Tacoma Narrows Bridge | Collapse, Disaster, Length, History, & Facts | Britannica

Tacoma Narrows Bridge

bridge, Washington, United States
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Tacoma Narrows Bridge, suspension bridge across the Narrows of Puget Sound, connecting the Olympic Peninsula with the mainland of Washington state, U.S. The original bridge, known colloquially as “Galloping Gertie,” was a landmark failure in engineering history.

Four months after the opening of the first Tacoma Narrows Bridge, on the morning of November 7, 1940, it suffered collapse in a wind of about 42 miles (67 km) per hour. The 2,800-foot (840-metre) main span, which had already exhibited a marked flexibility, went into a series of torsional oscillations whose amplitude steadily increased until the convolutions tore several suspenders loose, and the span broke up. An investigation disclosed that the section formed by the roadway and stiffening plate girders (rather than web trusses) did not absorb the turbulence of wind gusts. At the same time, the narrow two-lane roadway gave the span a high degree of flexibility. This combination made the bridge highly vulnerable to aerodynamic forces, insufficiently understood at the time. The failure, which took no lives because the bridge was closed to traffic in time, spurred aerodynamic research and led to important advances. The plate girder was abandoned in suspension bridge design.

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bridge: Tacoma Narrows
In 1940 the first Tacoma Narrows Bridge opened over Puget Sound in Washington state, U.S. Spanning 840 metres (2,800 feet),...

The failed 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge was replaced in 1950 by a new span stiffened with a web truss. To address growing congestion, a parallel bridge south of the original opened in 2007; the 1950 bridge now has four lanes of westbound traffic and the 2007 bridge four lanes of eastbound traffic.

The Editors of Encyclopaedia BritannicaThis article was most recently revised and updated by Melissa Petruzzello.