Yesterday (2019) - Yesterday (2019) - User Reviews - IMDb
Yesterday (2019) Poster

(III) (2019)

User Reviews

Review this title
1,119 Reviews
Sort by:
Filter by Rating:
7/10
Troubles seemed far away after watching
TheLittleSongbird3 December 2019
There were three main reasons really in seeing 'Yesterday'. The alternative world scenario sounded truly fascinating, one of the most fascinating concepts in recent years to me and a refreshing change from the remakes and sequels constantly made today. Like to love a lot of Danny Boyle's previous films and find him a talented director. The Beatles are not all time favourites but do appreciate him highly, understand their influence in music and like a lot of their songs a lot.

While it could have done more with its concept, 'Yesterday' turned out to still be entertaining and charming that put me and my sister in an uplifting mood leaving the cinema. Had not had an easy day, or week even, up to seeing the film, so 'Yesterday' was a much needed and appreciated antidote. As far as films released in 2019 go, it is neither one of the best or worst in a hit and miss year and somewhere around solid middle if having to rank.

'Yesterday' is a slick looking film, not exemplary but never cheap. Lily James looks great and the camera clearly loves her. The music of course is fantastic, it is The Beatles after all, with some of their greatest hits exuberantly performed, making one want to sing along regardless of whether they know all the words or not. "Hey Jude" is one of the most memorable examples. The script balances amusing comedy and never over-sentimental drama without making it too cartoonish or mawkish (well mostly).

Story-wise, 'Yesterday' captures the feel-good spirit affectionately and the portrayal of the music industry was fun and didn't get over the top. The John Lennon bit is a highlight. Boyle has done better and more inspired direction, but still directs at a crisp pace and balances things quite well. The performances are good, a truly charming James coming off best. Himesh Patel has come on a long way since 'EastEnders' while Kate McKinnon is riotous in the manager role.

On the other viewpoint, the concept was so fascinating and while it is always engaging the story is predictable and a bit too ordinary. Especially the final third, which is pretty much exactly as one would expect.

Ed Sheeran's "extended cameo" for my tastes was rather puzzling and didn't seem to gel with everything else.

All that aside, it was an enjoyable film on the whole and worth seeing. 7/10
78 out of 96 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
cool premise
SnoopyStyle15 November 2019
Warning: Spoilers
Jack Malik (Himesh Patel) is a struggling singer-songwriter in Suffolk, England. He is a "complete failure". His only fans seems to be his friends especially his lifelong best friend Ellie Appleton (Lily James). She has an unrequited love for him. One night, the lights go out and he gets hit by a bus. He wakes up to discover that The Beatles never existed. There are other surprising changes like the lost of Coke and Wonderwall. Jack tries to remake the Beatles songs with mixed results until he is contacted by Ed Sheeran who wants him as his opening act. Debra Hammer (Kate McKinnon) is Ed's money-grubbing Hollywood producer.

I love this premise which has the positive effect of including some great music. The general plot is fine although I would change some of the details. The filmmaker already made a few changes. In a delete scene, he actually sleeps with the Russian woman. In the movie, I treated his admission to Ellie as a joke. It's a good change. Their romance has to be kept pure which is why her dating Gavin is a little problematic. It's a false note that the movie is forced to correct with that big gesture. It's a terrible gesture. Putting an unsuspecting woman on a jumble screen is putting all the pressure on her and it's a bad way to break up a relationship. Jack and Ellie are fine but I would redo almost their entire love story. First off, Lily James is too beautiful. When a woman like her say things like that to any man, that man needs to stop and address it right away. He should close the door, block it with a chair, and have a sit down talk with her. It's actually a great moment to reveal The Beatles to her. The secret was definitely eating away at him and he has only one person to whom he would tell. For drama's sake, it's possible that she would get angry at him stealing music from some unknown band and she would walk out on him. That would make the final giveaway of the music that much more powerful as a gesture and it would make their reunion much more compelling.

As for the moments I love, I love Ellie's talk with him after the hotel cancellation. I love, love, love John Lennon. I love him so much that I want the movie to close with Jack bringing Ellie to meet him. Patel's sad sack performance is initially frustrating but he does grow on me as long as he doesn't lose his teeth. Ed Sheeran is pretty good at being Ed Sheeran. In general, the plot is fine but it could be so much better. I love the two Beatles fans and I really love their twist. In those two characters, there is the theme of the movie that Jack needs to hit much harder. They want to bring the music to the world and that is Jack's salvation. Those two could help him finish Eleanor Rigby. The film could have hit that point even harder than it already does. This movie has a cool premise. It's good. It could even be better.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
9/10
Charmed by It
Hitchcoc21 July 2019
I enjoyed this because I didn't think too much. If this were science fiction, which in some ways it was, and the Beatles never existed, how would so many things that were their legacy have developed. The British invasion would never have happened without them and a culture that expanded decades would never have taken place. But we can put that aside because the film tells us that the Beatles did not exist. Not that the four persons did not exist, but the band itself. I loved the bit with John Lennon where Mark David Chapman never came into his life. Anyway, it is a sappy love story in many ways, but the music is fun and the challenges of the protagonist are quite real in that milieu. I have been a huge fan of the Beatles from the get-go and if given a piece of paper and a pencil, could write the titles of a couple hundred songs. But to remember the lyrics, especially to a level of creative expertise, would be astonishing. Every once in a while something comes along that is just fun--no more criticism.
5 out of 8 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
8/10
Do You Believe In Yesterday?
boblipton20 June 2021
It is a funny and heartfelt romantic comedy co-written by Richard Curtis and directed by Danny Boyle. Himesh Patel (in his feature debut) plays a rock guitarist who giving up, getting ready to go back to teaching, despite the urging of his manager-roadie, Lily James, who has been in love with him since middle school, although he has never noticed. When she drops him off, he gets on his bike to pedal home, when suddenly the lights all over the world go out and he is struck by a bus. When he wakes, he discovers he is in a different world, where no one has ever heard of Coca-Cola or cigarettes.... or the Beatles. When he plays a Beatles song for his friends, they claim never to have heard of it before. He thinks they are joking, but as it dawns on him, he desperately writes all the Beatles songs, and is hailed as a great new talent, and taken under the agency of a Mephistophelean talent agent, played to glowering perfection by Kate McKinnon.

There are some wonderful sequences in this movie, and this is what Curtis excels at, like the incoherent buddy, played here by Joel Fry, who is utterly useless, and the assortment of friends. More than that, the recent spate of musicals about rock performers gives me some hope that we will see a revival of musicals, even if they are for the moment, of purely the diagetic variety.
1 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
Delightful Fantasy
claudio_carvalho27 October 2019
The aspirant singer Jack Malik (Himesh Patel) is struggling to be a great musician with the support of his agent Ellie Appleton (Lily James) and his closer friends. However he is a failure and needs to work in a supermarket to survive. One day there is a blackout and Jack has an accident while riding his bicycle. When he recovers, Ellie gives a new guitar to him and Jack plays "Yesterday". Soon he realizes that the world does not know "The Beatles" and he plays and sings their songs becoming the best musician in the world with a greedy agent. But can he afford the price he has to pay for the stolen success?

"Yesterday" is a delightful fantasy with the story of a world without "The Beatles", coke, cigarettes, USSR and Harry Potter. It is hard to understand Jack´s final decision, but the romantic story is a fantasy so it is very reasonable the conclusion. The sweet Lily James steals the film. My vote is seven.

Title (Brazil): "Yesterday"
9 out of 14 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
6/10
Yesterday
Prismark1018 September 2019
A film full of The Beatles songs cannot really go wrong.

Danny Boyle has made a whimsical fantasy. What if we live in a world where The Beatles did not happen. John, Paul, George and Ringo never amounted to much because they never got together.

Gosh it would mean somebody else narrated those early episodes of Thomas the Tank Engine.

Jack Malik (Himesh Patel) is a struggling singer in a small seaside town who is going nowhere. About to call it quits the only person who believed in him is best friend from school, Ellie (Lily James.)

One night when all the lights go out throughout the world, Jack is involved in a bus accident and wakes up in a world where no one have heard of the pop group The Beatles or their songs.

Jack writes the songs from memory and wows the audience with Hey Jude, Back in the USSR, Here Comes the Sun, Yesterday and Let it Be. These songs find an audience for the first time.

Unfortunately Richard Curtis's screenplay takes some interesting ideas and then diverts its attention to a soppy and unnecessary romance.

This is a rom-com. Jack and Ellie have only ever had a platonic relationship so far. All through childhood, to those teenage years when their hormones were raging to the present day.

Jack it seems has never had a girlfriend and has never romanced Ellie, the woman who has always believed in him. Suddenly Jack realises he needs Ellie when she has found someone else.

I would like to have known more about this world that had no Coca Cola, cigarettes and Oasis. The joke about Oasis was funny, a band so influenced by The Beatles, they could never exist if the Fab Four had never happened.

Then again without The Beatles there would had been no Bruce Springsteen, The Eagles and Brian Wilson would not have strived so hard to create Pet Sounds. Some young filmmaker called Robert Zemeckis would never had made a movie called 'I Wanna Hold Your Hand.'

It does raise another issue, The Beatles were more than just the songwriting. It was also the music, the harmonies, how they sang and the production by George Martin.

Some ideas are explored such as the music industry sanitising the product they want to sell. The White Album has diversity issues according to a marketing executive. However Curtis goes for the default romance story in the second half which lets it down.
18 out of 27 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
6/10
Poisonous Chalice of fortune and fame
nogodnomasters3 November 2019
Warning: Spoilers
Jack (Himesh Patel) writes his own music and sings in cafes. He has a small group of friends who love him. Very small. He realizes his ceiling and has come to "the end of the long and winding road." During a world wide blackout, Jack has an accident and as it turns out he is the only person in the world (minus two folks in Liverpool) who remember the Beatles. Jack capitalizes off of their music.

This is a feel-good love story that squandered potential in order to maintain mediocrity. Even the music could have been played better.

Guide: No sex, or nudity. 1 F-word
0 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
8/10
Tomorrow - the future
kosmasp15 March 2021
What would you do, if something happened and seemingly everyone has no recollection of one of the best known groups ever? That would be the Beatles in that case, if you were wondering. And add to that that you would be a struggling musician - which would only add to the already quite high confusion.

Now this movie flows along as one may expect (if you have accepted the concept and suspended your disbelief, because not only is no one aware of the Beatles but they have been erased from everywhere except our main characters brain) ... which is either great or confusing to watch.

Danny Boyle does a really good job with a one punch movie tag line. The main actor is really good and while the love story is so obvious it hurts, everyone can enjoy this ... I'll call it fairy tale ...
2 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
"A world without The Beatles is a world that's infinitely worse."
classicsoncall27 December 2019
Warning: Spoilers
Imagine a world without Coca-Cola, cigarettes, Harry Potter or The Beatles. Imagine a world in which the song 'Imagine' by John Lennon doesn't exist. I thought this was a pretty clever concept for a movie treatment and it works up to a point. It's just that the film had a less than totally polished look and feel to it. I couldn't warm up to the principal character Jack Malik (Himesh Patel) being the repository of the entire Beatles catalog following the twelve second blackout the world experienced. His second agent, Debra Hammer (Kate McKinnon) voiced that concern best when she stated "Is this the best you can look?" However when 'John Lennon' shows up in the picture, you really have to do a double take and remind yourself that he in fact is gone from this mortal coil. It was uncanny how actor Robert Carlyle resembled Lennon, living in a world in which the Beatles never came together. The romance angle between Jack and Ellie Appleton (Lily James) was sweet enough, but again, for some reason I couldn't reconcile the idea of the two of them together. Best part of the picture of course is the music, with quite reasonable renditions of many Beatles songs by actor Patel. There was one disconnect however when Jack Malik made his heartfelt confession to the crowd at Wembley Stadium. Even if he credited John, Paul, George and Ringo as the writers of all those hits, anyone hearing that confession and compelled enough to do an internet search like Jack did would have come up empty. Which still made Jack the originator of all those tunes in the newly established world order.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
8/10
one day there's going to have to be a festival of Beatles-themed movies
lee_eisenberg5 January 2020
Warning: Spoilers
OK, so Danny Boyle's "Yesterday" contains numerous plot holes,* but how can you not love a Beatles-themed movie, even if the gist is that the Fab Four never existed? This look at a man's effort to revive the Beatles' music could get shown on a double bill with Julie Taymor's "Across the Universe".

I did figure out the twist involving the people following the protagonist, but not the one about the address that they give him. In the end, the love you make is equal...I mean, it's an enjoyable movie.

*If the Beatles had never existed, then popular culture during the past half century would've evolved differently.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
Yesterday
jboothmillard6 July 2019
Warning: Spoilers
I saw the trailer for this film, it looked and sounded like a great idea for a concept, and it had all the right ingredients for something that should be good, written by Richard Curtis (Blackadder, Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, Love Actually, About Time), directed by Danny Boyle (Trainspotting, The Beach, 28 Days Later, Slumdog Millionaire, 127 Hours). Basically, Jack Malik (EastEnders' Himesh Patel) is a struggling singer-songwriter from Lowestoft. His manager and childhood friend Ellie Appleton (Lily James) encourages him not to give up on his dreams. One night, the whole world is momentarily hit with a massive blackout, Jack is hit by a bus whilst on his bike, he recovers in hospital. The following day his friends give him a brand-new guitar, he says for his first time it deserves a great song, he plays and sings "Yesterday" by The Beatles, but he is astonished that his friends have never heard it before. Jack is astonished to discover, after searching the internet, that The Beatles and their music no longer exists. Later, he also discovers that in this world, the band Oasis, the soft drink Coca-Cola, the entire concept of cigarettes, and Harry Potter never existed either. After his initial bemusement, being the only person in the world that remembers the "Fab Four", he questions his morals and wonders if he could claim all their songs as his own. Sure enough, he performs the songs at gigs, claiming he wrote them, and records a demo with local music producer Gavin (Alexander Arnold). Following a performance on local television, Jack is invited by pop star Ed Sheeran (as himself) to play as his opening act in Moscow. Ellie declines to join him, saying she has responsibilities as a schoolteacher, so Jack's roadie friend Rocky (Joel Fry) travels with him instead. After the gig, Jack is signed by Sheeran's agent, Debra Hammer (Kate McKinnon), and rises to global fame performing all songs he has recalled by The Beatles. At a party in Jack's home, Ellie confesses that she has always been in love with him. Hoping to trigger more memories of Beatles songs, Jack travels back to the UK to their hometown of Liverpool, visiting landmarks such as Strawberry Field, Penny Lane, and the grave of Eleanor Rigby. Jack gets drunk, spends the evening with Ellie and they kiss, but she tells him she does not want a one-night stand. The next morning, Jack and Rocky pursue Ellie to Liverpool train station, but Ellie reminds Jack he has to choose between her and his career. Jack is heartbroken and almost forced into returning to Los Angeles. The record label prepares to launch Jack's debut album, but they reject his suggestions for titles, taken from Beatles records (such as Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, and The White Album), they name the album One Man Only, pushing his talent. Jack persuades his label to launch the album with a performance in Gorleston. Backstage, Jack is approached by two stranger, Liverpudlian Liz (Sarah Lancashire) and Russian Leo (Justin Edwards), they remember The Beatles, which is a huge relief to Jack. They tell him they know he plagiarised the songs; but they thank him, they feared the music of The Beatles had gone forever. They give him the address of John Lennon (Robert Carlyle), who has lived into old age, he gives Jack the advice to chase the one he loves and to always tell the truth. Ed Sheeran arranges for Jack to perform at Wembley Stadium. Jack confesses to the crowd that he did not write the songs, they were created by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Star, and George Harrison, and he has Rocky upload the songs free to the internet, sabotaging the record release. He also finally tells Ellie that he loves her, they later marry and have a family together, and Jack becomes a music teacher. Also starring Sophia Di Martino as Carol, Meera Syal as Sheila Malik, Sanjeev Bhaskar as Jed Malik, and James Corden as himself. Featuring many great Beatles songs, including "Yesterday", "Let It Be", "Here Comes the Sun", "I Want to Hold Your Hand", "Yellow Submarine", and "Hey Jude" (which plays in full in the end credits) (the movie version is titled "Hey Dude"). Malik has changed significantly since being geeky Tamwar Masood in EastEnders, he gives a terrific performance as the struggling musician who becomes world famous when the whole world has forgotten about the most influential band of all time, James is likeable as his supportive friend and one true love who he is losing in the process, and Sheeran playing himself is splendidly funny and self-deprecating. It is a very clever concept, and you absolutely go with it, it is a good opportunity to celebrate great music, and really makes you realise that the world would be completely different without something, it is funny with a witty script, and it is a sweet love story, a really likeable jukebox musical romantic comedy. Very good!
2 out of 6 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Inventive story and a very entertaining evening of Beatles music.
TxMike5 October 2019
Set and filmed in England, British actor Himesh Patel as Jack Malik is a teacher but an aspiring songwriter. The problem is his songs aren't very good. He has a long-time friend, also a teacher, Lily James as Ellie Appleton, who actually serves as his manager although he doesn't get much work as an entertainer.

Then something very unusual happens, the result is that Jack seems to be the only one in the world who knows who the Beatles are. A web search turns up nothing. When he starts to play and sing "Yesterday" for his friends they love his song, they had never heard it before. Same with all the other Beatles songs that he can remember. His career takes off, he gets the attention of a big USA record producer.

It was nice to hear all the Beatles music but the thrust of the story is mostly his coming to terms with his guilt in having everyone think he is a great songwriter. Also coming to realize that maybe he and Ellie have much more than just a "friendship."

Even Ed Sheeran has a role, not just a one-scene cameo. Good movie and the acting is very appropriate.

My wife and I watched this at home on BluRay from our public library. We enjoyed it very much, it is one of the better movies we have seen in recent months. Then we re-watched it in August 2020, about 10 months later and it was still good and mostly fresh.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
4/10
But it had so much potential...
paul_haakonsen15 September 2019
I saw the trailer for "Yesterday" in the cinema and I must admit that the trailer was cut and edited in a manner that really made the movie look interesting. And thus I ended up eventually sitting down to watch this movie from director Danny Boyle.

First of all, the fact that it was directed by Danny Boyle hardly brought any excitement for me. Not that he is not a good director, but I am not the type of person whom watches movies solely because of whom has been behind the camera.

Secondly, "Yesterday" definitely had potential, and it was heading down a great path, right up until about halfway through the movie, which was about an hour in, give or take. Then the air just seeped out of the balloon and it went horribly flaccid and mundane. The storyline just crashed entirely for me at that point and the movie spiralled into mediocrity fast and irrevocably. It just got repetitive to watch the things that took place on the screen.

And the movie was long, so terribly, terribly long. And given the fact that the last half of the movie was so mundane didn't exactly help to lift up the enjoyment of sitting through the movie as it trotted onwards in a generic and monotonous pace.

Ed Sheeran was in the movie, playing himself. My wife liked that he was in the movie. Me? Not so much, as he is merely a pop musician of no importance as I don't like his music or that genre of music he plays. So that really didn't excite me to see him.

I will say that Himesh Patel carries himself and the movie quite well with his performance and his on-screen charisma. But it was a shame that the movie just nosedived halfway through. Kate McKinnon was in the movie, but it was so hard to tell if she was portraying the same character she did in the abysmal "Ghostbusters" remake, or if she is seriously ill-equipped for acting and she just everything the same way.

"Yesterday" definitely had potential, but it ended up being a less than mediocre movie at the end, when it comes to it for me. The movie was cut down because of its pacing, because of its length and because it just simply rolled over and decided to die halfway through.

I am rating "Yesterday" a generous four out of ten stars.
1 out of 5 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
what if no one remembered the Beatles?
blanche-229 July 2019
This is a cute and harmless film, courtesy of Danny Boyle.

The story concerns an aspiring musician, Jack Malik (Hamish Patel) who is discouraged about his lack of career and decides to quit. As he's on his way home, there's a worldwide blackout for something like 12 seconds. Danny plows into a bus and winds up in the hospital.

He soon realizes that the blackout wiped out a few parts of our culture - cigarettes, Coca Cola, and the Beatles. Jack seems to be the only person in the world who remembers the Fab Four. He starts singing Beatles songs as his own creations and becomes an international star.

The story is about what we all have in common and what happens if it's taken away - we lose that little piece that keeps us linked. It's also about a nightmare suffered by famous actors, musicians, artists, and writers - what happens when people realize I'm a fake? Many famous people, when their work is appreciated, feel like frauds.

In Jack's case, of course, he is one. As he gets ready for his first album, all the people and success start to get to him. And it's causing him to lose his girlfriend (Lily James).

I think another point here is that if the Beatles hadn't existed, we would have had to invent them. Their contribution to our world and our music is incredible. This is a fun film; don't look for Citizen Kane.
1 out of 1 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
Yesterday poses a "What if?" concerning the nonexistance of a certain musical group
tavm4 July 2019
Warning: Spoilers
The following sums up this movie's premise-"What if there was a worldwide blackout and only a struggling musician becomes the only one to have known of The Beatles' existence and successfully passed off their songs as his for a while?" Such is what's depicted and what he eventually does with that knowledge. Other culturally relevant things are also non-existant in the world depicted but anyway, I found this quite funny and a little touching and very entertaining concerning the classic Beatles songs performed during the whole thing. So that's a high recommendation for Yesterday.
1 out of 5 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Quite a fresh story
Gordon-1125 January 2020
I like the story, as I find it fresh and entertaining. The songs are good too. I enjoyed watching it.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
9/10
Cleverly written homage
michaelRokeefe31 December 2019
Warning: Spoilers
Written by Richard Curtis and Jack Barth and directed by Danny Boyle, YESTERDAY, could be called a sleeper by some...I call it mystical and a genuine hit. Jack Malik (Himesh Patel), is a struggling musician right on the edge of giving up. Right at the moment of a global blackout he gets hit by bus. When Jack wakes up he begins writing songs like no one has ever heard. That's because he discovers he's the lone person on Earth who knows of The Beatles and their legendary catalog of music. Astounding the world he steps into stardom singing The Beatles songs from an alternate timeline.

It is brilliant how Patel so easily is able to sing and play some of the greatest songs from The Beatles songbook. The adorable Lily James plays Patel's love interest. And singer Ed Sheeran is cast offering musical advise. Kate McKinnon is briefly Jack Malik's money hungry business manager. Beforehand, I had no idea I would enjoy this movie so much. And oh yes, there is a surprise character that will provide the most important twist in the story line.

"Oh yeah, I, wanna tell you somethin'"
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
A fab film about the fab four's music
studioAT16 August 2019
Richard Curtis and Danny Boyle team up (yes, really) to make this fab rom-com, that in a summer of Disney remakes and superhero nonsense comes as a breath of fresh air.

Yes, the premise is a bit too similar to 'Goodnight Sweetheart', but other than that this is as enjoyable a film as you could hope to see.

With good performances from all involved (Ed Sheeran doesn't disappoint) and of course great music from the fab four (sort of) I cannot recommend this enough.

This film thoroughly deserves to sit amongst Richard Curtis's other greats.
1 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
Good one
bevo-1367831 March 2020
I like the bit at the start where he is hit by the bus
2 out of 5 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
7/10
Not great but pleasant
preppy-34 July 2019
Struggling musician Jack Malik (Himesh Patel) has been trying for 10 years to be successful with no luck. Only his manager (Lily James) believes in him. Then there's a worldwide blackout for 12 seconds. During it Jack is in a car accident. He survives but it seems nobody in this reality ever heard of the Beatles, Also none of their songs exist either. So Jack starts to put out their songs as his originals and becomes famous...but he feels guilty.

Strange movie. It does manage to be both funny and dramatic. I was honestly never bored. Also Patel can sing and pulls off covers of the many Beatle songs pretty well. However this movie has issues too. Patel has a tendency to overact and James is downright atrocious. The supporting characters though are fun. Also the direction is all over the place throwing things at you out of left field. Still, I'm a Beatles fan so I'm cutting this some slack. I give it a so-so recommendation.
1 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
5/10
Help
writers_reign2 July 2019
Warning: Spoilers
The production company clearly spent a young fortune on PR for this title and if the flacks got it ride and drag the punters in the movie will easily make its neg cost back.Whilst it managed to keep my mind off Brexit and my dinner plans for the evening throughout the running time I had completely forgotten it by the time I reached the foyer on the way out. Part of the problem is that in my salad days I was frightened by screenwriters like Terence Rattigan and directors like Puffin Asquith who, had they turned out nothing more than The Way To The Stars and The Browning Version would have more than secured a lifetime pass to the Pantheon and these Poster boys for the luvvies Curtis and Boyle, who struggle to achieve mediocrity just aren't in the same league albeit as crowd-pleasers they're right up there with The Simpsons and Kermit the frog. This is a thinly-veiled rip-off of the tv sitcom Goodnight, Sweetheart, in which time-traveller Nicholas Lyndhurst passes off Beatles song as his own work and that's the story from soup to nuts. The best thing about it by a country mile is Lily James who, unlike the rest of the cast, is completely unselfconscious and doesn't walk through the film clearly in awe of being in this season's feelgood triumph. Go see it, though. You will anyway.
1 out of 4 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
5/10
Luckily Jack Barth & Richard Curtis don't write songs....
CinemaSerf27 November 2019
Sorry - but I don't understand. How can you take quite an original idea - man gets hit by a bus and awakens to a parallel existence where only he remembers the Beatles - and turn it into this one-joke film? Himesh Patel, himself, is quite engaging but he has nowhere near enough to work with to stretch this out for two whole hours!! Lily James tries her best to assist but there's no getting away from a very weak screenplay. The soundtrack is superb but most of that was written elsewhere 50-odd years ago.There is a sort-of swipe at the modern day music business and at the industries that support "solo" artists, but any potential for a more satiric review of the business is lost in the banality of it. Pity!
2 out of 4 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
10/10
Perhaps the most important word in YESTERDAY's script is . . .
oscaralbert11 July 2019
Warning: Spoilers
. . . "Shakespeare." Though this flick explicitly asks, "What if the Beatles, Coca-Cola, cigarettes, and Harry Potter NEVER happened?" its implicit primary query must be stated as "What if the Bard was never born?" Think about it. If the Stalwart on Avon never existed (and was unknown to EVERYBODY except YOU!), then if you said "The Truth must out," or pledged "My kingdom for a horse!" other people would raise their eyebrows. If you advised your college-bound kids, "To thine own selves be True" they might laugh in your face. When you were giving your bottle of Spray and Wash a workout at your local laundromat and muttered "Out, out, Dark Spot!" nobody would credit you with a smidgen of erudition. If you told someone "All the World's a stage," they might retort "So break a leg!" If you persisted in prepping for an audition while walking through a cornfield, declaiming "Friends, chums, country bums: Lend me your ears!" Vincent might give you BOTH of his! Upon noting, "Money is the root of all Evil," any Pachyderm within earshot might stick out their hands. Or if these miscreants heard you lament, "What a spider's web we weave, when first we practice to deceive," Designated Liar "Sirrah Huckleberry" could retort "Practice makes perfect." This would all be enough to make you long for YESTERDAY.
0 out of 4 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
9/10
A delight
neil-47619 July 2019
Warning: Spoilers
Jack Malik is an enthusiastic but unsuccessful singer/songwriter from Lowestoft, supported endlessly by his biggest, and often only, fan and would-be manager (and old school friend and wistful unrequited lover) Elle. Then, one night, strange events result in Jack being the only person in the world who remembers The Beatles. And The Beatles' songs prove to be just as memorable when Jack delivers them as they were in some other reality. But is Jack doing the right thing, achieving success on the back of someone else's talent, even if those people never showed that talent in this reality?

There are three narrative strands running through this movie. One, Jack's rags to riches success story. Two, the morality of trading on stolen songwriting. And, three, the underlying love story. All three work, and Richard Curtis' script is as gentle but sharp as one might expect it to be. The emotional heart of the film is the love story, but the dramatic heart is Jack's ever-increasing guilt, and the elements which factor into the resolution of this are enormously satisfying. And they brought tears to this old Beatles fan's eyes.

All the cast are good. Himesh Patel delivers the songs pleasingly, but all the supporting cast excel in, yes, giving support, especially an uncredited (and unrecognisable) Robert Carlyle.

I found this film enormously satisfying.
0 out of 2 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
Yesterday review
JoeytheBrit29 June 2020
A good idea suffers from writer Richard Curtis's tendency to warm over old formulas, and is saddled with a romantic sub-plot that feels completely surplus to requirements. Himesh Patel is flawless as the struggling singer-songwriter who inexplicably finds himself living in a world in which The Beatles never existed, whereas Kate McKimmon is terrible in a poorly written role that belongs in an entirely different movie. Needless to say, the music is great.
0 out of 0 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote.
Permalink
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Awards | FAQ | User Ratings | External Reviews | Metacritic Reviews


Recently Viewed