History of Bavaria

BavariaBavarianBavarian historyBavariansBavarian duchyDuchy of BavariaDuchy of (Upper) Bavariastem duchy of Bavaria1795 invasion of BavariaBavaria was reunited
The history of Bavaria stretches from its earliest settlement and its formation as a stem duchy in the 6th century through its inclusion in the Holy Roman Empire to its status as an independent kingdom and finally as a large Bundesland (state) of the Federal Republic of Germany.wikipedia
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Bavaria

BayernFree State of BavariaBavarian
The history of Bavaria stretches from its earliest settlement and its formation as a stem duchy in the 6th century through its inclusion in the Holy Roman Empire to its status as an independent kingdom and finally as a large Bundesland (state) of the Federal Republic of Germany.
The history of Bavaria includes its earliest settlement by Iron Age Celtic tribes, followed by the conquests of the Roman Empire in the 1st century BC, when the territory was incorporated into the provinces of Raetia and Noricum.

Theodo of Bavaria

TheodoTheodo ITheodo II
For a century and a half, a succession of dukes resisted the inroads of the Slavs on their eastern frontier and by the time of Duke Theodo I, who died in 717, had achieved complete independence from the feeble Frankish kings.
It is with Theodo that the well-sourced history of Bavaria begins.

Salzburg

Salzburg, AustriaIuvavumSalzbourg
Boniface organised the Bavarian church and founded or restored bishoprics at Salzburg, Freising, Regensburg and Passau. Bavaria at this stage included the Inn basin (including Salzburg and the Salzach basin) and the Danube from Donauwörth (Lech confluence) to Linz; the March of Verona (South Tyrol) briefly fell to Bavaria (952 AD) before passing to Carinthia (976 AD).
Independence from Bavaria was secured in the late 14th century.

Luitpold, Margrave of Bavaria

LuitpoldLuitpold of BavariaLiutpold
During the reign of Louis the Child, Luitpold, Count of Scheyern, who possessed large Bavarian domains, ruled the Mark of Carinthia, created on the southeastern frontier for the defence of Bavaria.
Luitpold (or Liutpold) (modern Leopold) (died 4 July 907), perhaps of the Huosi family or related to the Carolingian dynasty by Liutswind, mother of Emperor Arnulf of Carinthia, was the ancestor of the Luitpolding dynasty which ruled Bavaria and Carinthia until the mid-tenth century.

Regensburg

RatisbonRegensburg, GermanyCastra Regina
Boniface organised the Bavarian church and founded or restored bishoprics at Salzburg, Freising, Regensburg and Passau. The Roman centre of administration for this area was Castra Regina (modern-day Regensburg).
These give an overview on specific topics such as Roman, Jewish and Bavarian history.

Duchy of Carinthia

CarinthiaCarinthianDuke of Carinthia
During the reign of Louis the Child, Luitpold, Count of Scheyern, who possessed large Bavarian domains, ruled the Mark of Carinthia, created on the southeastern frontier for the defence of Bavaria. The neighboring Duchy of Carinthia, the large territories of the Archbishopric of Salzburg, as well as a general tendency to claim more independence on the part of the nobles: all these causes limited Bavarian expansion.
The Bavarian stem duchy was incorporated into the Carolingian Empire when Charlemagne deposed Odilo's son Duke Tassilo III in 788.

Otto I, Duke of Bavaria

Otto I Wittelsbach, Duke of BavariaOtto of WittelsbachOtto I Wittelsbach
A new era began when, in consequence of Henry the Lion being placed under an imperial ban in 1180 AD, Emperor Frederick I awarded the duchy to Otto, a member of the old Bavarian family of Wittelsbach and a descendant of the counts of Scheyern.
Otto I (1117 – 11 July 1183), called the Redhead (der Rotkopf), was Duke of Bavaria from 1180 until his death.

Duchy of Styria

StyriaStyrianDuke of Styria
The increasing importance of former Bavarian territories like the Mark of Styria (erected into a duchy in 1180 AD) and of the county of Tyrol had diminished both the actual and the relative strength of Bavaria, which now on almost all sides lacked opportunities for expansion.
It was created by Emperor Frederick Barbarossa in 1180 when he raised the March of Styria to a duchy of equal rank with neighbouring Carinthia and Bavaria, after the fall of the Bavarian duke Henry the Lion earlier that year.

Prince-Bishopric of Trent

Bishopric of TrentTrentBishop of Trent
In 1027 AD, Conrad II split off the Bishopric of Trent from the former Lombard Kingdom of Italy.
Originally a Bavarian fief, by 1027 the prince-bishopric was established, together with the similar Prince-Bishopric of Brixen.

Duchy of Saxony

SaxonySaxonDuke of Saxony
Henry IX's son Henry X, called the Proud, succeeded in 1126 AD and also obtained the Duchy of Saxony in 1137 AD.
In 747 their rebellious brother Grifo allied with Saxon tribes and temporarily conquered the stem duchy of Bavaria.

Prince-Bishopric of Brixen

BrixenBishopric of BrixenBishop of Brixen
From the 12th century onwards, the counts residing in Castle Tyrol near Merano extended their territory over much of the region and came to surpass the power of the bishops of Brixen, of whom they were nominally vassals.
The tribes who pushed into the territory of the present Diocese of Brixen, during the great migratory movements, especially the Bavarians and Lombards, accepted Christianity at an early date; only the Slavs of the Puster Valley persisted in paganism until the 8th century.

March of Verona

Margrave of VeronaVeronaMarca Veronensis et Aquileiensis
Bavaria at this stage included the Inn basin (including Salzburg and the Salzach basin) and the Danube from Donauwörth (Lech confluence) to Linz; the March of Verona (South Tyrol) briefly fell to Bavaria (952 AD) before passing to Carinthia (976 AD).
At the Reichstag meeting at Augsburg in the next year, Berengar II retained Italy, but had to renounce the Veronese march, which was attached to the stem duchy of Bavaria under Otto's brother Duke Henry I.

Prince-Archbishopric of Salzburg

Archbishop of SalzburgArchbishopric of SalzburgSalzburg
The neighboring Duchy of Carinthia, the large territories of the Archbishopric of Salzburg, as well as a general tendency to claim more independence on the part of the nobles: all these causes limited Bavarian expansion.
The former theory that he arrived already in c. 543 during the time of the unsourced early Bavarian dukes appears less likely than that he worked during the reign of the Agilolfing duke Theodo II (c.

Maria Theresa

Maria Theresa of AustriaEmpress Maria TheresaMaria Theresia
The death of the emperor Charles VI proved his opportunity: he disputed the validity of the Pragmatic Sanction which secured the Habsburg succession to Maria Theresa, allied himself with France, conquered Upper Austria, was crowned king of Bohemia at Prague and, in 1742, emperor at Frankfurt.
In total, Great Britain, France, Saxony, United Provinces, Spain, Prussia, Russia, Denmark, Sardinia, Bavaria and the Diet of the Holy Roman Empire recognised the sanction.

Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperor

Charles VIEmperor Charles VIArchduke Charles
The death of the emperor Charles VI proved his opportunity: he disputed the validity of the Pragmatic Sanction which secured the Habsburg succession to Maria Theresa, allied himself with France, conquered Upper Austria, was crowned king of Bohemia at Prague and, in 1742, emperor at Frankfurt.
In total, Great Britain, France, Saxony-Poland, the Dutch Republic, Spain, Venice, States of the Church, Prussia, Russia, Denmark, Savoy-Sardinia, Bavaria, and the Diet of the Holy Roman Empire recognised the sanction.

Rudolf I of Germany

Rudolph I of GermanyRudolph of HabsburgRudolf I
He supported Count Rudolph I of Habsburg, in his efforts to secure the German throne in 1273, married the new king's daughter Mechtild, and aided him in campaigns in Bohemia.
Orders were indeed issued for the establishment of landpeaces in Bavaria, Franconia and Swabia, and afterwards for the whole Empire.

Innviertel

By the peace of Teschen (13 May 1779) the Innviertel was ceded to Austria, and the succession secured to Charles of Zweibrücken.
Since the Early Middle Ages the region had belonged to the German stem duchy of Bavaria and was called Innbaiern.

Prince-Bishopric of Eichstätt

Bishopric of EichstättEichstättBishop of Eichstätt
In the war of 1805, in accordance with a treaty of alliance signed at Würzburg on 23 September, Bavarian troops, for the first time since the days of Charles VII, fought side by side with the French, and by the Treaty of Pressburg, signed on 26 December, the Principality of Eichstädt, the Margraviate of Burgau, the Lordship of Vorarlberg, the counties of Hohenems and Königsegg-Rothenfels, the lordships of Argen and Tettnang, and the city of Lindau with its territory were to be added to Bavaria.
The Diocese of Eichstätt was established in 741, when the Anglo-Saxon missionary Willibald was consecrated to the episcopate by Saint Boniface and turned to the church of Eichstätt in the German stem duchy of Bavaria.

Duchy of Jülich

JülichDuke of JülichCounty of Jülich
After a separation of four and a half centuries, the Electorate of the Palatinate, to which the duchies of Jülich and Berg had been added, was thus reunited with Bavaria.
Jülich and Berg fell to Count Palatine Wolfgang William of Neuburg and after the last duke of Palatinate-Neuburg (also Elector of the Palatinate from 1685) Charles III Philip had died without issue in 1742, Count Charles Theodore of Palatinate-Sulzbach (after 1777 also Duke of Bavaria) inherited Jülich and Berg.

List of rulers of Bavaria

Duke of BavariaElector of BavariaBavaria
The following is a list of rulers during the history of Bavaria.

Conradin

Conradin of HohenstaufenConrad III of JerusalemConradin of Swabia
He served as the guardian of his nephew Conradin of Hohenstaufen, and after Conradin's execution in Italy in 1268, Louis and his brother Henry inherited the domains of the Hohenstaufens in Swabia and elsewhere.

Haus der Bayerischen Geschichte: Museum

The Haus der Bayerischen Geschichte: Museum (aka Museum der Bayerischen Geschichte) is A history museum about the history of Bavaria in Regensburg.

History of Franconia

This instigated a rebellion, which was defeated and the Bavarian duchy was smashed.

Maximilian von Montgelas

MontgelasCount Maximilian Joseph von MontgelasCount Max Josef von Montgelas
Though both he and his all-powerful minister, Maximilian von Montgelas sympathized more with France than Austria, the state of the Bavarian finances and the fact that the Bavarian troops were scattered and disorganized placed him helpless in the hands of Austria.

Charles Theodore, Elector of Bavaria

Karl TheodorCharles TheodoreKarl IV Philipp Theodor
On 30 December 1777, when he died, the Bavarian line of the Wittelsbachs became extinct, and the succession passed to Charles Theodore, the elector palatine.
* History of Bavaria