Officeholders similar to or like Tom Foley

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Sentences

Sentences forTom Foley

  • With the election of Barack Obama as president and Democratic gains in both houses of Congress, Pelosi became the first speaker since Tom Foley to hold the office during single-party Democratic leadership in Washington.Speaker of the United States House of Representatives-Wikipedia
  • Term limits became an issue in the campaign, as Democrats seized on Nethercutt's broken term-limits pledge that he had made when he unseated Speaker Tom Foley in 1994.Patty Murray-Wikipedia
  • It was co-sponsored in the House of Representatives by parties' leaders, Tom Foley and Robert Michel, and it passed by margins of 346–11 and 87–3 in the House and Senate, respectively.Office of National Drug Control Policy-Wikipedia
  • On June 6, the Democratic Caucus brought Wright's speakership to an end by selecting his replacement, Tom Foley of Washington, and on June 30 Wright resigned his seat in Congress.Jim Wright-Wikipedia
  • Liberal and Conservative Northwesterners, such as former U.S. Senator Slade Gorton (R-WA) and moderate Democrats like former Speaker of the House Tom Foley (D-WA), have been prominent in the development of conservative approaches to environmental protection.Pacific Northwest-Wikipedia
  • In response to being bypassed for his top committee choices as result of his reform advocacy, Gutiérrez charged that then-House Speaker Tom Foley was "not a reformer in any sense".Luis Gutiérrez-Wikipedia
  • The first was Washington's Tom Foley, the last Democrat to hold the post before Pelosi.Nancy Pelosi-Wikipedia
  • Term limits became an issue in the campaign, as Democrats seized on Nethercutt's broken term-limits pledge that he had made when he unseated Speaker Tom Foley in 1994.2004 United States Senate elections-Wikipedia
  • In part due to the visibility gained from his 1988 presidential bid, Gephardt was elected majority leader by his House colleagues in June 1989, making him the second-ranking Democrat in the House, behind then-Speaker Tom Foley.Dick Gephardt-Wikipedia
  • Spokane native Tom Foley was a Democratic Speaker of the House and served as a representative of Washington's 5th district for 30 years, enjoying large support from Spokane, until his narrow defeat in the "Republican Revolution" of 1994, the only time U.S. voters have turned out a sitting Speaker of the House since 1860.Spokane, Washington-Wikipedia
  • The incumbent Speaker, Democrat Tom Foley, lost re-election in his district, becoming the first Speaker of the House to lose re-election since Galusha Grow in 1863.1994 United States House of Representatives elections-Wikipedia
  • On November 29, 1994, then-Speaker of the House Tom Foley appointed Coelho as one of 17 members of the Commission on the Roles and Capabilities of the United States Intelligence Community.Tony Coelho-Wikipedia
  • House Majority Leader Tom Foley of Washington, who opposed the amendment, said Brooks "is one of the most powerful and effective chairmen in Congress."Jack Brooks (American politician)-Wikipedia
  • The Caucus considered Poage to be too conservative and he was replaced by Tom Foley.William R. Poage-Wikipedia
  • House Democratic Whip Tom Foley of Washington insisted that such a penalty would violate the Fifth Amendment rights to due process.Jesse Helms-Wikipedia
  • AuCoin was also criticized for working with Senator Hatfield, Washington Representative Norman D. Dicks, and House Speaker Tom Foley for legislating a special timber sales program in 1990.Les AuCoin-Wikipedia
  • Shortly thereafter, during a town hall meeting, President Jimmy Carter said, "No one could be in a better political position than to be preceded and introduced by men like Tom Foley and Senator Warren Magnuson. I know of no one in the Congress than these two men who are more respected, more dedicated to serving their own people well, but who have also reached, because of their experience and knowledge, sound judgment and commitment, a position of national and even international renown and leadership."Warren Magnuson-Wikipedia
  • * Speaker: Tom Foley (D)103rd United States Congress-Wikipedia
  • Shortly after Atwater took over the RNC, Jim Wright, a Democrat, was forced to resign as Speaker of the House and was succeeded by Tom Foley.Lee Atwater-Wikipedia
  • Through high school and college, Gottheimer held internships with C-SPAN, the Secretary of the United States Senate, and Tom Foley, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives.Josh Gottheimer-Wikipedia
  • The entire highway was officially designated as the Thomas S. Foley Memorial Highway in 2018.U.S. Route 395 in Washington-Wikipedia
  • While the Democrats were in the majority, Bonior was the third-ranking Democrat in the House, behind Speaker Tom Foley and House Majority Leader Dick Gephardt.David Bonior-Wikipedia
  • At the midpoint of his career as a diplomat, Wilson served for a year (1985–1986) as a Congressional Fellow in the offices of Senator Al Gore and Representative Tom Foley; he would later attribute his working for the Democratic Party to "happenstance."Joseph C. Wilson-Wikipedia
  • * Speaker: Tom Foley (D)102nd United States Congress-Wikipedia
  • On many regional issues, Ullman was a de facto leader of the Pacific Northwest's Congressional delegation, along with Senator Henry "Scoop" Jackson (D-Wash.) and congressman (later to be House Speaker) Tom Foley (D-Wash.).Al Ullman-Wikipedia
  • Gingrich pressured the then Speaker of the House Tom Foley to ensure that the special counsel appointed to investigate the matter informed the voting public of the overdrafts and the identities of all of the Congressmen responsible.House banking scandal-Wikipedia
  • In Washington's 5th congressional district Republican George Nethercutt unseated Tom Foley, the incumbent Speaker of the United States House of Representatives.Washington State Republican Party-Wikipedia
  • The alumni of Gonzaga University include former Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Tom Foley, former Governor of the State of Washington Christine Gregoire, Academy Award-winning singer and actor Bing Crosby, NBA Hall of Fame basketball player John Stockton, and world-class mountain climber Jim Wickwire as well as scholars, athletes, business people, and prominent members of the legal community.Gonzaga University-Wikipedia
  • For over a century he remained the last incumbent House speaker to be defeated, until Speaker Tom Foley lost his seat in 1994.Galusha A. Grow-Wikipedia
  • Due to the significance of the relations between the two countries in recent years on trade and defense, with Japan being described by the United States State Department as "the cornerstone of U.S. security interests in Asia," the post has been held by many significant American politicians, including Mike Mansfield, Walter Mondale, Tom Foley and Howard Baker.List of ambassadors of the United States to Japan-Wikipedia

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