss: 11533

Vista Haven Dr., Pineville, N.C. 28134. pal has no other broadcast interests. Filed March 31.

Juice,

N.M.-

Jicarilla Apache Tribe seeks

91.1 mhz;

,;

HAAT: 1.494 ft. Address: P.O. Box 306, 87528. pal is

Indian tribe, headed by

Leonard

Atole, presi-

It has no other broadcast interests. Filed March 31.

, et

Plain, N.Y.

-William

H. Walker seeks 101.1 mhz;

HAAT: minus 422.6 ft. Address: RD

I,

Box 12, Route

Clintondale, N.Y. 12515. Principal has no other

:ast interests. Filed March 25.

. lacios. Tex.

-Bay

Broadcasting Ltd. seeks 100.7

3 kw:

HAAT: 300 ft. Address: Highway 35

East, Bay fex. 77414.

Principal is owned by Brenda Clark and 12

.

It also owns

KIOX(AM)

Bay

City, Tex. Filed March ve Oak. Fla.

-Frank

A. Baker seeks ch. 57; ERP vis. kw; aur.

500 kw; HAAT: 1,088 ft.; ant. height above d:

1,022 ft. Address: 512 Cherokee St., Marianna,

2446. Principal has no other broadcast interests. Filed t 28. ve

RP

Oak, Fla.

-Cardwell-

Bussey Partnership seeks ch. vis. 1,000 kw; aur. 200 kw; HAAT: 417 ft.; ant. t above ground: 460 ft. Address:

304 Stanton St., tack- le, Ala. 36265. Principal is owned by

William E. y and Lynda

Cardwell. It has no other broadcast inter-

Filed March 28. tradis:,

Nev.-

Pollack Broadcasting Co. seeks ch. 39; vis.

2,000 kw; aur. 200 kw; HAAT: 2,276 ft.: ant. t above ground:

135 ft. Address: 509 S.

Walnut St.,

,la,

Ark.

72370. Sydney Pollack and family. It also

KOSE(AM) -KHFO -FM Osceola.

Ark., and

R(AM)

Paducah, Ky. Filed Apr.

3. lorehcad City, N.C.

-Crystal

Coast Communications, eeks ch. 8; 316 kw: aur.

31.6 kw; HAAT: 1,965 ft.; ant. t above ground: 1,990 ft. Address: 1012

Bay St..

7.

Jr,

Principal is owned by and

William C. Horton, general limited partners, Reginald

Hawkins, Melvin and Spurgeon Webber. Webber has interest in

IU(TV) Belmont, N.C. Filed March 28. t lorehead City, N.C. ch. 8: 316

-Pine

Cone Communications L.P. kw: aur.

31.6 kw; HAAT: 2.000 ft.: ant. above ground: 2,002 ft. Address:

223 N. Yaupon

:e,

28557. Principal is owned by Mrs. Shirley B. Hen- n, general partner, and r, his brother, John and limited partners. Joseph B.

Gil L.

Lyons.

It has no other cast interests. Filed March 28. lorehead City. N.C.

-Dr.

James E. Carson seeks ch. 8;

.w; aur. 31.6 kw; HAAT: 1,009 ft.; ant. height above id: 1.004 ft. Address: 1866 Geiberger Dr., Fayetteville,

28303. Principal has no other broadcast interests. Filed h

28. ebanon,

5;

Pa.-

Lebanon Valley Television

Ltd. seeks

ERP vis. 5,000 kw; aur. 500 kw; HAAT: 1,093 ft.;

[eight above ground: 975.5 ft. Address: 4295 Winston leaumont, Tex. 75428. Principal has no other broadcast fists.

Filed March

31. fartinsburg,

W.Va.-Ivan

Lambert Broadcasting

Ltd. ch. 60; 5.000 kw; aur.

500 kw: HAAT: 850 ft.; ant. a above ground:

100 ft. Address: 205 Juneway Dr., mango, N.Y. 13037. Principal has no other broadcast interests. Filed March 31.

Bluefield,

Va.-

Interface Productions Inc. seeks ch. 40;

ERP vis. 1,110 kw; aur. 110 kw; HAM':

2503.6 ft.; ant. height above ground: 1,033 ft. Address: P.O.

Box 7346

-A,

Orlando. Fla. 32854. Principal is owned by Hugh C.

White and family. It owns KHCT-TV Salina, Kan. Filed

April

1.

AM's

Tendered

FM's

Facilities Changes

Applications

WBNR

(1260 khz) Beacon, N.Y. service

-Seeks

CP to add night with 500 w and make changes in ant. sys.

App.

April

1.

WPRQ (870 khz) Colonial Heights, Tenn.

-Seeks

CP to increase power to 10 kw.

App.

April I.

W SGI (1190 khz) Springfield, Tenn.

-Seeks

CP to change freq. to 760 khz and install DA -D. App.

April I.

KBAL

(1410 khz)

San Saba, Tex.

-Seeks

CP to increase power to 800 w.

App.

April

1.

WOMT (1240 khz) Manitowoc, Wis.

-Seeks

CP to change

TL.

App.

April

7.

Accepted

KXZI

(1030 khz) San

Luis Obispo, Calif.

-Seeks

MP to reduce day and change power to 2.5 kw; reduce night power to .7 kw,

TL.

App.

April I.

KEZW (1430 khz) Aurora, Colo.

-Seeks mod. of lic. to move SL to Denver. App.

April I.

WSKQ (620 khz) Newark, N.J.

-Seeks mod. of lic. to operate transmitter by remote control. App.

April

4.

Accepted

KWOZ (103.3 mhz) Mountain View,

Ark.

-Seeks

CP to change HAAT to 986.85 ft. App.

April

4.

KKHR (93.I mhz) Los Angeles

-Seeks

CP to change

ERP to 29.5 kw and change

HAAT to 3,498 ft. App.

April

4.

KMET

(94.7 mhz) Los Angeles

-Seeks mod. of lic. to install new transmission sys.

App. April I.

KWVE (94.7 mhz)

San Clemente.

Calif.

-Seeks mod. of lic. to install new ant. sys. App.

April I.

KCDA

(103.

I mhz) Coeur D'Alene, Idaho

-Seeks

CP to change

TL and change

HAAT to 328 ft. App.

April

4.

WLNR

(106.3 mhz) Lansing, aux. sys.

App. April

7.

Ill

-Seeks

CP to install

WITT

(93.5 mhz) Tuscola,

111. change

-Seeks mod. of

CP to

TL and change

HAAT to

148 ft. App.

April

4.

WCKQ (103.9 mhz) Campbellsville.

Ky -Seeks

CP to change ERP to 1.825 kw and change

April

I.

HAAT to

411 ft. App.

KRRV (100.3 mhz)

Alexandria,

La.

-Seeks

CP to change

TL and change

HAAT to 1.058.13 ft. App.

April

1.

NAB

1986

KFXZ (106.3 mhz) Maurice, La. -Seeks mod. of

CP to change ERP to

1.3 kw and change

HAAT to 494.1 ft. App.

April

4.

WMJS (92.7 mhz) Prince Frederick, change ERP to

1 kw.

App.

April

4.

Md.

-Seeks

CP to

WPNH -FM

(100.1 mhz) Plymouth,

N.H.

-Seeks

CP to change ERP to 2.34 kw and change

App. April

4.

HAAT to 364.08 ft.

KIVA (105.1 mhz)

Santa Fe,

N.M.

-Seeks mod. of

CP to change

HAAT to 1,935.8 ft. App.

April

I.

WFXC (107.1 mhz) Durham, N.C.

-Seeks mod. of

CP to change

TL; change ERP to 1.19 kw, and change HAAT to

505.12 ft.

App.

April I.

WCBE (90.5 mhz) Columbus, Ohio

-Seeks mod. of lic. to install new transmission sys. App.

April

1.

WMXQ

(105.5 mhz) Moncks Corner, S.C.

-Seeks

CP to change

TL and change

HAAT to 328 ft. App. April

4.

TV's

Accepted

KTVE

(ch. 10)

El Dorado,

Ark.

-Seeks

CP to change

HAAT to

2,000 ft. and replace ant.

App.

April

3.

WHCT-TV (ch.

18)

Hartford, Conn.

-Seeks

CP to change

ERP to vis. 3,273 kw, aur.

327.3 kw; change

HAAT to 1,110 ft.; replace ant., and change

TL. App.

April I.

WFTY

(ch. 50)

Washington-Seeks CP to move main SL outside community of lic. App.

April I.

WBFF

(ch. 45)

Baltimore-Seeks

CP to change ERP to vis. 1,589 kw, aur.

79.5 kw; change

HAAT to

1,056.16 ft., and change

TL. App. April

I.

KDEB -TV (ch. 27) Springfield, Mo.

-Seeks

MP to change

HAAT to 1,688 ft. App. April I.

WPTF

(ch. 28) Durham,

N.C.

-Seeks

CP to change

HAAT to

2,000 ft.; replace ant., and change

TL. App.

April

W

VBT

(ch. 43)

Virginia Beach, Va.

-Seeks

MP to change

HAAT to 979 ft.; replace ant.

, and change

TL.

App.

April I.

WLAX

(ch. 25) La Crosse, Wis.

-Seeks

MP to change

ERP to vis. 501 kw, aur.

50.1 kw; change

HAAT to 995 ft.; replace ant., and change

TL. App. April I.

Actions

AM's

WRAB (1380 khz) Arab, service

Ala.-Granted app. to add with

.65 kw and make changes in ant. sys. night

Action

April I.

KXEW (1600 khz) Tucson, crease day power to 2.5 kw.

Action April I.

WFTP (1330 khz) Fort Pierce, Fla.

-Returned app. to increase day power to 5 kw and night power to 1.5 kw.

Action April

1.

WGGG (1230 khz) Gainesville, change

TL. Action April I.

Fla.-Granted app. to

WGKA

(1190 khz) Atlanta power to

10 kw and change

-Granted app. to increase

TL. Action April I.

WKDC

(1530 khz) Elmhurst, crease power to 400 w.

Action

III.-

Granted app. to in-

April

I.

WARA (1320 khz)

Attleboro. increase

Mass.-

Granted app. to day and night power to

5 kw and make changes in

EDWIN

&

TORNBERG

COMPANY, INC.

Hospitality Suite

THE

ON

MANSION

TURTLE

CREEK

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

181

ant. s».

Action April I.

KCBN

(1230 khz) Reno

---

Action March

26.

Granted app. to change

TL.

WCQR (1030 khz) change

Mint

TL. Action April

I.

Hill.

N.C.

---

Granted app. to

WBZN (1030 khz) Wake Forest, make changes in ant. sys.

N.C.-Granted app. to

Action April

1.

KTCR

(1530 khz) Wagoner. Okla.-Granted app. to in- crease power to 840 w and make changes in ant. sys.

March 25.

Action

KKJB (1000 khz)

Marion. Tex.

--- granted app. to change

TL. Action April I.

KIKN

(840 khz)

Pharr. Tex.

---

Action April I.

Grunted app. to change

TL.

W V NR (I340 khz) Poultney.

Vt.-

Granted app. to change

TL and make changes in ant. sys. Action April I.

WQSF (740 khz) Williamsburg. make changes in ant. sys.

Va.-

Dismissed app. to

Action April I.

KZUN

(700 khz)

Newpon,

Wash.

-Dismissed app. to change city of lic. to Grangcville.

Idaho: change

TL: change

Services

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TOWER LOCATION HEIGHT STVDIES

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BROADCAST DATA SERVICES

Computerized Broadcast Service

Including

Data Base /Allocation Studies

Terrain Profiles

A

Div. of Maffei,

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Johnson, Inc.

(703) 841 -0282

RAMHROMIX, INC.

Connector Supplier to the Broadcast Industry

Kings/ITT Cannon

67 Jefryn Blvd.

E.

Deer Park,

N.Y. 11729

(516) 242-4700

THE

M STREET

JOURNAL

An authoritative weekly newsletter for radio. Format News'

FCC CRTC

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Activity.

Free sample:

Box

540381

Houston,

TX 77254

(713)

726 -8055

Comm nityTV

Journal

LPTV News, Views 8 Hard Data every other Wednesday 5175.yr

PO

Box

33964

Washington, DC 20033-0964

202

-234

-8694 day power to

5 ant. sys. kw; change to

DA

-2, and make changes

Action April I. in

KQEU

(920 khz) Olympia, Wash.-Granted app. to in- crease day power to

5 kw and change to

DA

-2.

Action April

FM's

WKYD-FM

(98.1 mhz) Andalusia. Ala.

---

Granted app. to change

TL and change

HAAT to 981.3 ft.

Action March

31.

KZZZ (94.7 mhz) Kingman.

Ariz. change

-Granted app. to

TL: change ERP to 45.701 kw. and change

HAAT to

2,491.88 ft. Action March

31.

KPDJ (92.3 mhz) Eureka.

ERI' to 32.3 kw and change

Calif.

HAAT

-Granted app. to change to 1,525 ft. Action

March

27.

KDJK

(95.1 mhz) Oakdale.

Calif.-

Granted app. to change ERP to 29.5 kw and change

Action

March 27.

HAAT to 631.6 ft.

KROR -FM (106.9 mhz)

Yucca Valley. app. to change ERP to 4 kw: change

Calif.-

Granted

HAAT to 1.371.04 ft.. and make changes in ant. sys. Action March

27.

FCC ON -LINE DATABASE

datawople

Ahocation

Terrain Studies

AM

FM

TV

LPTV ITFS

4827 Rugby

Ave

.

Sude

200

Bethesda. MO 20814

(301) 652 -8822

1-

800 -368.5754

Complete Listing

Of:

CA

L

LETTERS

Call Letter Systems

P.

0.

Box 13789

Jackson. MS

39236 -3789

1601) 981 -3222

Completely Current

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Maritime Calls

AVAILABLE

CALL LETTERS

WITH FULL APPLICATION Kn

RADIO INFORMATION CENTER e.glm

Arran

New York, NV 10022

(217)071 -4528 iW011 ssoctotes tr1C

(818) 351-5521

Professional

Services to the

Broadcasting 6

Production

Industries in

Architecture

Interior Design

Technical Design

Construction Mgt.

Stephen Raleigh

Broadcast Services

Full Service Technical Consulting

Specialists in

Audio

& RF

Systems

Facility

Design 8 Installation

P.O.

Box 3403, Princeton,

N.J. 08540

(609) 799 -4357

WNJY (94.3 mhz) Riviera Beach. Fla.

-

Granted change ERP to 1.38 kw.

Action March 27.

:

WCGQ (107.3 mhz) Columbus. Ga.--- wanted a change HAAT to 1.011 ft. Action

March 27.

WYNK -FM (101.5 mhz) Baton Rouge

- change

TL and change HAAT to

27.

Granted t

1.282.81 ft.

Action

KLPL -FM (92.7 mhz) Lake Providence. La. -Dist app. to change HAAT to

328 ft.

Action March 31.

WDHP

(96.9 mhz)

Presque Isle. Me.--- Granted a change

TL and change HAAT to 1.480.59 ft. Action

27.

KTCZ -FM

(97.1 mhz) change ERP to

71 kw.

Minneapolis-

Action

Dismissed

March 31. a

*WCAL

-FM (89.3 mhz)

Northfield. Minn.

-Dise app. to change ERP to

1.317.15 ft. Action

23.5 kw and change

March

31.

HA

WFTA (101.7 mhz) Fulton. Miss.

--- wanted change ERP to

1.35 kw and change

HAAT to

480 ft.

March

27.

KMMR

(100.1 mhz) Malta. Mont. change

TL and change HAAT

---

Grunted a1 to 377.2 ft.

WMVB -FM

(97.3 mhz)

Millville.

N.1.- ,ranted a change ERP to 50 kw and change

HAAT to 205 ft. /

March

31.

W PST (97.5 mhz) Trenton.

N.J.-Granted app. to c

ERP to 50 kw and change HAAT to

429.68 ft. Action

I

31.

KLSK change

(104.1 mhz)

Santa Fe.

N.M.

---

Granted ai

HAAT to 1.876.16 ft. Action March

27.

WYFL (92.5 mhz) Henderson, N.C.

-Granted ai change

HAAT to 990.56 ft. Action

March 27.

WVOD change

(99.3 mhz) Manteo,

N.C.

-

,ranted of

TL and change HAAT to 217.14 ft.

Action

I

26.

KRRZ (101.9 mhz) Fargo.

N.D. -Dismissed of change

HAAT to 846 ft. Action

March 31.

WRQK (106.9 mhz) Canton, Ohio-Granted app. stall new ant. sys. Action

March 28.

WCHO -FM

Ohio

(105.5 mhz) Washington Court

H

--

Granted app. to install new transmission sys.

P

March

28.

KQMI (99.5 mhz) Henryetta. make changes in ant. sys.

Okla.-Granted of

Action

March 27.

KWEN (95.5 mhz) Tulsa. stall aux. sys.

Okla.-

Dismissed app.

Action

March 31.

WHLM

-FM (106.5 mhz) Bloomsburg.

Pa.--- Grantee to change ERP to 35.5 kw; change

HAAT to 577.28 ft make changes in ant. sys. Action

March

31.

WSBA -FM

(103.3 mhz) York, change ERP to 6.4 kw and change

Po-Granted ap

HAAT to 1.305

Action March 31.

WLNB -FM (94.3 mhz) Goose Creek. S.C.

-Gr

app. to change TL and change

HAAT to 490 ft. A

March

27.

KBRA (95.9 mhz)

Freer.

ERP to 2.5 kw; change

Tex.-

Dismissed app. to et

HAAT to 354 ft.. and make chi in ant. sys. Action March

31.

KVMV (96.9 mhz)

McAllen,

Tex.

--

,ranted ap change

HAAT to 1,146.69

H.

Action March

25.

KGAR

(106.3 mhz) Mercedes. Tex.-Granted ap change ERP to .53

Action March 27. kw and change

HAAT to

633.(

KPXI

1100.7 mhz)

Mount Pleasant. Tex. -Granted to change

TL and change

HAAT to 984.5 ft. Action

N

31.

TV's

*KRCB -TV

(ch. 22) Cotali, Calif.

--

Granted apt change ERP to vis. 68.823 kw, aur.

6.823 kw and et

HAAT to 2,034 ft. Action March 25.

KMCI

(ch. 38) Lawrence, Kan. -Granted app. to ch

ERP to vis. 5.000 kw, aur. 1.000 kw; change

HAAT to ft.: replace ant.. and change

TL. Action

March

28.

I

KLAX

-TV

(ch. 31) Alexandria.

La.-

Granted ap change ERP to vis. 1,216 kw, aur. 122 kw; change HA.

1.357 ft., and change

TL. Action March

28.

WWAC -TV

(ch. 53) Atlantic City-Granted apf change ERP to vis. 12.2 kw, aur. 1.2 kw and change H to 280 ft. Action March 28.

*WNJB (ch. 58) New

Brunswick. N.J. --

Granted ap change ERP to vis.

1.321 kw.

Action

March 25.

*WSOC -TV

(ch. 9) Charlotte. N.C.-

--

Granted apt

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

182

ofessional

Cards

RING & ASSOCIATES,

P,C.

,ULTING RADIO ENGINEERS

Suits 500

140 Nineteenth

St., N.W.

Washington. D.C.

20036

(202) 223

-6700

Member AFCCE

Stir

CarliJorres

Corpondices

S!®,

A

NNA iramse noei

CiminEP

CONSULTING

ENGINEERS

7901

VARNW000 COURT

SPRINGFIELD

.

VA. 22153

1703/560

7704

MEMBER

AFCCE

LIMAN AND SILLIMAN

3701.

Georgia Ave.

=805

Silver Spring, MD

20910

BERT M.

(

301

(

SILLIMAN.

P.E.

589432138

DMAS

B.

(8121

SILLIMAN.

853-9754

Member AF

CC-F.

P.E.

MMETT &

EDISON, INC.

CONSULTING ENGINEERS lox 68. International n

Airport

Francesco.

14151

California

342 -5208

94128

Member AFCCE

Moffet, Larson

&

Johnson, Inc.

Consulting Telecommunications Engineers

1925

North Lynn Street

Arlington, VA 22209

,

(703)

841

-0500

Member AFCCE

JOHN

B.

HEFFELFINGER

9233

Ward Parkway.

Suite 285

816 -444

-7010

Kansas

City.

Mlssourl

641

1

4

.rCCE

VIR

JAMES

:ONSULTINO

ENGINEERS

,pócallons and Field Engineering

Tmpulerized Freauency Surveys

37

W.

Kentucky Ave.

-80219

(303)937 -1900

ENVER,

COLORADO

Member AFCCE &

NAB

ATFIELD

&

DAWSON

Consulting Engineers adcast and Communications

4226 6th

Ave., N.W., tattle, Washington,

98107

(206) 783 -9151

Member

AFCCE

JOHN

F.X.

BROWNE

&

ASSOCIATES,

P.C.

525 Woodward Ave.

Bloomfield Hills, MI

48013

(313) 642-6226

Washington Office

(202) 293 -2020

Member AFCCE

E.

&

Harold Munn, Jr.,

Associates, Inc.

Broadcast Engineering Consultants

Box 220

Coldwater, Michigan 49036

Phone:

517-

278 -7339

ENTERPRISE ENGINEERING

P.C.

Consulting Engineers

EW.

HANNEL. PE.

P0. Box 9001 Peoria. IL

(309) 691.4155

61614

Member

AFCCE

&

D.C.

WILLIAMS

ASSOCIATES,

INC.

Pos,

LPV

u.

crrCr

Bo.

Ter

FOLSOM, CALIFORNIA

(916) 933

-5000

95630

.,,

.-.-,-.

"

LAWRENCE L.

MORTON

ASSOCIATES

LAWRENCE L.

MORTON, E.E.

AM FM TV

APPLICATIONS FIELD ENGINEERING

ANTENNA BROADBANDING FOR AM STEREO

(714) 859 -6015

CLAIIrPCE

M eEVEMGE

MMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES. INC

IROADCAST ENGINEERING CONSVLT.WTS awn ta e3

CREEK ROAD

MOUNT MOLLY

NJ 0S060

N.O., 723

0N7

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FORD

BROADCAST ENGINEERING CONSULTANT

TT

R.R.

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TERRE

HAUTE, INDIANA

47885

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Frequency Searches

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8

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I

Rule Makings

C

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FCC

MMOS,

P/P Microeave lit

Class L

PE licensed staff

1234 Mass. Ave., N.W.,

Suite 1006

Ihington, D.C. 20005

Plane

(202) 639.5826

A3em6.

'Cc,

EVANS

ASSOCIATES

Consulting Communications Engineer

AM -FM -T V-C AT

W

TFS- SMN

I

Ite aroadcals Engineering Software

216

N.

Green Bay Rd.

THIENSVILLE, WISCONSIN 53092

Plane

(414) 242.6000

Member AGCCE

LOHNES & CULVER

Consulting

Engineers

1156 15th

St..

N

W. Suite 606

Washington. D C

20005

12021

296.2722

Member

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&

DAVID STEEL

ASSOCIATES, INC.

P O

Bo.

230

Mein

St.

L

Mel.In

Ave

Ouennslo.n, MO 2165e

(301) 627 8125

M.mAei TECE

JULES COHEN

& ASSOCIATES,

P.C.

Suite

400

1730 M St. N.W.

Washington

DC

20036

1202)

659.3707

Member AFCCE

ROSNER TELEVISION

SYSTEMS

CONSULTING 6 ENGINEERING

250

West 57

Street

New York. N.V.

10107

1212)

246-2850

STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS

TECHNOLOGY, INC.

MATTHEW

J.

VLISSIDES.

PRESIDENT

P.E.

TOWERS.

ANTENNAS, STRUCTURES

New Tall Towers, Existing Towers

Studies. Analysis. Design Modifications.

Inspections, Erection, Etc.

6867 Elm Si.. McLean.

VA

Member

22101í703)

356 -9765

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R.L. HOOVER

Consulting Telecommunications Engineer

11704

Seven Locks

Road

Potomac, Maryland 20854

301

983,0054

Member AFCCE

SELLMEYER & KRAMER, INC.

CONSULTING ENGINEERS

J.S.

Sellmeyer, P.E., S.M. Kramer, P.E.

APPLICATIONS FIELD ENGINEERING

P.O.

Box 841 Mckinney, TX

75069

214-542-2056 214- 548 -8244

Member

AFCCE

D.B.

COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Broadcast/ACC /cellular /satellite

Telecommunications Consultants

4401

East West

Highway

Suite 404

Bethesda. Maryland 20814

(Located in Washington, D.C.

(301) 654 -0777

Area) contact. Darrell

E.

Bauguess

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BE A

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To

Broadcasting's 191,781

Readers

Display your PrOlessionai

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1982

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CONSULTING ENGINEERS

1015 15th

St.. N.W.,

Suits 703

(2021

783-0111

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20005

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ANDRUS AND ASSOCIATES, INC.

ALVIN

H.

ANDRUS, P.E.

351

SCOTT DRIVE

SILVER SPRING. MD. 20904

A

301

384-5374

A

rMmb.,

AFCCE

CARL

E. SMITH

CONSULTING ENGINEERS

AM -FM -TV Engineering Consultants

Complete Tower and Rigging Services

"Serving the Breedrear Industry for over 50 ream"

Box 2727

Bath, Ohio

(216) 659-4440

44210

Mullaney Engineering,

Inc.

Consulting Telawmmuniceliens Engineers

9049 Shady Grove

Court

Gaithersburg,

MD

20877

301

-921.0115

Member AFCCE

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ASSOCIATES

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P.O.

Box 18312

Dallas, Texas 75218

(214) 669-0294

Member AFCCE

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&

BEVERAGE

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INCORPORATED

CONSULTING 8

FIELD SERVICES

P.O. Box 770

WILLIAMSTOWN, NEW JERSEY

(609) 728

-2300 08094

TY

AIMEARCH

11501

&A se Valley Dr/Reston. Ve9rm 72091

1701

Norm Greenville Avenue. SeaR

814

Wlturdson. Texas 75081

Harry

G

L

Camxxlcayals

Englneenrq Senxes

Stem*.

Pat Man.

Tens

VirOrsa

761417II4300

214/2

3531%

George Jacobs

&

Associates,

Inc.

Consulting Broadcast Engineers

Domestic & International

Member

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Suite

410

(301) 587 -8800

8701 Georgia Ave.

Silver Spring, MD

20910

LECHMAN & JOHNSON

TlkCOmmun,Catans Consultants

A aabeabons hall

Engineering

2033

M Street. N

W. Sude 702

Washington DC 20036

12021

7750057

install aux. ant. sys.

Granted separate app. to change to 1.179 ft. and replace ant.

Actions March 28.

HAAT

WYBE

(ch. 35) Philadelphia - Granted app. to change

ERP to vis. 323.6 kw; change

HAAT to 558 ft.; replace ant.. and change

TL. Action

March

25.

WAPA

-TV

(ch. 4)

San changes in aux. ant. sys.

Juan.

P.R.-

Action

Granted

March 28. app. to make

KHBU

ERP to

-TV (ch.

14)

Houston-

Granted app. to change vis. 4.4557 kw and change HAAT to 1.436.64 ft.

Action

March 28.

In

Contest

Review board made following decision

Homestead. Fla. (Homestead al) FM proceeding. Granted

Minority

Broadcasters. et joint requests by Homestead

Minority

Broadcasters

Inc..

Radio South Dade Inc..

Home- stead Community

Broadcasters, Dario Gonzalez. Leisure

Broadcasting Inc. and Radio Intermart Corp. agreement and dismissed apps.

Homestead Community. Gonzalez and Leisure dice; granted app.

Homestead. and

25. of of

Homestead. Radio South.

Radio Intermart for new for settlement with preju-

FM station at terminated proceeding. By order, March

ALJ Byron

E.

Harrison made following decision:

New Orleans (Loyd A.

Granted Crescent dismissed app.

City

Communications Co.'s motion and of

Loyd

A. Allen with prejudice for failure to prosecute. By order, March

Allen. et al)

TV proceeding.

27.

ALJ Edward

J.

Kuhlmann made following decision:

Cabo Rojo.

P.R. (Olga Iris Fernandez and Maria

Aviles) FM proceeding. Granted

I.

Ortiz joint request for settlement agreement by app. with tion at Cabo Rojo.

March

25.

Fernandez and and

Aviles; dismissed Fernandez's prejudice; granted Aviles's app. for terminated proceeding. new FM sta-

By MO &O.

ALJ

Walter G Miller made following decisions

Islamorada,

Fla. (Florida Educational Television Inc. and

Islamorada Educators Broadcasting ing. Granted morada for joint request missed Florida's app. with new educational terminated proceeding. for

Inc.)

Ed

-TV settlement agreement; dis- prejudice; granted app. proceed- of

Isla

-

TV station at Islamorado, and

By MO &O,

March 27.

Dallas (Agape Broadcasting Foundation joint

Inc.. et al) FM proceeding. Granted request by Crusader Broadcast

Foundation Inc. and

Criswell Center approval app. of settlement agreement and with prejudice. By for Biblical

Studies for dismissed Crusader's

MO &O.

March 20.

Call Letters

ALJ Joseph Chachkin made following decisions:

Eureka.

TV

Calif.

(James and Sharon proceeding. By

Dam

Sepulveda, et al) separate orders: granted Sepulveda's pe- tition to extent of adding issues to determine whether Cen- tennial Broadcasting is in

EEO compliance with commission s policy and whether it was so careless or inept in prepar- ing its app. as to affect its qualifications and on judge's own motion added financial issue against Pacific. By MO &O's.

March 21.

Sebring. Fla. (Focus Broadcast Communications al) TV proceeding. Granted cast. Channel

60 Inc.. joint requests

Hunt Partnership by and

Focus

Inc.. et

Broad-

Ridge Broad- casting Co. for settlement agreement; dismissed apps.

Channel 60, Hunt and

Ridge of with prejudice; conditionally granted app. of

Focus for new TV station on

Sebring. and terminated proceeding. By

Channel 60 at

MO &O,

March 27.

ALJ

Thomas 8. Fitzpatrick made following decision.

Danville.

Va. (Danville

Broadcasting and nership

Ltd.) TV proceeding. Granted

Naughton

Part- joint requests for ap- proval casting of agreement and dismissed app. with of

Danville

Broad- prejudice and retained Haughton's app. in hearing status. By

MO &O.

March 24.

Applications

Call

Sought by

New

AM

WGBE

WNAP

WTGR

KTMP

WOWM

Joanne

Miller Wbodbine.

Ga

Existing AM's

WDRV Statesville Family Radio Corp., States- ville. N C

WBMK Broadcast Media of

Knoxville Inc..

Knoxville,

Tenn.

KLVR

Creek Broadcasting Corp.. Heber City

Utah

WKAU Martin

Communications Inc_ Kau- kauna, Ws.

Existing FMs

ALJ John

M. Frys ak made following decisions.

New York ceeding. Pursuant to settlement agreement approved in

MO &O. released Dec. 27, 1985. which amended app. of

Digital

Paging and retained it in hearing status ceipt of

(Digital confirmation

Paging Systems Inc., that corp. consisting et of al) MDS pro- pending re- settling parties had been established, ordered that app. of

New York MDS for new MDS station at

New York is granted and terminated proceeding. By order. March 26.

El Paso (UN2JC Communications. et al) TV proceeding.

Granted request by

Josie Moore and dismissed her app. with prejudice. By order. March

21.

WBZD

KCGO

Grants

Call

WONG

WAGP

WKDZ -FM WKDZ Inc., Cadiz, Ky

KJAO Target Media Inc

.

Gordonsville. Mo.

Assigned to

New AM's

John

H.

Pembroke. Canton, Miss

Community Broadcasting Corp of

Beaufort

Beaufort

.

S.C.

Studio Systems

for

AM

*

FM

*

TV

Audio

"See us at the N.A.B., Booth "2581"

The

Audio Broadcast Group, Incorporated

2342

5.

Division Avenue

Grand Rapids, M149507

800 -253 -9281 (outside Michigan)

800- 632 -4535 (Michigan)

Outstanding

Workmanship.

Stunning Performance.

Delivered

On Time,

Within Budget.

Pre

-Wired

Studios,

In- cluding

Usually

Studio

Cabinetry.

Turn -Key

Installations,

Installed

In One

Day.

Over 100 Equipment

Lines.

Working

Displays,

In

Our

Showroom.

Financing Available.

KZRO

KSZL

WJxW

KYKN

WIZB

KFRE -FM

KEYO

WSST

WLLO

WGBF -FM

WLVW

KMGK

WJOJ -FM

WLTJ

WMMC

KAZZ

WECN

New TV

Charles

R

Shinn, Pine Blufl, Ark.

Existing

AM's

KPRD First American Communicat stow

Calif.

WCRJ Defuniak Communications li sonville. Fla

KGAY Capitol Equities Corp..

Saler

Existing FMs

WXLE Abbeville Wireless Corp.. At

Ala

KFRY Chester Associates. Fresno.

KGMJ High

Country Broadcasting gle. Colo

WINZ -FM WINZ Inc., Miami

WJRQ WJRO

Broadcasting

Inc., W

Fla.

WHKC First

In Evansville Inc.. Henc

Ky

WKYZ HVS Panners/Salisbury. Salts

Md.

KMGW KTWN -FM Inc

.

Anoka. Mini ford. Ohio

Cincinnati Broadcasting t

WPNT WPNT Inc..

Pittsburgh

WDPN Alpha Communications of

Sr

Carolina

Inc.. Columbia.

S.C.

KNOT Barbara Kazmark, Deer

Park.

Existing

W

WMPE Art

Broadcasting

Corp.. Nan

PR.

Summary of broadcasting

as of February

25, 1986

Service

Commercial AM

Commercial FM

Educational FM

Total Radio

FM translators

On

Air

CP's Tots

4.718

3.875

1,231

9.824

789

170

418

173

761

444

4,&

4,2!

1,41

10,5

1,2:

Commercial VHF

TV

Commercial UHF

TV

Educational VHF TV

Educational

UHF TV

Total TV

540

401

114

186

1,241

23

222

3

25

273

5(

6

1'

2'

1,51

VHF LPTV

UHF LPTV

Total

LPN

VHF translators

UHF translators

242

141

74

136

383 210

2,869

1.921

186

295

31

27

3,

2.21

ITFS

250

Low -power auxiliary

TV auxiliaries

824

7.430

UHF translator /boosters

6

Experimental

TV

Remote pickup

3

12.338

Aural STL 8 intercity relay

2,836

114

0

205

0

5

53

166

36

82

7,63

12.39

3.00

Includes off-air licenses.

Note: Due to computer problems,

FCC has not and will not release broadcast station totals for

November, December or

January

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

184

lassified

Advertising

See last page of

Classified Section for rates. closing dates, box numbers and other details.

RADIO

HELP WANTED MANAGEMENT ous format general manager:

1 kw fulltime west

New owner switching to religious format. Gener- nager must be experienced in religious broad

- g and must be able to put in place proper staff rogramming. Earned ownership position part of ickage. Reply to Box C -38. EOE.

Radio administrative assistant:

Handle secretarial, operational duties reporting to News Director, Oper- ations Managers of 2 radio stations. Clerical, tele- phone, people skills important. Need organized. enthu- siastic person. Resume to

Personnel Department.

WrOP

/Magic f102.3, 4646 40th Street, N.W., Washing ton. D.C. 20016. No calls. EOE. est group operation reopening search for exper- t general manager or sales manager for the flag

- talions in

Richmond, Indiana, Strong sales back - d manditory. Send resumes to:

William

Quigg tent, Central Broadcasting Corporation,

P.O.

Box

Richmond,

IN

47375. sting research director for major market radio to assist in format selection. market positioning tudience and sales promotion. Requires exper- in perceptual research. music testing and vulner- analaysis. Experience with broadcast marketing esearch firm preferred. Send resume with salary y and requirements to Entercom,

Two Bala Plaza,

Cynwyd,

PA

19004. EOE. p

V.P. sales in medium and small markets in north

-

Top dollars with benefits including stock option

19.

Coast, Midwest and Southern regional sales gers wanted. Broadcasting's oldest, internation-

1own, 32 -year old radio/TV

/cable sales promotion zany.

Community Club awards (CCA), looking for

Coast. Midwest. Southern, regional managers to n station presidents. managers and GSM's in live area. Media sales experience required.

Fulltime, lay /Friday, planned travel. Expense advance

Est substantial commission. Send resume, includ-

Complete

- sured. Include prior earnings. Personal interview ged. Immediate openings. John

C. Gilmore. dent, CCA. Inc.,

P.O.

Box 151. Westport.

CT

1.

203

-226

-3377. tral

M manager: Success oriented sales leader for combo in

Idaho.

Medium size college market.

I credentials required. Salary plus bonus, profit

-1g, and stock ownership. Send resume to Box C- t s i. manager

-or street wise. people wise, top ac- executive ready to step up. GM possible within

2

Call today.

618-382-4162. ring group needs general manager for AM /FM in essee. le

Need strong management skills, ability to two stations. prior success.

Earn salary/bonus

I

$80.000 plus ownership opportunity Contact Jim

;man,

VR Community Service Broadcasting,

108

10th. Mt. Vernon, IL

62864. EOE, M/F. rral manager for

Midwest

AM /FM being sold.

'act with salary and incentives. Opportunity with owners. EEO/AA. Box B

-163.

'rat sales manager. EOE/M/F.

Around $25,000 y and benefits. Major medical. Hire and train new staff. Salary and

% of increase guaranteed in g.

Send to WTTM, 333 West State Street. Trenton,

3618 or call 609

-695

-8515

--

Ask for Marc Scott. sting research director for major market radio

3 to assist in format selection, market positioning audience and sales promotion. Requires exper- t in perceptual research. music testing and vulner- y analysis. Experience with broadcast marketing esearch firm preferred. Send resume with salary

-y and requirements to Entercom,

Two

Bala Plaza

Cynwyd,

PA

19004.

EOE. s manager capable of further advancement. g leader to organize, train and motivate staff.

Must xperienced. people- oriented. aggressive, self

- tr who understands retail consultation. Activé mar

-

3reat lifestyle Fred Baker. Box 488. Fort Smith, usas, or contact me at

Loews Anatole during Dal

-

IAB.

HELP WANTED SALES

Sales pro wanted for leading East Texas high power

FM. Excellent situation for former announcer who sells. writes, and produces way to the top. Phone

Joe McNa- mara. 214

-586

-2527. EOE.

Here's your opportunity to move up to a top rated mid -market CHR FM in a prime midwestern location.

Only ambitious, success -oriented salespeople need apply

For the dedicated self- starter, this is a

"can't miss" opportunity. Call Roanna

Petrie,

WZOK Rockford,

IL.

815

-399

-2233. EOE.

General sales manager for Key Largo, Florida FM sta- tion. Must have experiences. All new operation. Auto- mated. Send resume to

David

W

Freeman,

Sr.,

513

Southard St,

Key

West, FL

33040. Phone 305

-294-

2542

Radio syndication:

Expanding sales dep. looking for experienced radio syndication reps with strong agen- cy contacts. Powerful

POON's "True Facts

".

12 -34 network. NATIONAL LAM

-

Contact Steve Lehman

213-

467 -2346.

Professional salesperson for new FM in growing

Sun- belt market of 100,000.

Send resume to

Megacom Inc.,

PO. Box 1477,

McAlester, OK 74502. EOE.

Sales manager: Growing broadcast group has open- ing for Sales Manager with at least 5 yrs. local and national sales experience. Demonstrated ability to work with computers.

Top 10 market, AOR format. New

FM ownership building staff.

Excellent salary and bene- fit package. Interested applicants send detailed re- sume and salary history to:

PO. Box 200, Roslyn, N.Y

11576. Open until filled. E.O.E. M/F/H.

Looking for salesperson dedicated broadcasting.

20% commissions on cash receipts.

We will train. Small market AM -FM operating for 28 years. If you would like to sell for a brecht, 612 professional organization,

Call Tom Al-

-629

-7575. A

Minnesota opportunity.

Sales position with top -rated AM/FM combo in Palm

Springs, CA.

Minimum

3 years experience, with suc- cessful track record. Send recent billing history, re- sume and letter of qualification.

EOE.

Reply Box C -66.

Sales help M/F for suburban N.YC. radio station. Re- sume & references. Call

201

-965

-1530.

Sales professional: Good opportunity for aggressive ambitious self -starter who believes the client is

#1.

Motivated by success. Must have integrity and ability to work closely with clients. Growing mid -SW med mar- ket with great lifestyle and nearby outdoor sports. Call

Gary

501-

782 -9125 after NAB or contact at

NAB Dal- las Loews Anatole.

Sales manager with integrity, ambition, ability to moti- vate. Promotion oriented station with leading technical and a/c programing in place. Excellent reputation throughout area.

Needs strong sales leader to match.

Good opportunity for advancement. Active growing

SW med. market. Beautiful country with outdoor recrea- tion close by.

Organize and train staff. Will consider top producer with very good administrative skills, but this is not a desk job.

EOE, etc. Resumes to Box C -72.

HELP WANTED ANNOUNCERS

Morning air personality for adult contemporary sta- tion. Must be fast moving, able to do production. Send tape

& resume to PO Box 278,

Fort

Myers, FL 33902.

EEO.

Announcer /newsperson.

Small market. Afternoon news. Weekend airshift.

Congenial working conditions.

One year air experience. Send tape and resume to:

WTTF, P.O.

Box 338, Tiffin, OH 44883

Top NE market: seeks morning

DJ for "lite" AC. No comics. Ability to communicate and relate in world economy a must. No calls. Rush tape and resume to:

Roslin Radio

Productions, Inc.. 509 Madison Ave.. New

York, NY

10022

ATT: Mr.

Marvin Roslin. EOE, M

/F.

Experienced announcers needed for new CHR FM in growing Sunbelt market. Send tape and resume to Me- gacom, Inc.. P.O. Box 1477,

McAlester, OK 74502.

EOE.

Wanted- dependable announcer and announcer -sale- sperson. Market about 40 miles from metro market in

MO. Sent T

&R to PO. Box 310, DeSoto, MO

63020.

Evening talker.

We have double -digit shares. great demos and a host so talented we're giving him a pro- motion. We're an excellent career move for a versatile personality who can anger, amuse, inform & entertain.

We'll back you with talented producers. excellent facili- ties and a superb support staff. 17K.

Rush T &R to

Robb

Yestaby,

PD

WMBD Radio, 3131 N.

University. Peoria.

IL.

61604. EOE/MF.

HELP WANTED TECHNICAL

Radio engineer, minimum two years radio mainte- nance experience, FCC General and SBE certification preferred.

LOE. WHBC, Box 9917.

Canton.

OH 44711.

WLTS FM/WYAT AM, New

Orleans is looking for an aggressive hard working engineer

Must be in good health, have own means of transportation, and a knowl- edge of microwave system. Salary dependant on ex- perience. Equal opportunity employer. Send resume and application to Mc Ed

Muniz, Phase

II

Broadcast- ing. 1639 Gentilly Blvd., New Orleans, Louisiana

70119.

NEWS

News director minimum of

3 years experience. mid - west university market, salary to $18,000. Resume to

Box C -9.

Wanted: News anchor. Suburban Boston AM

-FM ra- dio combo seeks full

-time news anchor. Good pay for good skills. Advancement opportunities. WATD,

P.O.

Box 487, Marshfield, MA 02050. 617

-837

-1166.

Dominant capital city AM-FM combo seeking an ex- perienced news director. Send tape /resume to Tom

Thies, c/o KLIK/KTXY, P.O.

414, Jefferson City,

MO

65102.

Experienced radio anchor /reporter for afternoon drive on news /talk station in exciting capital city of Al- bany, New York. Write clearly, take sumes,

P.O. phone calls to charge! Tapes. re-

News Director, WQBK AM /FM,

Box 1300, Albany, NY 12201.

518

-462

-5555

EOE.

HELP WANTED PROGRAMING

PRODUCTION & OTHERS

Production manager. Creative. Must be experienced in copy writing, co -op. etc. Good company, excellent benefits, growing chain on gulf coast of Florida. Send resume to

Bowman, WPAP Caller Box 2288, Panama

City, FL

32402.

A good

PD is hard to find. Educated, aware of the world. personality sign

-on, good jock leader, manag- ment- oriented. Arizona.

Is that you? EOE. Box C -1.

Receptionist WTOP/Magic 102.3, 4646 40th

St., NW,

Washington,

DC 20016. Reliable, diligent.

Will be given chance to venture into various departments if qualities merit. 50 wpm. Cover letter

& resume only to,

Personnel

Recep. No calls, please. EOE M

/F.

Program manager. Needed, an inexhaustible pro- gram department manager who realizes the PD does more than pick music and schedule jocks and who is also a top

PM air personality 100,000 watt #1 A/C coastal Florida station. Good pay and benefits. Exper- ienced pros only Resume and letter tells all. Box C -37.

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

185

Classical and jazz associate producers,

(WFPK-

FM/W FPL -FM) Radio Broadcasting Division of the

Lou- isville

Free Public

Library. B.A. in related field. Demon- strated announcing, production, editing and equipment operating and maintenance skills; protes sional experience with similar radio production duties; thorough knowledge of classical music (jazz music re- spectively); familiarity with foreign languages associat- ed with classical music. Audition tape (cassette only) must accompany resume. Deadline: April 30, 1986.

Salary: $12,481.56. Respond to:

City of Louisville,

Dgpt. of Employee Relations, 609

West

Jefferson, Lou- isville, KY 40202.

EOE.

SITUATIONS WANTED MANAGEMENT

Station manager. Successful medium market exper- ience in programing, sales. and engineering. Major market engineering and on -air experience. Looking for an advancement opportunity Peter

G.

Hamlett,

P.O.

Box 12573, Columbia,

SC

29211.

GSM seeks winning company!

Creative leader speaking at

NAB. Call

Mr.

Money, 214

-960

-5694.

General manager /sales manager team: Husband and wife with 22 years of combined experience in all phases of radio seek growing, professional operation.

Enthusiastic, dedicated, and honest. Box

C -34.

Sales oriented

GM: Programing, engineering, and sales management experience. Excellent references, stable family man. Seeking growth opportunity with dy- namic organization.

Box C -35.

Strong aggressive general manager, no- nonsense, hands on professional with 20 years experience man- aging AM -FM. Heavy sales and organizational skills. A quality leader that produces results you can bank on.

Box C -26.

Available for interim management, market consulta- tion, evaluation,

35 years experience: ownership, man- agement, sales, promotions. Joes Stavas, 2018 28th

St. Columbus, NE 68601. Phone

-

402

-564

-0401.

Shirt sleeve workaholic.

Eighteen years management experience. Looking for long term association with me- dium or small market station orgroup. Strong on admin- istration, programing and sales.

Call 215

-759

-5303.

SITUATIONS WANTED ANNOUNCERS

Morning personality with

2 years experience seeks move to larger market. Contact Drew at

601-445- after

2

PM central.

Two years' commercial experience in small market.

Want to move up.

Adult, top

40, MOR. Want to be alive. not just push buttons.

Call Dave anytime,

777 -0749. cre

201-

Announcer.

Experienced, but been away for a time.

Excellent knowledge of contemporary music. Excellent writing skills.

BS in Business, AA in Broadcasting. Like chance to get back with well established station on

East Coast. Mature voice. Box

C

-79

28 years radio/TV /cable.

All facets. Possible Investe- ment. NY NJ. CT Box C -75.

Major market talker:

Proven big voice generalist with mature, authoritative style

- aggressive but not obnox- ious! Quick wit and telephone finesse plus lots of politi- cal savvy Prefer

East but all offers seriously consid- ered. Box

C -62.

SITUATIONS WANTED TECHNICAL

Experienced engineer desires maintenance with an

AM /FM combo. Solid background with transmitter and studio. H. Roedell, 8163

Avery.

Indianapolis,

IN 46268.

Hot shot!

I can give you the best signal in your market.

10 yrs. experience providing the highest quality audio to networks and radio stations in the nations largest markets. Construction a specialty. Box

C -73.

These damn corporate buyouts and budget cuts mean great engineering talent is available to you.

12 yrs experience in television production, Radio

RF and construction, satellite signal distribution.

All offers con- sidered. Box

C

-74.

SITUATIONS WANTED NEWS

Bright, young journalism graduate

(University of Wis- consin- Madison) seeks entry-level news work Would prefer upper Midwest (Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota,

Michigan, Iowa.) George, 608

-249

-9037.

Anchor /reporter with 10 years medium and major mar- ket experience seeks news director or anchor position.

Lifestyle. creative reporting a specialty.

All markets considered. Box

C -15.

PBP sportscaster for major college statewide network with national network experience, seeks professional or college PBP Box

C -3.

Experienced sportscaster, who also has solid news background, willing to relocate anywhere in the coun- try. 201

-543

-2035.

Sports director, with PBP Minor league baseball, ju- nior college basketball, network experience. move up. David, 314-

756 -7097, after 2:15.

Wants

SITUATIONS WANTED PROGRAMING,

PRODUCTION & OTHERS

Conscientious motivated professional programer looking for new challenges. Small medium markets.

Promotionally minded. Community involved.

Box 8-

132.

PD

/music director:

6 years' announcing. Ready to ad- vance. Trained in management. Light rock,

AC pre- ferred. Small /medium market. Jim

615-896

-4271.

MISCELLANEOUS

Radio journalists, announcers and account execu lives: find out about new jobs daily on

MediaLine.

We scout out new job openings coast to coast and report them daily to our clients. MediaLine, 312

-855

-6779.

Must reading!

Befor you invest any money in an

"80/90" FM

-

5 articles that will make or save you money.

FREE with a 13 week subscription ($29.00). Small Mar- ket Radio Newsletter, 275 19th Street, Otsego.

MI

49078.

TELEVISION

HELP WANTED MANAGEMENT

Business manager. Southern California major market independent

TV station needs a management oriented business manager. Must have five years accounting and management experience in a television station.

Send resume with salary requirements to Box

B -153.

E.O.E.

Local sales manager:

Top -5 market network affiliate is looking for a highly motivated individual with a suc- cessful track record in sales management, knowledge- able in all aspects of sales management including tail, re- national and local sales.

EOE. Send resume to Box

C

-21.

Director of retail marketing.

Television Bureau of Ad- vertising. Seek retail (dept. store or mass merch.) back- ground and /or

TV sales /mktg. Job requires thorough knowledge of retail, excellent communications skills, ability to make major retail presentations, sales calls on retailers and serve as retail resource to TvB staff. Some travel; NYC based. Resume and salary requirement

W Westphal, TvB, 477

Madison

Ave.,

New to

York, NY

10022. No phone calls.

The Department of the Navy is seeking applications for a GS- 12/1101 Cable

TV Business and Industry Spe- cialist based in

Arlington, \A.

The successful applicant will have a working knowledge of applicable federal regulations, industry developments and business practices; be experienced in cable

TV franchise agree- ment preparation, negotiation and administration; and be able to serve as a resource for more than

100 Navy bases Opening date:

31

March

1986. Closing date: 30

April 1986. Apply to

Vacancy

No. 287 -43.

Bldg 200

-G, Washington Navy Yard, Washington,

D C

20374.

For further information contact

LCOR Bill Sonn- tag at 202

-692

-6556.

Send appli- cation

(SF

-171) and supplemental narrative to: CCPO,

Established top

10 independent in great market with major broadcasting group wants experienced Promo- tion Manager or assistant who wants the challenge of managing people, problems and competitors.

If you don't know what to do or say, don't apply. Current man- agement leadership is young, open and aggressive.

Send letter and resume to Box

C -77.

Controller:

NBC affiliate in Miami seeks a hands

-on individual experienced in all business aspects of televi- sion station. Candidate needs accounting degree, ex- perience with computer systems, strong supervisory and communications skills. Send resume to Personnel

Mgr., Sunbeam

N

P.O.

Box 1118,

Miami, FL 33238. An

EEO M/F employer.

Public television director of development/mar

Public television leadership opportunity ket for in top

: experienced, professional. Supervise t ment of ten; work closely with President and building on a strong existing base of

Br communi port. Comprehensive responsibility for marketin vidual, corporate, foundation support, auction, campaign, magazine advertising sales and sha sponsibility for marketing production, special cast and non broadcast program services. This managment position requires professional fund experience, public broadcasting expedencr ferred. Radio and

TV "on -air" competence and p ing in experience helpful. Three to five years expe managing people and marketing processes, i ing large computer tiles, helpful. College degrE ferred with course work in communication, mai or related field. Compensation: $35,000 to

$40,1 cluding incentive pay plus generous benefits letter of interest and background as soon as to: pc

Jerry Wareham, President and General

Ma

Greater Dayton Public Television. Inc., 3440 Off k

Drive. Dayton, Ohio 45439. Applications acc through April

30, 1986. GDPT is an equal oppc employer.

Promotion manager:

Top 20 West Coast

Inc dent. MII interview at BPME. Reply in confide

Box

C

-67. EOE.

National sales manager nio. for hot now Indy in

Sar

Delivered

7 share in first book. Current NSM with

3 -4 years local /national experience. Call

Beitch,

KRRT-TV,

512

-684

-0035.

HELP WANTED SALES

Local sales manager:

Top rated Southeaster! affiliate looking for a strong, aggressive local manager. Must have previous sales and training ience. Send resume and salary requirements to

I

77.

Account executive position is available for top

5 competitive independent. Solid list available for aggressive self starter who knows what it takes direct. Excellent company benefit package.

Se sume to Sales,

WAN

TV 23

Broadcast

Plaza, CI' ton, WV 25526.

Medium market CBS affiliate seeks local accoc ecutives

TV sales experience required in local agency accounts. Resumes to

Kevin Gardner,

Sales

Mgr., KOAM

-TV, P.O.

Box 659, Pittsbur

66762. E.O.E.

Regional account person needed to handle e tional list for group owned affiliate. Managemer growth oriented, tough, streetsmart, upwardly r persons with television experience are the only who need apply

All others, don't waste your

E.O.E.

05402.

Brad Worthen, WVNY

-N

Box 22, Burlingtt

Account executive:

WJKS-P/ NBC, Jacksonville ida needs a marketing oriented salesperson r minimum of three years of electronic media sales have a proven record of excellence and poss thorough knowledge of all aspects pertaining to sion spot sales. Send resume to Ernest

E.

Rhyne,

Sales Manager,

PO Box 17000, Jacksonville,

F

32216. A

Media General station, equal opportunil ployer.

Sales manager.

Sun

-belt, top 40 market station knowledgeable, aggressive person with good tra street skills. Excellent, established company

Sei sume, references to: Box C -70. EOE

M/F.

HELP WANTED ANNOUNCERS

TV personalities! commercials, or

Are you now appearing agency looking for tak

Sorry, tapes cannot be returned. Good Adverti

Inc., Box 400,

Olney, MD 20832.

(Washington, suburb). a in television show host with tele' a ue talent?

We are a national appear in national commercials and are reviewir cal television shows with national cable potential. ested? Please send

VHS, Beta, or 3/4" audition

HELP WANTED TECHNICAL

Chief

Studio engineer:

For small market ABC affiliate in r area. UHF transmitter and microwave experi along with supervisory and maintenance experit upgrading in progress. Send resume and s requirements to Michael Khouri, WGTU/WGTQ,

East Front Street, Traverse

City MI 49684.

Broadcasting Apr

14 1986

186

ser In charge for state -of- the -art mobile unit. once on

TK

-47's, BVH- 2000's,

Abekas digital

1s, its.

Chyron 4100 necessary. Competitive salary-

Mobile unit supported by large established

,tion facilities. Contact

Eric

Address,

E.J.

Stew-

:.

215- 626 -6500. EOE/ME

TV

33 has an opening for a maintenance engi- t-5 years experience in all phases of broadcast ion maintenace. FCC General Class or SBE certi- t.

Applicant must possess knowledge and ability

Vain and repair 3/4

". 1" and 2" video tape equip-

Ind peripheral broadcast television equipment.

- esume to

Joseph

A.

Maggio, Asst. Chief Engi-

CDAF

-TV Fox Television Stations. Inc. 8001 Car-

Freeway Dallas, TX 75247.

EOE M /F. dntenance technician. Immediate opening for enced individual in repair of Sony 3/4" VCR's and

) equipment. Min. requirements: H.S. degree, training in maintenance of leectronic equip

-

2 e s. g, years exp. in electronic maintenance. Send to:

Engineering Manager, WJWJ

-N

P.O.

Box

Beaufort, SC 29901 -1165, or call 803- 524-0808,

6PM. Salary

$17,641. WJWJ -TV is part of the

SC etwork. EEO employer. enance has two

)f 5 engineer: Telemation productions/Chi

- immediate openings due to retirement ivancement. Applicants should possess a mini

- years maintenance experience with all types jio equipment. Equipment includes: CMX 3400

Ampex ADo, Ikegami cameras, Utah -scientific

Aurora computer graphics. 4 camera/3 VTR e truck. Interested persons should contact: John

.bhard, Chief Engineer, Telemation Productions, iew, IL 60025,

1

-800- 323 -1256. engineer sought for full -time, full

-power religious

111 new state -of- the -art equipment. Technical sup

- rovided by group. Salary commensurate with ex-

1ce.

Send resume to

Director of

Engineering.

PO.

6, Dayton, OH 45401. EOE M

/F /H.

LTV, the ABC affiliate in

Las Vegas is seeking a engineer to manage our engineering staff of 14. cal maintenance experience plus a familiarity

:apital

& operating budgets necessary. Leader- and administrative skills a must.

EOE.

Send re- to:

General Manager, KTNV-TV,

3355

S

Valley

Blvd

,

Las Vegas.

NV 89102. tenance engineer with installation and mainte- experience on

Mirage.

GVG switchers, Sony

1

",

2" and TK47's wnated by suburban Philadelphia rction facility Resume to Eric

Address,

E.J. Stew - c.,

525 Mildred Avenue, Primos, PA

19018.215-

500.

EOE M/F

:mitten

H a engineer

-

Knowledgeable in

Harris plus: 3/4 -inch

ENG maintenance experience

/ of desirable. Send resume to:

Tim Winn, Man

-

Engineering. KFDA

-N

PO Box 1400, Amarillo,

)189 -1400. ision maintenance technician: Looking for a opportunity in the Los Angeles area? We are thing for an experienced technician /engineer fa-

(to the component level) with state -of- the -art edit

- quipment:

Sony,

Quantel, Grass Valley, etc. Send me to:

Box C -54. to c maintenance crew chief. New Hampshire

Television seeks experienced engineer to super

- nstallation and maintenance of studio and engi- ng equipment. make recommendations for pur- e of new equipment. develop and implement tntive maintenance program. supervise tour main

- ice technicians. and maintaen spare parts inven-

Associates degree in electronics or equivalent,

'ears of experience with studio broadcast equip-

. of which one year in a supervisory capacity is red. Salary

'ith range: $21.966- 34,139, commensur- experience. NHPTV is located on the seacoast iles north of Boston, and anticipates completion of v

Broadcast Center in 1987. Send resume by May

86 to Bob Ross, NHPTV.

Durham, NH 03824 An

'AA employer. o maint. engineer: Familiar with Sony

1 in. broad equip. ADO. Grass Valley and related equipment y open. Call Bob or

Randy

9 -5. M

/F.

212

-838-

, for appt

. smhter /studio maintenance engineer:

WTVH- teks qualified engineer with minimum of 3 -5 years rience to maintain RCA TT

:udio equipment. Send resume to Ed

Lewis,

DE,

-1

-N,

980 James St., Syracuse, NY 13203. EOE.

Video engineer: Expanding East Coast production house seeks qualified staff engineer to maintain and expand a full service

24 track audio/1" video produc- tion facility. Familiarity with ADO, Ouantel Paintbox,

Dubner CBG

Il,

Sony VTR's, CMX and CDL desirable

Editing and videodisc production experience a big plus.

We offer a future with growth potential for the right candidate. Salary comensurate with experience. Send resume to Terry

Lockhart. Director of

Engineering, Cin- emagraphicsNdeo

One, Inc., 100

Massachusetts

Ave.,

Boston, MA 02115.

Phoenix, Arizona new progressive broadcast corn

- pany has an immediate opening for a chief engineer with a minimum of

5 years real time experience. Must be familiar with

TV translators

& microwave. The job requires designing and supervising installations and overseeing maintenance. Travel. A wonderful opportu- nity for the right individual. Salary commensurate with experience. Send resume to 2515

E.

Thomas Road,

#16 -706, Phoenix, AZ 85016.

TV maintenance engineer sought by

KPBS

-N,

San

Diego's public broadcasting station, capable of com- ponent -level analysis and maintenance on sophisticat- ed TV production and broadcast systems including color studio cameras, videotape recorders, electronic graphics systems, computer editing systems, video production switchers, and stereo audio mixing and re- cording equipment. Minimum of two years of journey

- level experience in the installation, maintenance and repair of TV broadcast equipment required. Demon- strable expertise with micro -processor and digital cir- cuit technology required.

FCC General

Class license and /or independent broadcast technician certification desirable.

The equivalent of not less than two years college -level courses in electronics engineering tech- nology required. Salary range: $23,016- $30,360. Ap- plications must be received by

Wednesday,

April 30,

1986.

Obtain application directly from: San

Diego State

University Employment Office,

Third Floor-

Administra- tion Building,

San

Diego. CA 92182. EEO/AA/Title IX employer.

TV master control operator. Experienced. Position entails operation of MC switches 3/4 inch Sony

VTR'.

Microtime

TBC's. Must be able to read oscilloscope displays. Part-time. Must be available for all shifts.

Send resumes to:

MCC-TV, 7500

S.

Pulaski Rd., Chi- cago, Illinois 60652. The

City Colleges of

Chicago is an equal opportunity employer.

HELP WANTED NEWS

Director:

We're expanding and looking for the right person to join our team of number one news directors.

Ability to switch a must.

Post production editing skills desirable. If you're good and want to join an aggressive

NBC affiliate with state -of- the -art facilities in a very competitive market, send your resume to:

WSVN Per- sonnel,

P.O.

Box 1118.

Miami,

FL

33138.

EOE.

Anchor /producer: complement male anchor, early

-

/late news. weekdays.

2 years commerical

TV exper- ience, preferably reporting in midwestern middle -mar- ket VHF affiliate. KEVN, Box 677, Rapid City, SD

57709.

News producer. Immediate opening for experienced producer. Send resume. tape

& salary requirements to

News Director, PO Box 4009. Salisbury, MD 21801.

EOE.

News director. Mid -Atlantic affiliate needs leader who can manage group of talented individuals to give their best Strong writing, organizations skills and communi- ty involvement required. Send resume

& salary needs to Box

B

-147.

Weatherpeople:

Full and part-time positions for éxper- ienced and entry-level talent. Resume

& tape to: Jeff

Wmmer,

P.O.

Box 1122,

Flushing, NY 11354.

Producers/reporters/anchors: English -language news service in

Hong Kong seeks news and sports professionals with minimum of bachelor's degree and three years' experience in small to medium markets.

Short- listed applicants will be interviewed in

Honolulu,

LA,

SF,

Salt

Lake and

NY in late August. Airmail resume, references, salary expected and airchecks to: Ray- mond

R.

Wong,

NB

News.

77 Broadcast Drive, Kow- loon, Hong Kong. No phone calls, please

Washington

DC Independent television bureau seeks aggressive reporters who work fast. and produce bright packages. 400 North Capitol Street, #164,

Washington,

DC

20016.

Co- anchor needed for Spanish language daily news program in Los Angeles. Need native speaker who has three years experience. Send demo tape with resume to CO- ANCHOR, 1139 Grand Central Ave., Glendale,

CA 91201 EOE.

Weekend weatherperson/reporter needed for num- ber one network affiliate in top 60 market.

We have state

-of- the -art equipment, including a newsroom com- puter and computerized weather graphics.

We are looking for someone who can tell the weather in simple, non -technical terms and who can aggressively report three days a week. Minimum one year experience in a commercial

TV newsroom required. Send resume and salary requirements to Box

C

-22. MF /EOE.

Reporter. We're still looking for an excellent writer with anchor potential who can do "people- oriented" news.

Tape, tor, resume to Dean Bunting, Assistant News Direc-

KCRG

-N

Cedar Rapids, IA EOE.

Co-anchor. Warm, friendly, credible person to join our anchorman at 6 and 10.

Minimum two years commer- cial TV anchor experience. Tape. resume. references, and writing samples to:

Bob Allen, News Director,

KCRG

-N

Cedar Rapids,

IA EOE.

Regional reporter /coordinator wanted for mid -size

Southwest TV station. ENG and reporting experience required. Must be able to generate stories from small towns and enjoy it.

Send resume to:

Box

C -50.

Assignment editor: #2 spot in fast- growing. aggres- sive, sun -belt net affil news department. Person needs strong organizational skills and news sense. Send re- sume along with salary history to News Director,

WBBH

-TV,

3719 Central Avenue.

Fort

Myers.

FL

33901.

Weekend sports anchor /weekday sports reporter.

Top -rated news department looking for full -time. per- sonable individual with sports credibility. Attractive

Big

Ten market. Tape and resume to

News Director,

WMN

615 Forward Drive, Madison,

WI

53711. Equal opportu- nity employer.

Reporter /anchor:

General assignment and morning cut -ins.

Monday through

Friday.

One year minimum ex- perience required. Send resume and tape to

Sue Ber- nard.

WAGM

TV,

P.O.

Box 1149.

Presque

Isle. ME

04769. No phone calls please.

Need weathercaster for #1 ABC Affiliate in

West. Must be personally oriented. Send resume to Box

C

-78.

EOE.

Dynamic weekend sports anchor reporter wanted for major market independent. Box

C

-71.

Top 20 west coast station looking for weekday anchor.

Must have at least three years experience.

If you like to write and report from the field, this job is for you. Jour- nalism degree a must. Send resume in confidence to

Box

C -68. EOE.

Weathercaster/talk show host.

Good communicator, knowledgeable, creative.

No beginners. Send tape and resume to Roy

Brassfield, WBKO

-N,

2727 Russell- ville Road. Bowling Green, KY

42101. EOE. No phone calls.

Assignment editor:

Midwest ABC affiliate needs a bright, aggressive, innovative, well -organized person to develop meaningful stories. 70's market. ENG live.

Minimum two years experience. Reply Box C -47. EOE.

Medical reporter:

Our health reporter is featured in the late news. Need person to work with health care provid- ers and develop interesting and informative stories.

Must be good with tape. Minimum two years exper- ience. Reply Box

C -48. EOE.

Assignment editor:

Top rated Florida market. Must be aggressive. tough. relentless, both in dealing with hard- driving, demanding professional staff and in chasing stories. Highly tuned news judgements, writ- ing skills an absolute must. Two years experience re- quired.

Person sought might be second in large market wanting to move into top spot. Resume. letter with job ideas wanted. Box

C -61.

Reporter: Number one midwest NBC affiliate looking for bright, aggressive general assignment reporter.

Ex- perience and good writing skills a must. EOE -M /F

Send resume to Box

C

-64.

Broadcasting Apr

14

1986

187

HELP WANTED PROGRAMING

PRODUCTION

&

OTHERS

Editor.

Full service Rochester,

NY, production/post pro- duction facility seeks creative individual for

1" editing.

Should be experienced with Grass

Valley switching,

ISC or CMX editor, ADO and Chyron

IV

Forward re- sume to: CGI, Box 604, Ontario, NY 14519. Attention:

Ron

Dawson.

Production manager. Mariager with ideas, exper- ienced with

1" editing, ADO,

ESS and 3/4

".

All new equipment. Pros only

Resume, tape and sal